Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #16

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Emblem

Volume #16

Monday 06 October 2014

EDITORIAL:

You are now reading the sixteenth edition of the #histSTM weekly inks list Whewell’s Gazette. In most American States and in the UK sixteen is the age of sexual consent. Whewell’s Gazette has been including links to articles on the history of sex and sexuality since its conception and has recently added the very stimulating Notches (re)marks on the history of sexuality to its sources for interesting posts if you aren’t already reading it you should be.

On the 27 September the #histSTM community lost one of its prominent members with the death of British historian of mathematics Jacqueline Stedall.

Jacqueline Stedall (Photographer unknown)

Jacqueline Stedall (Photographer unknown)

 

An expert on seventeenth-century algebra she is particular dear to our editorial staff for her pioneering work on Thomas Harriot’s contribution to this genre. She was also author of the excellent The History of Mathematics: A Very Short Introduction and Mathematics Emerging: A Sourcebook 1540 – 1900 as well as co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics.

 

Thomas Fuller: “History maketh a young man to be old, without either wrinkles or gray hairs; privileging him with the experience of age.” h/t Darrin Hayton (@dhayton)

“If your history does not admit the weird then it’s not good history” Colin Dickey (@colindickey)

“Worse by far than a straw man is a straw man dressed in the designer suit of your choosing.” Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“One’s mind is a place where the past becomes present – required for historians.” Kate Morant (@KateMorant)

ON THE WEB BLOGS AND WEBSITES:

A Technical and Astronomical Birthday:

On Oct 4 1957 the Russians launched the first artificial satellite Sputnik 1. On 4 October 1959 the Russian satellite Luna 3 gave humanity its first view of the far side of the moon.

Wired: Oct. 4. 1957: Soviets Put Man-Made Moon in Orbit!

Sputnik

Sputnik

 

GIZMODO: Humans first saw the far side of the moon 55 years ago today

NASA: Solar System Exploration: Mission to the Moon: LUNA 3

Yovisto: Willy Ley – Founder of the German Rocket Society

Yovisto: Robert Goddard – the Man who ushered in the Space Age

Robert H. Goddard (1882-1945)

Robert H. Goddard (1882-1945)

History Physics: This year saw India’s 1st satellite. 50 years ago, Canada orbited ‘Alouette 1′ ‪

Science Notes: Today In Science History – October 1 – NASA

This Month’s Special:

Never heard of Dr Richard Mead (1673–1754)? Amongst other things he was Isaac Newton’s physician. The Foundling Museum have dedicated an exhibition to the “Generous Georgian” and launched a blog to accompany the exhibition. Want to know more then read Frances Spiegel’s post at Decoded Past.

Allan Ramsay, Dr Richard Mead, 1747, oil on canvas. Image courtesy of Coram in the care of the Foundling Museum

Allan Ramsay, Dr Richard Mead, 1747, oil on canvas. Image courtesy of Coram in the care of the Foundling Museum

The Foundling Museum: Exhibition: The Generous Georgian: Dr Richard Mead

Exhibition Blog: The Generous Georgian: Dr Richard Mead

Decoded Past: The Generous Georgian: Dr Richard Mead –an Exhibition at the Foundling Museum

A collection of Posts to International Coffee Day

The Recipes Project: Coffee: A Remedy Against Plague

Early Modern Medicine: The Coffee Controversy

The Paris Review: Blinded by Coffee

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Tycho Girl: her head full of stars (a tribute to Henrietta Swan Leavitt)

Case Western Reserve University: Institute for the Study of the UniversIty in Society: “Failure” Leads to Breakthrough

National Geographic: In a Planet-or-Not Debate, Some Astronomers Say “Long Live Planet Pluto”

Demoss: Scholars Discover Early Astronomical Drawings

AIP History: Oral History Transcript – Otto R. Frisch

New York Times: The Difficulties of Nuclear Containment: Espionage Threatened the Manhattan Project, Declassified Report says

Stanford News: Stanford’s Martin L. Pearl, winner of 1995 Nobel Prize for discovery of tau lepton, dead at 87

Ptak Science Books: Anti-Gravity Anti-Gravitas

The London Punch via Ptak Science Books

The London Punch via Ptak Science Books

Atomic Heritage Society: Britain

 

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The unfortunate backlash in the historiography of Islamic Science

BBC: Caesium: A brief history of timekeeping

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Board of Longitude Project: Time to Solve Longitude: the timekeeper method

 

City Lab: My 5 Favorite Maps: Bill Rankin

Map of Yamashiro Province, Author Unknown (19th Century)

Map of Yamashiro Province, Author Unknown (19th Century)

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: MedHum Monday: Stones, Clocks, and Stars at the National Maritime Museum

MEDICINE:

Two Nerdy History Girls: A physician reports in autumn 1810

Science Museum: Brought to Life: Thomas Sydenham (1624–89)

History of Medicine in Ireland: Cows, contagion and sanitation and Victorian Dublin

Panacea: Policing Medical Practice in the 17th Century

From the Hands of Quacks: Wilson’s Common Sense Ear Drums

Ad Wilson's Ear Drum 1900 Getty Images The advertisements for Wilson’ Ear Drums indicated that with the device, a d/Deaf person would be happier as they were able to participate in hearing society and include themselves in ways previously denied to them.

Ad Wilson’s Ear Drum 1900 Getty Images
The advertisements for Wilson’ Ear Drums indicated that with the device, a d/Deaf person would be happier as they were able to participate in hearing society and include themselves in ways previously denied to them.

Épistémocritique: Eighteenth-Century Archives of the Body (PDF)

Elektrotherapia

BBC: How blind Victorians campaigned for inclusive education

The History of Emotions Blog: The religious roots of cancerphobia

Early Modern Medicine: True English Bloodletting

NYAM: Revisiting the Fabrica Frontispiece

PACHS News and Notes: Remembering the Veteran: Disability, Trauma, and the American Civil War, 1861-1915

Science Notes: Today In Science History – October 3 – Frank Pantridge

Early Modern Medicine: Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine

Hagley Museum and Library: History of Patent Medicine

Huffington Post: Five Things From the Mary Rose That’ll Make You Go ‘Oooh’

Royal College of Physicians: Sir Francis Prujean, PRCP 1650-4

Dittrick Museum Blog: Body Snatching, You Say?

Museum of Health Care: Mandrakes, from Mythology to Museum Collectable

Yovisto: James Lind and a Cure for Scurvy

Science Daily: HIV pandemic’s origin located: Likely to have emerged in Kinshasa around 1920

CHEMISTRY:

Conciatore: Lixiviation Reprise

Tycho’s Nose: The Shiny Bits of Science: Chemical Notation from Ciphers to Calligraphy

Examples of ways to draw methionine.

Examples of ways to draw methionine.

Dscript.org: Artistic Science or Scientific Art – Chemical Calligraphy (PDF)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 5 – Dirk Coster

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Nautilus: The Sound So Loud That It Circled The Earth Four Times

Houghton Library: Hugh of Fouilly De bestiis et aliis rebus [ca. 1230-1250]

Library

International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature: Who is the type of Homo sapiens?

Academia Edu: Tortoises and the Exotic Animal Trade in Britain from Medieval to Modern

Science Daily: Unexpectedly speedy expansion of human, ape cerebellum

Huffington Post: 6 Things Aristotle Got Wrong

Mental Floss: 11 Images from the American Museum of Natural History’s Archives

Spitalfields Life: An Auricula For Thomas Fairchild

TECHNOLOGY:

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 29 – Rudolf Diesel Mystery

Tameshigiri: The Art of Cutting: Comparing Medieval images of European and Japanese sword polishers

Georgian Gent: So you think you can sew, Mr Saint?

In The Dark: The Origin of CERN

Nautilus: A Vehicle of Wonder

Conciatore: The Blue Tower

Yovisto: The Unfortunate Inventions of Charles Cros

Fortune: Walter Isaacson on the women of ENIAC

Jean Jennings (left), Marlyn Wescoff (center), and Ruth Lichterman program ENIAC at the University of Pennsylvania, circa 1946. Photo: Corbis

Jean Jennings (left), Marlyn Wescoff (center), and Ruth Lichterman program ENIAC at the University of Pennsylvania, circa 1946.
Photo: Corbis

Ptak Science Books: In the Enigma Machine Family: the Hagelin Cryptographic Machine, 1942

But Does it Float: Photographs of nuclear slide-rules

Mental Floss: 11 of America’s Most Inspiring Cup Holder Patents

The Washington Post: Jerrie Mock, first female pilot to fly solo around the world, dies at 88

META:- HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Royal Society: The Repository: Circus of science

The British Society for the History of Science: BSHS President Greg Radick

Yovisto: Fritz Kahn and the Mensch Maschine

The Original Poster of the Industrial Palace From: Fritz Kahn. Das Leben des Menschen Franckh'sche Verlagshandlung, Stuttgart

The Original Poster of the Industrial Palace
From: Fritz Kahn. Das Leben des Menschen
Franckh’sche Verlagshandlung, Stuttgart

 

Notches: Historians are gossips who tease the dead

New Humanist: The city and the sublime

The Recipes Project: ‘One does not learn remedies through books’ (Aristotle)

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: Medical Humanities: Building a Community

Defence in Depth: The Instrumentalisation of History

Wellcome Trust: Reality behind research: 21 years of oral history with Wellcome Witnesses

Thick Objects: Recreating Science (or, “The amoeba gets it in the end”)

DYNAMIS Acta Hispanica ad Medicinae Scientiarumque Historiam Illustrandam

VOLUMEN 34 (2)   2014

 

New Blog – JSTOR Daily also has #histSTM content

 

CERÆ: VOL 1 (2014) Emotions in History

Cambridge University Press: The History Manifesto

Corpus Newtonicum: Adventures in Huntingdonland, Pt. 2

Making Science Public: Philae: Where space science meets language science

The Burns Archive: The Anatomy & Education Collection

ESOTERIC:

Remedia: A Scientific Guide to Seeing Fairies: A fragment

BOOK REVIEWS:

Somatosphere: Book Forum – Introduction, Jeremy Greene’s “Generic”

Imperial & Global Forum: Exchanging Notes: Colonialism and Medicine in India and South Africa

NEW BOOKS:

Johns Hopkins University Press: More Than Hot: A Short History of Fever

Steven Johnson: How We Got To Now, The Book

THEATRE:

FILM:

Dan’s Papers: HIFF awards Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize to ‘The Imitation Game’

TELEVISION:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Pierre Descilier’s World Map – The Beauty of Maps – BBC Four

Youtube: Disease! Crash Course World History 203

Arts & Humanities Research Council: ‘Dear Mr Darwin’: What can we learn from 19th century science?

