Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #05

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #05

Monday 10 August 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days of all that the Internet has to offer in #histSTM gathered together for your delectation in the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly links list for the histories of science, technology and medicine.

Three weeks ago in our editorial we described the Trinity Test on 16 July 1945, as the greatest ever fall from grace of science and technology. Three weeks after this test science, technology, politics and ethics were hurled into a vortex of conflict in the mushroom cloud that rose over Hiroshima as the first atomic bomb used in war exploded above that Japanese city on 6 August 1945, killing at least 140 000 people. Three days later this crime against humanity was compounded, as the second, and till now last, atomic bomb used in warfare exploded above Nagasaki killing another 70 000.

There are very few moments in history that ‘changed the world for ever’ as the purveyors of hyperbole are all to fond of parroting but the moment when that first atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima is truly one such.

Now seventy years later the Internet has spat out many words documenting this inhuman tragedy. We have collected many of them together for this edition of Whewell’s Gazette that is humbly dedicated to the victims and survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The watch of Kengo Nikawa which stopped forever at 8.15 on the day the nuclear bomb fell on Hiroshima.

The watch of Kengo Nikawa which stopped forever at 8.15 on the day the nuclear bomb fell on Hiroshima.

“It was like something out of hell, and I didn’t feel like taking many pictures.” — Yoshito Matsushige

 “’Little Boy’ kills 140000 on August 6 in Hiroshima, ‘Fat Man’ kills 70000 on August 9 in Nagasaki at first moment”.

 “The use of the atomic bomb on Japan will come to be seen as one of the greatest blunders in all of history.” – Leo Szilard

 The bomb was dropped at 11:02 a.m., 1,650 feet above the city [Nagasaki]. The explosion unleashed the equivalent force of 22,000 tons of TNT. h/t @ferwen

Dannen.com: International Law on the Bombing of Civilians

Dannen.com: Groves-Oppenheimer Transcript, August 6, 1945

Dannen.com: A Petition to the President of the United States

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge Petition, July 13, 1945

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge Petition, mid-July, 1945

Dannen.com: The Franck Report, June 11, 1945

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Were there alternatives to the atomic bombings?

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The Kyoto misconception

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Were there alternatives to the atomic bombings?

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The Hiroshima Phone Call (1945)

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: A Day Too Late

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Atomic Editorial Cartoons (August 1945)

The New Yorker: Nagasaki: The Last Bomb

Tech Times: Interview: Alex Wellerstein and David Saltzberg Discuss Getting History and Science Right on ‘Manhattan’

IDEAS: What options were there for the United States regarding the atomic bomb in 1945?

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ray Gallagher and Fred Olivi’s Interview – Part 1

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lawrence Litz’s Interview (2012)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: The Hiroshima Mission

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Jacob Besser’s Lecture

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ray Gallagher’s Accounts of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Missions

AHF: William “Deak” Parsons

AHF: Using the Atomic Bomb – 1945

Scientific American: Cross Check: Bethe, Teller, Trinity and the End of the Earth

Scientific American: Cross Check: Historian Contemplates “Ugly” Reality of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

AP Was There: US drops atomic bombs on Japan in 1945

The National Security Archive: The Nuclear Vault: The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II

L.A. Times: New evidence of Japan’s effort to build atom bomb at the end of WWII

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Seven decades after Hiroshima, is there still a nuclear taboo?

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: The harrowing story of the Nagasaki bombing mission

The Boston Globe: The deterrent that wasn’t

Smithsonian.com: How Physics Drove the Design of the Atomic Bombs Dropped on Japan

Chicago Tribune: Was using an atomic bomb necessary to end WWII?

