Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #15

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #15

Monday 26 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

We are back again with Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list, as always bursting at the seams with all the histories of science, technology and medicine that the Internet had to offer over the last seven days.

I’m not actually sure if anybody reads the editorials that I put up here every week. They, together with the Quotes of the Week and Birthday(s) of the Week, are here to give the whole thing more the atmosphere of a real journal rather than just a rather tedious looking list of Internet links. The editorials that I write are always spontaneous, something that has occurred to me whilst putting together those rather formidable looking links lists. Some weeks its difficult thinking of anything to write, other times they write themselves with very little effort on my part.

This weeks editorial has sadly written itself, as on Sunday the #histsci community lost one of its most prominent, colourful and loved members with the death of Lisa Jardine. I’m not even going to attempt to outline all that Lisa did over a ridiculously prolific academic career, you can read all of that in the Wikipedia article I link to below. Instead I’m going to reproduce some, but by no means all, of the heart felt comments that flooded Twitter as the sad news spread throughout our Internet community. Lisa was one of a kind both as an academic and as a human being and she will be sorely missed by many who knew her personally and even more who only knew her through her numerous publications. After the comments are some links to radio broadcasts, videos, interviews etc. where you can experience once again in her own words, as well as the obituaries from the papers and others.

I humbly dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to one of the most vibrant British historians of the last fifty years, Lisa Jardine.

Lisa Jardine (1944–2015) Source: CELL

Lisa Jardine (1944–2015)
Source: CELL

 “Behave Badly”

We’ve lost one of the giants – Thony Christie

 Bugger. Lisa Jardine has died. Bugger. We all die, some sooner, some later. Some too soon. RIP Lisa. You are sadly missed. – Cornelius J. Schilt

 So sad to hear of the death of the wonderful Lisa JardineShe will be greatly missed by all who knew her – Athene Donald

 RIP Lisa Jardine, noted historian and public intellectual. Many happy memories of her lively company – Graham Farmelo

 Hugely shocked and sad to hear of Lisa Jardine’s death. She had such gusto and spirit, it doesn’t seem possible. Great loss for culture. – Philip Ball

Lisa Jardine always sparkling. Took me aside once and said I should speak up more. She did that for so many women…. – Suzanne Moore

Oh….terribly sad news about Lisa Jardine’s death. A fabulous scholar and colleague. Let us remember her well – Joe Cain

Lisa Jardine has been such an inspiration to me over the past few years! What a wonderful person and a terrible loss. – Meg Rosenburg

The death of a great historian is tragic, but they live on through their work – in their reconstruction of the past, we find their thoughts – Greg Jenner

Lisa Jardine dies at 71, leaving us too soon. Memories of our term together at Princeton in 1988. RIP. – Kathryn Olesko

So sad to hear that we’ve lost Lisa Jardine. A giant, a true renaissance woman, the model of what a scholar & public intellectual should be. – John Gallagher

So very sad to hear of the death of Lisa Jardine, such a generous warm-hearted academic whenever I encountered her ­– Katy Barrett

Just saw the news about the loss of Lisa Jardine. It’s hard to believe. She had such energy and presence. – Cathryn Pearce

RIP Lisa Jardine whose publications made a huge impact on my own research and dissertation – Katherine Martinez

Such an amazing response for Lisa Jardine tonight. In the sadness I’m glad for that, the books, broadcasts & the inspiration & generosity. – Rebekah Higgitt

Lisa Jardine an irresistible force finally met her immoveable object. Much missed. – Pete Langman

I am deeply saddened to hear that Lisa Jardine has passed away. I lived for her appearances on In Our Time. – Paraic O’Donnell

Oh my goodness. Sad news. Rest in peace. – Jennifer Park

Saddened to hear of the death of Lisa Jardine. She was very encouraging when I was hesitating over doing a Master’s as a mature student. – Sally Osbourne

Tremendously sad news about the death of Professor Lisa Jardine – Lee Durbin

Just heard that Lisa Jardine has died. Very sad. She was a great scholar & communicator of culture, science, and the cultures of science – Carsten Timmermann

