Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #41

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #41

Monday 30 March 2015

EDITORIAL: Welcome to the forty-first edition of you weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette, as always stuffed full of all the best that the Internet had to offer in the histories of science, technology and medicine over the last seven days.

This week we feature two science outsiders who share a birthday on 23 March and who have become historical icons over the years. First up is Amalie Emmy Noether the female mathematician from our own home base who set several milestones for women in the history of science in the early twentieth century. In a letter to the New York Times Albert Einstein wrote the following about her:

In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fräulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began. In the realm of algebra, in which the most gifted mathematicians have been busy for centuries, she discovered methods which have proved of enormous importance in the development of the present-day younger generation of mathematicians.

It is common practice to refer to Emmy as the greatest female mathematician of the twentieth century. This claim is however false, she was one of the greatest mathematicians male or female of the twentieth century.

Emmy shares her birthday with the nineteenth-century land surveyor and amateur geologist William Smith who produced the first ever geological map of an entire country; a map that celebrates its two hundredth birthday this year. Of working class origins Smith was originally treated with disdain by the gentleman of the Geological Society but they came to recognise their error and eventually awarded him their highest honour.

This edition of Whewell’s Gazette is dedicated to all those whose love of science is so great that they overcome the adversities that life throws into their paths to achieve their aims as did both Emmy and William

Quotes of the week:

When people on airplanes ask me what I do I used to say I was a physicist, which ended the discussion. I once said I was a cosmologist, but they started asking about makeup, and the title astronomer gets confused with astrologer. Now I say I make maps – Margaret Geller

‘When angry, count four; when very angry, swear.’ — Mark Twain h/t @girlinterruptin

“It’s a terrible tragedy & we can’t tell you anything meaningful so we won’t waste your time by speculating,” said no news broadcaster ever – Michael Brooks

Best panel title at Lunar & Planetary Sci Conf:”Your Last Chance to Talk about Ceres Before Data Wreck Your Theories” – Michael Robinson @ExplorationBlog

“Do not multiply emails beyond necessity” – Ockham’s Law of Academic Communication – Mark Eli Kalderon @PhilGeek

TELESCOPE, n. A device having a relation to the eye similar to that of the telephone to the ear, enabling distant objects to plague us with a multitude of needless details. Luckily it is unprovided with a bell summoning us to the sacrifice. – The Devil’s Dictionary – Ambrose Brice 1906 h/t @hist_astro

Galileo annoyed people in power; Ted Cruz is a person in power who annoys people – @drskyskull

“Pure mathematics, may it never be of any use to anyone.” A toast by Henry John Stephen Smith (1826-1883) h/t @cratylus

“Whoever becomes familiar with human anatomy and physiology, his faith in God increases.” – Ibn Rushd

There comes a time in life where a person is just left alone to walk and write. That’s true, isn’t it…isn’t it? – @DublinSoil

The great tragedy of Science – the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact -T.H. Huxley”

“Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.” – Richard Feynman “Members of the public can have useful insights that the experts may not have thought about” – @Roland_Jackson

“Ecclesiastical history is long, life is short” – Anthony Grafton

Birthday of the Week:

Emmy Noether born 23 March 1882 Noether   Google Doodle Archive: Emmy Noether’s 133rd Birthday Emmy Google Doodle   The Renaissance Mathematicus: The house where Emmy Lived

Emmy was born in this house on the Hauptstraße in Erlangen Photo: Thony Christie

Emmy was born in this house on the Hauptstraße in Erlangen
Photo: Thony Christie

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Emmy and the Habilitation

Time: New Google Doodle Honors Revolutionary Mathematician Emmy Noether

Vox: Emmy Noether revolutionized mathematics – and still faced sexism all her life

Galileo’s Pendulum: Emmy Noether and Symmetry, Revisited

The Washington Post: Emmy Noether Google Doodle: Why Einstein called her a ‘creative mathematical genius’