RADIO:

BBC: Germany Memories of a Nation: Strasbourg – Floating City featuring the cathedral clock

PODCASTS:

Royal Society: The private life of Isaac Newton

Royal Society: Longitude: back and forth across the years

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Lincoln: Lecture: Dr Marika Keblusek: A Living Library for Learning: The book collection of Michael Honywood as an intellectual centre in the Dutch Republic (1640-1660) 16 Oct 2014

CHoM News: Lecture: The Birth of the Pill 21 Oct 2014

History of the Physical Sciences at History of Science Society 2014

The British Society for the History of Science Research Grants

University of Leeds History and Philosophy of Science Seminar 2014–15, Semester 1

Advances in the History of Psychology: Oct 6 Talk! BPS History of Psych Disciplines Seminar Series: Professor Roland Littlewood (UCL) “The Advent of the Adversary: Negative Power in Certain Religio-Therapeutic Systems?”

 

Bundeskunsthalle: Exhibition: Outer Space 3 October 2014 – 22 February 2015

Cheltenham Festival: Talk: A History of the 20th Century in 100 Maps 7 Oct 2014

History of High-Technologies and Their Socio-Cultural Contexts The International Committee for the History of Technology’s 42nd Symposium in Tel Aviv, Israel, 16-21 August 2015

University of Sydney: Conference: Rethinking Intellectual History 7-9 April 2015

Scientiae: Conference: Disciplines of Knowledge in the Early Modern Period Toronto 2015 27-29 May

ChoM News: October–December Events Calendar

Museums Association: Royal Museums Greenwich consults on redundancies

Manchester Medieval Society: Events – Programme for 2014-15 includes #histSTM

National Center for Science Education: RNCSE 34:5 now on line (includes #histSTM book reviews)

Wellcom Library for the History of Medicine: Ada Lovelace – Wikipedia Ediathron – Tuesday 14 October

October 18: “Art, Anatomy, and the Body: Vesalius 500″ NYAM’s second annual Festival for Medical History and the Arts

Institute of Historical Research: One day colloquium 16 May 2015 The History of the Body: Approaches and Directions

British Society for the History of Science: Dingle Prize 2015

Michaelmas Term 2014 Seminar Series Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Seminar Room, 47 Banbury Road, Oxford, OX2 6PE

Battle of Ideas: Barbican Centre, London Oct 18-19

LSE Asia Research Centre: Lecture: An Inordinate Fondness for Beetles: The hero’s journey of Alfred Russel Wallace in Southeast Asia Wednesday 15 October

LOOKING FOR WORK?

CENTRE FOR THE HISTORY OF EUROPEAN DISCOURSES, THE UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND, BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA

Postdoctoral Fellowships on Science and Secularization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #15

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William WhewellEmblem

Volume #15

Monday 29 September 2014

EDITORIAL:

Today we publish our fifteenth edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list. The last week has seen the autumn equinox. The spring equinox signalled in earlier times the beginning of the year and played a central role in determining the date of Easter. The Fifteenth day of the Jewish month of Nissan is the start of the Jewish festival of Pesach, English Passover, the anniversary of the Jewish Exodus from Egypt. This date has played a role in the history of European science because of the Church’s attempt to determine it, a date on the lunar calendar, on a solar calendar in order to celebrate Easter. These efforts culminated in the Gregorian calendar reform of 1582, resulting in the calendar used throughout the world today. It should be pointed out used in parallel to other calendars in many cultures.

A couple of nice historical quotes about the history of science:

“To know the history of science is to recognize the mortality of any claim to universal truth”

Evelyn Fox Keller, 1985 (h/t @CRostvik)

“The history of the science is a great fugue, in which the voices of the nations come one by one into notice.”

—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (h/t @SciHistoryToday)

ON THE WEB BLOGS AND WEBSITES:

 

Birthdays of the Week:

William Playfair born 22 September 1759

Yovisto: William Playfair and the Beginnings of Infographics

Playfair's trade-balance time-series chart, from The Commercial and Political Atlas and Statistical Breviary, 1786

Playfair’s trade-balance time-series chart, from The Commercial and Political Atlas and Statistical Breviary, 1786

Michael Faraday born 22 September 1791

Michael Faraday  Thomas Phillips oil 1842

Michael Faraday
Thomas Phillips oil 1842

Chemical Heritage Foundation: Michael Faraday

#CosmosChat: “The Electric Boy”

 

The Victorian Web: Percival Leigh and Charles Dickens: The Chemistry of the Candle

Perimeter Institute: From Faraday to Present Day

Uncertain Principles: The Electric Life of Michael Faraday by Alan Hirshfeld

Abraham Gottlob Werner born 25 September 1749

Abraham Gottlob Werner Christian Leberecht Vogel

Abraham Gottlob Werner
Christian Leberecht Vogel

Yovisto: Abraham Werner and the School of Neptunism

History of Geology: Granite Wars – Episode I: Fire & Water

History of Geology: When Rock Classification is not hard anymore, thank Mohs’ Scale of Hardness

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Physics World: CERN Celebrates 60 years of science (see also videos!)

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 20 – Luna 16

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 21 – Donald Arthur Glaser

True Anomalies: MAVEN and the mystery of the Martian atmosphere

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lawrence S Myers Jr.

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 23 – Neptune

Before Newton: Tycho in China

Photo: Peter Barker

Photo: Peter Barker

WOUB Public Media: Dr. Arthur Fine Tells The Real Story Behind Albert Einstein

The Public Domain Review: Flowers of the Sky

Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch, Folio 28, c. 1552

Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch, Folio 28, c. 1552

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 26 – Karl Manne Georg Siegbahn

Ptak Science Books: On Einstein Not Being in the Popular Press Before the Great Eclipse of 1919

Restricted Data The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The lost IAEA logo

 

Popperfont: The illustrations for “Professor Astro Cat’s Frontiers of Space” are gorgeous

Art by Ben Newman. From Professor Astro Cat’s Frontiers of Space

Art by Ben Newman. From Professor Astro Cat’s Frontiers of Space

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Yovisto: The Topographia of Matthäus Marian

Halley’s Log: Halley’s Atlantic Chart, part 2: his results

Halley's Chart

Halley’s Chart

Travellers’ Tails: A Tale of Two Cooks

MEDICINE:

NYAM: A Medical Symphony: Celebrating African Americans in New York Medicine

Guardian: Nerophilosophy: Mo Costandi: A brief history of psychedelic psychiatry

New York Times: Selling Prozac as the Life-Enhancing Cure for Mental Woes

REMEDIA: Ebola: Epidemics, Pandemics and the Mapping of Their Containment

Harvard Medical School: Back Story: The beauty and bane of attempts to market food and drugs

Jeffrey M Levine: Arion Triumphant

About Education: Typhoid Mary

The New York Times: Time Machine: Marvellous Cures of Cancer Attributed to Radium 28 Sept 1913

Early Modern Medicine: Feeling ‘Louzy’

Early Modern Practitioners: The Agony and the Ecstacy: Hunting for 17th-century medics…with few sources

 

io9: The “Glass Delusion” Was The Most Popular Madness of the Middle Ages

 

The Embryo Project: Gordon Watkins Douglas (1921-2000)

http://embryo.asu.edu/handle/10776/8198

Boston Globe: 19th century advances paved way for today’s Ebola treatment

DORRS OPEN DAY: photoblog post: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Glasgow

The Public Domain Review: The Anatomy of Drunkenness (1834)

Dittrick Museum Blog: Listening to the Body: Stethoscopes in 1900

From the Sharp & Sharp Catalog of Instruments, 1905, displaying the variety of Cammann Stethoscopes available.

From the Sharp & Sharp Catalog of Instruments, 1905, displaying the variety of Cammann Stethoscopes available.

History of Geology: Physician Paracelsus and early Medical Geology

BBC: Victorian keep-fit exercises and gym regimes revealed

Ernst's manual has more than 20 different exercises for the whole family

Ernst’s manual has more than 20 different exercises for the whole family

CHEMISTRY:

Conciatore: Deadly Fumes Reprise

Chemical Heritage Foundation: Stories of the Great Chemists

A Vida Ilustres comic about Lavoisier depicts the scientist identifying constituents of air through experiments on combustion. At right, Lavoisier shares his discovery with an audience. (Othmer Library of Chemical History, CHF)

A Vida Ilustres comic about Lavoisier depicts the scientist identifying constituents of air through experiments on combustion. At right, Lavoisier shares his discovery with an audience. (Othmer Library of Chemical History, CHF)

Yovisto: Joseph Proust and the Law of Constant Composition

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 28 – Henri Moissan

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Atlas Obscura: A Garden That Can Kill

(photograph by Jo Jakeman/Flickr)

(photograph by Jo Jakeman/Flickr)

Embryo Project: Boris Ephrussi (1901-1979)

Ptak Science Books: Kingdoms of Dust and Street Dirt, and What People Breathed in 1878

Leaping Robot: DNA…From Blueprint to Brick

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 25 – Thomas Hunt Morgan

Hyperallergic: The Romance of Science in Victorian Natural History Bookbindings

A. C. Chambers, “Beauty in Common Things” (1874) (via Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library)

A. C. Chambers, “Beauty in Common Things” (1874) (via Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library)

The Embryo Project: Thomas Hunt Morgan’s Definition of Regeneration: Morphallaxis and Epimorphosis

Fossil History: Falconer’s Enthusiasm

The Huffington Post: Kew Gardens ‘Intoxication Season’ Invites You to Explore Mind-Altering Drugs

Chetham’s Library: The Theatre of Insects, or the tangled web of Elizabethan entomology

TECHNOLOGY:

The Plate: Tin-Can Titans and Bootle-Top Kings

Restricted Data The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Tokyo vs. Hiroshima

Board of Longitude Project Blog: Longitude solutions

IEEE Global History Network: Fax Machines

The National Museum of Computing: Colossus veterans revisit virtual and real worlds

The Telegraph: Tampons: liberating women from impractical pads

Unmaking Things: A Gift for Life – Astronomy and Magic in a Sixteenth-Century Locket

Guardian: Victorian inventions that didn’t change the world – in pictures

Useful New Design for ‘A Portable Bath’, 1861

Useful New Design for ‘A Portable Bath’, 1861

Popular Science: A Drive Through History

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Renaissance Planetary Horology

Computer History Museum: Celebrating 35 Years!