So sorry to hear. “Worldly Goods” helped me discover my love for the Renaissance. – Susan Rojas

Sad to lose our groundbreaking Early Modernist colleague, Lisa – American Science Blog

Lisa Jardine used to give out badges to women saying ‘Behave Badly’ on it. RIP. – Mirander Fay Thomas

Lisa Jardine (1944-2015). A giant of a public intellectual by any measure, a presence the moment you set foot in the vicinity of her fields. In research I encountered Lisa Jardine’s footprints everywhere; today I’m learning something new about her by the hour. Remarkable scholar.– Nicholas Tam

So sad to hear about Lisa Jardine. What a giant. Ingenious Pursuits was a high point in grad school. – Elly Truitt

Sad to hear that Lisa Jardine has died. Was inspired to study early modern history after reading ‘Erasmus, Man of Letters’ as an undergrad. – Robert Harkins

I’ve been very moved by the outpouring of love for Lisa Jardine on Twitter this evening. – Mathew Lyons

Jardine was wildly clever, funny, a great supporter of women in academia, and had excellent taste in music – Sophie Pitman

I never had the honor of meeting Lisa Jardine, but I am so sad to hear of her death. We have lost one of the giants of Renaissance history! – Alisha Rankin

Very sad to hear of the death of Lisa Jardine: great colleague, scholar, progressive, historian, mentor, author & shared admirer of Wedgwood – Tristram Hunt

We’ve lost Lisa Jardine today. I met her only twice, but those meetings had a huge impact on me; Lisa Jardine was one of the sharpest, boldest, wittiest, and most generous scholars I’ve met. But I’ve also met Lisa Jardine through the scholars she collected around herself, at Live & Letters but also in a wider circle. They are the brightest, most generous, most badly behaved, most adventurous group of historical scholars I’ve ever seen. Meeting them has reinvigorated my scholarship, and it has done so with many, I’m sure. Tonight my thoughts are with those scholars around Lisa Jardine, in sadness, and in excited anticipation of everything they’ll create. – Sjoerd Levelt

Lisa Jardine was one of my supervisors at grad school. An immense intellect (and personality), but unfailingly generous and unconceited. – Ross Dandridge

Lisa Jardine was one of the great historians. She understood that to write of humanity you needed to be fully part of it. – Simon Schama

Lisa Jardine kindly praised my article ‘A Physicist’s Lost Love.’ I’ll always feel honored. – Gene Dannen

Sad to hear of the death of Prof. Lisa Jardine. As V&A Trustee for 8 years, her expertise & intellect was invaluable – V&A

Lisa Jardine has died. Warm, provocative, inspiring. She still had too much to tell to us. – Johan Oosterman

Really sad Lisa Jardine has died. Funny, warm and mischievous — when we agreed and disagreed. Especially when we disagreed. – Mark Henderson

Sad to hear of death of Lisa Jardine. As a tribute I hope everyone takes up her call to “behave badly” – Peter Broks

So sad to hear about Lisa Jardine – I will miss her warmth, energy, wit and fantastic support for female colleagues – Felicity Henderson

We’re saddened by news Lisa Jardine has died aged 71 Our thoughts are with her family and friends. – Royal Society

Sad for history to be mourning 2 greats in Jardine & Cesarani; but note w/ pride huge value of their research/expertise beyond academe. – Sara Pennell

We are heartbroken to learn of the death of our beloved and respected President, Lisa Jardine – AHS

Lisa Jardine was an inspiring and exemplary historian. And a wonderful friend. The world is a poorer place without her. Amada Foreman

Lisa Jardine “I only do the things I love and I love the things I do” – Rose Essex

Finally got the courage up to look at twitter. Lisa was the best, and I’m so so glad that she helped and influenced so many of us x I keep returning to the memory of Lisa Jardine at RSA this year, utterly gleeful at the work being presented by ECRs at CELL panels & beyond. She had such a great, infectious love for smart, thoughtful research, and such deep, instinctive care for the people who take part in it. That’s how you do it, right. You love the work, and you support the people who do it in any way you can, and you never elide the hard graft and the effort doing that kind of work takes, and the differing challenges people face. – Kirsty Rolfe

In hope she might laugh:

Lisa your critics compared to thee

Excite contempt & laughter.

