Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #04

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #04

Monday 03 August 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days another edition of your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bring you the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine garnered from the last seven days throughout the Internet.

There is a tradition to date the beginning of the scientific revolution to 1543 because two classic books were published in that year Copernicus’ De revolutionibus and Vesalius’ De fabrica. The latter was instrumental in bringing the study of anatomy to the fore in medicine in the Renaissance.

The historian of astronomy spent many years conducting a census of the surviving copies of the first two editions of De revolutionibus providing an important research tool for his fellow historians.

 Daniel Magoesy and Mark Somos are conducting a worldwide survey of all extant copies of Vesalius’ Fabrica If your library has a copy please help the gentlemen in their endeavour.

University of Glasgow Library: Vesalius’ 1543 Fabrica: who owned it and how was it used?

On View: Center for the History of Medicine: Andreas Vesalius

“In 1543 Vesalius suggested that when preparing a anatomically skeleton one might as well keep the ear bone for a necklace…” h/t Mathe Bjerragaard (@museumgoggles)

Quotes of the week:

“Being a historian can sometimes be like painting a portrait of someone based solely on the contents of their handbag. We only know so much”. – Greg Jenner (@greg_jenner)

“A home without books is a body without soul”. – Cicero

“Learning without thought is labor lost; thought without learning is perilous”. –Confucius

“pico-newtons per square micron — that’s a nice fancy term for a pascal ….” – @Eaterofsun

“Today’s diploma is tomorrow’s wallpaper. But today’s learning is tomorrow’s wisdom.” – John Piper h/t @JohnDCook

“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices”. – William James

“I admit that mathematical science is a good thing. But excessive devotion to it is a bad thing.” – Aldous Huxley

“I love the philosophy of science”. – Alfredo Ovalle (@Fredthegrand)

“A hangover is the wrath of grapes.” ― Dorothy Parker

“One can even set up quite ridiculous cases. A cat is penned up in a steel chamber, along with the following device (which must be secured against direct interference by the cat): in a Geiger counter there is a tiny bit of radioactive substance, so small, that perhaps in the course of the hour one of the atoms decays, but also, with equal probability, perhaps none; if it happens, the counter tube discharges and through a relay releases a hammer which shatters a small flask of hydrocyanic acid. If one has left this entire system to itself for an hour, one would say that the cat still lives if meanwhile no atom has decayed. The psi-function of the entire system would express this by having in it the living and dead cat (pardon the expression) mixed or smeared out in equal parts”. – Erwin Schrödinger h/t Paul Halpern (@phalpern)

 Birthdays of the Week:

Jeremiah Dixon born 27 July 1733

 

Charles Mason (right) and Jeremiah Dixon (left, with sextant)

Charles Mason (right) and Jeremiah Dixon (left, with sextant)

On Display Blog: Playing with Museum Representations of 18th Century American Encounters

 Jeremiah Dixon (17733–1779) – A Biographical Note

Library of Congress: A plan of the west line or parallel of latitude, which is the boundary between the provinces of Maryland and Pensylvania : a plan of the boundary lines between the province of Maryland and the Three Lower Counties on Delaware with part of the parallel of latitude which is the boundary between the provinces of Maryland and Pennsylvania

The National Archives Catalog: Journal of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon

Beatrix Potter born 28 July 1866

20120904-104043

Brain Pickings: Beatrix Potter, Mycologist: The Beloved Children’s Book Author’s Little-Known Scientific Studies and Illustrations of Mushrooms

The Birch Wathen Lenox STEM Initiative

Maria Mitchell born 1 August 1818

Maria Mitchell, painting by H. Dasell, 1851 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Maria Mitchell, painting by H. Dasell, 1851
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Brain Pickings: Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science

Motherboard: How a Victorian Astronomer Fought the Gender Pay Gap, and Won

Patheos: Not in vain do we watch the setting and rising of stars

Vassar College Library: Maria Mitchell

Yovisto: Maria Mitchell and the Comets

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Grandma Got STEM: Sophie Brahe

Yovisto: The Astronomical Achievements of Sir George Biddell Airy

George Biddell Airy caricatured by Spy in Vanity Fair Nov 1875 Source: Wikimedia Commons

George Biddell Airy caricatured by Spy in Vanity Fair Nov 1875
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 28 July – Otto Hahn

