Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #28

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #28

Monday 25 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

 

 Another seven days have passed and the Internet has delivered up another bumper crop of post and articles on the histories of science, technology and medicine collected here in your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette.

There is a common misconception, shared on occasions by you friendly sub-editor, that history is something that happens in an undefined ‘distant’ past. However in realty the happenings of yesterday are already history. In the last days we were spectacularly reminded of this fact in a dispute over the history of one of the most recent discoveries/inventions in the history of the life sciences CRISPR.

What started as a dispute amongst specialists in genetic biology quickly attracted the attention of the mainstream media and the history of gene editing had, to quote Andy Warhol, its fifteen minutes of fame.

To prove that Whewell’s Gazette is on the ball and not stuck in the sixteenth century we bring you, hot off the digital presses, the contribution to this debate that our busy elves found on their searches through cyberspace this week.

Genotopia: A Whig History of CRISPR

Engineering Life: CRISPR In the history of science and intellectual property

SciRants: CRISPR Controversy and the Nobel Prize

The Washington Post: A social media war just erupted over the biotech innovation of the century

Genotopia: Criticism of Lander reaches mainstream media

Crispr-Cas9: Bitter row breaks out over ‘official history’ of gene-editing breakthrough

it is NOT junk: The Villain of CRISPR

STAT: In The Lab: Why Eric Lander morphed from science god to punching bag

Emmanuelle Charpentier, August 2015 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Emmanuelle Charpentier, August 2015
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

It would seem the problem started with a paper by Eric Lander on the history of CRISPR in which he tries to minimise the contributions of Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doubna in favour of Feng Zhang and George Church of Lander’s own Broad Institute. Although the motivation seems to be another is this yet another example of women being discriminated against in the history of science?

Jennifer Anne Doudna Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jennifer Anne Doudna
Source: Wikimedia Commons

One website dedicated to correcting the picture of women in #histSTM is Lady Science and Anna Resner and Leila McNeill have revamped their, in our opinion excellent blog, and issued the first Lady Science ebook, which you can download for free. You can read all about it in this Slate article by Bad Astronomer Phil Plait

home+logo

Quotes of the week:

Pooh quote

“When I was a kid, we had bloggers who could actually write and didn’t just post youtube videos”. – Jeet Heer (@HeerJeet)

“I cannot better describe walrus.. meat than by citing..tough Texas beef, marbled with fat and soaked in clam juice.” – Schwatka (1892) h/t @labroides

“Mathematicians stand on each other’s shoulders while computer scientists stand on each other’s toes”. – R. W. Hamming h7t @CompSciFact

“David Bowie dies and then a week later a whole new awesome planet just appears in space… coincidence? I think not”. – Sarcastic Rover (@SarcasticRover)

“The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders of the universe, the less taste we shall have for destruction.” – Rachel Carson h/t @SciHistoryToday

“Did you know that Heraclitus was a pre-Socratic philosopher? He didn’t”. – @historyscientis

“Hey guys I found a really big prime num—”

“WE FOUND A PLANET!”

“Aww.” – Andrew Taylor (@Andrew_Taylor)

“I miss the good old days at Davos when everyone wore flowing robes & the entrail readings were an intimate affair among friends”. – Scott Gosnell (@infinite_me)

MLK Science & Religion

Birthday of the Week:

 André Marie Ampère born 20 January 1775

 

Engraving of André-Marie Ampère (1775 – 1836) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Engraving of André-Marie Ampère (1775 – 1836)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: André-Marie Ampère and Electromagnetism

The British Museum: André Marie Ampère (mathématicien et physicien) / Collection de tous les portraits célèbres

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Medical physics quote

University Library Utrecht: Newton through the eyes of an amateur

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Christy’s Interview

Yovisto: Simon Marius and his Astronomical Discoveries

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Jerome Karle’s Interview

Online Archive of California: Otto Stern Photograph Collection, approximately 1895–1969

Nautilus: These Astronomical Glass Plates Made History

The Atlantic: The Women Who Would Have Been Sally Ride

Jerrie Cobb undergoing physiological testing (NASA).