BBC: Hiroshima marks 70 years since atomic bomb

British Library: Sound and vision blog: Memories of Hiroshima and After

New York Times: Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors Pass Their Stories to a New Generation

The Curious Wavefunction: The enduring legacy of Leo Szilard, father of the atomic age

Priceonomics: Leó Szilárd: A Forgotten Father of the Atomic Bomb

Ars Technica: The bomb and a new scientific and technical landscape

Scientific American: Survivor of the Hiroshima Nuclear Bomb Recalls the Bombing and Its Aftermath

Scientific American: Survivor of the Nagasaki Atom Bomb Describes His Experience

Members.peak.org: Leo Szilard, Interview: President Truman Did Not Understand

Jappan Times: How the Japan Times reported the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Bulletin of Atomic Scientists: Nuclear Notebook: Nuclear Arsenals of the World

The Bigger Picture: Science Service, Up Close: Covering the Atom, August 1945

History Today: Truman and the Bomb

Newclear Thinking: Remembering Hiroshima: Death, Tourism, and Social Media

Discover: On the70th Anniversary of Hiroshima Bombing Photos Document the Devastation. Plus: Personal Reflections

Circulating Now: The First Calamity of the Nuclear Age

Oregon Live: Hiroshima at 70: The Oregonian’s front page coverage of 1945 atomic bomb was chilling, apocalyptic (photos)

The Conversation: The little-known history of secrecy and censorship in wake of atomic bombings

Smithsonian Institution Archive: The Manhattan Project Videohistory Collection

The New York Times: Nagasaki, the Forgotten City

The Guardian: Nuclear fallout: the mental health consequences of radiation

Roger Williams University Docs: The United States Strategic Bombing Survey: The Effects of Atomic Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, June 30, 1946

Pressing Issues: When Truman Failed to Pause in 1945 – and the War Crime That Followed

The Irish Times: The Irish eyewitness to the atomic bomb at Nagasaki

Quotes of the week:

Can we please get over the idea that “many technologies” “progress” exponentially? – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

“It is a rare occurrence that a census taker has ever heard of a physicist…one is often tempted to register as a chemist” – A. W. Hull, 1944

“The æther will come back. This old and faithful comrade of the human mind in its imaginative flights cannot be dead forever” – K. Darrow 1944

‘Books are deadlier than drugs. It is a pity that we do not burn our libraries once a century.’ – (Sunday Express, 1922) h/t @harbottlestores

“The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers he is one who asks the right questions”

“The sources of history are threefold: written, spoken, & neither written nor spoken. The last falls to the archaeologist.” – C.R. Fish 1910 h/t @ProfDanHicks

“Journalists: Ban “scientists say” from your lexicon. You wanna know why? Scientists say.” – Josh Rosenau (@JoshRosenau)

“Reading an underlined library book is like being interrupted during a great conversation by a yappy dog. You, underliner, are the yappy dog.

“There is something reassuring in the fact that those who deface library books by underlining them rarely make it out of chapter one”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“I wonder if I’ll live long enough to witness people understanding that science and engineering are not the same thing”. – Bev Gibbs (@bevgibbs)

“Remember, there is a happy space between impostor syndrome and unrepentant bullshitting. Find it & live there…” – David Andress (@ProfDaveAndress)

“Why does philosophy matter?”

“I don’t know, why does science matter?”

“Well because scie…”

“Annnnnnnd you are doing philosophy”

“The learning and knowledge that we have, is, at the most, but little compared with that of which we are ignorant”. – Plato

“As an ‘extremely young earth’ creationist, I’m not sure I believe that the eighties actually existed”. – @gravbeast

“The father of Zoology was Aristotle … but the name of its mother has not come down to us” – Ambrose Bierce

“There is nothing more necessary to the man [sic] of science than its history” – Lord Acton, quoted by Popper and now by David Wootton

“And what should the scientist & citizen learn from the hist of sci?” Wootton adds in The Invention of Science. “That nothing endures.” h/t Philip Ball (@philipcball)

“Technology is neither good nor bad, nor is it neutral.” – Melvin Kranzberg

“What astrologers say about the influence of the constellations should really be attributed to the Sun”. – Athanasius Kircher

“The most damaging phrase in the language is: “we have always done it this way”.” – Grace Hopper

Birthdays of the Week:

P.A.M. Dirac born 8 August 1902

Paul Dirac with his wife in Copenhagen, July 1963 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Paul Dirac with his wife in Copenhagen, July 1963
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Graham Farmelo: The Strangest Man

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 8 – Paul Dirac

AIP: P. A. M. Dirac – Session I

Yovisto: Paul Dirac and the Quantum Mechanics

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

NPR: Cosmos & Culture: Pinning Down One Scientist’s Legacy

Vintage Ads: Atomic Ads, a Sunday Sampler

1772857_original

AIP: Marlan Scully

Tand Online: John Tyndall and the Early History of Diamagnetism (oa) (pdf)

Irish Philosophy: What has Hamilton to do with philosophy?