PACSL Finding Aids: Emmy Noether materials

Bitch Media: Happy birthday to brilliant mathematician Emmy Noether 3 Quarks Daily: Emmy Noether: Poet of Logical Ideas

William Smith born 23 March 1769

William Smith Source: Wikimedia Commons

William Smith
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BBC: William Smith: Seminal geological map rediscovered

Flickr: Rediscovered Smith Map

UCMP Berkeley: William Smith (1769-1839)

More than a Dodo: Celebrating Smith

Science Daily: Archivists unearth rare first edition of the 1815 ‘Map that Changed the World’

The Independent: Rare first edition of 200-year-old William Smith ‘map that changed the world’ found William Smith’s Maps – Interactive

History of Geology: A History of Geological Maps: I. From Outcrop to the first Map

The Geological Society: ‘Strata Identified by Organised Fossils…’ 1816–1819

Typical fossils found in the Lower Chalk stratum Image: Geological Society

Typical fossils found in the Lower Chalk stratum
Image: Geological Society

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY: Rundtaarn: The History

Rundetårn Copenhagen Source: Wikimedia Commons

Rundetårn Copenhagen
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Physics Today: Remembering the oil-drop experiment

Yovisto: Ulugh Beg – Astronomer

AHF: James B Conant

Intellectual Ventures Laboratory: A Story of Invention: the Laser

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Wakefield Wright’s Interview

The New York Times: Hydrogen Bomb Physicist’s Book Runs Afoul of Energy Department

Space.com: Astronomy’s Oldest Known ‘Nova’ a Cosmic Case of Mistaken Identity

A chart showing the position of a "nova" that appeared in 1670 and was dubbed Nova Vul 1670. It would later be renamed CK Vulpeculae. Its location was recorded by the famous astronomer Hevelius and was published by the Royal Society in England in its journal Philosophical Transactions.

A chart showing the position of a “nova” that appeared in 1670 and was dubbed Nova Vul 1670. It would later be renamed CK Vulpeculae. Its location was recorded by the famous astronomer Hevelius and was published by the Royal Society in England in its journal Philosophical Transactions.

Explore Whipple Collections: The parts of an astrolabe

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Rose Bethe’s Interview

AHF: Atomic Timeline

Polaroid: blipfoto: Inside Yale’s Van de Graaff Particle Accelerator

arXiv.org: The Reception of Newton’s Principia (pdf)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Who owns the time capsule found at historic Brashear factory?

Corpus Newtonicum: Elected by God

Yovisto: Aristarchus of Samos and the Heliocentric System

Luminarium.com: Medieval Cosmology

Novus Light: International Year of Light 2015: Celebrating Ibn Al-Haytham

Longitude Project Blog: Richard Dunn uncovers the story of Flamsteed’s well telescope

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Slate Vault: A 1935 Historical Map of Shanghai, Designed by an Enthusiastic Resident Expat

Carl Crow and the Shanghai Municipal Council, “Illustrated Historical Map of Shanghai,” 1935.

Carl Crow and the Shanghai Municipal Council, “Illustrated Historical Map of Shanghai,” 1935.

Longitude Project Blog: Observing at Greenwich with Dryden Goodwin 

Longitude Project Blog: Where should you put your meridian?

MEDICINE:

The James Lind Library

Fiction Rebbot: Daily Dose: Early Ectogenesis: Artificial Wombs in 1920s Literature

Embryo Project: Elinor Catherine Hamlin (1924– )

NYAM: Lost and Found

David Livingstone (1813–1873), in Livingstone, Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa, opposite page 1.

David Livingstone (1813–1873), in Livingstone, Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa, opposite page 1.

Nobelprize.org: Robert Koch and Tuberculosis

NYAM: Roget Beyond the Thesaurus

The Recipe Project: Was there a recipe for Korean ginseng?

