Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #06

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #06

Monday 24 August 2015

EDITORIAL:

After a brief surgical break Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM is back bringing you all that the Internet has to offer in the histories of science, technology and medicine or at least all that we could find of it.

I entered the Internet #histsci community somewhat more than seven years ago. Five years ago one of my, by then, good #histsci colleagues, Rebekah Higgitt, announced that she would be co-leading a major research project into the activities of the British Board of Longitude in the long eighteenth century.

Over the last five years this research project carried out by the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich and Cambridge University has been incredibly active and I have got to know most of those involved through their diverse activities. These include Richard Dunn, Alexi Baker, Katy Barrett, Sophie Waring, Katherine McAlpine and Nicky Reeves. The project has finally come to an end and the results have been quite stunning. This small group of dedicated scholars have produced an amazing amount of absolutely first class history of science material.

If you don’t know it already you can spend many a happy hour reading the contributions to the project’s blog,  an exemplary use of Internet communication. The latest contribution to the blog is a farewell to the project written by Maritime Museum team co-leader Richard Dunn.

If you want to know what the participants have been doing for the last five years then go to the Board of Longitude Project: Project Outcomes Page, you will knocked out by their productivity.

This project has set standards for anybody contemplation research into a #histSTM subject and can be held up as a role model for all such researchers. We at Whewell’s Gazette wish to congratulate all those involved and wish them well in their future endeavours.

Quotes of the week:

“The only qualification for being a writer is actually writing. All else is angst and bullshit.” – Henry Rollins h/t @cultauthor

“Hellenologophobia is a fear of Greek terms”. – @weird_hist

“Yet again twttr reminds me how many scientists think that all science works the same way their sub sub field of science does”. – Justin Kiggins (@neuromusic)

“Old math teachers never die, they just lose control of their functions.” – @intmath

“autocorrect, can you please stop changing ‘scicomm’ to ‘sickroom’? thank you” – Tori Herridge (@ToriHerridge)

Shelf-righteous adj: a feeling of superiority about one’s bookshelf” – Powell’s Compendium of Readerly Terms

“Dear Apple, if I change back something you’ve autocorrected, Don’t. Autocorrect. It. Again.” – Eric Marcoullier (@bpm140)

“I’m starting a new band called Terrifying German Bibliography. Our first album will be called Intimidating Footnotes” – Kirsty Rolfe (@avoiding_bears)

“logic is like a secret society in this country. Hardly anyone knows how to use it.” –‪@Goethelover h/t @jondresner

“Ask a man his philosophy and he’ll be annoying for an hour; teach a man to do philosophy and he’ll be annoying for life”. – Keith Frankish (@keithfrankish)

“I quite realized,” said Columbus,

“That the earth was not a rhombus,

But I am a little annoyed

To find it an oblate spheroid.”

E. Bentley h/t @JohnDCook

Birthday of the Week:

Denis Papin baptised (born?) 22 August 1642

 

Denis Papin holding the plans for his steam engine. Unknown artist 1689 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Denis Papin holding the plans for his steam engine.
Unknown artist 1689
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 22 – Denis Papin

Yovisto: Denis Papin and the Pressure Cooker

Papin's steam digester 1679 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Papin’s steam digester 1679
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A household name

Jean Léopold Nicolas Frédéric (Georges) Cuvier born 23 August 1769

Georges Cuvier Portrait by François-André Vincent, 1795 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Georges Cuvier Portrait by François-André Vincent, 1795
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Embryo Project: Georges Cuvier (1769–1832)

Embryo Project: Essay: The Cuvier-Geoffroy Debate

Letters From Gondwana: Mary Anning’s Contribution to French Paleontology

Yovisto: Georges Cuvier and the Fossils

Forbes: How do we know what extinct species looked like?

Cuvier´s secret reconstruction of the Anoplotherium commune, shown in lifelike pose with its skeleton, musculature, and body-outline. Source: Forbes

Cuvier´s secret reconstruction of the Anoplotherium commune, shown in lifelike pose with its skeleton, musculature, and body-outline.
Source: Forbes

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE :

Corpus Newtonicum: Newton in Atlantis

arXiv.org: Greek Astronomy PhDs: The last 200 years (pdf)

Inside the Science Museum: How to land on Venus

Scientific American: Cocktail Party Physics: In Memoriam: Jacob Bekenstein (1947–2015) and Black Hole Entropy

Jacob Bekenstein Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jacob Bekenstein
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Shtetl–Optimized: Jacob Bekenstein (1947–2015)

ESA: The History of Sounding Rockets and Their Contribution to European Space Research (pdf)

Berkeley News: Pursuing charm in a singularly unfeminine profession

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Watercolour Meteor

Paul Sandby The Meteor of August 18, 1783, as seen from the East Angle of the North Terrace, Windsor Castle.