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Crucial Instances in the Principia

Starts With a Bang: Einstein, Edison and an Aptitude for Genius

Yovisto: Victor Franz Hess and the Cosmic Radiation

Collections Online: Letter from Benjamin Franklin to [John Franklin] (copy), 25 December 1750

AIP: Roger Penrose

Yovisto: Sir Roger Penrose and the Singularity

ESA: GAIA: A History of Astrometry – Part I Mapping the Sky From Ancient to Pre-Modern Times

Stone tablet of Shamash, the Sun-god, from the ancient Babylonian city of Sippar. Credit: © Trustees of the British Museum.

Stone tablet of Shamash, the Sun-god, from the ancient Babylonian city of Sippar. Credit: © Trustees of the British Museum.

ESA: GAIA: A History of Astrometry – Part II Telescope Ignites the Race to Measure Stellar Distances

Yovisto: Ernest Lawrence and the Cyclotron

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Collection items: Anglo-Saxon world map

History Extra: The Northwest Passage search: behind the scenes of the expedition that found Franklin’s HMS Erebus

Atlas Obscura: 7 Gorgeous Sea Maps From the Age of Exploration

Frederik De Wit's 1654 Dutch Sea Atlas. Image courtesy of the Harvard Map Collection

Frederik De Wit’s 1654 Dutch Sea Atlas. Image courtesy of the Harvard Map Collection

Yale News: Hidden secrets of Yale’s 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

British Library online Gallery: Depiction of the Isle of Wight 1600

Medievalist.net: Medieval Maps of Britain

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

William Savage: Pen and Pension: Daily Medicine: Georgian-style

NPR: How a Scientist’s Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies’ Lives

Nurcing Clio: A Pot of Herbs, A Plastic Sheet, and Thou: A Historian Goes for a “V-Stream,”

Forbes: Why Did My Grandmother Try LSD for Multiple Sclerosis in the 1960s?

Derelict Places: Selly Oak Hospital

Vesalius Fabrica: A Guide to the Historiated Capitals of the 1543 Fabrica

R Cap A continuation of the theme of Q. Three medical putti dissecting a thorax.

R Cap A continuation of the theme of Q. Three medical putti dissecting a thorax.

Yovisto: Johann Friedrich Struensee – A Royal Affair

Yovisto: Joseph Carey Merrick – the Elefant Man

Ask the Past: How To Use Chocolate, 1672

The Recipes Project: Swimming in Broth: Medicated Baths in Eighteenth-Century Europe

CHSTM: News and Notes: Treating the Black Body: Race and Medicine in American Culture, 1800–1861

Advances in the History of Psychology: BBC Mind Changers: New Episodes on Carol Dweck and B.F. Skinner

Advances in the History of Psychology: BBC Mind Changers: Carl Rogers and the Person-Centred Approach

New York Times:Louis Sokoloff, Pioneer of PET Scan, Dies at 93

Conciatore: Filippo Sassetti

NYAM: Adventures in Rare Book Cataloging

Anthony Rhys: Victorian Photographs of Disability

MetaFilter: RIP Frances O. Kelsey, Ph.D., M.D.

