Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #08

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #08

Monday 07 September 2015

EDITORIAL:

We’re back again, one day late, but as the old cliché goes, better late than never. So here you have the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette you weekly links list for all things #histSTM, bringing all we could scrape together from the outer reaches of cyberspace of the histories of science, technology and medicine.

Our rubric Birthday of the Week, of course, features big name scholars when there is some sort of major anniversary, which generates much Internet activity. However there are always several scholars who have birthdays in any given week and not all of them get featured in this rubric but we try to pick out ones who might not be household names but who we think deserve more public awareness.

This week’s birthday boy, John Dalton, is a perfect example of this. If one were to ask the proverbial average person on the street who Dalton was they would probably come up with something like, “didn’t he used to play for Manchester United?” Dalton was one of the founders of the modern atomic theory of matter but he also made significant contributions to a wide range of other scientific disciplines, including founding the scientific investigation of colour blindness from which he suffered himself.

Dalton remains largely unknown to the public at large but we are of the opinion that he deserves to be up there with Newton and Darwin in public awareness, as a great British scientist.

Quotes of the week:

 

Don't poo on science Caption courtesy of Jack Stilgoe (@Jackstilgoe)

Don’t poo on science
Caption courtesy of Jack Stilgoe (@Jackstilgoe)

“BoreVore: A predatory creature that paralyzes its prey by going on and on about its specialized diet. Mostly found in Industrialized West”. – @wetbinkt

“Why didn’t you eat your greens? Tell me. Why? Why?”

“Calm down. I wasn’t expecting the spinach inquisition” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“You can’t go against the grain of the universe and not expect to get splinters.” – C. S. Lewis

Archive quote of the day: “…may the Lord deliver me from the Teutonic cult of pedestrian technocracy.” @librarycongress – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

“The imperfection of all our records of the past is too well known to geologists.” – A R Wallace (1879) h/t @Jamie_Woodward

Schiller Quote

Birthday of the Week:

Dalton by Charles Turner after James Lonsdale (1834, mezzotint) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dalton by Charles Turner
after James Lonsdale
(1834, mezzotint)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Dalton born 6 September 1766

 Yovisto: John Dalton and the Atomic Theory

CHF: John Dalton

From Alchemy to Chemistry: Five Hundred Years of Rare and Interesting Books: Dalton, John (1766–1844) A New System of Chemical Philosophy

In the Dark: The Day of Daltonism

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

io9: Every Place We Used to Think Was a Planet (until We Knew Better)

Yovisto: Sir Bernard Lovell and the Radioastronomy

Yovisto: Hermann von Helmholtz and his Theory of Vision

Mental Floss: Meet the Woman Who Discovered the Composition of the Stars

Cecelia Payne Image Credit: Smithsonian Institution, Wikimedia Commons

Cecelia Payne
Image Credit: Smithsonian Institution, Wikimedia Commons

Physics Today: Information: From Maxwell’s demon to Landauer’s eraser

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 2 – Franz Xaver von Zach

History Physics: Carrington Event 1859

The Telegraph: The man who proved Stephen Hawking wrong

Leaping Robot: Astronomy’s History Trap

The Mountain Mystery: Newton and the Speed of Sound

Newton’s speed of sound experiment re-enacted at Trinity College, Cambridge

Newton’s speed of sound experiment re-enacted at Trinity College, Cambridge

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 3 – Carl David Anderson

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Did Lawrence doubt the bomb?

AHF: Richard Tolman

AIP: Edoardo Amaldi

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Georgian Gentleman: Let’s hear it for Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville, who died on 31 August 1811

Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville

Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville

io9: Archaeologists Tracked Lewis and Clark by Following Their Trail of Laxatives

British Library: Maps and views blog: A Rare View of the Siege of Boston (1775–1776)

The Hakluyt Society Blog: Essay Prize Series Part 2: The Manuscript Circulation of Sir Henry Mainwaring’s ‘A Brief Extract’

Vox: All those, confusing geography terms, explained in a gorgeous antique map

pictoralchartofgeographicaldefinitions

Jstor: Livingstone’s Zambezi Expedition

Halley’s Log: Instructions for Halley’s third voyage

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 31 – Hermann von Helmholtz

William Savage: Pen and Pension: Eighteenth-Century Paten Medicines: Kill or Cure?

daily-advertiser-5081735

Discover: A Weapon in the Soil

Cardhouse.com: Vintage condom package design

io9: Strychnine: A Brief History of the World’s Least Subtle Poison

Thomas Morris: Worms on the pillow

The Daily Telegraph: Bubonic plague Sydney: How a city survived the black death in 1900

Rat catchers with a pile of dead vermin in Sydney in 1900. Rats were fetching up to six pence a head during the outbreak. Picture: State Library of NSW

