Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #42

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #42

Monday 30 May 2016

EDITORIAL:

 Swooping in, somewhat delayed, out of the aether it’s the latest edition of the #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bring to your attention all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could gather up over the last seven days from the far corners of the Internet.

This week saw the addition of the biography of Sarah Guppy (1770–1852) to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, not a fish but an eighteenth-century inventor and engineer. Unfortunately her well-deserved and long overdue inclusion in this essential data source for historians has already led to the creation of several instant historical myths.

Sarah Guppy Plaque C

The Bristol Post announced her inclusion with an article with the following headline: Recognition at last for the mum-of-six who designed Bristol’s Clifton Suspension Bridge – not Brunel. In other areas of the Internet some commentators took this myth building even further claiming that Sarah Guppy invented the suspension bridge, per se.

Interestingly Deborah Jaffé who researched and wrote about the life of Sarah Guppy and was invited onto BBC Radio 4’s flagship news magazine the Today programme to talk about her, the Beeb having picked up on the story, did her best to damp down the more sensational claims.

Sarah Guppy invented and patented a system of pilings for bridges making long span suspension bridges viable. This method was used with her knowledge and permission by Thomas Telford to construct the Menai Suspension Bridge. She was also involved in some capacity with Marc Brunel in the design of the Clifton Suspension Bridge. However the claim in the Bristol Post’s headline is vastly exaggerated and in fact way down the article they backpedal from their own headline writing instead: Though the precise impact of her ideas on his design is unknown…

I first learnt about the extraordinary Sarah Guppy through the good offices of Mike Rendell, The Georgian Gentleman, who wrote about her on his excellent blog more than three years ago. I found her story delightful then and thought that she certainly deserved to be more widely known.

Unfortunately the sensationalist, overblown reports that have circulated as a result of her inclusion in the ODNB will result in Internet memes that Sarah Guppy invented the suspension bridge and that Guppy and not Brunel designed the Clifton Suspension Bridge, both of which statements are very simply not true. I very much support bringing to public attention scientists, physicians, engineers and inventors whom time has forgotten, especially the women, but I find it deeply unfortunate when such actions are accompanied by the creation of, often ridiculous, myths.

In her interview on the Today Programme, Deborah Jaffé said that Sarah Guppy had not been written out of history, as some were claiming, but rather she had not been written in. #histSTM‪ is still a comparatively young group of disciplines and we are still dealing with the substantial fallout of the big names, big events versions of those histories that all too long passed as the norm. We need to write in lots of Sarah Guppys, both female and male, to finally get rid of the big names big events mythologies of science, technology and medicine

Quotes of the week:

Today’s advert of choice: “Ladies wanted to try new Lucifer Sanitary Towels”, Manchester Evening News, 7 Jul 1939 h/t @KingTekkers

Mathematicians

“What idiot called Verdi a composer and not an operatunist?” – Moose Allain(@MooseAllain)

How to Impress People at Academic Conferences Kirsty Rolfe (@avoidingbears)

How to Impress People at Academic Conferences Kirsty Rolfe (@avoidingbears)

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn” – Benjamin Franklin

“What hath God wrought?” was the message of the 1st telegram ever, sent 24 May in 1844 by Samuel Morse h/t @TEYLERS

“Early modern view on tobacco ‘the smoke of it is held to be a great antidote against venom and pestilential diseases’” h/t @RCPEHeritage

“A historian’s blessing: may the royalties on your book always recoup the cost of the image reproduction fees” – Will Thomas (@GWilliamThomas)

“If Donald Trump wins the U.S. presidential election, it will be the first time in history that a billionaire moves into public housing vacated by a black family” – Jim David (@ComicJimDavid)

Shit got real

“Must not go down rabbit hole of why mentally ill medieval people feared they were made of glass, but no one does now.” – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

“I think I’ll steal that Pepys line for my next bad review: ‘not worth a turd’”. – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

Kiss my Arse

“The first rule of Renaissance Club is nobody is really sure when the meetings begin or end” – @historyscientis

If the history of life on Earth was condensed into 24 hrs, this is what it would look like… Science Alert {@ScienceAlert)

If the history of life on Earth was condensed into 24 hrs, this is what it would look like… Science Alert {@ScienceAlert)

“everyone loves to use occam’s razor, but if you really want to see occam freak out, use his toothbrush” – Jeff Tiedrich (@jefftiedrich)