ESA: Space Science: 28 July 1851: First photo of a solar eclipse

Physics: Focus: Invention of the Maser and Laser

Taylor & Francis Online: This Day in Physics

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bob Caron’s Tape to Joe Papalia

Nature: History: From blackboards to bombs

Time: Edwin Hubble: A Classic Portrait of a Genius at Work

Astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble looking though the eyepiece of the 100-inch telescope at the Mt. Wilson Observatory. MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE—THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

Astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble looking though the eyepiece of the 100-inch telescope at the Mt. Wilson Observatory.
MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE—THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

io9: Michael Faraday Was the World’s Most Badass Insurance Investigator

The Renaissance Mathematicus: σῴζειν τὰ φαινόμενα, sozein ta phainomena

AIP: I. I. Rabi – Session I

Corpus Newtonicum: To the unknown scribe – Isaac Newton’s assistants

Jardine’s book of martyrs: The Supernova of 1667: Cassiopeia A was observed in Scotland

Taylor & Francis Online: ‘Land-marks of the universe’: John Herschel against the background of positional astronomy. (oa) (pdf)

Dannen.com: Bomb Production Schedule, July 30 1945

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 31 July – Lunar Prospector crashes into the Moon

AIP: A profile in American Innovation

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lew Kowarski’s Interview – Part 2

Ideas Beta: What options were there for the United States regarding the atomic bomb in 1945?

Washington Post: Five myths about the atomic bomb

Dannen.com: Einstein to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Sorry Caroline but Maria got there first!

Caroline Herschel at age 92

Caroline Herschel at age 92

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Online Gallery: Galway Ireland 1611

British Library: Online Gallery: Chester 1585

British Library: Online Gallery: North East Corner of Kent 1585

The Hakluyt Society Blog: Essay Prize Series Part 1: Printing the Pacific

Halley’s Blog: Halley writes from Spithead

New York Public Library: Sea Blazers and Early Scriveners: The First Guidebooks to New York City

Sfera. Dati, Gregorio (1362-1436)

Sfera. Dati, Gregorio (1362-1436)

The Map House: Map of the Month

City Lab: A New Yorker’s Delightfully Stereotypical Map of America

cbcnews: Franklin expedition to Arctic included cannibalism, researches say

Medievalist.net: The World in 1467

Yovisto: Jean-François de La Pérouse and his Voyage around the World

NASA: Beyond Earth: This Month in Exploration – August

Medievalist.net: Ten Beautiful Medieval Maps

The Mappa Mundi of Saint Beatus of Liébana (c.730 – c.800)

The Mappa Mundi of Saint Beatus of Liébana (c.730 – c.800)

La Catoteca: Las más antiguas representaciones cartográficas de las corrientes marinas

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Nursing Clio: A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news

Isulin Nation: Dr Banting: Called a Failure, Discovers Insulin

Banting and Dog 1923 Banting House National Historic Site of Canada I often stare at an old photograph of Dr. Frederick Banting, the discoverer of insulin, to get ideas. I am inspired by his sheer tenacity. Against all odds, he succeeded in bringing insulin treatment into the world. I am completely in awe of how he had an idea and gave up everything right down to his old Ford to continue his research. He may have been trained as a surgeon with a special interest in orthopedics, but he forever changed the way diabetes is treated. After Dr. Banting finished his residency at the Sick Children’s Hospital in Toronto and the hospital failed to give him an appointment on staff, he set up practice in London, Ontario. Unfortunately, during his first month of practice, he only saw one patient. He needed a paying job, so he took a position as an assistant professor of physiology at the University of Western Ontario.

Banting and Dog 1923
Banting House National Historic Site of Canada
I often stare at an old photograph of Dr. Frederick Banting, the discoverer of insulin, to get ideas. I am inspired by his sheer tenacity. Against all odds, he succeeded in bringing insulin treatment into the world. I am completely in awe of how he had an idea and gave up everything right down to his old Ford to continue his research. He may have been trained as a surgeon with a special interest in orthopedics, but he forever changed the way diabetes is treated.
After Dr. Banting finished his residency at the Sick Children’s Hospital in Toronto and the hospital failed to give him an appointment on staff, he set up practice in London, Ontario. Unfortunately, during his first month of practice, he only saw one patient. He needed a paying job, so he took a position as an assistant professor of physiology at the University of Western Ontario.

