Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #14

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #14

Monday 19 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

It’s that time again, time for the next edition of your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that could be scooped up from the depths of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Last Tuesday was Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of women in STEM, so naturally this week’s Whewell’s Gazette has the same theme. The first section of links deals with women in STEM in general.

FIVE: An interview with… Athene Donald on Women in Science

The Guardian: Why Ada Lovelace Day Matters

Churchill College Cambridge: Professor Dame Carol Robinson

BuzzFeed: 100 Inspiring Women Who Made History

New Statesman: This Ada Lovelace Day, Let’s celebrate women in tech while confronting its sexist culture

The next section is a collection of links about Ada Lovelace that mostly concentrate on the real history and less on the hagiography.

“If Ada Lovelace did not exist, it would be necessary to invent her”. –Christopher Burd (@christopherburd)

“Ada Lovelace exhibition at the Science Museum seemed to me like a nice, balanced, modest display, and well worth a visit”. – Philip Ball (@philipcball)

Royal Museums Greenwich: Ada Lovelace and female computers

Inside the Science Museum: Ada Lovelace: A visionary of the computer age

Gallery View of “Ada Lovelace Enchantress of numbers. An exhibition about the remarkable story of Ada Lovelace, a Victorian pioneer of the computer age, celebrating the bicentenary of her birth.

Gallery View of “Ada Lovelace Enchantress of numbers. An exhibition about the remarkable story of Ada Lovelace, a Victorian pioneer of the computer age, celebrating the bicentenary of her birth.

ODNB: Ada Lovelace

BBC Four: Calculating Ada: Not your typical role model: Ada Lovelace the 19th century programmer

BBC Radio 4: The Letters of Ada Lovelace

BBC News: Ada Lovelace’s letters and work on display at Oxford Library

CHF: the French Connection

An 1839 woven silk portrait of French textile merchant and inventor Joseph-Marie Jacquard, recently added to CHF’s collections. The portrait, made on a Jacquard loom, required more than 24,000 cards to create the pattern. (CHF Collections/Jesse Olanday)

An 1839 woven silk portrait of French textile merchant and inventor Joseph-Marie Jacquard, recently added to CHF’s collections. The portrait, made on a Jacquard loom, required more than 24,000 cards to create the pattern. (CHF Collections/Jesse Olanday)

We then have a section of links on the stories of individual or groups of women in #histSTM.

Atlas Obscura: The Daredevil Girl Pals Who Conquered the Sky

A signed photograph of Harriet Quimby and Matilde Moisant. (Photo: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives/flickr)

A signed photograph of Harriet Quimby and Matilde Moisant. (Photo: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives/flickr)

Google Cultural Institute: 1944: Women in Computing: A British Perspective

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A bewitching lady astronomer

Aglaonice Source: unknown

Aglaonice
Source: unknown

ODNB: Squire, Jane (bap. 1686, d. 1743)

Scientific American: 15 Works of Art Depicting Women in Science

“Portrait of Gabrielle-Émilie le Tonnelier de Breteuil, Marquise du Châtelet” – Nicolas de Largillière
(oil on canvas)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Guardian: On Ada Lovelace Day, here are seven other pioneering women in tech

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Isabella Karle’s Interview

Open Culture: Hear Seven Hours of Women Making Electronic Music (1938–2014)

Delia Derbyshire

Delia Derbyshire

Government Equalities Office: Women in Engineering

Wellcome Library: Women pharmacists demand the vote

Wired: Her Code Got Humans on the Moon – And Invented Software Itself

Margaret Hamilton at the MIT Museum in Cambridge, MA. Photo: HARRY GOULD HARVEY IV FOR WIRED

Margaret Hamilton at the MIT Museum in Cambridge, MA.
Photo: HARRY GOULD HARVEY IV FOR WIRED

Musings of a Clumsy Palaeontologist: In Honour of Ada Lovelace – Female Palaeontologists

Letters From Gondwana: Marie Stopes and Her Legacy as Plaeobotanist

Marie Stopes (1880-1958) photographed by George Bernard Shaw. (LSE Archives Image Record, 1921).