Two Nerdy History Girls: Friday Video: An Extravagant Cabinet with Many Secrets

Retronaut: 1930s: 30 Ways to Die by Electrocution

History Com: 8 Things you may not know about the Guillotine

Yovisto: Seymour R. Cray – the Father of Supercomputing

META:- HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

APS Physics: Telling the History of Physics Through Historical Places

MacArthur Fellows Program: “History and Philosophy of Science”

Trinity College Cambridge: John Dee’s Library Catalogue

Culture Digitally: How to Give Up the I-Word, Pt. 2

City Desk: How to Live Like a Genius in D.C. (Pamela Long)

Guardian: The H-Word: Who are the martyrs of Science?

Conciatore: A Third Eye Toward History

Herald Net: Burke Museum exhibit showcases scientific illustration

Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni), colored pencil. By Marly Beyer.

Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni), colored pencil. By Marly Beyer.

Physics Today: Cosmology, physics, and science in general figure centrally in “Big History”

 

The Renaissance Mathematicus: If you’re going to pontificate about the history of science then at least get your facts right!

PACHS News & Notes: Thomas Wijck’s Painted Alchemists at the Intersection of Art, Science and Practice

The #EnvHist Weekly

ISIS: Focus: The Peculiar Persistence of the Naturalistic Fallacy (open access)

Wallifaction: Jesuit Science since the 16th century

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Jesuit Day

Matteo Ricci dressed in traditional Chinese robes. Artist unknown

Matteo Ricci dressed in traditional Chinese robes.
Artist unknown

Maggie Koerth: At the Houghton Library

 

Slate: The Mysterious Geometry of Swordsmanship Gorgeously Illustrated

"Human proportions established through mythological figures." By Girard Thibault.

“Human proportions established through mythological figures.” By Girard Thibault.

 

Genotopia: Cardboard Darwinism

Corpus Newtonicum: Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 1

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: A Network of Alchemists

"The Alchemist" 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.

“The Alchemist” 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.

History of Alchemy: Podcast: Heinrich Khunrath

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

BJHS: Books received for review

Rentetzi on Priestley, ‘Mad on Radium: New Zealand in the Atomic Age’

NEW BOOKS:

Reaktion Books: Peter Adey “Air: Nature and Culture”

 

9781780232560

THEATRE:

FILM:

TELEVISION:

Tech Times: Atomic bombs, female scientists and Los Alamos: An interview with ‘Manhattan creator Sam Shaw

VIDEOS:

Youtube: UNESCO–Cern 60 years

Youtube: Göttingen and the World of Physics: An Evening with Gustav Born

Youtube: Preserving Lonesome George

Youtube: From Past to Present Tolman/Bacher House

Youtube: Under the Knife, Episode 1 – The Clockwork Saw

Youtube: The Renaissance Mathematicus: Astronomy, Astrology & Medicine in the Early Modern Period

RADIO:

BBC: Lisa Jardine A Point of View: Keeping Time

Dosenförmige tragbare Uhr, Peter Henlein zugeschrieben (Germanisches Nationalmuseum)

Dosenförmige tragbare Uhr, Peter Henlein zugeschrieben
(Germanisches Nationalmuseum)

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal Museums Greenwich: Science, Voyaging, Art, Empire: Study Day – 18 October 2014

Birkbeck History Research History Forum: Conference: CfP: Biological Discourses: The Language of Science and Literature around 1900 10-11 April 2015

Warwick University: Conference: (Re)Imagining the Insect: Natures and Cultures of Invertebrates, 1700-1900. Saturday 7 March 2015

University College London Union: UCL faces RACE: Eugenics at UCL Friday 10 October 2014 6-9pm

Yale University: Program in the History of Science and Medicine: Colloquia Fall Term 2014

Leeds University: HPS Centre Seminar Series

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine Seminar Series 2014-15

University of Ulster: Conference: Explaining and Explaining Away in Science and Religion 8-9 January 2015

 

University of Manchester: Art History and Visual Studies: AHVS Events 2014-2015

RIA Novosti: Hungary to Host Conference on History of Computer Science

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: CfP: Knowledgeable Youngsters: Youth, Media and Early Modern Knowledge Societies Utrecht 26-27 June 2015

 

Beijing Renmin University: CFP: Manufacturing Landscapes: Nature and Technology in Environmental History

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Health History in Action

 

Dittrick Medical History Center: Upcoming Events

 

HSS Graduate & Early Career Caucus: Mentorship Program

Society for the History of Technology: Registration for THATCamp SHOT is now open!

Newly Expanded Wood Library-Museum (WLM) of Anesthesiology Opens in Breathtaking New Schaumburg, IL Headquarters

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM) University of Manchester Seminars first semester 2014

Historiens de la santé: L’expérience et ses mots à la Renaissance

The Royal Institution: Lecture: Science, society and the Royal Institution 12-12:45pm Tuesday 30 Sept 2014

Public lecture for World Mental Health Day 10 October 2014 – Royal College of Nursing, 20 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0RN

British Journal for the History of Science has a new editor: Dr Charlotte Sleigh (University of Kent)

LOOKING FOR WORK?

Cancer Research UK: Science Media Officer

University of Notre Dame: Assistant Professor, History of Science

Keeper of Medicine Science Museum

The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin Department III, Artefacts, Action, and Knowledge, Director: Prof Dagmar Schäfer, announces One Postdoctoral Fellowship for up to two years.

The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin Department III, Artefacts, Action, and Knowledge, Director: Prof Dagmar Schäfer, announces One Research Scholarship for up to three years

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #14

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Emblem

Volume #14

Monday 22 September 2014

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. 14

 

EDITORIAL:

As already announced last week, due to the fact that our editorial staff are off gallivanting around Franconia celebrating the life and work of Renaissance mathematicus Simon Marius at diverse conferences the whole weekend, this is perforce a curtailed edition of your all time favourite #histSTM weekly links list, which only covers the first four and one half days of the last seven. If you were foolhardy enough to post that world shattering history of science, technology or medicine post at the weekend then it will have missed its chance to be included in Whewell’s Gazette, a cause for the gnashing of teeth, the ripping out of hair by the roots and the rending of garments. Not that that will change anything. Almost normal service will be resumed with the next scintillating, titillating, and invigorating edition next Monday.

 

A wonderful piece of news this week for the #histSTM community is that independent scholar Pamela O Long author of Openness, Secrecy, Authorship: Technical Arts and the Culture of Knowledge from Antiquity to the Renaissance (2001) and Artisan/Practitioners and the Rise of the New Sciences, 1400-1600 (2012), amongst others, has been awarded a MacArthur Fellows Award.

 

ON THE WEB BLOGS AND WEBSITES:

Birthdays of the Week:

Murry Gell-Mann 15 September 1929

James Tauber (14) meeting Murray Gell-Mann

James Tauber (14) meeting Murray Gell-Mann

Thought Streams: Murray Gell-Mann

AIP History: Oral History Transcript – Dr Murray Gell-Mann

John Goodricke 17 September 2014

John Goodricke: James Scouler Royal Astronomical Society

John Goodricke: James Scouler
Royal Astronomical Society

Yovisto: John Goodricke and the Varible Star of Beta Persei

Teleskopos: Sights and sounds: darkness and silence

Edwin Mattison McMillan 18 September 1907

-Edwin McMillan (1907-1991) Credit Nobel Foundation

-Edwin McMillan (1907-1991) Credit Nobel Foundation

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 18 – Edwin Mattison McMillan

AIP History: Oral History Transcript – Dr Edwin McMillan

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Podcast: Rose Bethe’s Interview

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Joseph Rotblat

Science Note: Today In Science History – September 16 – Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit

Greg Gbur: An image out of history! Dennis Gabor, the inventor of holography, standing next to his holographic portrait.

AIP History: Oral History Transcript – Dr Edwin McMillan

Retronaut: c.1975: Control Room of the Synchrophasotron

Red Orbit: Multiverse

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Wired: Uncovering Hidden Texts on a 500-Year-Old Map That Guided Columbus

The Royal Society: The Repository: Longitude

Halley’ Log: Halley’s Atlantic Chart, part 1: fish or fowl revisited

Extract from Halley’s Atlantic Chart – notice the feet. (© Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Image S0015919)

Extract from Halley’s Atlantic Chart – notice the feet. (© Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Image S0015919)

MEDICINE:

Miriam Posner: Frequently asked questions about lobotomy

Yovisto: The psychologist must study mankind from the historical or comparative standpoint – Moritz Lazarus

British Library: Untold Lives Blog: King Silence – the lives of Victorian deaf children

From the Hands of Quacks: Experiences of a Deaf Man

Dittrick Museum Blog: Blood Rises – Tension and Truth in The Knick

The Quack Doctor: A devil of a cure

Photo: Jonathon Brown

Photo: Jonathon Brown

Royal College of Physicians of Ireland Heritage Centre Blog: Theories of the cases of fever in Dublin in the early 19th century

Slate: 19th-Century Infographic Shows American Morality as a Cluster of Cute Little Charts

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 17 – Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne du Boulogne

The Chirugeon’s Apprentice: Ten Terrifying Knives from Medical History

Notches: Sexual Curiosities? Aphrodisiacs in early modern England

Remedia: Migraine Fears

Royal College of Physicians: The cure of old age and preservation of youth

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 15 – Aleksandr Mikhaylovich Butlerov

The Paris Review: Extreme, extreme! The literature of laughing gas

“This is not the Laughing, but the Hippocrene or Poetic Gas, Sir.” Colored etching by R. Seymour, 1829, via the Wellcome Library.

“This is not the Laughing, but the Hippocrene or Poetic Gas, Sir.” Colored etching by R. Seymour, 1829, via the Wellcome Library.