Yale Books Unbound: Illness from the Patient’s Perspective

New Statesman: “Hunger, filth, fear and death”: remembering life before the NHS

The H-Word: Aliens, immigrants, religion, and the health service in Britain

A ward in the Manchester Jewish Hospital, early twentieth century. Photograph taken from the collection of the Manchester Jewish Museum, based in a former Spanish and Portuguese synagogue, the oldest in the city. Photograph: Christopher Thomond/Manchester Jewish Museum/ Christopher Thomond

A ward in the Manchester Jewish Hospital, early twentieth century. Photograph taken from the collection of the Manchester Jewish Museum, based in a former Spanish and Portuguese synagogue, the oldest in the city. Photograph: Christopher Thomond/Manchester Jewish Museum/ Christopher Thomond

New Scientist: Plague may not be solely to blame for Black Death’s mortality

EurekAlert!: Barrow scientists ‘rewrite’ history books

Public Domain Review: Reenactment of First Operation under Ether (ca. 1850)

Advances in the History of Psychology: Networking the Early Years of the American Journal of Psychology

The Recipes Project: Swimming in Broth: Medicated Baths in Eighteenth-Century Europe

The Lancet: An once of prevention

History Today: Heroin A Hundred-Year Habit

New York Times: Howard W. Jones Jr., a Pioneer of Reproductive Medicine, Dies at 104

History of Modern Biomedicine: The Development of Narrative Practices in Medicine c.1960–c.2000 (pdf)

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Olearius on Glass

Conciatore: Turquoise Glass

Conciatore: Art of Fire

houzz: The Sketches of Earl S. Tupper’s Pre-Tupperware Inventions

More Intelligent Life: The Proto-Internet

INTELLIGENT LIFE MAGAZINE JULY / AUG 2015 Early internet map - The Eastern Telegraphic System and its General Connections.

INTELLIGENT LIFE MAGAZINE JULY / AUG 2015
Early internet map – The Eastern Telegraphic System and its General Connections.

Ptak Science Books: Tubular, Streamlined Boat Construction, 1935/6

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 29 July – NASA

flickr: Cycling found by the community fr…

History of Technology: SHOT Newsletter

My medieval foundry: Latten maille and the uses of brass in war

NASA History: The NACA’s First Victory

NASA Law

NASA Law

boingboing: “The Computer Girls,” 1967 Cosmopolitan magazine article on women working with technology

Smithsonian.com: A Brief History of Pierre L’Enfant and Washington, D.C.

Modern Mechanix: “Boat Tunnel” for Habor Crossing (Aug, 1932)

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Thurrock Gazette: Down Memory Lane ­ Free lecture on town’s top scientist Wallace

Remedia: Meat

Ri Science: Finger Prints

Nature: Archaeology: The milk revolution

International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature: Who is the type of Homo sapiens?

New Scientist: Megafauna extinction: DNA evidence pins blame on climate change

NYAM: Robert Hooke’s Micrographia (Item of the Month)

The title page of Hooke’s Micrographia.

The title page of Hooke’s Micrographia.

Forbes: Ancient Stories Provided An Early Warning About Potential Seattle Earthquakes

The Sloane Letters Blog: Eighteenth-Century English Gardens and the Exchange with Europe

H-Environment: Wells. ‘Car Country’, Roundtable Review, Vol. 5, No. 5 (pdf)

Science Friday: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word Clone

Vox: A Renaissance painting reveals how breeding changed watermelons

Christie Images LTD 2015/Shutterstock The watermelon, then and now.

Christie Images LTD 2015/Shutterstock
The watermelon, then and now.

The Siberian Times: First glimpse inside the Siberian cave that holds the key to man’s origins

NCSE: Listening to the Grand Canyon’s Story

Notches: Queers, Homosexuals, and Activists in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain

Notches: Archives of Desire: A Lavender Reading of J. Edgar Hoover

BHL: Notes & News from the BHL Staff: The Conchologists: Searching for Seashells in 19th Century America

Say, Thomas. American Conchology. pl. 29. (1830-38). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/7959406.

Say, Thomas. American Conchology. pl. 29. (1830-38). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/7959406.