Social History of Medicine Advance Access: ‘Nature Concocts & Expels’: The Agents and Processes of Recovery from Disease in Early Modern England

The Conversation: Faecal transplants: not the first prescription of medicinal poo

TECHNOLOGY:

Nasa: Gemini A Bridge to the Moon

National Archive: Today’s Document: Radio, RCA victor, Coil Winder

Nasa: Dr Robert H Goddard, American Rocketry Pioneer

Atlas Obscura: Objects of Intrigue: Micky Mouse Gas Mask

Astrolabes and Stuff: Historical navigational instruments on trial

The Recipes Project: New-Fashioned Recipe: Angle Food Cake and Nineteenth Century Technological Innovation

Conciatore: Chalcedony Glass

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.

Conciatore: Aventurine

Small amphora in aventurine glass ”,  Murano, Salviati.

Small amphora in aventurine glass ”,
Murano, Salviati.

Opposing Views: Which Way Should Toilet Paper Be Put On A Holder? Original 1891 Patent Solves The Mystery (Photos)

Tech Republic: Hacking the Nazis: The secret story of the women who broke Hitler’s codes

Georgian Gent: Knives and scissors sharpened…

Low-Tech Magazine: Email in the 18th century: the optical telegraph

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Science News: Telling stories from stone tools

The Public Domain Review: Living Lights: a Popular Account of Phosphorescent Animals and Plants (1887) 14005583845_092af70f98_b Notches: Beyond penetration: rethinking the murder of Edward II

Avidly: The Inhuman Anthropocene

H-Grad: Environmental History a reading list

Bioscience: Darwin’s Children’s Art Saved a Bit of His Science

Charles Darwin's children drew serveral pictures on the original manuscript of his historic book "On the Origin of Species." (Source: American Museum of Natural History)

Charles Darwin’s children drew serveral pictures on the original manuscript of his historic book “On the Origin of Species.” (Source: American Museum of Natural History)

Niche: Met Techs, the Environment and Science at the Joint Artic Weather Stations, 1947–1972

Notches: Reading Silences in Histories of Religion and Sexuality

History of Geology: A History of the Use of Illustrations in the Geosciences: I. Seeing is Believing…

NYAM: Happy Bird-Day Conrad Gessner

Audra J Wolfe: Germs in Space – Joshua Lederberg, Exobiology, and the Public Imagination, 1958– 1964

AIP: The Discovery of Global Warming

The Sloane Letters Blog: Of a leveret brought up by a cat V0021351 A hare. Coloured wood engraving.

CHEMISTRY:

Meteorite Manuscripts: John Dalton and the Curious Album Page

C&EN: 100 Years of Chemical Weapons

Narratively: Isabella Karle’s Curious Crystal Method

Sitting in her sunroom, Dr. Karle reviews her husband's research documents and publications.

Sitting in her sunroom, Dr. Karle reviews her husband’s research documents and publications.

The Royal Society: Rumford – the colourful Count

CHF: James Bryant Conant

Embryo Project: Diethystibestrol (DES) in the USA

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The DDT Collector

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Centre for Medical Humanities: Why Medical Humanities?

Niche: Postcards from America I Slide1 Conciatore: Mother Dianora

The Bigger Picture: Science Service, Up Close: “Stealth Authors” and An Appreciation of Honesty

Huffpost Tech: Gather Your Allies, Engage in Unorthodox Thinking – 300 Year Old Lessons in Innovation

Nature: A criticism of ‘science fandom’ prompts online reflection

CHF: Distillations: Spring 2015 Volume 1 Number 1

AHA Today: AHA Issues Letter of Support for the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine

CHoM News: Getting the Word Out

NCSE: Friends of Darwin and Friend of the Planet awards for 2015

Ptak Science Books: Great Babies: Baby Einstein, Baby Feynman, Baby Schroedinger, and More

Niels Bohr, 1890, age about 5. Source: http://www.nbi.ku.dk/english/www/niels/bohr/barndom/

Niels Bohr, 1890, age about 5. Source: http://www.nbi.ku.dk/english/www/niels/bohr/barndom/

The Guardian: Remembering an overlooked treaty

From Factory to the Future in Ambler Pennsylvania: History. Health. Community.