Jerrie Cobb undergoing physiological testing (NASA).

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ralph Lapp’s Interview

Culture of Knowledge: ‘Skybound was the mind’: Johannes Kepler

Hyperallergenic: Rediscovered Glass Plate Photographs Show the Skies 120 Years Ago

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bill Hudgins’s Interview

NASA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Voyager Mission Celebrates 30 Years Since Uranus

Space.com: Clyde Tombaugh: Astronomer Who Discovered Pluto

Royal Museums Greenwich: Robert Hooke: the man who knew everything

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

National Geographic: Making Maps Under Fire During the Revolutionary War

Atlas Obscura: Found: A Very early and Very Rare Ottoman Atlas

Medievalists.net: Ten Beautiful Medieval Maps

Tabula Rogeriana

Tabula Rogeriana

Yovisto: The World According to Sebastian Münster

AEON: Sky readers

Atlas Obscura: 100 Wonders: The Mapparium

Dawlish Chronicles: A Forgotten Hero of Exploration: Vitus Bering

The Gabriel as drawn by Martin Spangsberg in 1827. Picture: Danish Geografisk Tidsskrift

The Gabriel as drawn by Martin Spangsberg in 1827. Picture: Danish Geografisk Tidsskrift

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Franklin health

Perceptions of Pregnancy: The Phantoms of Pregnancy

Wellcome Library: New database: Popular Medicine in America, 1800–1900

Advances in the History of Psychology: Surgery for Desperados: On Neurosurgical Solutions to Criminality

Thomas Morris: A dismal tail

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: Medicines of the 18th Century

henbanebelladonna

Remedia: Between Photography and Film: Early Uses of Medical Cinematography

Harvard Gazette: Did famine worsen the Black Death?

Science Museum: Thalidomide’s legacy

The Sunday Times: “I heard a baby cry and the doctors talking. I knew something wasn’t right”

The Guardian: Sixth-century wooden foot thought to be Europe’s oldest prosthetic implant

NYAM: The Nightmare of Imminent Baldness

Yovisto: Vladimir Bekhterev and the Bekterev’s Disease

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: H.T. Hamblin: Opthalmologist and Mystic

Thomas Morris: Suffocated by a fish

npr: Was Dr. Asperger A Nazi? The Question Still Haunts Autism

Dr. Hans Asperger with a young boy at the Children's Clinic at the University of Vienna in the 1930s. Courtesy of Maria Asperger Felder

Dr. Hans Asperger with a young boy at the Children’s Clinic at the University of Vienna in the 1930s.
Courtesy of Maria Asperger Felder

Thomas Morris: The man who fought a duel in his sleep

Cleveland Historical: The Cunningham Sanitarium

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: The Cullen Project: digitizing medical history

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Robert Burns and his medical biographer Dr James Currie

Early Modern Medicine: Frances’ Frigidity

emroc: Medicine in the Granville Family Manuscript

Randi Hutter Epstein: Elusive Powers of Estrogen

Anthropology Now: Zika and Microcephaly: Can We Learn from History?

Thomas Morris: Fruit, feathers and hair

Medievalists.net: 23 Medieval Uses for Rosemary

Rosemary illustrated in British Library MS Egerton 747 f. 85v

Rosemary illustrated in British Library MS Egerton 747 f. 85v

Cambridge Journals: Medical History: The Sources of Eucharius Rösslin’s ‘Rosegarden for Pregnant Women and Midwives’ (1513)

Wellcome Library: Linking letters across archives

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Thomas August Watson – Recipient of the Very First Phone Call

Medievalists.net: Printing with gold in the fifteenth century

Conciatore: Reflections on the Mirror

Conciatore: Like Snow From Heaven

JHI Blog: Hippie Bibliography

hippie-bib_image-5

Open Culture: Why Violins Have F-Holes: The Science & History of a Remarkable Renaissance Design

Morbid Anatomy: Midcentury Stereopanorama

Yovisto: Who remembers Apple’s Lisa?