Mill grinding

Birthdays of the Week:

 Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz born 28 May 1807

Jean Louis Agassiz in 1870 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jean Louis Agassiz in 1870
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Life of Louis Agassiz (Real Life Comics, #30)

http://atomic-surgery.blogspot.de/2016/01/the-life-of-louis-agassiz-real-life.html

Letters from Gondwana: The Poetry of the Ice Age

https://paleonerdish.wordpress.com/2014/10/09/the-poetry-of-the-ice-age/

William Hunter born 23 May 1728

Hunter IV

Hunter III

Royal College of Physicians: the best teacher of anatomy that ever lived

 

Inside William Hunter's dissecting room in 1770s by Thomas Rowlandson.

Inside William Hunter’s dissecting room in 1770s by Thomas Rowlandson.

HUnter II

 

William Whewell born 24 May 1794

(c) Trinity College, University of Cambridge; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

(c) Trinity College, University of Cambridge; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Whewell’s Ghost: A man of many talents

Whewell quote

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The history of “scientist”

Whewell quote II

Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography: Whewell, William

William_Whewell

TED: The Philosophical Breakfast Club

William Whewell on Galileo

William Whewell on Galileo

General Theory of Relativity confirmed 29 May 1919

Solar Eclipse 1919 From the report of Sir Arthur Eddington on the expedition to the island of Principe (off the west coast of Africa). Source: Wikimedia Commons

Solar Eclipse 1919
From the report of Sir Arthur Eddington on the expedition to the island of Principe (off the west coast of Africa).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 Royal Society Publishing: A Determination of the Deflection of Light by the Sun’s Gravitational Field, from Observations made at the Total Eclipse of May 29, 1919

 

esa: space science: Relativity and the 1919 Eclipse

Youtube: HBO Signature Films: Einstein and Eddington Trailer (HBO)

The Golden Gate Bridge San Francisco opened 27 May 1937

A pedestrian poses at the old railing on opening day, 1937 Source: Wikimedia Commons

A pedestrian poses at the old railing on opening day, 1937
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Smithsonian.com: What Do You Know About the Golden Gate Bridge

SF Gate: 17 fun facts about the Golden Gate Bridge on its 79th birthday

Bancroft Library: Golden Gate Bridge – Construction Photographs 1933–1934

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Herschel quote

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Nathaniel Everett Green

AIP: John Bardeen

Voices of the Manhattan Project: James B. Conant’s Interview

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The blue flash

esa: magisstra: The Story Behind Paolo’s Space Station Photos

The_International_Space_Station_with_ATV-2_and_Endeavour_large

Dannen.com: Truman Revokes Bombing Order, August 10, 1945

PNAS: The Copernicus grave mystery

The Catholic Astronomer: Heliocentrism Condemned: 400 Years Ago on May 26

Arizona Public Media: Era of Solar Discovery on Kitt Peak Coming to an End

Air&Space: Who ‘Created’ Planetary Science?

Ptak Science Books: Artwork for Detecting Nuclear Explosions in Outer Space (1960)

The New York Times: 10 February 1881: The Beauty of the Evening Sky: Telescopic Contemplation of the Moon, Jupiter, Venus, and Mars

Skulls in the Stars: Optics by hot air balloon?

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Repeat after me! – They knew it was round, damn it!

Picture from a 1550 edition of De sphaera, showing the earth to be a sphere. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Picture from a 1550 edition of De sphaera, showing the earth to be a sphere.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Guardian: Auguste Piccard: the physicist who went stratospheric

Scoop: Historic telescope will return stargazing to city

Pasadena Now: Last Paper of Influential Pasadena Astronomer Unravels 100-Year Old Stellar Mystery

AHF: Edwin McMillan

AHF: Luis Alvarez

AHF: Morris “Moe” Berg

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: These Stunning Maps Highlight the Tricks in a Cartographer’s Toolkit

Medium: 400 Years of Cartography – The Holcomb Digital Map Collection

Humanities: Imagine Nation: How Pocket Maps helped Poets and Subjects Reenvision England

Atlas Obscura: Map Monday

Library of Congress: Collection: Discovery and Exploration

La Californie ou Nouvelle Caroline : teatro de los trabajos, Apostolicos de la Compa. e Jesus en la America Septe.

La Californie ou Nouvelle Caroline : teatro de los trabajos, Apostolicos de la Compa. e Jesus en la America Septe.