Rat catchers with a pile of dead vermin in Sydney in 1900. Rats were fetching up to six pence a head during the outbreak.
Picture: State Library of NSW

Surgeons’ Hall Museums: Key Object Page

Royal College of Physicians: ‘My case’: Sir Augusts Frederick D’Esté

The New York Times: Endre A. Balazs, Doctor Who Found a Lubricant for Arthritic Knees, Dies at 95

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: Manchester Medical Manuscripts Collection

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 6 – John James Richard Macleod

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Glass Salt

Teyler’s Museum: Electric lighter with lamp

The Atlantic: The $1 Pocket Microscope

The Conversation: LOL in the age of the telegraph

An 1809 drawing of the electric telegraph. Source: Wikimedia Commons

An 1809 drawing of the electric telegraph.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Ptak Science Books: A Lot of Computer Data on One Sheet of Paper (1956)

Capitalism’s Cradle: The Great British (Industrial) Bake-Off

Yovisto: Ferdinand Porsche – Innovation as a Principle

Capitalism’s Cradle: How Norway Conquered Leviathan

Abraham Staghold, a blacksmith, won a £20 premium from the Society of Arts in 1772 for a whale harpoon to be fired from a swivel gun

Abraham Staghold, a blacksmith, won a £20 premium from the Society of Arts in 1772 for a whale harpoon to be fired from a swivel gun

The Recipes Project: Cooking (Over an Open Fire) In Class

Yovisto: John McCarthy and the Raise of Artificial Intelligence

itv News: Oldest chain bridge in the world’ to re-open in Llangollen

Capitalism’s Cradle: What have Asylum Seekers invented for Us?

Technology’s Stories: Speed!

Early Visual Media: The Stereoscope, Stereo-photography & 3D-Film

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Letters from Gondwana: “Kunstformen der Natur” (Art Forms of Nature)

Yovisto: Sergei Winogradsky and the Science of Bacteriology

Notches: Her Virginal Members: Chastity and Sexual Desire in the Middle Ages

Aelred of Rievaulx Source: Wikimedia Commons

Aelred of Rievaulx
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Atlas Obscura: Object of Intrigue: Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon

Historian of Biology William Provine has passed away

NCSE: William B. Provine dies

Natural History Apostilles: The first source for the spinach-iron myth

UCL Museums & Collections Blog: Behind the Mask – Research in the Noel Collection

Public Domain Review: Tribal Life in Old Lyme: Canada’s Colorblind Chronicler and his Connecticut Exile

Science League of America: Huxley’s Paley, Part 1

Yovisto: Max Delbrück and the Genes

Notches: Race, Class, and Sex Education in Early Twentieth-Century South Africa

Royal Historical Society: Joanne Baily ‘Manly bodies in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century England’

Forbes: What Archaeologists Really Think About Ancient Aliens, Lost Colonies, and Fingerprints of God

Native American pictograph (painted rock art) from a panel of images found in Horseshoe/Barrier Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, Utah. (Image via wikimedia commons user Scott Catron, used under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license.)

Native American pictograph (painted rock art) from a panel of images found in Horseshoe/Barrier Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, Utah. (Image via wikimedia commons user Scott Catron, used under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license.)

NCSE: Eric Davidson dies

Bodleian: Marks of Genius: Micrographia

Latintos: Connecting with Alfred Russel Wallace

Mammoth Tales: Mammoths in the News

Making Science Public: Climate wars

Medievalist.net: Pets in the Middle Ages: Evidence from Encyclopedias and Dictionaries

Skulls in the Stars: Spiders and the electric light (1887)

Embryo Project: “The Origin and Behavior of Mutable Loci in Maize” (1950), By Barbara McClintock

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 1 – Carl Auer von Welsbach

The University of Glasgow Story: Frederick Soddy

Yovisto: Wilhelm Ostwald and Modern Physical Chemistry

The Guardian: Toxic Shock: Agatha Christie’s poisons

Christie's toxic tally tops 30 killer compounds, which she uses in a staggering array of creative methods for murder. Photograph: Alamy

Christie’s toxic tally tops 30 killer compounds, which she uses in a staggering array of creative methods for murder. Photograph: Alamy

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

JHI Blog: Is There a Philosophy of History Today?

The Recipes Project: Teaching Recipes: A September Series (Vol. II)

Londonis.com: The Geek Goddess of London

Dr Sue Black (photo shared via creative commons).

Dr Sue Black (photo shared via creative commons).

Scientific American: Cross-Check: Copernicus, Darwin and Freud: A Tale of Science and Narcissism

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: Manchester Medical Manuscripts Collection

the many-headed monster: The job market for historians: some data, 1995–2014

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Aristocrats and paupers, farmers and tradesmen –

Where do the scientists come from?