Yovisto: The Steel of Sir Henry Bessemer

Yovisto: Ray Dolby and the Noise Reduction System

The Recipes Project: Searching, Sieving, Sifting, and Straining in the Seventeenth Century

 

Yovisto: Umberto Nobile and his Airships

Yovisto: John Fitch and the Steam Boat

Fact:Danish electronic music legend Else Marie Pade dies at 91

Academia: A natural draught furnace for bronze casting (pdf)

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Women Computers in World War II

Betty Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas (right) operating ENIAC's main control panel.

Betty Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas (right) operating ENIAC’s main control panel.

Atlas Obscura: The First Cross-Country Road Trip Took 2 Men and a Pitbull 63 Days

PM: The Obscure History of the World’s First Synth, Built in 1901

My medieval foundry: Ongoing bell posts – Part 2 – making small bells

Collecting and Connecting: The story that changed my mind

Atlas Obscura: 160-Year-Old Ganges Canal Super-Passages Are An Engineering Marvel

Science Museum: 30 Years On: The Rise of the Macintosh Computer

National Library of Scotland: Scottish glass industry

Science & Society: Picture Library Prints: De Dondi’s ‘Astrarium’, the world’s first astronomical clock, 1364

Tenby Observer: Pembroke Dock maritime museum reflects on first year of operation

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Linneas

Yovisto: Caspar Friedrich Wolff – the Founder of Embryology

 

This Day in Water History: January 14, 1829: First Slow Sand Filter in England

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘The Most ingenious book that ever I read in my life’ Pepys and Micrographia

Notches: The Cologne Sexual Assaults in Historical Perspective

The Public Domain Review: In Search of the Impossible: The Perfect English Rabbit

Genes to Genomes: Calvin Bridges: Bringing genes down to earth

Notches: After Roe: Engaging the Lost History of the Abortion Debate

BHL: Fantastic Worlds: Exploring the Ocean through Science and Fiction

The Public Domain Review: The Bestiarium of Aloys Zötl (1831–1887)

Mèthode: One of the foremost experiments on the 20th century: Stanley Miller and the origins of prebiotic chemistry

TrowelBlazers: Zelia Nutall La Reina de Arqueologiá

Zelia Nuttall Image by kind permission of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley CA.

Zelia Nuttall Image by kind permission of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley CA.

The Public Domain Review: The Embalming Jars of Frederik Ruysch

Understanding Race: Science 168s–1800s: Early Classifications of Nature

TrowelBlazers: Mary Ann Woodhouse Mantell

AMNH: How Hot is Hot? Chile Pepper in Our Global Kitchen

Atomic Surgery: The Life of Louis Agassiz (Real Life Comics, #30)

Joides Resolution: Happy Birthday Andrija Mohorovicic!

Naturally Curious: / Million Wonders: How natural history museums help people and nature flourish in the North West

Slate: The Vault: A Victorian Argument That Snow is Holy, Illustrated by a Beautiful Catalog of Flakes

Letters from Gondwana: The Geological Observations of Robert Hooke

Hooke’s drawing of fossil bivalves, brachiopods, belemnites, shark teeth and possibly a reptilian tooth (Copyright © The Royal Society)

Hooke’s drawing of fossil bivalves, brachiopods, belemnites, shark teeth and possibly a reptilian tooth (Copyright © The Royal Society)

Sinc: La ciencia es notica: The five bird species that Darwin couldn’t discover in Medeira and the Azores

Scripturient: The Flat Earthers Respawn

CHEMISTRY:

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Going to Pieces: A Detective Story

Muslim Heritage: From Alchemy to Chemistry

Front cover of Dix traités d'alchimie de Jâbir ibn Hayyân - Les dix premiers Traités du Livre des Soixante-dix (French translation by Pierre Lory). (Paris, 1983).

Front cover of Dix traités d’alchimie de Jâbir ibn Hayyân – Les dix premiers Traités du Livre des Soixante-dix (French translation by Pierre Lory). (Paris, 1983).