Conciatore: Neri’s Cabinet #6: Saltpeter

The AAT project: The 150th Anniversary of the Periodic Table

British Library: Untold Lives Blog: Arsenic, Cyanide and Strychnine – the Golden Age of Victorian Poisoners

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Daily Echo: Fossil hunters: uncover history and follow in the footsteps of Mary Anning at Lyme Regis

Embryology Project: Wilhelm Roux nineteenth-century experimental embryologist

Natural History Apostils: Three Facts about Darwin, Blyth, Loudon, and Matthew

New York Times: ‘Animated Life: Seeing the Invisible’

New York Times: Art Entangled in Nature

Naturally Fun Days: Charles Darwin’s life in Shrewsbury

Yovisto: How Ötzi became World Famous

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: The Discovery of Glass Reprise

Guardian: Why the story of materials is really the story of civilisation

The Atlantic: Before Computers, People Programmed Looms

This portrait was woven using a Jacquard loom. ( Michel-Marie Carquillat/Wikimedia )

This portrait was woven using a Jacquard loom. ( Michel-Marie Carquillat/Wikimedia )

Guardian: Revolutionary diving suit to be used at site of ‘world’s oldest computer’ find

Yovisto: Squire Whipple – The Father of the Iron Bridge

Conciatore: The Art of Metals

Thick Objects: What is a complete object?

 

A control stand from an Victor “Snook Special” x-ray machine. It was purchased in 1926 for the University of Toronto physics laboratory run by John Cunningham McLennan (1867-1935). On the left is part of the schematic that was sent with the original unit. On the right is the unit as it appeared when it was finally decommissioned by the Department of Physics in the early 2000s. The colourful modifications to the original faux marble panel could represent damage to a classic instrument, or evidence of a remarkably rich provenance.

A control stand from an Victor “Snook Special” x-ray machine. It was purchased in 1926 for the University of Toronto physics laboratory run by John Cunningham McLennan (1867-1935). On the left is part of the schematic that was sent with the original unit. On the right is the unit as it appeared when it was finally decommissioned by the Department of Physics in the early 2000s. The colourful modifications to the original faux marble panel could represent damage to a classic instrument, or evidence of a remarkably rich provenance.

META:- HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

BBC: A Point of View: The long shadow of war

Newsworks: The art of explaining science… and why it’s so hard to do

From Past to Present: The Tolman/Bacher House

Ether Wave Propaganda: Schaffer on Machine Philosophy, Pt. 5a: Automata and the Proto-Industrial Ideology of the Enlightenment — History

Time Mapper: Medieval Philosophers – Timeliner

The Environmental History Weekly

The Royal Society: The Repository: Circus of science

Crane Court, from an engraving by C.J. Smith

Crane Court, from an engraving by C.J. Smith

ESOTERIC:

Forbidden Histories: One Year of ‘Forbidden Histories’

Scientific American: Tetrapod Zoology: Loxton and Prothero’s Abominable Science! Origins of the Yeti, Nessie, and Other Famous Cryptids; the Tet Zoo review

NEXOS: Women Alchemists

Goddess Alchemy carries a flask containing the quintessence of the Earth © NYPL/Science Source: Getty Images

Goddess Alchemy carries a flask containing the quintessence of the Earth
© NYPL/Science Source: Getty Images

BOOK REVIEWS:

Heavenfield: Holmes on Animals in Saxon & Scandinavian England

NEW BOOKS:

Cambridge University Press: Philosophy of Microbiology

THEATRE:

FILM:

BBC: Imitation Game wins Toronto top prize

TELEVISION:

Science Based Medicine: Medicine past, present, and future: Star Trek vesus Dr Kildare and The Knick

Dr Kildare

Dr Kildare

VIDEOS:

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Voyages of Darwin: The Complete Series on DVD (Region 2)

Youtube: The past, present and future of the bubonic plague – Sharon N. DeWitte

Youtube: Herbarium digitisation: 4M in 1.5 years for Naturalis Biodiversity Center

Live Stream: Cosmopolitanism and the Local in Science & Nature: Rewriting the History of Science and Philosophy in Late Colonial India by Dhruv Raina 2 October 2014

Youtube: John Hobbie Distinguished Scientist and Senior Scholar at the Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, John Hobbie, discusses his research and the history of the Ecosystems Center.

Youtube: Into the Vault: Darwin’s Orchid Book

RADIO:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Dissertation Reviews: Now accepting dissertations in Science Studies (broadly defined) for review in our 2014-15 season

The Society for the History of Natural History: History of Teaching Natural History Oct 10-11

Historiens de la santé: University of Pennsylvania: Conference: Professionalizing Nursing and Medicine September 27

Medical Library Association: Murray Gottlieb Prize: The Murray Gottlieb Prize is awarded annually for the best unpublished scholarly paper about a topic in the history of the health sciences.

University College London: Here is the programme for the UCL Science and Technology Studies seminars for Autumn 2014

University of Leiden: CfP: The Descartes Centre for the History and Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities, Huygens ING, and Naturalis Biodiversity Centre invite abstracts for papers on the circulation of knowledge regarding non-European plants and plant components, to which therapeutic properties were attributed in the early modern period (1500-1800) for their conference, to be held in Leiden, the Netherlands, 15 April to 17 April 2015.

University of Liverpool: Making Waves: Oliver Lodge and the Cultures of Science, 1875-1940: Workshop 3: Science, Pure and Applied: Oliver Lodge, Physics and Engineering 31 October 2014

ESSWE: CfP: Magic and Intellectual History University of York 15 March 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: The Canadian Society for the History of Medicine and the Canadian Association for the History of Nursing annual meeting, 30 may – 1 June 2015

University of Glasgow: Conference: Gartnavel Royal Hospital and the History of Scottish Psychiatry 15 November 2014

SHAC: ‘The Royal Typographer and the Alchemist: Willem Sylvius and John Dee’, Museum Plantin-Moretus, Vrijdagmarkt 22, Antwerp, Belgium, 26 October 2014

LOOKING FOR WORK?

Science Museum Group: Associate Curator, Mathematics Gallery Project

Historiens de la santé: Call for applications: UCLA Position in History and Social Studies Medicine

University College Berkeley: Position: Assistant Professor in the History and Rhetoric of Science and Technology

University of Strathclyde: Lecturer in History of Health and Medicine

Caltech: Postdoctoral Instructor in History & Philosophy of Physics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #13

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William WhewellEmblem

Volume #13

Monday 15 September 2014

EDITORIAL:

If our editorial staff suffered from triskaidekaphobia we might have followed the example of some American architects and simply gone from our twelfth edition to the fourteenth one but we are not inclined to superstition and the number thirteen holds no fear for us and so you are now reading the thirteenth edition of the weekly history of science, technology and medicine (#histSTM) link list Whewell’s Gazette.

By far and away the biggest history of science related story was the purported discovery of one of the ill-fated Franklin Expedition 1845-48. This has stirred up much reaction and comment throughout the Internet so we have decided to make our thirteenth edition The Franklin Expedition edition.

Next weeks fourteenth edition will perforce be a very truncated edition as our editorial staff will be actively involved all of next weekend in two conferences to celebrate the achievements of the Franconian astronomer Simon Marius. Normal service will be assumed for the fifteenth edition.

 

ON THE WEB BLOGS AND WEBSITES:

The Franklin Expedition:

CBC News: Lost Franklin expedition ship found in the Arctic

Rice Education: Inuit Testimony About Franklin

Sir John Franklin and his crew were captured in this 1847 painting by W Turner Smith called The End In Sight

Sir John Franklin and his crew were captured in this 1847 painting by W Turner Smith called The End In Sight

BBC: Sir John Franklin: Fabled Arctic ship found

Royal Museums Greenwich: Sir John Franklin and Lady Franklin

Royal Museums Greenwich: Marine Chronometer from Franklin’s expedition

Guardian: Horologists ponder mystery of how 19th-century chronometer survived fatal Arctic expedition

The Globe and Mail: The Franklin discovery’s not about what, but where

Guardian: Sir John Franklin: From the archive

JSTOR – Global Plants: Digitized letters from John Richardson who accompanied Franklin on 2 Arctic expeditions

Ottawa Citizen: Adriana Craciun: Franklin’s sobering true legacy

Geopolitics & Security: Missing, Submerged and Floating Objects: Franklin’s ship and the Northwest Passage

British Library – American Studies Blog: Finding Franklin

The Globe and Mail: Why is the Franklin expedition such a Canadian story?

Active History.ca: History Matters: Why Should We Care About the Erebus (or Terror)?

Birthdays of the Week:

Ulisse Aldrovandi 11 September 1522

Ulisse Aldrovandi Augostino Carracci

Ulisse Aldrovandi Augostino Carracci

Letters from Gonwanda: The Legacy of Ulisse Aldrovandi

Letters from Gonwanda: The Early History of Ammonite Studies in Italy

History of Geology: In the beginning was the word

History of Geology: On the track of Ichnology

Harvey Fletcher 11 September 1884

Harvey Fletcher (1884-1981) American physicist and audio technology pioneer

Harvey Fletcher (1884-1981) American physicist and audio technology pioneer

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 11 – Harvey Fletcher

Yovisto: Harvey Fletcher – the Father of Stereophonic Sound

Alexander von Humboldt 14 September 1769

Alexander von Humboldt Drawn by Rudolf Lehmann

Alexander von Humboldt Drawn by Rudolf Lehmann

History of Geology: Alexander von Humboldt and the Hand-Beast

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: General Grove’s secret history

The Renaissance Mathematicus: I expected better of Tim Radford

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Another one bites the dust

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 12 – Moon

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Leo Szilard

American Institute of Physics: Nobel Worlds in Physics, 1901-1965

Leaping Robot A 17th Century Space Race

Cover of Godwin’s book

Cover of Godwin’s book

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Ashley Kupferschmidt: Fragments of Paper found in Medical Kit: “Expedition”

CONTEXT 2: HATTERSLEY-SMITH: ARCTIC EXPEDITION, 1953

Board of Longitude Project: Navigation vacation

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The naming of America – Redux

MEDICINE:

The H-Word: Ashya King: An odd form of celebrity

The Cat’s Meat Shop: Sanitising History

From the Hands of Quacks: A Chamber of the Stillness of Death: Phyllis M.T. Kerridge’s Experiments in the Silence Room

Perceptions of Pregnancy: From Medieval to Modern: ‘Hopes of being with Child’: An Early Modern Guide to Knowing You Are Pregnant

History News Network: The Sad Reason We Don’t Know More About Ebola

Neurophilosophy Mo Costandi: A brief history of psychedelic psychiatry

Diseases of Modern Life: The Gent and the Ballet-Girl

NYAM: Aseptic Surgery: Innovation circa 1900

Houghton Library: Choice Receipts for the Prevention and Cure of the Plague

Medical Press: The history of medical studies of male infertility

Circulating Now: Rare Footage of FDR at NIH

http://circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov/2014/09/10/rare-footage-of-fdr-at-nih/

Shannon Selin: Félix Formento and medicine in 19th century New Orleans

Advertisement for Dr. de Laferrière’s sulphurous steam-baths, Louisiana Courier, May 1821

Advertisement for Dr. de Laferrière’s sulphurous steam-baths, Louisiana Courier, May 1821

University of Glasgow Library: Syphilis – what’s in a name?