The Atlantic: Introducing the Archive Corps

Countway Library of Medicine: The Archives for Women in Science

first_class_small_caption2

University of Leiden: Free Academic Images

MPIHOS: Records of Reception: Framing Knowledge on Asian Art in Early Modern Inventories

MPIHOS: Cabinetizing Art and Knowledge in Early Modern Northern Europe

The #EnvHist Weekly

Medieval Books: Medieval Posters

The H-Word: Britain’s most important historic laboratory is under threat

An early photograph of James Clerk Maxwell’s original Cavendish Laboratory (built 1874). A large archway is due to be knocked through the ground floor of the right-hand wing. From: A History of the Cavendish Laboratory (1910). Photograph: A History of the Cavendish Laboratory (1910)

An early photograph of James Clerk Maxwell’s original Cavendish Laboratory (built 1874). A large archway is due to be knocked through the ground floor of the right-hand wing. From: A History of the Cavendish Laboratory (1910). Photograph: A History of the Cavendish Laboratory (1910)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Internet and the history of science community

NYAM: Do You Recognize These Men? Help Us Identify 19th-century Carte de Visite Photographs

Doc Searls Weblog: Everything we know is provisional

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: The Dregs

Conciatore: Alchemy in the Kitchen

Tesoro del Mondo,

Tesoro del Mondo, “Ars Preparatio Animalium”
Antonio Neri 1598-1600, f. 10r (MS Ferguson 67).

BOOK REVIEWS:

Forbes: God as Ultimate Artist: Frank Wilczek’s Beautiful Question

Bryn Mawr Classical Review: Emily Albu, The Medieval Peutinger Map: Imperial Roman Revival in a German Empire

Tabula Peutingeriana (section)—top to bottom: Dalmatian coast, Adriatic Sea, southern Italy, Sicily, African Mediterranean coast Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tabula Peutingeriana (section)—top to bottom: Dalmatian coast, Adriatic Sea, southern Italy, Sicily, African Mediterranean coast
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Financial Times: ‘The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution’, by David Wootton

Phys Org: What has science ever done for us?

Biographile: Interconnected Worldview Traced to Source in The Invention of Nature

New Scientist: The Invention of Nature find’s science’s lost hero

Humboldt’s trip to South America inspired Darwin to join the Beagle (Image: BPK/SPSG, Berlin-Brandenburg/Hermann Buresch)

Humboldt’s trip to South America inspired Darwin to join the Beagle (Image: BPK/SPSG, Berlin-Brandenburg/Hermann Buresch)

Kirkus: The Hunt for Vulcan …And How Albert Einstein Destroyed a Planet, Discovered Relativity, and Deciphered the Universe

9780812998986

Kirkus: The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World

homunculus: Nature: the biography

NEW BOOKS:

University of Chicago Press: The Territories of Science and Religion

Harvard University Press: The Global Transformation of Time

9780674286146

M Libraries: Digital Conservancy: ‘Many paths to partial truth:’ archives, anthropology, and the power of representation

Armand Colin: Paul Bert… L’inventeur de l’école laïque

Springer: Theory and Practice in the Bioarchaeology of Care

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Royal College of Physicians: Exhibition: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee January–July 2016

The British Museum: A Walk on the Wild Side Tunbridge Wells Museum 12 June–20 September 2015 Last Chance!

walk_on_the_wild_side_304x431

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics

Museum of the Mind: The Maudsley at War: The Story of the Hospital During the Great War Closes 24 September!

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Wallifaction: Alchemy and Avarice: Scientific and Religious Fraud in Ben Jonson’s “The Alchemist” (1610)

Stephen Ouimette at Subtle, the pseudo-alchemist, in the 2015 production at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival.

Stephen Ouimette at Subtle, the pseudo-alchemist, in the 2015 production at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival.

Stratford Festival: The Alchemist 1 August–3 October

The Guardian: Nicole Kidman: ‘You’re still fighting for your voice in a world that can be male-dominated’

Noël Coward Theatre: Photo 51 Bookings to 21 November 2015

National Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time 7 September 2015–13 February 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

The Genius of George Boole

Public Domain Review: Jacob Sarnoff and the Strange World of Anatomical Filmmaking

A still from the film showing the day old infant’s veins mounted on a board.

A still from the film showing the day old infant’s veins mounted on a board.