Marie Stopes (1880-1958) photographed by George Bernard Shaw. (LSE Archives Image Record, 1921).

Embryo Project: Marie Stopes International

TrowelBlazers: Veronica Seton-Williams

Veronica Seton-WIlliams, image courtesy of the EES.

Veronica Seton-WIlliams, image courtesy of the EES.

Brain Pickings: Trailblazing Astronomer Vera Rubin on Obsessiveness, Minimizing Obstacles, and How the Trill of Accidental Discovery Redeems the Terror of Uncertainty

Mental Floss: 8 Stellar Facts About the Most accomplished Female Astronomer You’ve Never Heard Of

Caroline Herschel IMAGE CREDIT: MRS. JOHN HERSCHEL, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Caroline Herschel
IMAGE CREDIT:
MRS. JOHN HERSCHEL, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

A lot of the articles in the Internet on the #histSTM of women are unfortunately historically not very accurate and mythologizing. A great exception is Lady Science, which celebrated its first anniversary last Friday. Lady science is well researched, well written and historically accurate and if you don’t already subscribe to their monthly newsletter you should.

Lady Science 1 Year Anniversary

Lady Science

We close our women in #histSTM on a sombre note. 12 October was the one hundredth anniversary of the English nurse Edith Cavell in Belgium in WW I.

Edith Cavell executed 12 October 1915

 CRGXCp-W8AAyqvD

The Conversation: Edith Cavell: the British nurse who taught women the way of the stiff upper lip

The H-Word: Edith Cavell: nurse, martyr, and spy?

image-20151009-9124-1xz2zt2

British Pathé: Service at Westminster Abbey – Nurse Cavell 1915

ODNB: Cavell, Edith Louisa (1865–1915)

CRGZ_klWoAEMZ-8.jpg-large

Quotes of the week:

Calvin

“People laugh about children who ask “why?” all the time but not about the adults who never do”. – Andy Matuschak (@andy_matuschak)

‘Science in itself’ is nothing, for it exists only in the human beings who are its bearers. –Virchow h/t @embryoprojct

“Men don’t make passes at girls who wear glasses.”

“Why do you think I wear them?” – Jennifer Wallis (@harbottlestores)

“Hard work is for people who have nothing better to do”–

“The truth is rarely pure and never simple”. – Oscar Wilde

“My take on scientists saying that we might have MAYBE! detected an alien civilization? Crying in my beer over the stupidization of astronomy” – Mike Brown (@plutokiller)

“When Adam delved, and Eve span, who was then the gentleman? From the beginning all men by nature were created alike” – John Ball 1338-1381

“I think I cracked the Gödel Code. It’s like God but this heavy metal version with the Nazi dots”. – Casmilus (@Casmilus)

 Wren quote

 PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

New Scientist: Explore 100 years of general relativity

moonandback.com: Ninth Planet Named For God of Dark, Dank, Distant Underworld

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Henry Frisch and Andrew Hanson’s Interview

Physics Central: Buzz Blog: Christopher Columbus Steals the Moon

The Space Review: Declassified documents offer a new perspective on Yuri Gagarin’s flight

Gagarin being led to his spaceship at the top of the gantry by Oleg Ivanovsky who was the “lead” (production) designer of the Vostok spaceship.

Gagarin being led to his spaceship at the top of the gantry by Oleg Ivanovsky who was the “lead” (production) designer of the Vostok spaceship.

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 14 – Friedrich Kohlrausch

AHF: Norman Ramsey:

The H–Word: Frank Malina and an overlooked Space Age milestone

AIP: Jesse Greenstein I

AIP: Jesse Greenstein II

Martin J. Clemens: The Mysterious Celestial Spheres of the Ancient Mughal Empire

The famous celestial globe of Muhammad Salih Tahtawi is inscribed with Arabic and Persian inscriptions, completed in the year 1631.