BBC: Anti-thalidomide hero Frances Oldham Kelsey dies at 101

Dr Kelsey received a presidential award from John F Kennedy in 1962

Dr Kelsey received a presidential award from John F Kennedy in 1962

NPR: Frances Kelsey, FDA Officer Who Blocked Thalidomide, Dies at 101

The Cut: What the 17th Century Can Teach Us About Vaginas

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

TECHNOLOGY:

Slide Rule Museum: Circular Slide Rules and selected Disc Charts

Mashable: 1890–1968 Flying Cars

Atlas Obscura: The History of Vending Machines Goes Back to the 1st Century

Iowa State University Library Special Collections Department Bog: Engineering the Home: Domestic Comfort via Science

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 4 August – Phoenix Mars Lander

NYC Department of Records: Hindenburg (Airship)

Yovisto: On the Road with Bertha Benz

Bertha Benz and the ‘Patent Motorwagen’

Bertha Benz and the ‘Patent Motorwagen’

Yovisto: Road Trippin’ with Alice Ramsey

Alice Ramsey (1886 – 1983) Image: Library of Congress

Alice Ramsey
(1886 – 1983)
Image: Library of Congress

Independent: The London: After 350 years, the riddle of Britain’s exploding fleet is finally solved

Conciatore: Decolorization of Glass

Neatorama: The Wonderful World of Early Computers

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Made in Nürnberg

Schöner Celestial Globe 1535 Source: Science Museum London

Schöner Celestial Globe 1535
Source: Science Museum London

Wired: Birth of the Microphone How Sound Became Signal

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 6 August – Electric Chair

History Today: The First Execution by Electric Chair

DSFP’s Spaceflight History Blog: Failure Was an Option: What If an Apollo Saturn Rocket Exploded on the Launch Pad?

KCET: When Oil Derricks Ruled the L.A. Landscape

ESA: History Of Europe in Space: ESA’s ‘First’ Satellite: COS-B

Atlas Obscura: The Almost Perfect World War II Plot to Bomb Japan With Bats

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

jardine’s book of martyrs: The Scottish Hurricane of 1675

Dr Jennifer Evans: A Little find in the archive

The Sloane Letters Blog: Shell Games: Martin Lister and the Conchological Collections of Sir Hans Sloane

Melo aetheopica, Sloane 2374, Natural History Collection next to its portrayal by Susanna Lister in the Historiae, Table 801. Note she altered the perspective so it is possible to see the distinguishing characteristic of the umbilicus. Photo by Anna Marie Roos, © The Natural History Museum, London.

Melo aetheopica, Sloane 2374, Natural History Collection next to its portrayal by Susanna Lister in the Historiae, Table 801. Note she altered the perspective so it is possible to see the distinguishing characteristic of the umbilicus. Photo by Anna Marie Roos, © The Natural History Museum, London.

Bucknell University: Archive to Arctic

BBC Earth: How do we know that evolution is really happening?

Natural History Apostilles: On spinach & iron: König 1926

Natural History Apostilles: On spinach & iron: Richardson 1848 & Wolff 1871

NCSE: Fact, Theory, and Path Again, Part 2

Forbes: This 1831 Geological Journey Was Decisive For Darwin’s Scientific Career

Letters from Gondwana: The Legacy of the Feud Between Florentino Ameghino and P. Moreno

RCS: Hamsters in the Library

preview

The Sloane Letters Blog: Public and Private Gardens in the Eighteenth Century

Public Domain Review: Shells and other Marine Life from Albertus Seba’s Cabinet of Natural Curiosities (1734)

The Guardian: Sir Jack Goody obituary

National Geographic: Phenomena: Curiously Krulwich

Making Science Public: Carbon Pollution

Heritage Daily: Bones of the Victims at Roman Herculaneum

AGU Blogosphere: 16th century Italian earthquake changed river’s course

Partial reproduction of a 16th century painting showing the position of the Po River (corso principale del Po) and Ferrara (yellow arrow) before the river changed course. Credit: Egnazio Danti

Partial reproduction of a 16th century painting showing the position of the Po River (corso principale del Po) and Ferrara (yellow arrow) before the river changed course.
Credit: Egnazio Danti

Smithsonian Libraries: Underworlds: Fossils and Geology: What lies beneath?

The New York Times: The Great Victorian Weather Wars

Nautilus: The Dueling Weathermen of the 1800s

BBC: Tyndal’s climate message, 150 years on

Embryo Project: William Bateson (1861–1926)

Embryo Project: Ernst Haeckel’s Biogenetic Law (1866)

CHEMISTRY:

Science Note: Today in Science History – 3 August – Richard Willstäter

Richard Willstätter (1872-1942) 1915 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Richard Willstätter (1872-1942) 1915 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Oesper Collections: The Oesper Collections in the History of Chemistry

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 9 – Amedeo Avogadro

Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856) Italian chemist known for his gas law and the constant that bears his name.

Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856) Italian chemist known for his gas law and the constant that bears his name.

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The Guardian: Terrawatch: The lost art of specimen illustration

Steven Gray’s Blog: On Pigeonholing

Double Refraction: Are scientists who do history like tourists? Thoughts on Steven Weinberg’s analogy

the many-headed monster: What is History? Or: Doing history/thinking historically

Chemical and Engineering News: Science Historians Revive Ancient Recipes

LIFE CASTING In the 16th century, encasing living objects—such as flowers in metal was a popular endeavor. Credit: Making & Knowing Project

LIFE CASTING
In the 16th century, encasing living objects—such as flowers in metal was a popular endeavor.
Credit: Making & Knowing Project

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford

Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources

JHI Blog: Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading in the Archive (II)

Lady Science: Archive

MIT Technology Review: Tech’s Enduring Great-Man Myth

The Royal Society: Notes and Records: 350 Years of scientific periodicals Table of Contents

Ether Wave Propaganda: Joseph Agassi’s Philosophy and Influence Resist Simple Answers

The Scientist: Foundations: Science History

George Boole 200*: About George Boole

Frontiers in Psychology: Fifty psychological and psychiatric terms to avoid: a list of inaccurate, misleading, misused, ambiguous, and logically confused words and phrases

Ptak Science Books: Books are Weapons in the War of Ideas

The #EnvHist Weekly

Wellcome Collection: A cat among the collection

Excavating Jacquetta Hawkes

BHL: The Arcadia Fund Awards Grant to Support The Field Book Project

academia.edu: Legislating Truth: Maimonides, the Almohads and the 13th Century Jewish Enlightenment

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Reports from Parnassus

Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511) Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail).

Rafael – El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)
Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail).

History of Alchemy: Episode 70: Distillation

Atlas Obscura: Edison’s Last Breath at the Henry Ford Museum

BOOK REVIEWS:

Cell Press: The untenability of faithism

H–Environmental Roundtable Reviews: Kendra Smith-Howard Pure and Modern Milk: An Environmental History since 1900

H-Net: Kenneth Garden The First Islamic Reviver: Abu Hamid al-Ghazali and His Revival of the Religious Sciences

The Lancet: How chemists came to matter

Nature: Books & Arts Special

Reviews in History: Notebooks, English Virtuosi, and Early Modern Science

Chris Aldrich: Musings of a Modern Day Cyberneticist: Breaking the Code – The Economist

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Annotated Malay Archipelago

9789971698201_1024x1024

Science Book a Day: The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves

NEW BOOKS:

OUP: Mathematicians and Their Gods: Interactions between mathematics and religion

The Geological Society of America: Recollections of a Petrologist: Joseph Paxson Iddings

The Royal Society: Shortlist for 2015 Winton Prize for Science Books announced

Nature: A scintillating shortlist for the Royal Society prize

Springer: Leibniz’s Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms

HSS: Isis Books Received April–June 2015

Enfilade: William Hunter’s World

51obh-1q4tl-_sx351_bo1204203200_

Truman State University Press: Bridging Traditions: Alchemy, Chemistry, and Paracelsian Practices in the Early Modern Era

Routledge: Domestic Disturbances, Patriarchal Values

EM Spanish History Notes: Skaarup, Anatomy & Anatomists in EM Spain

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Journal of Art in Society: Science Becomes Art

Joseph Wright of Derby, An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768)

Joseph Wright of Derby, An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768)

Royal College of Physicians: Power and beauty: seals, charters and the story of identity 1 September–23 December 2015

New Walk Museum and Gallery Leicester: World of Wallace: Alfred Russel Wallace and his life in the field 22 August–25 October 2015

CHF: The Artist in the Laboratory:

The Hans India: Hyd gallery to be in National Museum map show 11 August–11 October