Paul Sandby The Meteor of August 18, 1783, as seen from the East Angle of the North Terrace, Windsor Castle.

History Extra: Life of the Week: Marie Curie

The Columbian: Vancouver woman’s Manhattan Project memories

The Local: Seven brainteasers to honour Schrödinger

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 20 – Fred Hoyle

National Radio Astronomy Observatory: Pre-History of Radio Astronomy

Yovisto: Viking 1 and the Mission to Mars

Restrcted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Hiroshima and Nagasaki at 70

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 23 – Charles-Augustin de Coulomb

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Slate Vault: The Roads Around Late–18th–Century London. Mapped in Close-Up Detail

Atlas Obscura: John Harrison’s Marine Chronometers

Harrison's first sea clock (H1) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Harrison’s first sea clock (H1)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: How High/Low Can You Go? – The Explorer Auguste Picard

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Der Erdapfel

Behaim's Erdapfel Source: Wikimedia Commons

Behaim’s Erdapfel
Source: Wikimedia Commons

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: Captain Cook Lands on Possession Island

NOAA: Who first charted the Gulf Stream?

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

History Matters: Donald Trump: Galenic Enthusiast?

Yovisto: Thomas Hodgekin – a Pioneer in Preventive Medicine

Yovisto: The Contraceptive Pill – One of the Most Influential Inventions of the 20th Century

The Recipes Project: Valuing “Caesar’s and Sampson’s Cures”

Rattle-snake with section of rattle and tooth, from Mark Catsby, (1731) The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

Rattle-snake with section of rattle and tooth, from Mark Catsby, (1731) The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

The Recipes Project: Adjudicating “Caesar’s Cure for Poison”

Ptak Science Books: Electropathic Pathology: the Invisible Quackhood of the Electric Brush (1884)

drive.google.com: Quistorp and ‘Anaesthesia” in 1718

Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry: From the Archive: Witchcraft and Healing in the Colonial Andes, 16th-17th Centuries

Journal of the American Revolution: For to Cure for the Etch

Thomas Morris: Brain of hare and turd of dog

Pinterest: Inside the Vintage Medicine Cabinet

Thomas Morris: Wine, the great healer

Wellcome Library Blog: Diary of an Asylum Superintendent

Thomas Morris: Leeches: for external and internal use

leeching

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Gabriel Lipmann and the Colour Photography

Yovisto: Pierre Vernier and the Vernier Scale

Ptak Science Blog: An Automatic Page Turner, 1887

Yovisto: Making Photography Really Operational – Louis Daguerre

Christie’s The Art People: Mechanical miracles: The rise of the automaton

Engines of Our Imagination: No. 1703: IBM 360 Computer

Motherboard: The Soviet Architect Who Drafted the Space Race

Design for the technology module of the Mir space station (1980). Image: Galina Balashova Archives

Design for the technology module of the Mir space station (1980). Image: Galina Balashova Archives

Slate: The Mechanical Chess Player That Unsettled the World

The chess-playing Turk baffled and amazed Europe until it was revealed to be a hoax: the figure was actually controlled by a man hidden inside the box. Photographs: Bridgeman Images; AKG-Images

The chess-playing Turk baffled and amazed Europe until it was revealed to be a hoax: the figure was actually controlled by a man hidden inside the box. Photographs: Bridgeman Images; AKG-Images

Yovisto: William Murdock ‘enlights’ the 19th century

C&EN: Timeline: A Brief History of the Internet and Chemistry

The New York Review of Books: They Began a New Era

Yovisto: Paul Nipkow and the Picture Scanning Technology

The Guardian: Letters reveal Alan Turing’s battle with his sexuality

Yovisto: E.F. Codd and the Relational Database Model

The Telegraph: England’s last master cooper seeks apprentice

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Niche: The Herbarium: An Interior Landscape of Science

Der Beutelwolf–Blog: Alfred Russel Wallace

Letters from Gondwana: Climate Change and the Evolution of Mammals

Jonathan Saha: Animals in the Asylum

The Telegraph: Anger over Natural History Museum plans to bulldoze wildlife garden

Mental Floss: The Adventurous Life of Jane Dieulafoy, Pioneering Archaeologist, Artist, and Feminist

Jane Dieulafoy Image: Eugène L. Pirou

Jane Dieulafoy
Image: Eugène L. Pirou

Notches: “What can I do to be normal?” Queer Female Desires in Letters to Dr. Alfred Kinsey

The Victor Mourning Blog: Mary Vaux Walcott

Culture 24: The starfishes, octopuses and squid of scientists’ 70,00-mile 19th century journey to the deep sea

Public Domain Review: When the Birds and the Bees Were Not Enough: Aristotle’s Masterpiece

Embryo Project: George McDonald Church (1954)