The famous celestial globe of Muhammad Salih Tahtawi is inscribed with Arabic and Persian inscriptions, completed in the year 1631.

AHF: The Alsos Mission

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 16 – China Goes Nuclear

Louvre: Roofed spherical sundial

Slate: The Vault: An Early-20th-Century Globe Promoting the Fantasy of a Socialist Culture on Mars

The Royal Society: The Repository: Newton’s dog-ears

NASA: Remembering George Mueller, Leader of Early Human Spaceflight

Yovisto: Réaumur and the Réaumur Temperature Scale

BBC News: The First Spacewalk

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Mariners Today Still Use a Math Genius’ 1802 Navigation Guide

Atlas Obscura: China’s Classroom Maps Put The Middle Kingdom at the Center of the World

Ptak Science Books: A Glorious if Not Accurate Map of Ocean Currents 1675

Intelligent Life: Deleted Islands

Atlas Obscura: How Marshall Islanders Navigated the Sea Using Only Sticks and Shells

Cambridge University Library: Collections: Marshal Islands Sailing Charts

Sailing chart of Marshall Islands archipelago. Black & White photograph, taken in May 1928, from the Science Museum Photo Archive. Object on loan to the Science Museum from the Royal Empire Society

Sailing chart of Marshall Islands archipelago. Black & White photograph, taken in May 1928, from the Science Museum Photo Archive. Object on loan to the Science Museum from the Royal Empire Society

Atlas Obscura: Places You Can No Longer Go: The Navigation Trees

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Business Insider: A relic of medieval history explains why glasses make people look smart

Thomas Morris: Stay of execution

The Atlantic: A Short History of Empathy

Mimi Matthews: Aphrodisiacs, Elixirs, and Dr, Brodum’s Restorative Nervous Cordial

V0016204 Two unorthodox medical practitioners, J. Graham and G. Kater Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

V0016204 Two unorthodox medical practitioners, J. Graham and G. Kater
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org

Royal College of Physicians: Mark Edwin Silverman

The Cut: The First Legal Abortion Providers Tell Their Stories

Embryo Project: Rudolf Carl Virchow (1821–1902)

Museum of Health Care: Diphtheria

The History of Modern Biomedicine: History of Cervical Cancer and the Role of Human Papillomavirus, 1960–2000

Remedia: Crafting a (Written) Science of Surgery: The First European Surgical Texts

Atlas Obscura: The True Story of Dr. Voronoff’s Plan to Use Monkey Testicles to Make Us Immortal

L0003517 Caricature of Serge Samuel Voronoff (1866 - ) Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

L0003517 Caricature of Serge Samuel Voronoff (1866 – )
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org

Fugitive Leaves: Tracing Monsters Across Medicine

Thomas Morris: Brained by a bull

Conciatore: A Gift for the Innocent

Thomas Morris: A case of hiccups

NYAM: Cook Like a Roman: The New York Academy of Medicine’s Apicius Manuscript

The Recipes Project: Removing Arrowheads in Antiquity and the Middle Ages

History of Medicine in Ireland: AIDS and history

Conciatore: Alessandro Neri

Thomas Morris: Aleing all day, and oiling all night

Medium: Ralph M. Rosen: The Best Doctor is Also a Philosopher: Galen on Science and the Humanities

Thomas Morris: Hemlock and millipedes

One to be taken three times a day

One to be taken three times a day

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: The Origins of Anesthesia

Smells Like Science: Ether and the Discovery of Anesthesia

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: The Purse of Envy

A Thoroughly Anglophile Journal: Uncovering a History of Secrets

The Atlantic: The Sexism of American Kitchen Design

Mrs. H.M. Richardson, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) housewife is shown as she prepares a meal in her all-electric kitchen in Morris, Tenn., on January 15, 1936. (AP Photo)

