Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #07

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #07

Monday 31 August 2015

EDITORIAL:

Like the proverbial bad penny Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list keeps turning up and we’re back again with another week of the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine gathered up over the last seven days from the Internet.

In my youth I had a polymathic interest in all things scientific and there was no way that I could take up a serious study of all the areas that interested me. I could however, like many, many others, at least teach myself the basic of the various sciences by reading popular science magazines. One of the main ones that I read almost religiously for many years was Scientific American. My memories of Scientific American is of a modern journal bringing me understandable synopsises of the latest developments in the sciences and also of the history of science. From time to time I get reminded that Scientific America is in the meantime a part of the history of science itself.

The first edition of Scientific American appeared 170 years ago on 28 August 1845, as the journal has reminded us this week.

From Volume 1, Number 1 of Scientific American, August 28, 1845.

From Volume 1, Number 1 of Scientific American, August 28, 1845.

Scientific American: On Scientific American’s 170th Anniversary, a Nod to Founder Rufus Porter

Scientific American: Celebrating 170 Years of Scientific American

I no longer read Scientific American but I do hope that other young science fans are still getting a view of the larger picture of the sciences from America’s oldest continuously published magazine.

Quotes of the week:

“Heaven and hell seem out of proportion to me: the actions of men do not deserve so much.” – Jorge Luis Borges

“Academics: is there a verb for “struggling to pull research notes and thoughts into article form”?” – Katrina Gulliver (@katrinagulliver)

“I ain’t afraid of no ghost, but people who vehemently believe in the paranormal scare me a little”. – Brian Switek (@Laelaps)

“Fortunately there is no encouragement of beatnik behaviour by ordinary people in Britain” – The People, 1960.     h/t @matthewcobb

“The task is to understand how reliable knowledge and scientific progress can and do result from a flawed, profoundly contingent, culturally relative, all-too-human process.” – David Wootton h/t @philipcball & @matthewcobb

“A mission statement is no substitute for a mission”. – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“Every time someone gets made a peer in the House of Lords a democracy fairy dies”. – Lily Bailey (@LilyBaileyUK)

Me: What did the professor call the reading list that got out of control?

Library college: I don’t care

Me: Godzyllabus.

Her: Groan. – @librarianshipwreck

“How to write a book pitch: Step 1, order a coffee. Step 2, open blank page and hold pen. Step 3, write tweet about Steps 1 and 2. Ok, done”. – Mike McRae (@tribalscientist)

“The role of the historian is to move the debate forward, no more, no less”. – Frank McDonough (@FMXC1957)

CNYD-OIU8AAKDfW

Birthday of the Week:

 Antoine Laurent de Lavoisier born 26 August 1743

Portrait of Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and his wife and assistant Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze by Jacques-Louis David, ca. 1788

Portrait of Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and his wife and assistant Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze by Jacques-Louis David, ca. 1788

Yovisto: Modern Chemistry started with Lavoisier

Lavoisier 2

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 26 – Antoine Lavoisier

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The father of…

Madame Lavoisier while assisting her husband on his scientific research of human respiration; she is visible at the table on the far right.

Madame Lavoisier while assisting her husband on his scientific research of human respiration; she is visible at the table on the far right.

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 24 – Louis Essen

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Alexander Langsdorf’s Interview

Yovisto: The Exploration of Saturn

Scientific American: Was Einstein the First to Invent E=mc2?

Corpus Newtonicum: All was light – but was it?

Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathemica, Titlepage and frontispiece of the third edition, London, 1726 (John Rylands Library)

Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathemica, Titlepage and frontispiece of the third edition, London, 1726 (John Rylands Library)

Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage: Follow the Information: Comets, Communicative Practices and Swedish Amateur Astronomers in the Twentieth Century (pdf)

Trinity College Library, Cambridge: Navigating Newton’s Novels: Exhibiting the Value of Personal Libraries

Irish Philosophy: Truth above all things: G.G: Stokes

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 27 – Ernest Lawrence

Sydney Morning Herald: From Betelguese to Vega, who named the stars?