Embryo Project: Eugenical Sterilization in the United States (1922), by Harry H. Laughlin

Paige Fossil History: Fossils vs Marine Biology: Which History of Science is More Fun

New York Times: John Henry Holland, Who Computerized Evolution, Dies at 86

Expedition Live: A Marvel of Unpreparedness

Forbes: Geology and Ancient Fossil’s Inspired H.P. Lovecraft to Write His Best Horror Story

Londoner Culture: The man who brought us drinking chocolate and his Chelsea past

Sir Hans Sloane

Sir Hans Sloane

Darwin Live: Celebrating the Life of Alfred Russel Wallace

Public Domain Review: Tempest Anderson: Pioneer of Volcano Photography

National Geographic: Phenomena: The Rise and Fall of America’s Fossil Dogs

AMNH: Shelf Life: Kinsey’s Wasps

CHEMISTRY:

Conciatore: Vitriol of Venus

Conciatore: Tartar Salt

Conciatore: Sulfur of Saturn

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 21 – Jean Servais Stas

Jean Servais Stas (1813-1891) Belgian Chemist Credit: OEuvres Complètes, Jean Baptiste Depaire, 1894

Jean Servais Stas (1813-1891) Belgian Chemist Credit: OEuvres Complètes, Jean Baptiste Depaire, 1894

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 17 – Walter Noddack

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 19 – Helium

Yovisto: Jules Janssen and the Discovery of Helium

1868 Pierre Jannsen observes new spectral line during a solar eclipse-later linked w:new element (He)

1868 Pierre Jannsen observes new spectral line during a solar eclipse-later linked w:new element (He)

CMsNVuHWEAAuJns

The Conversation: How science lost one of its greatest minds in the trenches of Gallipoli

Othmeralia: Lavoisier

Yovisto: Jöns Jacob Berzelius – One of the Founders of Modern Chemistry

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Fit for print: developing an institutional model of scientific publishing in England, 1655–ca. 1714

Historical Reflections: Appetite for Discovery: Sense and Sentiment in the Early Modern World

The Newyorker: What is Elegance in Science?

in propria persona: law, tech, history: Historians need to stop obsessing over writing books

Smithsonian Libraries: Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology

The Huntingdon: The Dibner History of Science Program

OHSU: Oral History Program

Brill: Journal of the Philosophy of History Contents

Lady Science: Subscribe to email newsletter

Centre for the History of Emotions: Major new grant to explore emotional health

academia.edu: The Catholic Cosmos Made Small: Athanasius Kircher and His Museum in Rome

Portrait of Kircher at age 53 from Mundus Subterraneus (1664) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Kircher at age 53
from Mundus Subterraneus (1664)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wolfram Alpha: Timeline of Systematic Data and the Development of Computable Knowledge

Oxford Today: From Hindu Paintings to Hebrew Manuscripts – the Digital Treasures of the Bodleian Library

New @ Northeastern: In Italy, students get a history lesson in science

Leaping Robot: Shifting Gears and Changing Rooms

University of London, Institute of Historical Research: Research Seminar: Questioning Theories of History Autumn Term 2015

Capitalism’s Cradle: “And it all started here in the US of A”

Long Reads: Our Sex Education: A Reading List

ESOTERIC:

Yovisto: Johann Valentin Andreae and the Legend of the Rosicrucians

Johannes Valentinus Andreae Source: Wikimedia Commons

Johannes Valentinus Andreae
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Atlantic: Rewriting Autism History

New York Times: ‘Neuro Tribes’ by Steve Silberman

New York Times Book Reviews Podcast

John Elder Robinson: Neurotribes – Steve Silberman’s new book on the history of autism

Nature: Autism: Seeing the spectrum entire

The Economist: Horrible history: The treatment of autistic children in the 20th century was shocking

Wired: How Autistic People Helped Shape the Modern World

Science Book a Day: NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity

The Guardian: Neurotribes review – the evolution of our understanding of autism

neurotribes

Science Book a Day: Einstein’s Masterwork: 1915 and the General Theory of Relativity

The Renaissance Mathematicus: To Explain the Weinberg: The discovery of a Nobel Laureate’s view of the history of science

Alembic Rare Books: How Men (and Women) Fly: Gertrude Bacon & Early Aviation

Science Book a Day: The Art of Medicine

Brain Pickings: Wheels of Change: How the Bicycle Empowered Women

Scientific American: Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cat

Forbes: New Book Explores Biogeography and the Human Adventure

NEW BOOKS:

Ashgate: Australia Circumnavigated: The Voyages of Matthew Flinders in HMS Investigator, 1801–1803

Juxtapost: Eva Wirtén Making Marie Curie: Intellectual Property and Celebraty Culture in an Age of Information

l_c967fbb0-2ec0-11e5-855b-bd6d15300024

University of Pennsylvania Press: Early Modern Cultures of Translation

ART & EXHIBITIONS

The Sydney Morning Herald: The League of Remarkable Women exhibition aims to break down barriers for women in science