Storify: Museum objects and non-museum objects: bicycles and chairs: An exploration Mapping the Past with Linked Data in OpenHistoricalMap

The Washington Post: Ted Cruz invokes Galileo to defend climate scepticism – and historians aren’t happy

Compasswallah: The Needle and the Rainbow

Blink: The light and the sea

Reflected glory ‘The Shipwreck of the Minotaur’ (1810) by JMW Turner, who was the first to tear down the distinction between subject and object, presaging what would be later known as impressionism. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Reflected glory ‘The Shipwreck of the Minotaur’ (1810) by JMW Turner, who was the first to tear down the distinction between subject and object, presaging what would be later known as impressionism.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

JHI Blog: The Bookends of Chronicles: Decisions About Time

ESOTERIC:

Open Culture: Goethe’s Theory of Colors: The 1810 Treatise That Inspired Kandinsky & Early Abstract Painting goethe-color-first-plate-of-Zur-Farbenlehre Forbidden Histories: Carl Gustav Jung and the Clairvoyant, Mrs. Fäßler

BOOK REVIEWS:

The New York Times: Apple Opens Up to Praise New Book on Steve Jobs, and Criticize an Old One

Rosetta Stones: A Perfect Book for Hooking Kids on Rocks

Self-Awareness.com Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leuwenhoek and the Reinvention Of Seeing

Thinking Like a Mountain: Anatomy & the Organisation of Knowledge, 1500–1850

L0021649 A. Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org 'Tertia musculatorum' (third muscle man). De humani corporis fabrica libri septem Andreas Vesalius Published: 1543 Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

L0021649 A. Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
‘Tertia musculatorum’ (third muscle man).
De humani corporis fabrica libri septem
Andreas Vesalius
Published: 1543
Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews: Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History

Science Book a Day: Street-Fighting Mathematics: The Art of Educated Guessing and Opportunistic Problem Solving

Science Mag: Ivan Pavlov, revealed

The Wall Street Journal: Through a Glass, Brightly

n+1 Magazine: What Did You Do In The War, Doctor?

Trowelblazers: Archaeology, Sexism, and Scandal

Popular Science: Scientific Babel – Michael D. Gordin

Science Direct: The Age of Scientific Naturalism: Tyndall and his Contemporaries Forbes: Steven Weinberg Tackles The History of Science

NEW BOOKS:

University of Chicago Press: Making Marie Curie 9780226235844 Historiens de la santé: Too Hot To Handle: A Global History of Sex Education

THEATRE:

FILM:

Exploring the Past: National Geographic Films and Historical Progress

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Brunelleschi IMHS: Galileo’s Telescope the Invention

Youtube: AMNH: Inside the Collections: Wasps

Bloggingheads.tv: Science Faction John Hogan & Neuroskeptic

Brain Pickings: Jane Goodall Tells Her Remarkable Life-Story, Animated

BBC: A History of Ideas

Science Daily: On the hunt for astronomical artifacts

Vimeo: Engineering fiction: literature and science in interwar Britain

Youtube: Houghton Library: Starry Messengers

Youtube: Emily Winterburn discusses Caroline Herschel’s 1787 account of a new comet

Youtube: Erwin Schrödinger – Do Electrons Think? (BBC 1949)

RADIO:

Siren FM: History of Science – Power Plants

BBC: In Our Times: The Curies Graham Farmelo: Wells and the Bomb

PODCASTS:

Science Friday: Writing Women Back Into Science History

Nature: Audiofile: Music and the making of science

Physics Buzz Blog: Manhattan Project Historical Park

Blog Talk Radio: Virtually Speaking Science: Kelly Hills & Alice Dreger – Galileo’s Middle Finger