Dittrick Museum Blog: Blood Rises – Tension and Truth in The Knick

ChoM News: Staff Finds: IPPNW Anti-War Efforts Recognized by World Leaders

NYAM: Jonas Salk, The Polio Vaccine, and The Shot Felt ‘Round the World

Science Friday: Podcast: The Science of ‘Sameness’: Developing Generic Medication

Cleveland.com: Shaker Historical Museum features herbal medicines of 19th century

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Gruesome Tale of Self-Surgery

Yovisto: William Budd and the Infectious Diseases

Encyclopaedia Britannica Blog: Walter J. freeman II and Lobotomy: Probing for Answers

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 8 – Willard Frank Libby

Trowel Blazers: Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin

Dorothy Hodgkin (then Crowfoot) ca. 1920s, as she was when she excavated at Jerash in her late teens (with thanks to the Crowfoot family for providing this image - All Rights Reserved)

Dorothy Hodgkin (then Crowfoot) ca. 1920s, as she was when she excavated at Jerash in her late teens (with thanks to the Crowfoot family for providing this image – All Rights Reserved)

Concocting History: Dragons live forever but not so little boys and girls

Conciatore: Neri’s Cabinet #5: Sulfur of Saturn

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Unmaking Things: The wonder of man – the wonder of nature: 
a seventeenth-century Nautilus cup

Nautilus cup, unknown maker, ca. 1620, Dutch. Engraved nautilus shell set in a silver gilt mount enamelled in white and blue, Museum no. M.179:1, 2-1978, Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Nautilus cup, unknown maker, ca. 1620, Dutch. Engraved nautilus shell set in a silver gilt mount enamelled in white and blue, Museum no. M.179:1, 2-1978, Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

History of Geology: Happy Birthday Plate Tectonics!

Medievalist.net: Ten Strange Medieval Ideas about Animals

Inside the Science Museum: 30th Anniversary of DNA Fingerprinting

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 13 – Hans Christian Joachim Gram

The Public Domain Review: Tractatus de Herbis (ca. 1440)

The Irish Times: Writing that inspired a generation of scientists (Schrödinger, “What is Life?”)

TECHNOLOGY:

Retronaut: 1950s: The Perhapsatron

Patch of Puddles: Visiting Bletchley Park

Londonist: A Brief History of London Poo

DSC_0016

Conciatore: Art and Science Reprise

Ptak Science Books: The Sky Above & Mud Below Department, 1890

Ptak Science Books: “Spirit Writing”: Electric, Script-Writing Telegraph, 1879 (!!)

New Scientist: Myth and reality of the Nazi space rocket

Airspace Blog: “Vengeance Weapon 2”: 70th Anniversary of the V-2 Campaign

VOX: We live in the future AT&T imagined in 1994

Thick Objects: An “Incomplete” Artefact: Part 2 – Knowing an object’s past

META:- HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

CRUX: Photos from inside the Vatican Secret Archives

Diseases of Modern Life: File it Under C…

Sideways Look at Science: 4S / ESOCITE JOINT MEETING: “SCIENCE IN CONTEXT(S): SOUTHS AND NORTHS”

Free Virtual Issue of Social History of Medicine

The Mod Squad: Steve Daniel’s Early Modern Philosophy Calendar

Science – AAAS: Public Science 2.0 – Back to the Future

Smithsonian.com: Lunar Bat-men, the Planet Vulcan and Martian Canals: Five of science history’s most bizarre cosmic delusions

Gilbert U-238 Atomic Energy Lab (1950-1951)

GilbertAtomicOpentrimmed

Wonders & Marvels: How I write History…with Chet van Duzer

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: The Art of Preparing Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r. "Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r.
“Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar.”

100 Years New Republic: Albert Einstein Endorsed a Popular Psychic in 1932. This Is the Controversy that Ensued

Forbidden Histories: One Year of ‘Forbidden Histories’

BOOK REVIEWS:

NEW BOOKS:

Aptowicz.com: Dr Mütter’s Marvels

Bloomsbury Publishing: Dorothy Hodgkin A Life

Georgina Ferry: Dorothy Hodgkin and me

Historiens de la santé: Recycling the Disabled: Army, Medicine and Modernity in WWI Germany

Brown Walker Press: Idolatry & Infinity: Of Art, Math, & God

THEATRE:

FILM:

Aperiodical: An Alan Turing expert watches the “The Imitation Game” trailer

CP24: Filming at Bletchley Park ‘ghostly’ for stars of Turing biopic ‘Imitation Game’

TELEVISION:

Mental Floss: 5 Things We Learned from The Knick’s Medical Advisor

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Reflections of Einstein

Vimeo: Alan Turing, le code de la vie

RADIO:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Call for participation: American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 2015 Conference, Los Angeles: Round table discussion: How do we study Eighteenth-Century science?

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 2015 Conference, Los Angeles Call for Papers

Gravity Fields Festival: Lecture: Newton and the Apothecary 25 Sept 2014

Institute of Historical Research: Seminars: History of Gardens and Landscapes (includes #histsci)

Medical Heritage Society: Call for guest bloggers

25 Chicago Humanities Festival; Baskes Lecture in History: Peter Galison: From Einstein’s Clocks to the Refusal of Time

Royal Museums Greenwich: Science, Voyaging, Art, Empire: Study Day 18 October 2014

York University: STS Seminar Series Schedule 2014-2015

ChoM News: Lecture: Sept 16: 500 Years of Human Dissection

ChoM News: Lecture: Sept 18: Colonial Governance and Medical Ethics in British India 1870-1910

8TH EUROPEAN SPRING SCHOOL ON HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND POPULARIZATION: CfP: LIVING IN A TOXIC WORLD  (1800-2000):  EXPERTS, ACTIVISM, INDUSTRY AND REGULATION

Oxford Sceptics in the Pub: Alice Bell Lecture: The Scientific Revolution that Wasn’t – Wednesday 5 Nov 7:30 pm

Swarthmore College: Exhibition Opening: Joseph Leidy and the foundation of Philadelphia biology 2 Oct 2014

Science Museum: Collider Exhibition Embarks on International Tour

CfP: 5th Biennial Conference of the Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice (SPSP) Aarhus 2015

Canadian Society for the History of Medicine: Hannah Summer Studentship

University of Oxford: St Cross College: One-Day Conference “Wittgenstein and Physics”

CBC News: Canada Science and Technology Museum remains closed due to mould

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Research Project: Networks and Knowledge of Glass in the Dutch Republic, 1650-1795

Holland Museum: Lecture: Dr Lindsey Fitzharris & Adrian Teal: Skeletons in the Basement

The Jenks Society: CfP: Lost Museums Colloquium

LOOKING FOR WORK?

Call for Co-Editor Nominations: Canadian Bulletin of Medical History / Bulletin canadien d’histoire de la medicine

Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions: Call for Early Career International Research Fellowships

Royal Society: Research Grants for Early Career Scientist (includes history of science)

University of Strathclyde Glasgow: Lecturer in History of Health and Medicine

Histories de la santé: Call for Applications: Fellowship in the History of American Obstetrics and Gynecology

Harvard University: History of Technology Tenure Track

Historiens de la santé: Call for Applications: Molina Fellowship in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

Historiens de la santé: University of Lewisburg: Call for Applications: Tenure-track assistant professor in history of Science, Medicine or Technology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #12

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Emblem

Volume #12

Monday 08 September 2014

 

EDITORIAL:

The dozen is full and you can now read the twelfth edition of the #histSTM weekly links list Whewell’s Gazette. It’s a bit early to be getting out the champagne but it would appear that our journal is in the process of becoming established.

Time to ask the reader(s) for a little feedback. Do you like what you see? Do you want it to continue? Do you have suggestions for improvements (that don’t involve too much work!). Do you have a #histSTM blog that we have consistently ignore? If so pipe up and demand attention! Your opinion is important to us (maybe!).

An important message to all, who use images in the Internet.

THINK OF THE BABY WOMBATS!

Exploding Baby Wombats

The 1 September saw a sad anniversary in the history of nature and the environment with one hundred years since the death of the last known passenger pigeon, Martha. Once one of the most numerous birds in North America it was no more. We start our journal this week with a round up of some, there were many more, of the articles remembering Martha and the fate of her once so numerous fellow pigeons.

 

ON THE WEB BLOGS AND WEBSITES:

A Martha Special:

Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) Catalog no. 461042 © AMNH/C. Chesek

Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) Catalog no. 461042
© AMNH/C. Chesek

American Museum of Natural History: Cautionary Anniversary: Last Passenger Pigeon Died 100 Years Ago

Scientific American: Observations: Black Skies No More: Passenger Pigeons Slaughtered

West Virginia Public Broadcasting: The Flight of the Passenger Pigeon, Now 100 Years Extinct

Slate: The Loney Life and Mysterious Death of the Lasat Passenger Pigeon

Wildlife Activities: How many of our birds are destined to go the way of the passenger pigeon?