No pair of heels I do believe

So many have run after – Faye Getz

Wikipedia: Lisa Anne Jardine, CBE FRS FRHistS (née Bronowski 12 April 1944–25 October 2015)

Lisa Jardine Source: Tribune REporter

Lisa Jardine
Source: Tribune REporter

Lisa in her own words

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Behind the Scenes: The Seven Ages of Science an Interview with Lisa Jardine

BBC Radio 4: Seven Ages of Science

Science Museum Group Journal Review: Seven Ages of Science, BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4: Desert Island Discs: Lisa Jardine

Youtube: Lisa Jardine: Lecture: ‘What is left of Culture and Society’

Soundcloud: Conway Hall: Things I Never Knew about my Father

Youtube: Inaugural Lecture – Professor Lisa Jardine

New Statesman: Lisa Jardine on life and death

New Statesman: Lisa Jardine (1944–2015): How history can be built around fictions, not events

UCL Press: Lisa Jardine: Temptation in the Archives (free download)

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: The Royal Society

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Zero

BBC Radio 4: Point of View: Keeping time

Tributes and Obituaries

BBC Radio 4: A Point of View: A Tribute to Lisa Jardine

The Guardian: Renowned historian Lisa Jardine dies aged 71

THE: Lisa Jardine: academics pay tribute to historian

The Independent: Lisa Jardine dead: ‘Inspirational historian’ and broadcaster dies aged 71

UCL Press: A Tribute to Lisa Jardine (12 April 1944–25 October 2015)

BBC News: Lisa Jardine: Tributes after renowned historian dies

The Guardian: Lisa Jardine ‘She bedazzled her generation’ – (audio)

In The Dark: R.I.P. Lisa Jardine

The Guardian: Lisa Jardine and David Cesarani were just the kind of public intellectuals Britain needs

British Science Association: A tribute to Professor Lisa Jardine

Apollo Magazine: A Tribute to Lisa Jardine

History News Network: Lisa Jardine, historian, humanist, daughter of Jacob Bronowski, dies

Quotes of the week:

“We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.” – Kurt Vonnegut

“If history is boring, it’s the historian’s fault” – Alexis Coe (@AlexisCoe)

“Astronomy is one of the sublimest fields of human investigation. The mind that grasps its facts and principles receives something of enlargement and grandeur belonging to the science itself. It is a quickener of devotion”. – Horace Mann h/t @HistAstro

“Documentation on journals can be really hard to find. Nature threw everything away in the 60s!” – Malinda Baldwin (@Malinda_Baldwin)

“The only truth in Music” – Jack Kerouac

“I immediately loved working with flies. They fascinated me, and followed me around in my dreams.” – Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard h/t @embryoproject

“When everyone is dead, the Great Game is finished. Not before.”– Rudyard Kipling

“”Why isn’t there cool stuff like hoverboards!?” types stupid man on handheld device capable of accessing the sum total of human knowledge”. – Stu Lux Lisbon (@StuLuxLisbon)

“Though God cannot alter the past, historians can; it is perhaps because they are useful to Him in this respect that He tolerates their existence.” – Samuel Butler h/t @jondresner

“What’s this Mummy?” “It’s a pachy… pachyceph… It’s a sort of allosaurus, because Mummy can pronounce that one.” – Sophia Collins (@sophiacol)

“To study the abnormal is the best way of understanding the normal”. – William James

“Every meme ever: I wish humans weren’t so human. I wish we were what we pretend we are”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

Birthdays of the Week:

The Earth was born 23 October 4004 BCE

The Earth as seen from Apollo 17

The Earth as seen from Apollo 17

 October 23, 4004 B.C.: Happy Birthday Earth!