Georgian Gent: Edward Jenner, completely cuckoo! And news of a new book

The Dispersal of Darwin: Recent Darwin/evolution articles from the Journal of the history of Biology

NCSE: Fact, Theory, and Path Again, Part 1

Embryo Project: Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

Natural History Apostilles: Further comments on spinach and iron: part 1

Natural History Apostilles: Further comments on spinach and iron: part 2

Forbes: Leonardo a Vinci’s Geological Observations Revolutionized Renaissance Art

Londonist: Who is Old Father Thames?

Dirty Father Thames comes from a poem in Punch magazine, in 1848.

Dirty Father Thames comes from a poem in Punch magazine, in 1848.

Nautilus: Once Upon a Gemstone

Yovisto: Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and the Evolution

Atlas Obscura: Francisco Hernandez: The Coolest Explorer You’ve Never Heard Of

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 27 July – John Dalton

Dalton in later life by Thomas Phillips, National Portrait Gallery, London (1835). Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dalton in later life by Thomas Phillips, National Portrait Gallery, London (1835).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Stephanie Kwolek and the Bullet-proof vest

Stephanie Kwolek,

Stephanie Kwolek, “I don’t think there’s anything like saving someone’s life to bring you satisfaction and happiness”, “Women in Chemistry”, Chemical Heritage Foundation
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Primo Levi and The Periodic Table

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

JHI Blog: Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading in the Archive (I)

ICRC: Now open: ICRC archives from 1966–1975

IEEE Spectrum: When Innovation Fails

Roger Smith: The Fontana/Norton History of the Human Sciences: Full, corrected text now freely available on line

UBC: Online Companion to Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735: An Anthology of Literary Texts and Contexts

The Cullen Project: The Medical Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen

Mausoleum, bearing a profile in relief, erected in the mid-nineteenth century over Cullen's grave in the burial-ground at Kirknewton, Midlothian by the Royal College and the physician's descendants.

Mausoleum, bearing a profile in relief, erected in the mid-nineteenth century over Cullen’s grave in the burial-ground at Kirknewton, Midlothian by the Royal College and the physician’s descendants.

The #EnvHist Weekly

Physics World.com: Curing the Curie Complex

AHF: July Newsletter

The Atlantic: Why Aren’t There More Women Futurists?

Collecting and Connecting: I prefer not to talk about it

Wynken de Worde: how to destroy special collections with social media

The Conversation: How to value research that crosses more than one discipline

SciLogs: How Do You Define Science Communications

Mail Online: Anger after Science Museum which has been free since 2001 announces it is to start charging families to use Lauchpad gallery

Slate: When Science Doesn’t Have a Simple Answer

Mint on Sunday: Separating Fact from Ancient Indian Science Fiction

Victorian Web: John Tyndall: Address Delivered Before the British Association Assembled at Belfast With Additions, 1874

John Tyndall circa 1850 Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Tyndall circa 1850
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Advances in the History of Psychology: Historiography in the Social History of Medicine: Records at the NIH and the UK Web Archive

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: Some notes on “Misticall words and Names Infinite” by Humphrey Locke

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Technology and Society: Raf de Bont Stations in the Field: A History of Place-Based Animal Research, 1870–1930

WSJ: Preaching to the Converted (Google title and click on first link to beat paywall)

Inside Higher Ed: On the Verge of De-Extinction

Washington Post: The vast and complicated universe inside a seashell

Spirals in Time

The Guardian: A Beautiful Question: Finding Nature’s Deep Design by Frank Wilczek

The Wall Street Journal: Petal to the Metal (Google title and click on first link to beat paywall)

THE: The Matter Factory: A History of the Chemistry Laboratory, by Peter J. T. Morris

Science, Technology, and Society: Making Marie Curie: Intellectual Property and Celebrity Culture in an Age of Information

Los Angeles Review of Books: Two-Way Monologue: How to Get Past Science vs. Religion

The American Scholar: It Takes a Laboratory

Kiwiwalks in Speculative Fiction: “The Voice of the Dolphins” by Leo Szilard

NEW BOOKS:

NPL: The Birth of Atomic Time – Essen’s memoirs published

essen-book-cover

 ART & EXHIBITIONS

UCL: Queen of the Sciences: A Celebration of Numbers and the London Mathematical Society February–December 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Prize for Illustration 2015 – Eleanor Taylor

The Finch & Pea: The Art of Science: Radical Elements

The Guardian: Bridges 2015: a meeting of maths and art – in pictures

NHM: Amazonian artwork by pioneers of evolutionary theory now online

London art trail: What’s In Your DNA?