Live Science: A Century for the Last Passenger Pigeon

Bird Watching: On a Monument to the Pigeon, by Aldo Leopold

National Geographic: Century After Extinction, Passenger Pigeons Remain Iconic—And Scientists Hope to Bring Them Back

Smithsonian.com: 100 Years After Her Death, Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon, Still Resonates

environment 360: Fate of the Passenger Pigeon Looms as a Somber Warning

Financial Times: The extinction of the passenger pigeon

Natural History Museum: 100 passenger pigeon facts on the 100th anniversary of its extinction

The Lawson Trek: Along the Path: The Passenger Pigeon – – Returning to the Original Observers

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Atomic Heritage: Marie Curie

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 2 – Franz Xaver von Zach

Wired: Fantastically Wrong: The Imaginary Radiation That Shocked Science and Ruined Its ‘Discoverer’

Compass Wallah: The Auroras of Bombay (1872)

tumblr_inline_nbcxbwY53o1rwys5r

Space Watchtower: Astronomy and World War II

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The naming of America

Yovisto: The Travels of William Dampier

Map of the East Indies from Dampier's "A New Voyage Round the World", published in 1697

Map of the East Indies from Dampier’s “A New Voyage Round the World”, published in 1697

Halley’s Log: Halley writes from Long Reach

MEDICINE:

SFARI: London as a crucible for autism in the 1950s

Figaries: The case of five children: who were inoculated in Dublin, on the 26th of August, 1725

Conciatore: Top Physician Reprise

From the Hands of Quacks: Refitting a Hospital during the Great War

Constructing Scientific Communities: ‘Sir: I am not a medical man…’: Laypeople and Medical Journals in the Nineteenth Century

NYAM: Patient Photographs and Medical Collecting

The Atlantic: How Racism Creeps Into Medicine

Notches: Where are the animals in the history of sexuality?

A Durok sow with her piglets (Wikimedia Commons)

A Durok sow with her piglets (Wikimedia Commons)

Swansea University: Obituary: University pays tribute to Professor Anne Borsay

The Conversation: Four weird ideas people used to have about women’s periods

The Atlantic: The Dawn of Modern Anesthesia

History of Medicine in Oregon: Leslie Kent became the first woman in the country elected president of a state medical association.

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today In Science History – September 1 – Carl Auer von Welsbach

SciLogs: Dorothy Hodgkin: The Queen of Crystallography

Nature: Milestones in Crystallography

Jennifer Sherman Roberts: Great Globs of Glowing Urine

Joseph Wright The Alchemist (Wikimedia Commons)

Joseph Wright The Alchemist (Wikimedia Commons)

Ptak Science Books: The Molecular World in Not-Quite 3-D

Conciatore: Neri’s Cabinet #4

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Yovisto: Sergei Winogradsky and the Science of Bacteriology

Guardian: Comment is Free: Limits to Growth was Right

The Embryo Project: The Pasteur Institute (1887- )

Yovisto: Ernst Curtius and the Excavation of Olympia

Kestrels and Cerevisiae: Mendelian-Mutationism (I): The Forgotten Synthesis

Mendelian-Mutationism (II): The Fluctuation-Mutationism Distinction

The Friends of Charles Darwin: The surprise punctuationist

Road to Paris: A very short history of climate change research

Letters from Gondwana: Ancient Greek Theater and the Past Mediterranean Climate

Trowel Blazers: Anne Phillips – The Curious Case of Miss Phillips’ Conglomerate

Anne and John Phillips' grave in York. Photo by Liam Herringshaw, All Rights Reserved.

Anne and John Phillips’ grave in York. Photo by Liam Herringshaw, All Rights Reserved.

TECHNOLOGY:

Spitalfields Life: So Long, George Cossington the Steeplejack

Yovisto: Louis Henry Sullivan – the ‘Father’ of the Skyscraper

The National Museum of Computing: Computing in 1974 from Computer Weekly

Twister Sifter: 100 Years Ago this Telephone Tower in Stockholm Connected 5000 Telephone Lines

Stockholm telephone-tower 1887-1913 over 5000 telephone-lines connected Photograph Courtesy of Tekniska Museet

Stockholm telephone-tower 1887-1913 over 5000 telephone-lines connected
Photograph Courtesy of Tekniska Museet

Europeana: Early 20th Century Water Cycles

New Scientist: Soviet-era hyperboloid tower saved from destruction

Thick Objects: An “Incomplete” Artefact: Part 1 – Missing Pieces

Conciatore: Stonework

The Journal of Music: Where Electronic Music Began

Tech Dirt: Why Is Huffington Post Running A Multi-Part Series To Promote The Lies Of A Guy Who Pretended To Invent Email?

Inside the Science Museum: Robert Watson-Watt and the Triumph of RADAR

Royal Museums Greenwich: John Harrison and the search for longitude

Ptak Science Books: An Harmonic Analyzer, 1916

The Physics Mill: Non-Digital Computers

META:- HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The H-Word: Tattoos for Time Travellers at the British Science Festival 2014

In Newton’s Footsteps: fickr

The Nation: Science as Salvation?

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: James Bradley’s Lectures on Experimental Philosophy

The Recipes Project: Teaching Recipes: A September Series

BSHS Travel Guide: Museum of Ethnography in Budapest

Scientia Salon: The return of radical empiricism

The H-Word: The big Australian science picnic of 1914

Map from The British Empire: its Geography, Resources, Commerce, Land-ways and Water-ways (1891). British Library Flickr

Map from The British Empire: its Geography, Resources, Commerce, Land-ways and Water-ways (1891). British Library Flickr

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: Wangensteen Library

Oregon State University: Dear Professor Einstein: The Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists in Post-War America

ITV: Bletchley code-breaking machine to be used in school history lessons

New York Times: So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class …

Royal Society: The Repository: “Went to Sir JB’s”: Charles Blagden’s diary and scientific life in Georgian London

The Medievalist: Women Scientists of the Middle Ages and 1600s

ESOTERIC:

British Library: Medieval Manuscripts Blog: A physicians Folding Almanac

A page from a 15th century physician's folding almanac: London, British Library, MS Harley 3812, f.

A page from a 15th century physician’s folding almanac: London, British Library, MS Harley 3812, f.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Fiction Reboot : Daily Dose: My Notorious Life

The Neuro Times: Piers J. Hale, Political Descent: Malthus, Mutualism, and the Politics of Evolution in Victorian England

Portal to the Universe: Two New Eclipse Publications

DailyHistory.org Top Ten Social History of American Medicine Booklist

Richard Carter: ‘The Making of the Fittest” by Sean B Carroll

carroll-making

 

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Jewish Medical Resistance in the Holocaust

Historiens de la santé: Health and Wellness in 19th-century America

The MIT Press: Recording Gender: Women’s Changing Participation in Computing

9780262018067

Springer: History of Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand (includes History and Philosophy of Science)

Historeins de la santé: Unseen Enemy: The English, Disease, and Medicine in Colonial Bengal, 1617-1847

THEATRE:

Hull Daily Mail: The story of Bletchley Park: That Is All You Need To Know arrives at Hull Truck Theatre in September

Progress Theatre: Darwin & Fitzroy Mon 8 Sept–Sat 13 Sept

darwin-710x300

TELEVISION:

BBC TWO: Castles in the Sky (The story of RADAR) Just three days left to watch!

VIDEOS:

YOUTUBE: Science and Islam, Jim Al-Khalili – BBC Documentary

VIMEO: Society for the History of Technology Dissertation Video Contest

VImeo: The Nature of Things – Martin Gardner

Vimeo: Under The Knife – Opening Sequence

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: A Point of View: Lisa Jardine: When fiction comes to the historian’s rescue

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Ghent University: Concepts and methods in philosophy and history of science: Calendar, 2014-2015

Medical Museion: “Anatomy, art and the body” – Copenhagen symposium on Vesalius’ 500th Anniversary

2015 BSHS Postgraduate Conference – Call for papers

The National Archives: All at Sea: international conference on Prize Papers 6 October 2014

All Souls College Oxford: CfP Mathematical readers in the early world 18–19 December 2014

University of Sheffield: CfP Social Networks 1450-1850

The Royal Institution: Ada Lovelace Day – Live! Tuesday 14 October

Wadham College: Symposium: John Wilkins and his Legacy

Public Domain (Wikimedia Commons) If somebody knows the artist tell me.

Public Domain (Wikimedia Commons) If somebody knows the artist tell me.

The British Museum: Exhibition: Witches and wicked bodies: 25 Sept 2014 – 11 Jan 2015

NYAM: Lecture: Author’s Night – Generic: The Unbranding of Modern Medicine

H-NET: Call for submissions: European Association for the History of Medicine and Health (EAHMH) book prize

Royal Museums Greenwich: Library Lates: Nevil Maskelyne, Longitude’s Champion 11 September

Manchester Science Festival 23 Oct – 2 Nov 2014

NIH: US National Library of Medicine: Exhibition: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection Pictures of Nursing

Royal College of Physicians: The anatomy of a building: Denys Lasdun and the Royal College of Physicians 8 Sept 2014 – 13 Feb 2015

American Association for the History of Medicine: George Rosen Prize Deadline 31 Oct 2014

Historiens de la santé: History of Iberian Science & Medicine

Art Daily: First major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cult astronomy opens at LACMA

The British Society for Literature and Science: CfP BSLS Syposium on Teaching Literature and Science

University of London: EMPHASIS programme 2014-15 (includes #histSTM)

Making Waves: Deadline extended! Science, Pure and Applied: Oliver Lodge, Physics, and Engineering, University of Liverpool, 31 October 2014

The Renaissance Diary: The Oxford-Globe Forum for Medicine and Drama in Practice 4 Oct 2014

The Renaissance Diary: CfP Towards a History of Errors Berlin 10-11 Dec 2014

Historiens de la santé: CfP Medical Humanities in Medieval England Deadline 15 Sept 2014

SHNH: Horniman Museum History of teaching natural history Oct 10-11 2014

Graham Farmelo: The life and Legacy of Sir John Cockcroft 18-19 Sept 2014

LOOKING FOR WORK?

The Museum of Science and Industry – Manchester: Curator of Science and Technology

Northwestern University: Postdoctoral Fellowships, Science in Human Culture

University of Notre Dame: Assistant Professor, History of Science

Two Faculty Positions in Science Studies at Michigan State University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. 11

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Emblem

Volume #11

Monday 01 September 2014

EDITORIAL:

mere training in one or more of the exact sciences…is no guarantee of a humane or sceptical outlook – George Orwell – What is Science?