Harvard Magazine: William Cranch Bond: Brief life of Harvard’s first astronomer 1789–1859

Ptak Science Books: The Preliminary Tower at Trinity, 1945

Trinity Tower Source: Grove Archive

Trinity Tower
Source: Grove Archive

The National: Look at the stars, there’s still a lot of wisdom there

Atlas Obscura: See Fascinating Relics from the Secret Soviet Space Program

AHF: Francis Birch

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 30 – Ernest Rutherford

AIP: Rutherford’s Nuclear World

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

The Conversation: Here’s why the Greenwich Prime Meridian is actually in the wrong place

The Hakluyt Society Blog: Matthew Flinders and the Circumnavigation of Australia, 1801–1803

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: James Weddell and the Southern Ocean

James Weddell´s second expedition, depicting the brig

James Weddell´s second expedition, depicting the brig “Jane” and the cutter “Beaufoy”.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Advances in the History of Psychology: Hermann Helmholtz’s Graphical Recordings of the Speed of Nervous Stimulations

Our Roots: White Caps and Red Roses: History of the Galt School of Nursing, Lethbridge, Alberta 1910–1979

Duke University Libraries: The Devil’s Tale: Promising Cures for Hearing Loss in Early 20th Century America

DeafnessCure_Header-300x196

Motherboard: How Viking 1 Won the Martian Space Race

Migraine Histories: On Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

John Singer Sargent, Portrait of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (c.1900) via Wikipedia

John Singer Sargent, Portrait of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (c.1900) via Wikipedia

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Role of Heredity in George Combe’s Phrenology Work

BuzzFeed: How Oliver Sacks Helped Introduce the World to Autism

Yovisto: Charles Richet and Anaphylaxis

From the Hands of Quacks: Actina: A Wonder of the 19th Century

NYAM: Dr. William Edmund Aughinbaugh, Medical Adventurer

Embryo Project: The Marine Biology Laboratory

The Wall Street Journal: The Man Who Invented Psychopathy

academia.edu: A Museum of Wonders or a Cemetery of Corpses? The Commercial Exchange of Anatomical Collections in Early Modern Collections (pdf)

Science Notes: Today in Science History ­ August 29 – Werner Forssmann

Brumpic: ‘Birmingham Innovations: The Steam Engine, Electroplating… and the Airbag’ by Jonathan Reinarz

First Southern Birmingham 3

First Southern Birmingham 3

Diseases of Modern Life: ‘Sweet oblivious antidotes’? Lady perfume drinkers of the late 19th century

TECHNOLOGY:

The Guardian: Technology has created more jobs than it has destroyed, says 140 years of data

Atlas Obscura: The Weird History of Hand Dryers Will Blow You Away

Atlas Obscura: Take a Ride with the Country’s Most Dedicated Elevator Tourist

Thick Objects: Chakhotin’s Microsurgery Device (1912)

Tchahotine-Microsurgery-Devoce-885x1024

Ptak Science Books: A Map of Fordlandia: the “Drama of Transportation”, 1932

io9: No, Da Vinci Wasn’t the First to Dream About Human Flight

Yovisto: Lee De Forest and the Audion

Conciatore: Lime

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Printing mistakes

Johannes Gutenberg in a 16th century copper engraving Source: Wikimedia Commons

Johannes Gutenberg in a 16th century copper engraving
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Viewpoints: Innovators Assemble: Ada Lovelace, Walter Isaacson, and the Superheroines of Computing

academia.edu: Antipocras. A Medieval Treatise on Magical Medicine. By Brother Nicholas of the Preacing Friars (c. 1270) Translated by William Eamon (pdf)

Yovisto: The Hyperbolic World of Vladimir Shukhov

Capitalism’s Cradle: Not-so-Anonymous Tinkerers and the Industrial Revolution

Capitalism’s Cradle: Who will watch the Watch-Men? – Celebrating the Watch-Makers of the British Industrial Revolution

AIP: John Mauchly

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The New York Times: How a Volcanic Eruption in 1815 Darkened the World but Colored the Arts

The deep volcanic crater, top, was produced by the eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in April 1815 - the most powerful volcanic blast in recorded history. Credit Iwan Setiyawan/KOMPAS, via Associated Press

The deep volcanic crater, top, was produced by the eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in April 1815 – the most powerful volcanic blast in recorded history. Credit Iwan Setiyawan/KOMPAS, via Associated Press

TrowellBlazers: Gertrude Caton Thompson

Partners of convenience: The Met Office and the BBC

The Genealogical World of Phylogenetic Networks: Spinach and iron fallacy

Ptak Science Books: Early Map of Elevations of Plants and Trees, 1873

“Chart of Principal Vegetable Growths and Chief Staples” from Matthew Fontaine Maury’s Physical Geography,

Twilight Beasts: The last squawk of the dodo

New York Times: Eric Betzig’s Life Over the Microscope

Archaeology: Rethinking the Form and Structure of Hominid Fossils

CHEMISTRY:

Conciatore: Saltpeter

Conciatore: Sulfur

Chemistry World: Agatha Christie, the queen of crime chemistry 

As a young woman, Christie worked in a hospital dispensary and gained a first-hand knowledge of drugs of poisons © Bettmann/Corbis

As a young woman, Christie worked in a hospital dispensary and gained a first-hand knowledge of drugs of poisons © Bettmann/Corbis

The Vaults of Erowid: The Subjective Effects of Nitrous Oxide by William James

Yovisto: Carl Bosch and the IG Farben

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Scientific American: Cross Check: Why There Will Never Be Another Einstein

“I am no Einstein,” Einstein once said. On top of all his other qualities, the man was modest. Photo by Oren Jack Turner courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

“I am no Einstein,” Einstein once said. On top of all his other qualities, the man was modest. Photo by Oren Jack Turner courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

the many-headed monster: VoxPop2015: The People’s Conclusion

G.C. Gosling: In Memoriam; or, Getting Personal

Peddling and Scaling God and Darwin: The Church of England and Creationism

RBSC Manuscripts Division News: Expanded Digitization of Islamic Manuscripts

Harvard University: Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments

Crova registering actinometer

Crova registering actinometer

The New York Times: The Case for Teaching Scientific Ignorance

Science Insider: How the Franco dictatorship destroyed Spanish science

The Last Word on Nothing: Story, History, Story

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Misusing Galileo to criticise the Galileo Gambit

Galileo demonstrating his astronomical theories. Climate contrarians have virtually nothing in common with Galileo. Photograph: Tarker/Tarker/Corbis

Galileo demonstrating his astronomical theories. Climate contrarians have virtually nothing in common with Galileo. Photograph: Tarker/Tarker/Corbis

The Ordered Universe Project: AHRC Funding: Ordered Universe

Anzamems Inc: Free Online Courses on the History of the Book

The Recipes Project: Exploring CPP 10a214: Anne Layfield Reading Bishop Andrewes

Roots of Unity: Gauss and Germain on Pleasure and Passion

Marie-Sophie Germain

Marie-Sophie Germain

Making Science Public: Snapshots of the unknown – some holiday souvenirs

University of Oxford: Research: The randomness of archives

Medieval Sicily: Islamic Education and the Transmission of Knowledge in Muslim Society (pdf)

The New Yorker: What is Elegance in Science

AEON: Future Perfect: Social progress, high-speed transport and electricity everywhere – how the Victorians invented the future

ESOTERIC:

MIT Library Special Collections: Faraday and Table-Talk

J. Prichard. A Few Sober Words of Table-Talk About Table-Spirits, and the Rev. N.S. Godfrey’s Incantations. 2nd ed., 1853

J. Prichard. A Few Sober Words of Table-Talk About Table-Spirits, and the Rev. N.S. Godfrey’s Incantations. 2nd ed., 1853

alphr: Parapsychology: The rise and fall of paranormal experimentation

Chemistry World: A shared secret?

academia.edu: Transmuting Sericon: Alchemy as “practical Exegesis” in Early Modern England (pdf)

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: Heroes, monsters and people: When it comes to moral choices, outstanding physicists are very ordinary

THE: Temptations in the Archives: Essays in Golden Age Dutch Culture, by Lisa Jardine

The Atlantic: Before Autism Had a Name

Refinary 29: What You Need to Know About The Hidden History of Autism

PLOS Blogs: NeuroTribes: Steve Silberman on a haunting history and new hopes for autistic people

SFARI: “Neurotribes” recovers lost history of autism

Maclean’s: Steve Siberman on autism and ‘neurodiversity’

San Francisco Chronicle: ‘NeuroTribes’ by Steve Silberman

Boston Globe: NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity

Financial Review: From wild to domesticated: a history of garden evolution

A rare 18th century book containing nature prints. Getty Images

A rare 18th century book containing nature prints.
Getty Images

Big Think: Scientific Revolutions in Optics Made Vermeer a Revolutionary Painter

Science Book a Day: The Hidden Landscape: A Journey into the Geological Past

Inside Higher Ed: An End of Era?