Mrs. H.M. Richardson, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) housewife is shown as she prepares a meal in her all-electric kitchen in Morris, Tenn., on January 15, 1936. (AP Photo)

Christie’s The Art People: The evolution of the modern PC in Eight objects

NPR: Turnspit Dogs: The Rise and Fall of the Vernepator Cur

AEON: The hand-held’s tale

Academia: Seeing the Invisible: The Introduction and Development of Electron Microscopy in Britain, 1935–1945

Leaping Robot Blog: Remembering Lines of Light

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Washington Post: A scientist found a bird that hadn’t been seen in half a century, then killed it. Here’s why

Embryo Project: Theodor Heinrich Boveri (1862–1915)

Royal Society: The Repository: Drawing under the Microscope

BHL: Fossils Under the Microscope: Hooke and Micrographia

Robert Hooke's microscope. Micrographia, 1665. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/786364. Digitized by: Missouri Botanical Garden.

Robert Hooke’s microscope. Micrographia, 1665. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/786364. Digitized by: Missouri Botanical Garden.

BHL: Proving Extinction: Cuvier and the Elephantimorpha

BHL: Early Innovations in Paleontology: Gessner and Fossils

BHL: The Roots of Paleontology: Brongniart and Fossil Plants

BHL: A Sinner Killed During the Great Flood or a Fossil Reptile? Discovering a Plesiosaur

World of Phylogenetic Networks: Buffon and the origin of the tree and network metaphors

Brain Pickings: Gorgeous 19th-Century Illustrations of Owls and Ospreys

Royal Natural History Lydekker 6

Royal Natural History Lydekker 6

BHL: Fact or Fiction? Discovering the Mosasaur

Hyperaallergic: The 16th–Century Fossil Book that First Depicted the Pencil

BHL: The First Described and Validly Named Dinosaur

BHL: Uncovering the “Fish Lizard”: Ichthyosaurs and Home

BHL: Naming the Second Dinosaur: Mantell and Iguanodon

BioInteractive: Reading Primary Sources: Darwin and Wallace

Public Domain Review: Richard Spruce and the Trials of Victorian Bryology

Map showing Spruce’s route through the Andes from Notes of a Botanist on the Amazon and Andes (1908), edited by Alfred Russel Wallace – Source.

Map showing Spruce’s route through the Andes from Notes of a Botanist on the Amazon and Andes (1908), edited by Alfred Russel Wallace – Source.

American Museum of Natural History: Invertebrate Zoology: Amber

Mammoth Tales: The First Trilobite

Embryo Project: The Meckel-Serres Conception of Recapitulation

CHEMISTRY:

io9: How Pee Led to One of the 17th Century’s Most Important Chemistry Breakthroughs

The Alchemist in Search of the Philosopher's Stone, by Joseph Wright, 1771 Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Alchemist in Search of the Philosopher’s Stone, by Joseph Wright, 1771
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gizmodo: How One Man’s Love of Urine Led to the Discovery of Phosphorus

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 12 – Ascanio Sobrero

Science at Play: Periodic Round Table

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 13 – Margaret Thatcher

Chemistry World: Chemistry Nobel laureate Richard Heck dies

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Factually: The patron saint of the internet is Isidore of Seville, who tried to record everything ever known

Culture 24: The Crime Museum Uncovered: Museum of London’s show merges morbid curiosity and real stories

The Recipes Project: Categories in a Database of Eighteenth-Century Medical Recipes

The Chronicle of Higher Education: The Future of History

The Guardian: History v historical fiction

Willing to suspend disbelief … Jane Smiley. Photograph: Rex

Willing to suspend disbelief … Jane Smiley. Photograph: Rex

#EnvHist Weekly

In Useful: Nathaniel Comfort Begins as Third NASA/Library of Congress Chair of Astrobiology

CHF: Merger Announced

CHF: CHF and LSF Announce Merger

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Change, history, and a talk before Parliament

EurekaAlert!: Six Degrees of Francis Bacon launches

Smithsonian.com: Six Degrees of Francis Bacon Is Your New Favourite Trivia Game

Corpus Newtonicum: Isaac Newton Library Online

The Newton Project: Books in Newton’s Library

Londonist: Pie Charts of the Life of the Londoner Who Invented Pie Charts

William Payfair's pie chart. Much better and less frivolous than our own examples.