Renaissance Mathematicus: In defence of the indefensible

Irish Philosophy: James Ussher academic modernity

Science League of America: Seven Myths about Ussher

James Chadwick born 20 October 15

 

James Chadwick Source: Wikimedia Commons

James Chadwick
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AIP: James Chadwick

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 20 – James Chadwick

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Nature Physics: A century of physics

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 19 – Ernest Rutherford

Modern Contemporary: The Global Transformation of Time: 1870–1950

Popular Science: General Relativity: 100 Years Old and Still Full of Surprises

The New York Times: George Mueller, Engineer Who Helped Put Man on Moon, Dies at 97

A tense moment during the AS-101 launch. Standing, from left to right are George Mueller, Wernher von Braun, and Eberhard Rees (Director for Research and Development at MSFC). Source: Wikimedia Commons

A tense moment during the AS-101 launch. Standing, from left to right are George Mueller, Wernher von Braun, and Eberhard Rees (Director for Research and Development at MSFC).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: Los Alamos, NM

AHF: The Science Behind the Atom Bomb

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Rose Bethe’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Furman’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Lamphere’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: David P. Rudolph’s Interview

AHF: The Alsos Mission

AHF: Nuclear Fission

The Conversation: The astronomer and the witch – how Kepler saved his mother from the stake

Great Comet of 1577, which Kepler witnessed with his mother as a child.

Great Comet of 1577, which Kepler witnessed with his mother as a child.

Journal of Art in Society: Comets in Art

The Christian Science Monitor: How astronomy solved a Civil War mystery

Wellcome Trust Blog: Image of the Week: Prince Iskandar’s horoscope

AIP: Felix Bloch

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The plot against Leo Szilard

The Atlantic: The First Image of Earth Taken From Space (It’s Not What You Think)

Compasswallah: The Rings on Buddha’s Saturn

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BBC Future: How a Nazi rocket could have put a Briton in space

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 25 – Evangelista Torricelli

IOLbeta: A brief history of relativity

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Mental Floss: 8 Antique Maps That Were the First of Their Kind

Atlas Obscura: The Hole Truth About Why We ‘Dig to China’

Atlas Obscura: The 50-Foot Long Map of Manhattan Only On View for 6 Hours

History Today: Richard Burton dies in Trieste

Slate: The Vault: An Early-20th-Century British Map of the Global Drug Trade

Opium Map

Opium Map

British Library: Revelatory Rivers in Germany – Part 2

Princeton.edu: Hydrography

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Lettuce, a Class A drug

Wellcome Library: Doctors and the invention of the English seaside

V0012256 Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. C Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. Coloured etching by W. Heath after himself. By: William HeathPublished: -

V0012256 Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. C
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. Coloured etching by W. Heath after himself.
By: William HeathPublished: –

The Wall Street Journal: LSD Archive Has Been on a Long, Strange Trip

CHICC Manchester: Early Medical Printed Illustrations

Royal College of Physicians: The ornament of his age

Wellcome Images: Aids Posters

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 22 – Vitamin C

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Littlejohn’s Report of the Sanitary Conditions of Edinburgh

The New York Times: In Ancient DNA, Evidence of Plague Much Earlier Than Previously Known

The Recipes Project: Antimony and Ambergris: ‘New’ Ingredients in the Antidotarium Magnum

Apothecary shop, British Library Ms Sloane 1977 f. 49v. From an early 14th century manuscript of the Circa instans (and other works), France (Amiens). Image Credit: The British Library.

Apothecary shop,
British Library Ms Sloane 1977 f. 49v. From an early 14th century manuscript of the Circa instans (and other works), France (Amiens). Image Credit: The British Library.