The New York Times: U.S. Returns a Stolen Christopher Columbus Letter, but Msytery Remains

Knau: Arizona Public Radio: Scott Thybony’s Canyon Commentary: The Map

Royal Museums of Greenwich: By Endurance We Conquer: An epic tale of bravery and endurance

Universiteitsbibliotheek Utrecht: A princely example of the world’s first nautical atlas

Wales Online: The History of Wales in 12 Maps

 Cambriae Typus by Humphrey Llwyd (1573)

Cambriae Typus by Humphrey Llwyd (1573)

Jonathan Potter: A Map Dealer’s Reflections on the Last Forty-Five Years

MacDonald Gill: 1884–1947 Mapmaker, Graphic Designer, Letterer, Architect

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Temp hospital

Atlas Obscura: Why the First Cremation in the U.S. Was so Controversial

NYAM: Carte de Visite Collection

Journal of Victorian Culture Online: Kristin Hussey, Looking for the Victorian Eye in London’s Medical Museums

Smithsonian.com: How Forensic Scientists Once Tried to “See” a Dead Person’s Last Sight

The Guardian: ‘Eye-watering’ scale of Black Death’s impact on England revealed

Smithsonian.com: Research Reveals More Complete Picture of the Devastation Wrought by the Black Death

Wired: Black Death maps reveal how the plague devastated medieval Britain

NYAM: Many Anatomy Lessons at the New York Academy of Medicine

Mimi Mathews: The Solitary Vice: Victorian Views on Masturbation

The Secret Companion by R J Brodie, 1845. (Image via Wellcome Library, CC By 4.0)

The Secret Companion by R J Brodie, 1845.
(Image via Wellcome Library, CC By 4.0)

Academia: Camille Laurin, historien de la médecine? Retour sur un projet historiographique devenu outil de réforme scientifique et sociopolitique.

Whipple Library Books Blog: F is for Foster, Founder of the Cambridge School of Physiology

Thomas Morris: Sugar is good for your teeth

Nature: The secret history of ancient toilets

U Ottawa: Tabaret: L’assurance-maladie: un passé insolite, un avenir incertain

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: What led Laennec to invent the wooden stethoscope?

Illustration from De l’ auscultation mediate (1819) by Laennec showing his design for a wooden stethoscope.

Illustration from De l’ auscultation mediate (1819) by Laennec showing his design for a wooden stethoscope.

Atlas Obscura: How the Medical Cadaver Finally Got the Respect it Deserves

Atlas Obscura: La Specola Anatomical Collection

Dr Alun Withey: Pig boys and boar bits: a seventeenth-century medical consultation

Thomas Morris: Honking like a goose

Aesthetic Surgery Journal: Joseph Constantine Carpue and the Bicentennial of the Birth of Modern Plastic Surgery

Le Huffington Post: Portrait de médecins: Maurice LeClair

BBC Culture: Why these anatomical models are not disgusting

kin deepCreated between 1780 and 1782, the original anatomical Venus by Clemente Susini (pictured) can still be seen at La Specola – the public science museum founded by Leopold II in Florence. Also known as ‘the Medici Venus’, the life-size wax figure has real human hair, and can be dissected into seven anatomically correct layers. She spawned numerous copies, referred to as Slashed Beauties or Dissected Graces and also displayed in medical museums. “Supine in their glass boxes, they beckon with a gentle smile or an ecstatic downcast gaze,” writes Ebenstein in The Anatomical Venus. “One idly toys with a plait of real golden human hair; another clutches at the plush, moth-eaten satin cushions of her case as her torso erupts in a spontaneous, bloodless auto-dissection; another is crowned with a golden tiara, while one further wears a silk ribbon tied in a bow around a dangling entrail.” (Credit: Museo di Storia Naturale Università di Firenze, Zoologica, ‘La Specola’, Italy/Photo Joanna Ebenstein)

kin deepCreated between 1780 and 1782, the original anatomical Venus by Clemente Susini (pictured) can still be seen at La Specola – the public science museum founded by Leopold II in Florence. Also known as ‘the Medici Venus’, the life-size wax figure has real human hair, and can be dissected into seven anatomically correct layers. She spawned numerous copies, referred to as Slashed Beauties or Dissected Graces and also displayed in medical museums. “Supine in their glass boxes, they beckon with a gentle smile or an ecstatic downcast gaze,” writes Ebenstein in The Anatomical Venus. “One idly toys with a plait of real golden human hair; another clutches at the plush, moth-eaten satin cushions of her case as her torso erupts in a spontaneous, bloodless auto-dissection; another is crowned with a golden tiara, while one further wears a silk ribbon tied in a bow around a dangling entrail.” (Credit: Museo di Storia Naturale Università di Firenze, Zoologica, ‘La Specola’, Italy/Photo Joanna Ebenstein)