Scroll.in: How the romance between an Aligarh Muslim and a Lithuanian Jew has shaped an Indian pharma major

CHF: George Hitchings and Gertrude Elion

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

vistorica: Mathematics, science, engineering, 1500–1600 European

BBC News: Cash to preserve and digitise historical documents

The Public Domain Review: Japanese Prints of Western Inventors, Artists and Scholars

The Englishman Arkwright wanted to make a spinning-frame. It took him such a long time that he became very poor and so his wife got mad and broke his machine. Angry at her, he sent her away. But even after all this, he succeeded and became extremely rich.

The Englishman Arkwright wanted to make a spinning-frame. It took him such a long time that he became very poor and so his wife got mad and broke his machine. Angry at her, he sent her away. But even after all this, he succeeded and became extremely rich.

Wynken de Worde: what those libraries were in The Toast

Science, Spies, and History: Job Market Stats for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The Hindu: Scientific Histories

Melissa Terras: A Few Words for Professor Lisa Jardine

lisaj

The Arts Newspaper: The Buck Stopped Here: a grand send-off for the polymath powerhouse Prof Lisa Jardine

Avoiding the Bears: Multum in Parvo (said the cupcake toppers)

Cornell College: News Center: Alumna pursuing history career in collections

Londonist: London’s Entire History To Be Mapped By New Project

The H-Word: Flat-Earthers aren’t the only ones getting things wrong

Readex: Early American Newspapers, 1690–1922: By Series

Catholic Herald: Meet five Catholic heroes of science

SocPhilSciPract: January HPS&ST Note

Feministing: New Website Aims to Transform the Philosophy Canon by Highlighting Women

The Guardian: ‘People think curating just means choosing nice things’ – secrets of the museum curators

Darin Hayton: The Use and Abuse of Kuhn’s “Paradigm Shift”

ESOTERIC:

BOOK REVIEWS:

facebook: History Physics: Volume 1 of Tyndall project reviewed

THE: The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains, by Thomas W. Laqueur

Conciatore: CONCIATORE Book Excerpt

CONCIATORE, The Life and Times of 17th Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri, By Paul Engle

CONCIATORE, The Life and Times of 17th
Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri, By Paul Engle

The Guardian: Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs by Lisa Randall – when will anther asteroid wreak havoc on Earth?

Chemistry World: The birth of he pill – how four pioneers reinvented sex and launched a revolution

Science Book a Day: The Composition of Kepler’s Astronomia nova

Rhapsody in Books Weblog: Review of The Invention of Science by David Wootton

Science Book a Day: Empires of Food: Feast, Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilisations

Providence Journal: The genius of astronomer Johannes Kepler

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: The Antivaccine Heresy

519J7776mvL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

 

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Etcetera: Inside the lost library of John Dee, a Tudor wizard

Smithsonian.com: A Painting of John Dee, Astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I, Contains a Hidden Ring of Skulls

The Guardian: John Dee painting originally had circle of human skulls, x-ray imaging reveals

History Extra: In pictures: John Dee, the ‘Elizabethan 007’

streetsofsalem: John Dee, Renaissance Man

Culture 24: New John Dee discovery reveals resemblance to mother and a mysterious ‘dwarf’

The Spectator: John Dee though he could talk to angels using medieval computer technology

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise: Galileo exhibit to feature books, art at OU art museum

OU Lynx: Plan Your Visit

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

151223-ul-600th_0

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Historiens de la santé: Sang sens : observations médicales, interprétations fluides Exposition Bibliothèque Osler d’histoire de la médecine Le vernissage, qui aura lieu le 27 janvier

NewsOK: Galileo magnifico: University of Oklahoma continues yearlong ‘Galileo’s World’ project with exhibit ‘An Artful Observation of the Cosmos’

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The Telegraph: The best art exhibitions of 2016 (some #histSTM connections!)