William Payfair’s pie chart. Much better and less frivolous than our own examples.

Priceonomics: Should You Ever Use a Pie Chart?

The Bookseller: Knowledge Unlatched moves into second phase

the many-headed monster: Sources, Empathy and Politics in History from Below

ESOTERIC:

Open Culture: In 1704, Isaac Newton Predicts the World Will End in 2060

Modern Mechanix: Machine Reads Your Head Bumps (Jul, 1931)

med_machine_reads_head_bumps

BOOK REVIEWS:

The New York Review of Books: The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt

Forbes Tech: Pre-Digital Cartography is Still Key to “Mapping” Human History

MAP-flat-cover-1705x1940

Notches: “The Gay Revolution”: An Interview with Lillian Faderman

Science Book a Day: Imagination and a Pile of Junk: A Droll History of Inventors and Inventions

Thinking Like a Mountain: Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914

NEW BOOKS:

Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine: A History of Bovine TB c.1965–c.2000 Free download

W.W. Norton: Lady Byron and Her Daughters

9780393082685_198

University of Toronto Press: The Secrets of Generation: Reproduction in the Long Eighteenth Century

Bloomsbury Publishing: Medical Negligence in Victorian Britain

Jim Baggott: Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation

Science Book a Day: Epidemics (eyewitness Guides)

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace

BBC News: Ada Lovelace: Opium, maths and the Victorian programmer

Wellington.scoop: History of maps of charts – new exhibition opening at National Library

Academia: #ColeEx – Twitter Exhibition of Twentieth-Century Natural History and Zoology at the Cole Museum of Zoology, UK

Journal of Art in Society: Science Becomes Art

Joseph Wright of Derby, A Philosopher giving that Lecture on the Orrery (1766) Derby Museums (detail)

Joseph Wright of Derby, A Philosopher giving that Lecture on the Orrery (1766) Derby Museums (detail)

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything 10 October–28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs till 21 February 2016

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Closes 25 October 2015

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs till 13 March 2016

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Extended to 31 January 2016

CLOSING SOON: Florence Nightingale Museum: The Kiss of Light 23 October 2015!

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscopy Runs till 23 November 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Early Modern Medicine: Review: Jane Wenham the Witch of Walkern

The Conversation: Good year for science on stage as Nicole Kidman discovers the double helix in Photograph 51

Photograph 51, , Credit Johan Persson

Photograph 51, , Credit Johan Persson

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Bookings until 21 November 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Science Museum: Evening Exchange: Ada Lovelace

University of York: Ada Lovelace Day Wikipedia 2015 Editathon at YorkU 29 October

Youtube: Experimenter – Official Trailer 1 (2015)

Barts Pathology Museum: Contraception & Consent: a 19thC Sex Education 25 November 2015

Youtube: The Forgotten Voyage: Alfred Russel Wallace and his discovery of evolution by natural selection

Museum of Fine Arts Boston: Sorting Out a World of Wonders: Science in the Dutch Golden Age 4 November 2015

Johns Hopkins University: History of Medicine Department: Colloquium with Harold Cook: Descartes’ Early Medical Interests: Some Conjectures 22 October 2015

University of Strathclyde: James Watt’s heat engine: energy transitions past, present, and future 21 October 2015

Royal College of Physicians: Walking Tour: Fit to rule?