Huffpost Arts & Culture: Inside the Bizarre ‘Venus’ Figures Once Used as Anatomical Models

The New York Times: Suzanne Corkin, Who Helped Pinpoint Nature of Memory, Dies at 79

Alabama Yesterdays: Alice McNeal, M.D.: Alabama’s Fist Female Anesthesiologist

TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING:

Atlas Obscura: The Invention that Tamed America, and the Town Obsessed with it

ice: Budapest Chain Bridge online archive – an ambition achieved

Colossal: An Historically Accurate 19th Century Photo Studio Built in 1:12 Scale

Library of Congress: First telegraphic message – 24 May 1844

0001d

Collectors Weekly: Retail Therapy: What Mannequins Say About Us

TLS: On the trail of the Chinese typewriter

Conciatore: The Importance of Being Diligent

The Recipes Project: Fueling Beer Breweries in Early Modern London

The Guardian: 25 May 1914: The woman at the wheel

A woman at the wheel, circa 1913. Photograph: REX/Shutterstock

A woman at the wheel, circa 1913. Photograph: REX/Shutterstock

Stephan Wolfram Blog: Solomon Golomb (1932–2016)

Atlas Obscura: Netherlands Electricity and Radio Museum

Washington Center for Equitable Growth: Environmental Regulation and Technological Development in the U.S. Auto Industry

Apollo: Why the history of photography starts north of the border

Ptak Science Books: Industrial Depth: Unexpected Industrial Photographs (ca. 1910)

Universe Today: The Curious and Confounding Story of How Arcturus Electrified Chicago

British Library: flickr: Ships, found by the community fr…

Ptak Science Books: Cross-sections: U.S.-Built R.A.F. Fighter Aircraft, 1942

BBC News: Secret German WW2 code machine found on eBay

Ptak Science Books: Cars of the Future (1942)

6a00d83542d51e69e201b7c8650e85970b-500wi

The Guardian: Early computers as objets d’art

The Washington Post: Jane Fawcett, British code-breaker during World War II, dies at 95

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Geology is not only poetry, but also sometimes art ... field notes by Italian geologist Sturani (1975) h/t @David_Bressan

Geology is not only poetry, but also sometimes art … field notes by Italian geologist Sturani (1975) h/t @David_Bressan

 New York Times: Edward N. Lorenz, a Meteorologist and a Father of Chaos Theory, Dies at 90

The Public Domain Review: Sex and Science in Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora

New Scientist: 5000-year-old beer-brewing kit found in China

Simthsonian.com: Gan Bei! Chinese Brewed Beer 5,000 Years Ago

Forbes: Archaeologists Draft Ancient Chinese Beer Recipe

 

U-M Special Collections Library: The Chicken or the Egg?

BBC Earth: How humanity first killed the dodo, then lost it as well

Sailors supposedly killed dodos by beating them with sticks (Credit: Mary Evans Picture Library/Alamy Stock Photo)

Sailors supposedly killed dodos by beating them with sticks (Credit: Mary Evans Picture Library/Alamy Stock Photo)

The New York Times: On the Trail of Nabaokov in the American West

we.prm.ox.ac.uk: The Invention of Museum Anthropology, 1850–1920

Guildhall Library Blog: The Wonders of George Loddiges Botanical Cabinet

Until Darwin: A Short Biography of John Bachman (1790–1874)

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Leonard Jenyns

Slate: The Vault: Pretty Portraits of the Tiny, Lumpy, Sweet Strawberries of the Early 20th Century

BBC Earth: There are only 35 kinds of animals and most are really weird

flickr: Biodiversity Heritage Library’s photos

sapiens.org: The Birth of the “Neanderthals”

When first found, “Neanderthal man” remains were thought by some scientists to be from a diseased modern human. However, upon examining the Gibraltar skull, George Busk argued that the Neanderthal skull represented a separate species. Paul Hudson/Flickr