Like the proverbial bad penny Whewell’s Gazette keeps turning up, today for the eleventh time. This week our editorial staff were very jealous because many of our Internet friends were at the XXXIII Scientific Instrument Symposium at the University of Tartu in Estonia enjoying some fantastic talks. You can watch them here on the website where they have been filmed by UT TV

In the history of astronomy Tartu is famous as being the workplace of Friedrich George Wilhelm Struve (1793-1864)

Struve

 

one of the Struve dynasty of telescopic astronomers, who measured the stellar parallax of Vega in 1843.

The great archetypal Fraunhofer refractor, 1824.  Struve used it to measure the parallax of Vega

The great archetypal Fraunhofer refractor, 1824. Struve used it to measure the parallax of Vega

 

ON THE WEB BLOGS AND WEBSITES:

Birthday of the Week: Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier born 26 August 1743

Antoine_lavoisier_color

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Collection Online: Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (1743–1794) and His Wife (Marie-Anne-Pierrette Paulze, 1758–1836)

Chemical Heritage Foundation: Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier

h/t Ben Gross

h/t Ben Gross

Science Notes: Today In Science History – August 26 – Antoine Lavoisier

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The father of …

Ernest Rutherford born 30 August 1871

Martha Rutherford with Eva and (left to right) Charles, Ernest, Jim, and Herbert, 1885. Ernest was 14. Credit: Tyree, Rutherford family.

Martha Rutherford with Eva and (left to right) Charles, Ernest, Jim, and Herbert, 1885.
Ernest was 14. Credit: Tyree, Rutherford family.

AIP: Rutherford’s Nuclear World

Science Notes: Today In Science History – August 30 – Ernest Rutherford

Herman von Helmholtz born 31 August 1821

Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894) in 1876

Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894) in 1876

Science Notes: Today In Science History – August 31 – Hermann von Helmholtz

Mary Shelly born 30 August 1797

Mary Shelley, by Richard Rothwell, 1840

Mary Shelley, by Richard Rothwell, 1840

History of Geology: Mary Shelley born Aug 30, 1797, was she inspired to write “Frankenstein” by the Tambora eruption?

Shelly’s Ghost: Mary Shelly (1797-1851)

Yovisto: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly, the Mother of the Monster

History Today: Science & Shelly: What Mary Knew

Science 2.0: Happy Birthday Mary Shelly

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 25 – Frerick William Herschel

PreservationNation Blog: Road Trip to the Secret City: Atomic History in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

University of California Museum of Paleontology: Paleontological field work and nuclear testing

The Renaissance Mathematicus Galileo, Foscarini, The Catholic Church, and heliocentricity in 1615 Part 2 the consequences: A Rough Guide

The Royal Institution: John Tyndall: written back into the history of magnetism

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 27 – Ernest Lawrence

Skulls in the Stars: Physics Demonstrations: Faraday Disc

io9: 12 Diagrams That Changed How We Understand Out Solar System

Tusi Couple

Tusi Couple

The Crux: Like GPS? Thank Relativity

Science Notes: Today In Science History – August 30 – Ernest Rutherford

Friendly Atheist: Obituary: Victor Stenger, Physicist and Prolific Atheist Author, is Dead at 79

Yovisto: Fred Whipple and the Dirty Snowballs

Yovisto: Sir Bernard Lovell and the Radioastronomy

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

MEDICINE:

Perceptions of Pregnancy: Midwives Behaving Badly?: Complaints against Lying-In Charity Staff c.1800-1834

Circulating Now: Medicine, Morality, Faith, and Film

The Recipes Project: Exploring CPP 10a214: Wingfield Family Lines

Victorian Dotage: Why was someone with dementia called a ‘lunatic’?

Shakespeare’s England: School of Physick

NYAM: “The Pest at the Gate”: Typhoid, Sanitation, and Fear in NYC

Somatosphere: The Recent History of “Contagious Shooting” (1982-2006) and more recent events in Ferguson, Missouri

Wellcome Collection Blog: Object of the Month: Cowrie Snuff Box

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 29 – Werner Forssmann

Yovisto: Werner Forssmann and the dangerous Self Experiment in Cardiac Catheterization

The H-Word: Hospital food standards: did medieval hospitals do it better?

A nurse brings polte de orzo (possibly barley broth) to a patient. 15th century illustration courtesy of the Wellcome Library, London. Photograph: Wellcomeimages

A nurse brings polte de orzo (possibly barley broth) to a patient. 15th century illustration courtesy of the Wellcome Library, London. Photograph: Wellcomeimages

Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute: Uta and Chris Frith: A partnership of the mind

Uta & Chris Frith

Uta & Chris Frith

The Chirugeon’s Apprentice: The Saddest Place in London: A Story of Self-Sacrifice

NYAM: Global Celebration of Vesalius’s 500th Birthday

NYAM: The Merits of Cocaine

CHEMISTRY:

Smithsonian.com: From Gunpowder to Teeth Whitener: The Science Behind Historic Uses of Urine

William O’Shaughnessy (1809-1889)

Conciatore: Neri’s Cabinet #3

Crystals of Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate (Vitriol of Venus)

Crystals of Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate
(Vitriol of Venus)

Vimeo: Video: “If It’s Fun on TV … “ 65 years in Mass Spectrometry Fred McLafferty

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Ockham’s Razor: The power of plants in science, culture and medicine

Science Direct: Friedrich Miescher and the discovery of DNA

The Embryo Project: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek

Wired: Fantastically Wrong: The Legend of the Homicidal Fire-Proof Salamander

A salamander relaxing in a fire, just minding its own business, is rudely prodded by a shirtless man. “A salamander lives in the fire, which imparts to it a most glorious hue,” reads the caption. Welcome to the wonderful world of alchemy. Wikimedia

A salamander relaxing in a fire, just minding its own business, is rudely prodded by a shirtless man. “A salamander lives in the fire, which imparts to it a most glorious hue,” reads the caption. Welcome to the wonderful world of alchemy. Wikimedia

io9: A Historic Experiment Shows Why We Might Not Want to Debate Fanatics

VICE: Why are Historians so Afraid of Fucking?

The Appendix: Space Cadets and Rat Utopias

Yale Alumni Magazine: The man who saved the dinosaurs

TROWEL BLAZERS: Zofia Lielan-Jaworowska

The #EnvHist Weekly

Letters from Gondwana: Haeckel and the Legacy of Early Radiolarian Taxonomists

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Lee de Forest and the Audion

Thick Objects: The Micromanipulator Project: A Rabbit Hole

The Appendix: Technology and Apocalypse in America

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 28 – Godfrey Hounsfield

Conciatore: Manganese from Piedmont Reprise

British Library: Taking the Train to America: The Royal Scot and a ‘Century of Progress’

New York Times: Werner Franz, Survivor of the Hindenburg’s Crew, Dies at 92

Medievalist.net: Ten Medieval Inventions that Changed the World

META:- HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Fiction Reboot: Med-Hum Monday: The Medical Heritage Library’s “Never-Ending Work in Progress”

Yahoo News: Art, Science & Philosophy Behind Photos of Oldest Living Things

BSHS: Journal: Viewpoint 104 – Supernatural

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Books on the Manhattan Project

Guardian: Florence Nightingale Letters brought together online

George Orwell – What is Science?

Forbes: Peter Godfrey-Smith Takes On The Philosophy of Biology

Biblio Blog: Copernicus Book Thought Destroyed in Fire is Found Again

iai news: The End of Psychology?

The Journal.ie: Can you help identify these pioneering 1920s Irish science students?

Female science students at UCD

Female science students at UCD

Double Refraction: How to save the symmetry principle in six easy steps

Wallifaction: the new martyrs of science

Forbes: Just How Much Did The Scientific Revolution Owe To The East?

Ether Wave Propaganda: Derek Price on Automata, Simulacra, and the rise of “Mechanism”

Sagansense: the manuscripts of the masters

BBC: Millions of historical images posted to Flickr

Manhattan District History: Manhattan Project’s history in 36 volumes written in 1940s declassified & available for download

Physics Today: The Dayside: Rutherford, Bohr, and the rise of Nature

Commission for the History and Philosophy of Computing Website

Zetatrek: The Freedom of Going Back

The National Archives: Accessions to Repositories h/t Nicky Reeves

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Alchemy in the Kitchen

Tesoro del Mondo, "Ars Preparatio Animalium" Antonio Neri 1598-1600, f. 10r (MS Ferguson 67).

Tesoro del Mondo, “Ars Preparatio Animalium”
Antonio Neri 1598-1600, f. 10r (MS Ferguson 67).

Forbidden Histories: Who was Dr. Karlo Marchesi? The Zagreb-Durham Transoceanic ESP Experiments. Guest Post by Boris Kožnjak, Zagreb

The Recipes Project: The (lack of) power of gemstones

Forbidden Histories: Clever Hans and the Origins of German Experimental Parapsychology: Sixth Pre-Print Article from SHPSC Special Issue

BOOK REVIEWS:

Some Beans: Degrees Kelvin by David Lindley

Some Beans: Greenwich Time and the Longitude by Derek Howse

Some Beans: Finding Longitude by Richard Dunn & Rebekah Higgitt

Early Modern Medicine: Old Age and Disease in Early Modern Medicine

RP-P-1910-1483-216x300

THE: From Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science, and Women’s Rights in Gilded Age America

Australian Journal of Philosophy: Philosophy of Biology by Peter Godfrey-Smith

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: New Book: Medical Transitions in Twentieth-Century China

MIT Press: New Book: Beyond Imported Magic: Essays on Science, Technology and Society in Latin America

Astro Pixels.com: New Book: Thousand Year Canon of Solar Eclipses 1501 to 2500

Historiens de la santé: New Book: Histories of Health in Southeast Asia: Perspectives on the Long Twentieth Century

TELEVISION:

YOUTUBE:

The Chemical Heritage YouTube Chanel

The Royal Institution YouTube Chanel

RADIO:

Guardian: Author responds to Katherine Hodgkin’s criticism of his play The Chemistry Between Them

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Historiens de la santé: CfP The 2nd What is & How to Do LGBT History Conference Manchester 14-15 February 2015

New Blog: Faith and Wisdom in Science Discussion Blog: an invitation

University of Kent: School of English: Conference: Liminal Time and Space in Medieval and Early Modern Performance 5th-7th September 2014

University College London: Institute of Making: CfP Hidden histories of things: genealogies of the non-human 26 January 2015

Guardian: Exhibition: London maps: a unique view of the capital through classic cartography 4-14 September

London Map

Georg Braun & Franz Hogenberg: Londinium Feracissmi Angliae Regni Metropolis. Published in Braun & Hogenberg’s book Civitates Orbis Terrarum, 1572

The Natural History Museum: Grand Opening September 13-October 4 The Queens Museum

New York Academy of Medicine: Calendar

Brewery History: The Geoffrey Ballard Essay Award

Science Museum: Conference: Interpreting the Information Age: New Avenues for Research and Display 3-5 November 2014

British Museum: Museum of the Future debate 11 September 2014

H-net: New books in medicine seeking podcast hosts

The Royal Society: Lecture: Longitude back and forth across the years Martin Rees and Rebekah Higgitt 25 September 2014

Royal Museums Greenwich: Expert talk: The Art of Longitude – the Famous Quest from Print to Film 4 September 2014

The Canadian Society for the History of Medicine and the Canadian Association for the History of Nursing CfP Congress for the Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Ottawa 30 May – June 1st.