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology

The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities: Inaugural Annual Ada Lovelace Lecture 27 October 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek by Jan Verkolje, c.1680

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek by Jan Verkolje, c.1680

TELEVISION:

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Manhattan noir

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Damon Albarn’s Dr Dee live session

Youtube: Alpen-Adria-University Klagenfurt: POPSCI 2015

Youtube: Continental Drift Alfred Wegener Song by The Amoeba People

Nature Documentaries.org: The Making of a Theory: Darwin, Wallace, and Natural Selection

BSHS: BSHS Annual Conference in Swansea

Vimeo: Jim Endersby: Darwin, Hooker, and Empire

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Perpetual Motion

PODCASTS:

New Books in Medicine: EUGENE RAIKHEL, EDITOR; TODD MEYERS, ASSOCIATE EDITOR; EMILY YATES-DOERR, MEMBER Somatosphere.net

Soundcloud: Poem: On the Publishing of Robert Boyle’s The Sceptical Chymist, 1661

The_Sceptical_Chymist

abc.net: RN Drive: Twitterati: @brennawalks

The Royal Society: Hooke’s microscopic world

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Leeds: Call for Participants: Workshops: Pasts, Presents and Futures of Medical Regeneration January, April and June 2016

University of Oxford: Bodleian Libraries: Gough Map Symposium 2015: 2 November

St Anne’s College Oxford: CfP. Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

UCL: CfP: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain during April 2016

H–SCi–Med–Tech: CfP: Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 25 January 2016

The Linnaean Society of New York: Programs 2015–2016 Seasons

University of Lancaster: CfP: Panel on Photographic History at SHS Conference 21–23 March 2016

UCL: Conference: Europe From The Outside in? Imagining Civilization through Collecting the Exotic

The Wagner Free Institute of Science: Chemistry Series: The Periodic Table of Elements: How We Got It and How We Can Use It Mondays Begins 19 October 2015

University of Alberta: Three Societies Meeting: BSHS–CSHPS–HSS 22-25 June 2016

ICHST 2017: 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology Rio de Janeiro Brazil 23-29 July 2017

banner_1434035935_5_4_layer1

University of Minneapolis: CfP: The International Society for History and Philosophy of Science 11th International Congress 22–25 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Harvard: Tenure-Track Assistant Professor in the History of Modern or Contemporary Physics

The Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences: Professor for Science Communications

University of Ghent: Three Fully Funded PhD Scholarships in European Periodical Studies

University of Basel: Postdoc: The Effects of Glass Making in Venetian Self-Perception and Identity

APS: Long-Term Pre-Doctoral Fellowships

UC Irvine: Assistant, Associate or Full Professor: History and Philosophy of Science preference

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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5 Responses to Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #14

  1. Phillip Helbig says:

    A lot of Ada here, but over at TRM much deconstruction of same. Discuss.

      • Phillip Helbig says:

        I suspected something similar, but it is rather strange to have links here, presumably placed by you, pointing to articles about Ada Lovelace as the first computer programmer, while over at TRM you state that this is basically bullshit and such journalists should suffer for their sins!

      • thonyc says:

        I try to maintain a certain level of editorial neutality here at Whewell’s Gazette. I often post links to article with which I don’t necessarily agree, leaving it up to the readers to make their own judgements. On AL, I basically strongly support ALD but am on record as saying that I wish they had chosen another figurehead, as I don’t think AL is appropriate. On this occasion I only selected those articles on AL that were half way reasonable. I have a collection of links on my computer to articles on AL posted on Tuesday that I refused to include here. I shall be using them for my next anti-AL-hagiography article.

      • Phillip Helbig says:

        “On AL, I basically strongly support ALD but am on record as saying that I wish they had chosen another figurehead, as I don’t think AL is appropriate.”

        I agree: She is remembered primarily for the fact that she is a woman, her scientific reputation is exaggerated and few dare to comment on the lack of the empress’s new clothes. Pretty much wrong in every respect as the figurehead for “women in science”. Almost as bad (with respect to women in science, not otherwise) as that other famous Lovelace. 🙂

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