Discover Medical London: Walking Tours: London’s Plagues

The Royal Society: Event: Dating species divergence using rocks and clocks 9–10 November 2015

The Royal Society: Where were the women boffins? 20 September 2015

APS Museum: Event: The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World 17 September 2015

British Photographic History: Symposium: Beyond Vision: Art, Photography and Science 12 September 2015

British Science Festival: How chemistry saved the Caribbean after WWII 10 September 2015

University of Bradford: Love and War: The Mathematical Way 10 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

L0007159 Dispensing of medical electricity. Oil painting by Edmund Br Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Dispensing of medical electricity. Oil painting by Edmund Bristow, 1824. Oil 1824 By: Edmund BristowPublished: - Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

L0007159 Dispensing of medical electricity. Oil painting by Edmund Br
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
Dispensing of medical electricity. Oil painting by Edmund Bristow, 1824.
Oil
1824 By: Edmund BristowPublished: –
Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 TELEVISION:

BBC Four: Calculating Ada: The Countess of Computing

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Museo Galileo: Galileo’s trial

Vimeo: Genius of George Boole – Graphics Reel

Youtube: Durham University: The Importance of our own Past: Research at Durham University

Youtube: Royal Society: Objectivity #34 – Pearl of Wisdom

Center for the History of Medicine: Voices from the Archives

Synthtopia: An Introduction to the Mellotron (1965)

RADIO:

Radio New Zealand: National: Cracking the Genetic Code

PODCASTS:

History of Alchemy: First 3 minutes of History of Alchemy E01

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

History of Emotions: CfP: Emotions: Movement, Cultural Contact and Exchange, 1100­1800 Freie Universität Berlin 30 June–2 July 2016

Medical History Workshop: Images and Texts in Medical History National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda Maryland 11–13 April 2016

University of Glasgow Dissecting the Page: Medical Paratexts Schedule 11 September 2015

History of Medicine in Ireland: CHOMI Seminar Series Semester One 2015–2016

St Anne’s College Oxford: CfP: Scientiae Oxford 2016 Disciplines of knowing in the early modern world (roughly 1400-1800) 5–7 July 2016

British Library: Lecture: A 17th Century Revolution 2 November 2015

University of London, Birkbeck: CfP: Religion and Medicine: Healing the Body and Soul from the Middle Ages to the Modern Day 15–16 July 2016

American Association for the History of Medicine: CfP: AAHM Annual Meeting Minneapolis, Minnesota 28 April–1 May 2016

University of London: Institute of Historical Research: Trade, Discovery and Influences in the History of Herbal Medicine 14 October 2015

The British Society for Literature and Science: CfP: BLSL Winter Symposium: Science in the Archives Museum of English Rural Life and University of Reading’s Special Collections, 14 November 2015

University of Plymouth: CfP: 3-day Conference: Gender, Power, and Materiality in Early Modern Europe, 1500–1800 7–9 April 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Asian/Asian American Sexualities

the daily: How has midwifery, child birth changed throughout history? Find out at Dittrick Museum of Medical History event 24 September 2015

Museo Nazionale della Scienza e della Tecnologia Leonardo da Vinci, Milan: Scientific Heritage at World Exhibitions and Beyond. The Long XXth Century 20-22 September 2015

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis: CfP: The History of Science and Contemporary Scientific Realism 19-21 February 2016

British Library: Lecture: The Mapping of Cyprus 1485–1885 25 September 2015

cyprus-1566-parijs-sebastian-25-sep

SocPhilSciPract: CfP Metasciences: New Trends in Metaphysics of Science Paris 16–18 December 2015

SHARP 2016 Panel: CfP: The Languages of the Medical Book Paris 18-21 July

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: The Matter of Mimesis 17–18 December 2015

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality and Religion

Leopoldina: Die Ordnungen der Dinge 5–7 October 2015

Canadian Journal of History Special Issue: CfP: The Early Modern Military-Medical Complex

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Medicine and Manuscripts 900–1150 Kalamazoo 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Aarhus University: Postdoc position (2 years): Histories of thought experiments

HSS: NSF-Funded Travel Grants for 2015 HSS Meeting Deadline 30 September!

University of Edinburgh: European Research Council PhD Studentship: Philosophy of Science

Natual Reserve System: University of California: ISEECI Postdoctoral Fellowship in California Ecological and/or Environmental History

Danish Council for Independent Research: Intuitions in Science and Philosophy 2 Postdocs and I PhD Student

Yale University: Senior Tenured Appointment History of Science

Washington University: Assistant Professor History of Medicine

Purdue University: R. Mark Lubbers Chair in the History of Science

Society for Renaissance Studies: Conference Grants

SocPhilSciPract: University of Geneva: PhD Position in Philosophy of Physics or Philosophy of Science

AHF: Fall 2015 Intern

University of Pittsburgh: Associate/Full Professor of History and Philosophy of Science

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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3 Responses to Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #08

  1. Great stuff, and have you spotted a new improved 2015 translation of William Gilbert’s 1600 Latin ‘De Magnete’ at http://www.new-science-theory.com/De%20Magnete/De-Magnete.php

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