University of Glasgow Library: Skeletons and Injections: William Hunter’s Lectures on Anatomy and Aesthetics

The Irish Times: The limits of reason: Boolean links between art and science

Chicago Booth Museum: Exhibit Explores Ancient Money and Business

Science Museum: Cosmos and Culture 23 July 2009­–31 December 2015

Wellcome Collection: Medicine Man Permanent Exhibition

MOSI: Meet Baby Runs every Tuesday and Wednesday

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The Guardian: Not actually a scientist

“The Element In The Room” being performed at the Tangram Theatre. Photograph: Alex Brenner

“The Element In The Room” being performed at the Tangram Theatre. Photograph: Alex Brenner

Young Vic: A Number: Closes 15 August 2015

National Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Royal College of Physicians: Free drop in tours – monthly, every first Wednesday 1.30pm

Wellcome Library: John Quekett, Victorian Microscopist 11 August 2015

52649

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: Open and Expand Your Mind: A Museum Object Handling Drop-In Session 13 August 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Frontispiece of the Rudolphine Tables

Tabulae Rudolphinae: quibus astronomicae …

Tabulae Rudolphinae: quibus astronomicae …

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: Genius Of the Ancient World: Socrates 12 August 2015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: London’s Plagues

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

AEON Video: Kempelen’s chess–playing automaton

Youtube: Eddie Izzard Venn

Youtube: Susannah Gibson: “Animal, Vegetable, Mineral?” 

Climate Denial Crock of the Week: We are The Asteroid

RADIO:

G. C. Gosling: NHS History on Radio 4

PODCASTS:

History of Philosophy without gaps: Juhana Toivanen on Animals in Medieval Philosophy

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Nottingham: Conference: Science, Society and the State (1870–1935) 4 September 2015

University of Bucharest: CfP: Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science 6–7 November 2015

Wikimedia UK: Booking open for Wikipedia Science Conference 2–3 September 2015

University of Oxford: Medicine of Words: Literature, Medicine, and Theology in the Middle Ages 11–12 September 2015

Bodleian Libraries: Gough Map Symposium 2015: Mr Gough’s ‘curious map’ of Britain: old image, new techniques 2 November 2015

Madison: CfP: Workshop: Pharmacopoeias in the Early Modern World 1–2 April 2016

Victorian Persistence: Text, Image, Theory: CfP: Becoming Animal with the Victorians Université Paris Diderot 4–5 February 2016

V & A Museum: Conference: On the Matter of Books and Records: Forms, Substance, Forgeries, and Meanings Beyond the Lines 23 November 2015

Barcelona: CfP: 2016 Joint ESHHS/Cheiron Meeting

National Library of Medicine: Workshop: Images and Texts in Medical History 11-13 April 2016

THATCamp: The History of Science Society hosts its second annual THATCamp on November 19 2015

Pursey House Oxford: Library and Information History Group Conference 2015: Libraries and the Development of Professional Knowledge 19 September 2015

University of Leuven: Conference: What do we loose when we loose a library? 9-12 September 2015

Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal: Call for Papers Women and Science Issue

itp: Colloquium: Celebrating 30 years of the mobile phone in the UK University of Salford 12 September 2015

Contagions: CfP: Medieval Landscapes of Disease ICMS Kalamazoo MI 12–15 May 2016

Technology and Culture: Call for Abstracts: Special Issue Africanizing the History of Technology

LOOKING FOR WORK:

British Museum: Director of Scientific Research

Wellcome Trust: Wellcome Trust Centres

Environmental Humanities: Four new Associate Editors

Yale University: Professor History of Science

University of Warwick: Department of History, Centre for History of Medicine Research Fellow (2 posts)

University of Warwick: Department of History, Centre for History of Medicine Research Fellow (Public Engagement) (2 posts)

AIP: Research Assistant

CRASSH: Visiting Fellows at CRASSH Early Modern Conversations: Religions, Cultures, Cognitive Ecologies

British Library: Applications are invited for Eccles British Library Writer in Residence Award 2016

University of Vienna: Four-year doctoral studentship in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science

Science Museum Group: Website Editor

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s