365 Days of Astronomy: Cultural Astronomy – Easter and the Missing Days

Star Date: African Astronomy

BBC: The Clocks Go Forward Tonight

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Museum Boerhaave: Registration: Materia Medica on the move: trading, studying, and using plants in the early modern period 15-17 April 2015

Pisa: CfP: HaPoC: Third International Conference for the History and Philosophy of Computing 8–11 October 2015

The Royal Society: Science on myself: Explore the history of ethics and self-experimentation in medicine 9 April 2015

INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON SCIENCE AND LITERATURE DIVISION of HISTORY of SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL UNION for the HISTORY and PHILOSOPHY of SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL ON SCIENCE AND LITERATURE Greek island of Andros 22-26 June 2015

The Royal Society: Mendel’s legacy 2 June 2015

academia.edu: Programme: The History of the Body: Approaches and Directions Institute of Historical Research, London 16 May 2015

SIGGIS: Call for Submissions: Computer History Museum Prize

Oxford MHS: Exhibition: ‘Dear Harry…’ – Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War 14 May–18 October 2015

H-ArtHist: Call for Publications: Tales from the Crypt: Museum Storage and Meaning

Main Point Books: Book Launch with Paul Halpern for Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cats 18 April 2015 Bryn Mawr

Oxford University: Unique Course: The History and philosophy of Evidence-Based Health Care 15–19 June 2015

Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona: International Workshop: A Comparative Study of Nuclear Energy Programs from the 1940s until the 1970s 7-8 May 2015

AJS Annual Meeting 2015 Boston – CfP: Jewish medical knowledge and rabbinic discourse(s) in Late Antiquity

University of Edinburgh: Beyond Leeches and Lepers: Medieval & Early Modern Medicine 2 May 2015

The Royal Society: Archival afterlives 2 June 2015

Science History Publications/USA: Savant Remains: Brains and Remains of Scientists 4th Watson Seminar in the Material and Visual History of Science Organized by Marco Beretta, Maria Conforti, Paolo Mazzarello University of Pavia, Pavia, September 4th, 2015.

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Register Now for 70th Anniversary Events 2-3 June 2015

SHNH: Invitation for submissions to the Stearn Student Essay Prize 2015 for natural history

Centre for the History and Philosophy of Physics: Physics and the Great War One-Day Conference Oxford 8 June 2015

Natural History Museum: Talk: Robert Hooke and the Miracles of the Miniature 1 April 2015

CHF: First Friday: The Alchemist’s Cookbook 3 April 2015

CHoM News: Lecture: Gettysburg to Boylston Street: The Legacy of Civil War Medicine in the 21st Century Center for the History of Medicine Harvard 13 April 2015

Heterodoxology: ContERN meeting at ESSWE5 in Riga 18 April 2015

BSHM: LMS 150th Anniversary BSHM–LMS De Morgan Day 9 May 2015

SEAC 2015: Astronomy in Past and Present Cultures

New University of Lisbon: CfP: 2nd Portuguese-Brazilian Meeting on the History of Tropical Medicine 14-16 October 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Swansea University: Fully-funded PhD Studentship: Swansea Science: The First 100 Years

Birkbeck: University of London: PhD Studentship

Swansea University: AHRC Funded PhD Studentship: Calculating Value: Using and Collecting the Tools of Early Modern Mathematics

ADHO: Apply to Become AHDO’s Next Communications Fellow

Conecta: History of science/history of medicine Ph. D. opportunities at University of Glasgow: deadline 03/04/15

University of Warwick: Assistant Professor in the History of Medicine

Mendeley Blog: Lets talk about science – Scopus Young Researchers’ Award for science communications

Burns Library, Boston College: Head of Public Services and Instructional Outreach

The dual carriageway to Damascus: Assistant for the public engagement project Nappy Science Gang

Queens University: Term Adjunct appointment to teach history of medicine

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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