Thomas Morris: An ‘unnatural propensity’ and its perils

The Atlantic: There Will Be Blood

Thomas Morris: The electric scalpel

Oxford Today: Cigarettes, bully beef and camel meat: How First World War soldiers survived in the Near East

TECHNOLOGY:

The J.Paul Getty Museum: Thomas Annan Steam Engine

Royal Society of Chemistry: Classic kit: Vernier scale

Gizmodo: The History and Future of Locks and Keys

1485731789406437413

Conciatore: San Giovanni

Time Out London: Back to the past: ideas for London that never took off

Ptak Science Books: A Note on the Future of the Future, 1911

Science Museum: The Clockmakers’ Museum

CEO’s Blog: Alex Benay: Canada’s Spirit of Innovation: Music, Sound and Technology

All Things Georgian: 18th Century Hearing Aids

Atlas Obscura: Why Was It Faster To Build Subways in 1900

Conciatore: Black is Beautiful

We Are Dorothy: Electric Love Blueprint – A History of Electronic Music

Inside the Science Museum: Ruth Belville: The Greenwich Time Lady

Ruth Belville in the Evening News, 1929.

Ruth Belville in the Evening News, 1929.

Pictorial: How the Inventors of the 19th Century Brought People Closer to Talking with the Dead

Noah Veltman: What shape is the internet?

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Reciprocal Science: Structural Biology: a beginners’ guide?

Natural History Apostilles: Those who cavalierly reject the theory of…what?

NCSE Reports: Out of Darwin’s Shadow

the many-headed monster: Can the Sodomite Speak? Voicing Sodomy in Early Modern England

Asia One: Firm friends since double-helix DNA discovery

Atlas Obscura: A 16th Century Pope Buried His Pet Elephant Under The Vatican

 One of Raphael's sketches of Hanno (Image: Raphael/Wikimedia)


One of Raphael’s sketches of Hanno (Image: Raphael/Wikimedia)

Natural History Apostilles: The real decimal-point error that transmogrified into the spinach-iron myth

Science League of America: The Cave of Homo naledi, or A Textbook Example of How to Do Science

Medievalists.net: ‘I know not what it is’: Illustrating Plants in Medieval Manuscripts

Notches: From Cod to Codpieces: Benjamin Franklin’s Guide to Food and Sex

Embryo Project: George Wells Beadle (1903–1989)

University of Leeds: Learning the right lessons from Mendel’s peas

BHL: From the Experts: Recommended Fossil Books

storify: Fossil Stories

RCPE: Basil Besler’s Hortus Eystettensis

Basil Besler

Basil Besler

The Guardian: US film of parachuting beavers found after 65 years (it’s OK, they survived)

BHL: Ancient Myths Inspired by Fossils

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 24 – Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

The New York Times: Robert M. White, Who Revolutionized Weather Forecasts, Dies at 92

HSS: When history Meets Science: A Remembrance of William B. Provine (1942–2015)

Why Evolution is True: Was Darwin lactose-intolerant?

CHEMISTRY:

Yahoo News: What can we learn about the discovery of Thomas Jefferson’s chemistry lab at the University of Virginia

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 21 – William A. Mitchell

Chemistry World: Pregl’s analysis tubes

Pregl's apparatus allowed michrochemical determination of many elements © Image source: DOI: 10.1039/AP9933000272

Pregl’s apparatus allowed michrochemical determination of many elements © Image source: DOI: 10.1039/AP9933000272

Distillations Blog: Jane Marcet Conversations on Chemistry

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 23 – Gilbert Lewis

Education in Chemistry Blog: The early teaching of chemistry

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Phlogiston Theory – Wonderfully wrong but fantastically fruitful

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Nylon: A Revolution in Textiles

Richard Carter: Darwin on earthworms: small change writ large

Open Culture: Charles Darwin’s Kids Drew on Surviving Manuscript Pages of On the Origin of Species

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Now Appearing: The evils of science exaggerations

The Guardian: Humanities research is groundbreaking, life-changing…and ignored

Wellcome Trust: Research Spotlight: Dr Angela Cassidy

Dr Angela Cassidy

Dr Angela Cassidy

Royal Society: All journal content free access until 30 November 2015

Conciatore: Pirates

Irish Examiner: Cork City wined and dined during Famine, Boole letters show

The New York Times: Museum Specimens Find New Life Online

storify: Ad Stijnman on early modern engraving techniques

History Matters: Historic Fiction and Alternative Truths

The Recipes Project: The (Near) Magic of Digital Access to Manuscript Cookbooks

Page from “Gemel Book of Recipes : manuscript, circa 1660-1700,” New York Academy of Medicine. Curse on bottom of page: Jean Gembel [Gemel] her book / I wish she may be drouned yt steals it from her.