Science Museum: Science Museum to create new home for the Clockmakers’ Collection

LOOKING FOR WORK?

University of Kent: School of European Culture and Languages: Research Associate in Philosophy ‘Grading evidence of mechanisms in physics and biology’

University of Oxford: Sackler Keeper of Antiquities

University of Bristol: ‘The Life of Breath’ Philosophy of Medicine Wellcome Trust PhD Studentship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. 10

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Emblem

Volume #10

Monday 25 August 2014

EDITORIAL:

We can hardly believe it ourselves but this is the tenth edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly digest of the best in the histories of science, technology and medicine, so we are dedicating this edition to Pythagoras and the Pythagoreans. You may ask yourself why we are doing this.

The Pythagoreans who are considered to be one of the founders of Western science were great believers in numerology, who considered the natural numbers to be the building blocks of the cosmos and for them the number ten was the most special number in their metaphysical beliefs.

Ten was known as the Tetraktys (meaning four) by the Pythagorean, being the sum of the first four natural numbers 1+2+3+4 = 10 and displayed as a triangular number.

338px-Tetractys.svg

It had many interpretations. One is a point or zero dimensions, two is two points forming a straight line or one dimension, three is three points forming a triangle or two dimensions and four is four points forming a tetrahedron or three dimensions. For the Pythagoreans there were ten celestial bodies: the fixed stars, the seven planets (Moon, Mercury, Venus, Sun, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn), the Earth and Antichthon (the counter-earth). The Earth and Anthichthon revolve around the Central Fire, a theory that led Copernicus to erroneously attribute heliocentricity to the Pythagoreans, which in turn led Copernican being referred to as Pythagoreans in the Early Modern Period.

Following a lively discussion on Twitter the editorial team of Whewell’s Gazette have decided to replace the hash tag tape worm #histsci, #histtech & #histmed with the single hash tag #histSTM and we hope that all historians of science, medicine and technology will follow our example and adopt this space and character saving device in future.

 

 ON THE WEB BLOGS AND WEBSITES:

Birthdays of the Week: H. P. Lovecraft! (20 August 1890)

lovecraftface1

Letters from Gondwana: Halloween Special: Lovecraft and the Mountains of Madness

The Dynamic Earth: At the Orogen of Madness

Lovecraft

 

Haeckel’s Kunstformen der Natur (1904), plate 90: Cystoidea. From Wikimedia Commons

The Devil’s Exercise Yard: “Don’t mention the war.” – some thoughts on H.P. Lovecraft and race

Georges Cuvier 23 August 1769

Georges_Cuvier

The Embryo Project: Georges Cuvier (1769-1832)

Stratotype of Basin of Paris (1808)

Stratotype of Basin of Paris (1808)

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Podcast: Glen Seaborg’s Interview

Wiener Zeitung: Wiener Physiker Walter Thirring verstorben

The four Nobel laureates of NBI. Niels Bohr is on the right. Who can name the others? Via @telescoper

The four Nobel laureates of NBI. Niels Bohr is on the right. Who can name the others? Via @telescoper

Pat’s Blog: Why there are seven colours in the rainbow

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Podcast: Robert Hayes’s Interview

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 23 – Charles-Augustin de Coulomb

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Halley’s Log: Halley and Longitude

MEDICINE:

The New Yorker: The Real “Knick”

BBC Travel: New York City’s most morbid museum

The Prague Revue: The Plague in Rhyme (Or Not)

Philly.com: Historical antecedents to experimental Ebola treatments

NYAM: The Practical Druggist 1917

New York Academy of Medicine: The Fabrica of Andreas Vesalius: Object of the Month

Vesalius Fabrica Frontispiece 1543

Vesalius Fabrica Frontispiece 1543

New York Academy of Medicine: Electrification

Notches: (re)marks on the history of sexuality: ‘A Tempory Member’: ‘Hermaphrodites’ and Sexual Identity in Early Modern Russia

CHEMISTRY:

About.com: Chemistry: Who Invented the Periodic Table?

Yovisto: Jöns Jacob Berzelius – One of the founders of modern chemistry

Conciatore: Neri’s Cabinet #2

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Public Domain Review: The Bestarium of Aloys Zötl (1831–1887)

Public Domain Review: Birds from The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands (1754)

Public Domain Review: Redressing the Balance: Levinus Vincent’s Wonder Theatre of Nature

Detail from a print featured in the first part of Vincent’s Wondertooneel der Nature

Detail from a print featured in the first part of Vincent’s Wondertooneel der Nature

 

Making Science Public: Fermenting thought: A new look at synthetic biology

History Matters: Old Leaves and New: From Gloucestershire Tobacco to Albanian Pot

Geological Society of London Blog: A new version of Sopwith’s Buckland portrait

Embryo Project: Hwang Woo-suk’s Use of Human Eggs for Research 2002-2005

The Copenhagen Post: Danish museum finds lost Charles Darwin treasure

Houghton Library Blog: The Poet as Naturalist: Thomas Grey’s copy of Linnaeus’ Systema Naturae

Beetle-e1408811376733-150x150

History of Geology: Pompeii – a Geological Movie-Review: Introducing the Main Character

TECHNOLOGY:

The Daguerreian Society: The Daguerreian Process: A Description

The Recipes Project: Illuminating the ‘elusive’: reconstructing mediaeval recipes for anthocyanin pigments

The Recipes Project: Old-Fashioned Recipes, New-Fashioned Kitchens: Technology and Women’s Recipe Collecting in the Nineteenth Century

Frontispiece showing two women working in a kitchen. Mrs. E.A. Howland, The American Economical Housekeeper and Family Receipt Book (Cincinnati: H.W. Derby & Co., 1845). Library of Congress.

Frontispiece showing two women working in a kitchen. Mrs. E.A. Howland, The American Economical Housekeeper and Family Receipt Book (Cincinnati: H.W. Derby & Co., 1845). Library of Congress.

Computer History Museum: Who Invented the IC?

Yovisto: William Murdock ‘enlights’ the 19th Century

Atlas Obscura: Horologium Mirabile Lundense

META:- HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

AEON: Small things: The discovery of a microscopic world shook the foundations of theology and created modern demons

Guardian: Podcast: The science of the invisible

Evolving Thoughts: Some more videos: John Wilkins shorts on philosophy of science

The Public Domain Review: Highlights from Folger Shakespeare Library’s Release of almost 80 000 Images

Folger

Nautilus: Public, Pointed Scientific Spats – Feature, Not Bug

The Times of India: IIEST plans to marry arts and science

The Royal Society: The Repository: A proverb in the hand…

London Historians’ Blog: Gresham, the Great Golden Grasshopper

The Gresham family badge: a grasshopper.

The Gresham family badge: a grasshopper.

The Sloane Letters Blog: How to Build a Universal Collection, or Nicknackatory:

Open Culture: Sigmund Freud Appears in Rare Surviving Video & Audio Recorded During the 1930s

Compass Wallah: The Astronomer & the Chessboard: Reading List

The Creativity Post: Science Is Not About Certainty

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Don Giovanni

New Republic: Houdini Loved to Use His Magic to Expose Real Con Artists Edmund Wilson 1925

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Atlantic: Who has the right to pain relief?

James Ungureanu: Victorian Scientific Naturalism

James Ungureanu: The Age of Scientific Naturalism

Joanne Bailey Muses on History: Meditating on Materiality – a 3-part book review: Part1, Part 2, Part 3

TELEVISION:

The Denver Post: TV finds heroes in science: Physicists, sexologists, surgeons and more

RADIO:

Guardian: Review: Thatcher and Hodgkin: A personal and political chemistry?

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

The Hakluyt Society Essay Prize

Rachel Carson Center: Turku Book Award #histenv

UCL: First London Philosophy of Science Graduate Workshop – Approaches Within Philosophy of Science Date: 2-3 September 2014

The Royal Institution: Join the Ri

Cambridge University Press: New Book: Daryn Lehoux, What Did the Romans Know? : An Inquiry into Science and Worldmaking

Queen Mary University of London: CfP: Being Modern: Science and Culture in the early 20thcentury Institute of Historical Research, London 22-24 April 2015

National Maritime Museum: The Whale: an exploration 20 September

Bloomsbury History: New Book: A History of Environmentalism

CRASSH: Things that Matter 1400-1900 Alternate Wednesdays 12.00-2.00pm during term time

Cleveland.com: Author Kate Manning to hold book launch party at Dittrick Museum for tale of ‘Notorious’ midwife

ChoM News: Marian Cabot Putnam Papers Open for Research

Leeds University –Faculty of Arts: Shaping the Trading Zone: Bringing Aesthetics and Philosophy of Science Together 5–6 September 2014

Irish History Podcasts: Book Project Blog: 1348 A Medieval Apocalypse The Black Death in Ireland

Scientific Instrument Society Research Grants

LOOKING FOR WORK?

Rochester Institute of Technology: Assistant Professor – Sociocultural Context of Science and Technology

UCL: STS Vacancies

Science Europe: Vacancy Notice: Senior Scientific Officer (Humanities) pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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