RCS: Surgeons at Work: The Art of the Operation 31 March–19 September

MOSI: Meet Baby Runs every Tuesday and Wednesday

art at the heart of the RUH: Fusion – Where Two Minds Collide 17 July –2 October

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Bedlam Theatre: ADA  August 5-6, 8-11, 13-18, 20-25, 27-30

Platform Theatre: Jekyll and Hyde Last Chance 8 August 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks: Fermat’s Room

Advances in the History of Psychology: ‘37’ – A Forthcoming Film on the Kitty Genovese Case

Eccles Centre (British Library) Summer Scholars Series 2015: Over the Ice: When Polar Explorers Took to the Skies & Sea Birds, Lost Bodies, and Phantom Islands on the Event Horizon of the New World 7 August 2015

New York Public Library: Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing, with Laura J. Snyder, Fulbright scholar, professor at St. John’s University, and also the author of “The Philosophical Breakfast Club” and “Reforming Philosophy” 4 August 2015

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscopy

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Harley-Street-Dreamstime-Banner

Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy Evenings

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK:

150746-004-3F4BD323

Albrecht Dürer Rhinocerus

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

The History of Modern Biomedicine: Josephine Arendt

Guardian: Life’s big surprises: two videos and a question

Youtube: Harry Potter and the History of Alchemy

Gizmodo: How It Felt to Work at Bell Labs in the 60s

Youtube: Triple Helix DNA

OU: Youtube: What can we earn from Ancient Greek medicine?

CHF: Youtube: Women in Chemistry: Stephanie Kwolek

Medievalist.net: Hildegard’s Cosmos and Its Music: Making a Digital Model for the Modern Planetarium

RADIO:

BBC World Service: Salt and its Diverse History – Part OnePart Two

BBC World Service: The Colour Purple

BBC Radio 4: The Life Scientific: E O Wilson

Youtube: Erwin Schrödinger – “Do Electrons Think?” (BBC 1949)

PODCASTS:

Historical Climatology: A Conversation with Dr. Geoffry Parker

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Engaging With Communication: Celebrating 30 years of mobile phone in the UK University of Salford 12 September 2015

Portal to the Heritage of Astronomy: Hawaiian, Oceanic and Global Cultural Astronomy: Tangible and Intangible Heritage Hilo Hawai’i 16–20 August 2015

University of Bucharest: Master-Class: Isaac Newton’s Philosophical Projects 6–11 October 2015

Open University: Open Learn: The body in antiquity

SSHM: CfP: Workshop: Framing The Face Friend’s Meeting House Euston London 28 November 2015

h-madness: CfP: Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities Belfast: Gruelling Ordeals: The Irish Workhouse Diet, 1850–1950 12 October 2015

AAHM: CfP: Annual Meeting Minneapolis 28 April–1 May 2016

Economic History Society: CfP: Urban History Group 2016: Re-Evaluating the Place of the City in History Robinson College Cambridge 31 March–1 April 2016

Science Museum London: Who Cares? Interventions in ‘unloved’ museum Collections: The Conference 6 November 2015

Mosaic the science of life: Call for pitches: Digg and Mosaic want you!

The Warburg Institute: Ptolemy’s Science of the Stars in the Middle Ages 5–7 November 2015

Economic History Society: CfP: Annual Conference Robinson College Cambridge 1–3 April 2016

h-madness: CfP: The Victorian Brain Victorian Network Deadline: 15 August 2015

Food as Medicine: Historical perspective Programme

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Warwick: Teaching Fellow in the History of Medicine

University of Warwick: Teaching Fellow in the History of Science and Medicine

University of Greenwich: MPhil/PhD Scholarship – Professions and the Press 1690–1920

Scientific Instrument Society: Research grants

University of Leicester: AHRC funded PhD Studentship: The Changing Cultures of Government Science Since 1979: Exploring Privatisation and Commercialisation through Life Histories

University of York: Chair in Sociology/Science and Technology Studies

Christ’s College Cambridge: Junior Research Fellow

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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