Page from “Gemel Book of Recipes : manuscript, circa 1660-1700,” New York Academy of Medicine. Curse on bottom of page: Jean Gembel [Gemel] her book / I wish she may be drouned yt steals it from her.

The Guardian: Royal Institution to sell science treasures to rescue finances

Cradle in Caricature: Programming Historian Live

Girl in the Moon: Rare books gifs – John Dee, volvelles, apples and things

The #EnvHist Weekly

University of Kent: Notes on periodical genres, inspired by a trip to Trondheim

Heterodoxology: Why fear the history of science? A brief response to Don Wiebe

storify: Scientific Books and their makers

India Today: Bad miss, Nobel!: 7 discoveries that should have got the Nobel Prize

Daily Camera: Boulder’s climb from ‘scientific Siberia’ to scientific peak

ESOTERIC:

The Toast: Scientists Announce Ultimate Success of Alchemy

The Somnium Project: Hekla, Witchcraft and Katherina Kepler

Detail of Abraham Ortelius' 1585 map of Iceland showing Hekla in eruption. The Latin text translates as

Detail of Abraham Ortelius’ 1585 map of Iceland showing Hekla in eruption. The Latin text translates as “The Hekla, perpetually condemned to storms and snow, vomits stones under terrible noise”.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: Maps: charting and changing the world

NCSE: Reports: Wallace, Darwin, and the Origin of Species

Science Book a Day: The Red Canary: The Story of the First Genetically Engineered Animal

red-canary

Wall Street Journal: Man’s Other Best Friend (Goggle title and click on first link to avoid paywall!)

Brain Pickings: Ten Days at the Mad-House: How Nellie Bly Posed as Insane in 1887 in Her Brave Exposé of Asylum Abuse

Forbes: When Scientific Amateurs Have Eureka Moments

The Economist: Understanding the universe

NEW BOOKS:

University of Toronto Press: The Secrets of Generation: Reproduction in the Long Eighteenth Century

Editions Hermann: Écrits de phénoménologie et de philosophie des sciences

Palgrave Macmillan: Navigational Enterprises in Europe and its Empires, 1730–1850

9781137520630

AIP: Selection of 2014–2015 titles researched at NBL&A

Advances in the History of Psychology: Rethinking Interdisciplinarity across the Social Sciences and Neurosciences

ART & EXHIBITIONS

U.S. National Library of Medicine: Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature

photo-home-digitalgallery

Natural History of Museum: Images of Nature

Culture 24: A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee

Chadds Ford Live: Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life

Hyperallergic: Remembering Forgotten Female Printmakers from the 16th to 19th Centuries

Maria Sibylla Merian, “Der Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung” (“The Wonderful Transformation of Caterpillars”) (1679-83) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

Maria Sibylla Merian, “Der Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung” (“The Wonderful Transformation of Caterpillars”) (1679-83) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

CLOSING SOON: Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscopy

Museum of the History of Science: Extended to 31 January 2016: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs till 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs till 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs till 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Tuesdays & Wednesdays

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The Blue Orange Theatre: Frankenstein Runs till 8 November 2015

Coach House Theatre: Nothing to Hyde Closes 31 October 2015

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Runs till 21 November 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Runs till 18 June 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

CHoM News: Celebrating Ten Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine 3 November 2015

University of Yale: 2015 Terry Lecture: Becoming Darwin: History, Memory, and Biography 5 November

London Museums of Health & Medicine: Lecture: Finding Voices in the Medical Collection 28 October 2015

Webinar: Medical technology and disability in the First World War 12 November 2015

Science Museum: Computer says Lates 28 October 2015

The Guardian: The dangers of Disney’s film about Charles Darwin

‘Whether Darwin will seem so swashbuckling if the film is honest about his chronic sea-sickness is another matter.’ Photograph: Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images