JHI Blog: Reflections on “Treasured Possessions” and Material Culture

University of Lincoln: The Life and Legacy of George Boole

Boole-A4-Poster-V2-212x300

Union Station: Da Vinci The Exhibition Opens October 23

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations – D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics 21 August–25 October

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday and Wednesday

Royal Society: Seeing Closer: 350 years of microscopy 29 June–23 November

Wellcome Library: Kiss of Light 12 May–23 October

Museum of the Mind: The Maudsley at War: The Story of the Hospital During the Great War 6 July– 24 September 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Pleasance Courtyard Edinburgh: The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or The Survival of (R)Evolutionary Theories in the Face of Scientific and Ecclesiastical Objections: Being a Musical Comedy About Charles Darwin 26 August

Bedlam Theatre Edinburgh: Ada Runs until 30 August 2015

National Theatre: The Hard Problem

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Women and Medicine

Lady Mary Wortley Montague

Lady Mary Wortley Montague

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Sex and the City

U.S. National Library of Medicine: The Movies: The Human Body in Pictures: The Blood Vessels and Their Function

Science Museum: Beyond Vision: Photography, Art and Science symposium 12 September 2015

Wellcome Collection: Discussion: The Blue Corpse 27 August 2015

MHS Oxford: Lecture: Harry’s Nobel Prize 25 August 2015

Royal Observatory Greenwich: The Great Eclipse Expedition Mystery 27 August 2015

Oxford Biomedical Research Group: Open Doors – How blood flows to and around the brain Tour: 11 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Piltdown-gang-007

John Cooke’s 1915 painting of the ‘Piltdown Gang’

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: The Secret of Quantum Physics

PBS: The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements

Forbes: PBS’s The Mystery of Matter and its Message for Chemistry

Youtube: Manhattan Season Two Trailer

BBC Four: Genius of the Ancient World: Socrates

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Ri: Cloud Chamber: The Birth of Helium Atoms

Youtube: The Hereford World Map – Mappa Mundi

Youtube: The Man Who Saved Geometry (excerpt)

Vimeo: The Man Who Saved Geometry (complete)

Youtube: Ri: The Race to Crack the Genetic Code with Matthew Cobb

Two Nerdy History Girls: Friday Video: The Clock That Changed the World

Gresham College: Cannabis Britannica: The rise and demise of a Victorian wonder-drug

Youtube: Royal Society: Field Microscope – Objectivity #30

History Physics: Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity

Youtube: Scream – The History of Anaesthetics

Youtube: Betrand Russell – Man’s Peril

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Inside Science Matthew Cobb on Life’s Greatest Secret (14m39)

BBC Radio 4: Book of the Week: Spirals in Time

PODCASTS:

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Peter Galison’s Interview

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of York: Centre for Global Health Histories: Public Lectures 22 September–12 November 2015

University of Paderborn, International Workshop: The Self-Determined Individual in the Enlightenment 14 September 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: The Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies International Medieval Congress University of Leeds 3–7 July 2016

Manchester Medieval Society: CfP: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference University of Hull: 6–8 January 2016

University of the Pacific: The Invention of Nature – Talk and Book Signing with Andrea Wulf

Royal Society: Open House Weekend – History of Science Lecture Series 19 September 2015

Royal Historical Society: Public History Prize

Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science: CfP: 6–7 November 2015

University of Klagenfurt: International Conference on Science, Research and Popular Culture Programme 17–18 September 2015

University of London, Birkbeck: CfP: Religion and Medicine: Healing the Body and Soul from the Middle Ages to the Modern Day 15–16 July 2016

SocPhiSciPract: CfP: 2nd Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Group in India 19–21 December 2015

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering: CfP: History of Computing – International Communities of Invention and Innovation 25–29 May 2016

History of Science Society: Call for Posters: HSS Meeting San Francisco 17 August 2015

IRH–UNIBUC: Master-class on Isaac Newton’s Philosophical Projects

Amherst College: Books and Prints between Cultures, 1500–1900 18–19 September 2015

The Royal Society: Lecture: A 13th century theory of everything

ADAPT: CfP: Hands on History: Exploring New Methodologies for Media History Research Geological Society London 8–10 February 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Princeton University: Call for Applications: Fellowships at Davis Center 2016–17 Risk and Fortune

University of Utrecht: PhD Candidate History of Art, Science and Technology

University of Utrecht: Postdoc History of Art, Science and Technology

USA Jobs: Department of the Air Force: Historian

The Royal Society: Newton International Fellowship

Aarhus University: Intuitions in Science and Philosophy: 2 Postdocs & 1 PhD Studentship

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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