SomeBeans: Stargazers – Copernicus, Galileo, the Telescope and the Church by Allan Chapman

Forbes: Recalling The History of Time and Navigation In The Age of GPS

The Guardian: The Meaning of Science by Tim Lewens review – can scientific knowledge be objective

Popular Science: How Not To Be Wrong – Jordan Ellenberg

Science Book a Day: Magnificent Principia: Exploring Isaac Newton’s Masterpiece

H-Environment: Drake, ‘Loving Nature, Fearing the State,’ Roundtable Review

big think: The Science of Why Nature is Beautiful to Us

Open Letters Monthly: After Nature

Financial Times: ‘The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution’, by David Wootton

The Guardian: Brief Candle in the Dark: My Life in Science by Richard Dawkins

The Dispersal of Darwin: Book Review, Guest Post & Giveaway: Ancient Earth Journal: The Early Cretaceous

9781633220331

The New York Times: ‘The Butterflies of North America; Titian Peale’s Lost Manuscript’

NEW BOOKS:

Royal Society: Winton Prize for Science Books

University of Chicago Press: Islam and Travel in the Middle Ages

9780226808772

OUP: The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England, c. 1530–1700

ART & EXHIBITIONS

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: An exhibition without walls

dna india: A cartographer’s horde

Prashant Lahoti with a pilgrimage route map of Shatrunjaya, a holy site for Jains located in Palitana, Gujarat; c. 1750. The map is on display at the National Museum in Delhi Manit Balmiki dna

Prashant Lahoti with a pilgrimage route map of Shatrunjaya, a holy site for Jains located in Palitana, Gujarat; c. 1750. The map is on display at the National Museum in Delhi Manit Balmiki dna

Science Museum: Revelations: Experiments in Photography Closing Soon!

Herschel Museum of Astronomy: Waterloo and the March of Science 18 June–13 December 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

broadwayworld.com: Linda Purl, Brett Rickaby and Peter van Norden to lead Rubicon Theatre’s COPENHAGEN; Sets Sept Opening

Putney Theatre Company: The Effect

The Place: Touch Wood 2015: Programme 1: Goethe’s Faust from a contemporary female perspective

Noël Coward Theatre: Photograph 51

Show_Photograph51

FILMS AND EVENTS:

CHF & Lantern Theatre Company: Women in Science – Science on Stage 19 September 2015

The Ordered Universe Project: Ordered Universe at the Royal Society Public Lectures: Open House 19 September 2015

Walking Tour: Robert Hooke’s 17th Century City of London 17 September 2015

The Monument depicted in a picture by Sutton Nicholls, c. 1753. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Monument depicted in a picture by Sutton Nicholls, c. 1753.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Science Museum: Time Travelling Operating Theatre 13 September

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Homes for Healing

Wellcome Collection: STT Talk: Infectious Diseases 3 September 2015

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: A Diseased Cerebellum, or a Wildness in the Face 5 September 2015

Florence Nightingale Museum: ‘Design for Living’: Life Inside the Tuberculosis Sanatorium 10 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Carl Spitzweg – The Geologist 1860

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

George Boole 200: The Genius of Georg Boole

George Boole Source: Wikimedia Commons

George Boole
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Vimeo: Countway Objects: Dominic Hall

Ed TED: Quantum mechanics 101: Demystifying tough physics in 4 easy lessons

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Forty History of Ideas Animations

ARD Mediathek: Alfred Russel Wallace – Pionier in Darwins Schatten

PODCASTS:

Modern Notion: What Computers Taught Us about Genetics

Ben Franklin’s World: Adam D. Shprintzen, The Vegetarian Crusade: The Rise of the American Reform Movement

Science Friday: Writing Women Back Into Science History

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality and Religion

University of Pennsylvania: Literary Histories of Science: Race, Gender, and Class 12–15 November 2015

Université Paris Diderot: CfP: Becoming Animal with the Victorians SFEVE Annual Conference 4–5 February 2016

sfeve-annual-conference-2016v7

BSHS: CfP: BSHS Postgraduate Conference 6–8 January 2016

University of Notre Dame: CfP: Beyond Tradition: Rethinking Early Modern Europe

The History of Emotions Blog: Conference: ‘Tears and Smiles: Medieval to Early Modern’ 7 October 2015

Medical History Workshop: Workshop: Images and Texts in Medical History National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda Maryland April 11–13 2016

University of Sussex: International Workshop for ECRs: Call for Participants: Science, Technology and Innovation in Neglected Diseases: Policies, Funding and Knowledge Creation 17–20 November 2015

h-madness: CfP: History 6 Philosophy of Psychology Section & UK Critical Psychiatry Network Joint Conference Leeds Trinity University 22–23 March 2016

Wellcome Library: CfP: Religion and medicine Birkbeck University of London 15–16 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Academic Jobs Wiki: History of Science, Technology, and Medicine 2015–2016

University of Toronto: Assistant Professor – History of Technology

BSHS: Special Project Grants

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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One Response to Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #07

  1. Pingback: Let the debate begin! | The Renaissance Mathematicus

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