‘Whether Darwin will seem so swashbuckling if the film is honest about his chronic sea-sickness is another matter.’ Photograph: Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images

Royal College of Physicians: Walking Tour: “London’s Plagues”

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Unknown artist: Chemist or Pharmacist in His Laboratory, with Assistants and Apparatus (c) Museum of the History of Science; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Unknown artist: Chemist or Pharmacist in His Laboratory, with Assistants and Apparatus
(c) Museum of the History of Science; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Laughing Squid: A Fascinating Look Into What Goes Into Building Miniture Replicas for the Museum of Scotland

Scientific American: The Pigeon, the Antenna, and Me: Robert Wilson

Youtube: Alfred Russel Wallace Top #10 Facts

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

BookLab 009: Sapiens and the Upright Thinker

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

ICHST2017: CfP: 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology Rio de Janeiro 23–29 July 2017

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Drew University: CfP: Transatlantic Connections 3 Conference: How Medical Humanities is Building Bridges to the Future of Medicine 13–16 January 2016

Binghampton University: CfP: The Pre-Modern Book in a Global Materiality and Visuality 21–22 October 2016

University of Hull: Maritime Trade, Travel and Cultural Encounter in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries 13–14 November 2015

The Hakluyt Society Essay Prize: This year’s results and Next year’s CfP

University of Kent: Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Context 710 July 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: CfP: Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference University of Sheffield 5–8 July 2016

Victoria University in the University of Toronto: Workshop: Jesuit Science in the Early Modern World

Wrocław, Poland: CfP: Ludwik Fleck’s theory of thought styles and thought collectives – translations and receptions 10–11 March 2016

Hôpital Adultes Timone, Marseille: Colloque: Classification et catégories en psychiatrie : enjeux éthiques 29 Janvier 2016

BPS/UCL Hist Psych Disciplines Talk: “Getting on in Gotham: Preventing Mental Illness in New York City, 1945-1980” 29 October 2015

Institute of Historical Research: Maritime History and Culture Seminars 2015–16

Karl Jaspers Centre Heidelberg: Conference: Psychiatry in Europe after World War II 30-31 October 2015

UCL: CfP: Science/Technology/Security: Challenges to global governance? 20-21 June 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Nazarbeyev University, Astana, Kazakhstan: Assistant Professor History of Medicine, Public Health, and/or Environmental History

Royal Museums Greenwich: Fellowships 2016

Trinity College Dublin: Assistant Professor in Environmental History

University of Cambridge: Graduate funding opportunities in History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge 2016–17

British Library: Curator of Ancient and Medieval Manuscripts

National Maritime Museum: seeks proposals from university partners for collaborative doctoral scholarships to start in October 2016

Academic Job Wiki: History 2015–16

UCL: Research Associate Inner Lives

University of Leeds Library: Medical Collections Project Assistant

UEA: Self-Funded PhD Project: History of Logic

British Library: Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Hans Sloane’s Books: Evaluating an Enlightenment Library

University of Hertfordshire: PhD Studentship in Early Modern History

Sorbonne Universités Paris: Postdoctoral Fellowship – History of nuclear energy and society

South, West, and Wales: Doctoral Training Partnerships 2016/17

University of Leiden: 3 PhD Positions on Rethinking Disability: the Global Impact of the International Year of Disabled Persons (1981) in Historical Perspective

The Antique Boat Museum: Executive Director

Antique Boat Museum Ian Coristine Photo

Antique Boat Museum
Ian Coristine Photo

University of Göttingen: 4 Early Career Fellowships

American Geographical Society Library: Fellowships

Carnegie Mellon University: One-Year Visiting Assistant Professor in History of Science and Technology and/or Science and Technology Studies

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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3 Responses to Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #15

  1. Phillip Helbig says:

    Sorry folks, but there was no “Letter From Albert Einstein To His Daughter”. See, e.g., http://www.snopes.com/quotes/einstein/universalforce.asp and remember that social media are often bullshit multipliers.

  2. Ahmet Yükseltürk says:

    Thank you for writing editorials.

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