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Last Chance: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Henry Walter Bates Until 26 February:

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Daily Motion: Life Story: The race for the Double Helix [1/2]

Daily Motion: Life Story: The race for the Double Helix [2/2]

The Denver Post: “Vera Rubin” performance a collaboration of the BETC and Fiske Planetarium

Vera Rubin measuring spectra, c. 1970

Vera Rubin measuring spectra, c. 1970

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

New Diorama Theatre: Reptember Reloaded 10 January–1 February 2016

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

EVENTS:

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

Descartes event

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Cardiff University: Lecture: Framing the Face: A History of Facial Hair, 1700–1900 20 January 2016

University of York: Lecture: Not Everyone Can Be A Gandhi: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post-WWII Era 3 March 2016

NCSE: Darwin Day Approaches

University of Leeds Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Lecture: Object 1. Horse and Rider 26 January 2016

London PUS Seminar: Celebrity Science – How Does Ancient DNA Research Inform Science Communication? 27 January 2016

University of Kent: Trial by water, or, seafarers’ perspectives on the quest for longitude, 1700–1830 27 January 2016

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Edge of Disaster – Vaccines and Epidemics 21 January 2016

UCL: Lecture: Henry Nicholls: The Galapagos. A Natural History 27 January 2016

The Washington Post: These are the most exciting museum happenings in 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

Shackelton Event

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Dr William Gilbert (1544-1603) showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court, 19th century (oil on canvas)

Dr William Gilbert (1544-1603) showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court, 19th century (oil on canvas)

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Simon Singh on Tudor code breaking and John Dee

Open Culture: Prize-Winning Animation Lets You Fly Through 17th Century London

London Live: John Dee exhibit opens at Royal College of Physicians

Niche: Clearing the Plains and Clearing the Air: Environmental History and National Memory

PBS Newshour: Author explores life on the expanding autism spectrum

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician the lost library of John Dee at the Royal College of Physicians

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: A constellation for John Dee by Jeremy Millar, 2016

Rune Soup: John Dee: Scholar, Courtier, Magician

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: The Meteorite and the Hidden Hoax

BBC Radio 4: An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin

PODCASTS:

Ben Franklin’s World: Bonus: Why Historians Study History

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Upcoming History of Medicine Events

University of Leeds: Workshop on Interwar Telecommunications History 29 January 2016

UCL: ERC Project Calendars in Antiquity and the Middle Ages Workshop 7: Al-Biruni and his world 15 February 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurs in Berlin. Perspectives on the Berliner Brachiosaurus brancai, 1906˗2015 10–11 March 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: CfP: Working on Things: On the Social, Political, and Economic History of Collected Objects 21–22 November 2016

University of Bristol: CfP: Philosophy of Biology in UK: 8–9 June 2016

Conference Centre Kaap Doorn, near to Utrecht: Philosophy of Science in a Forest 19–21 May 2016

Marsh’s Library: CfP: Newspapers and Periodicals in Britain & Ireland, 1641–1800

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Research in Progress 2016 Queen’s College Oxford 27 February

British Society for the History of Mathematics: History of Mathematics in Education: An Anglo-Danish collaboration Bath Spa University 21–24 August 2016

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Mathematics in the Enlightenment Rewley House Oxford 25 June 2016

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Celebrating the History of Women in Mathematics at Manchester: Manchester University 9 March 2016

University of Cumbria: CfP: The World of Outdoors 24 June 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: Book Prize

Birkbeck University of London: ‘Fluid Physicalities’ speaker programme 2016

European Society for Astronomy in Culture (SEAC): 24th SEAC Conference Bath 12–16 September 2016

The Royal Society: Call for Nominations: Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Prize

University of Nottingham: CfP: Medieval Midlands Postgraduate Conference 13 April 2016

New York University: Conference: Experimental Philosophy Through History 20 February 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2016
Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts 7–10 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin: Postdoctoral Fellowship

University of Westminster: Professor of Modern History of Science and Innovation

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: Collections Scholarships

Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin: Post-Doc Fellow, Archaeology Collection Research

CHoM News: 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

University of London: Alan Pearsall Postdoctoral Fellowship in Naval and Maritime History

Wellcome Library: Wikimedian in Residence at the Wellcome Library

Museum of Health Care: Margaret Angus Research Fellowship

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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