When first found, “Neanderthal man” remains were thought by some scientists to be from a diseased modern human. However, upon examining the Gibraltar skull, George Busk argued that the Neanderthal skull represented a separate species. Paul Hudson/Flickr

Atlas Obscura: Malm Whale

Forbes: This Meteorite Has Been Preserved For Over 520 Years

Academia: Emil du Bois-Reymond, “Darwin and Copernicus,” Nature: A Weekly Journal of Science 27, no. 702 (12 April 1883): 557–558

Notches: Reforming Sodom: Protestants and the Rise of Gay Rights

HNN: Five Things You Didn’t Know About John James Audubon

Live Science: Q&A with a Dinosaur Hunter: How Jack Horner Changed Paleontology

Jstor: Global Plants: Botanische Staatssammlung München Artwork – Water Colours of Fungi by Fritz Wohlfarth

Niche: Natures Past Episode 53: The Social and Environmental History of Hamilton Harbour

Letters from Gondwana: Tilly Edinger and the Study of ‘Fossil Brains’

Earthly Musings: Flagstaff’s Arizona Daily Sun Newspaper Runs Article on “Grand Canyon: Monument to an Ancient Earth”

Bonhams: Great White Shark Attack. Ricciardi, Francesco

Banff museum

Banff museum

The Christian Science Monitor: Did weather defeat the Mongol Empire?

Echoes From The Vault: Birth of American Bee Culture: A Look at Advertisements in A.J. Cook’s The Bee Keepers’ Guide

Dr Caitlin R. Green: Camels in early medieval western Europe: beasts of burden & tools of ritual humiliation

TrowelBlazers: Happy Birthday Mary Anning – and Team TrowelBlazers!

The Thrifty Traveller: In Search of Wallace – Part 5: Simunjan, Borneo

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: 1922 chemistry Nobel medal up for auction

Francis William Aston (1877–1945)

Francis William Aston (1877–1945)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Nautilus: Are We in the Anthropocene Yet?

Muslim Heritage: Women’s Contribution to Classical Islamic Civilisation: Science, Medicine and Politics

Smithsonian Libraries: Unbound: Fixing a Fold-Out Plate

IMG_1764-227x300

The Kant Research Group: Women Intellectuals of 18th Century Germany

Academe Blog: Reclaiming the Value of the Humanities

iPhylo: Thoughts on Wikipedia, Wikidata, and the Biodiversity Heritage Library

Nature: Source material: Geneticists and historians need to work together on using DNA to explore the past

The #EnvHist Weekly

WikiEdu: The Roundup: Cold War Science

The Point: Can Liberal Education Save the Sciences?

Historiens de la santé: Journées d’études: L’histoire du suicide Table of Contents

Conciatore: 2016 Gold medal winner, Independent Publishers Book Awards for European Nonfiction 

IPPY gold

LSE: The verdict: is blogging or tweeting about research papers worth it?

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Agnolo della Casa

JSTOR Daily: Inside the Alchemist’s Workshop

Alchemist_1050x700

Conciatore: A Matter of Plagiarism

The Selfish Gene at 40:

41aXMXYRxAL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

BBC News: The gene’s still selfish: Dawkins’ famous idea turns 40

AEON: Die, selfish gene, die

AEON: Dead or Alive? Is it time to kill off the idea of the ‘Selfish Gene’?

homunculus: Still selfish after all these years?

BOOK REVIEWS:

Nature: Ecology: The sea-otter whisperer

Historiens de la santé: Sister Soldiers of the Great War: The Nurses of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

The Guardian: Work from 1616 is ‘the first ever science fiction novel’

Classroom Science: The Not-So-Intelligent Designer, by Abby Hafer

Science Book a Day: The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic – and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

ghost-map

TLS: Autistic expression

Hakai Magazine: Franklin’s Lost Ship: The Historic Discovery of HMS Erebus

The Guardian: Siddhartha Muherjee: ‘genes are personal. They ask the question: why are we like this?

The Washington Post: Is the printed word doomed? Not now or ever argues a glut of new books about paper

 

NEW BOOKS:

Routledge: Science in the Public Sphere: A history of lay knowledge and expertise

Historiens de la santé: Healthy Boundaries. Property, Law, and Public Health in England and Wales, 1815–1872

Stanford University Press: Infectious Change: Reinventing Chinese Public Health After An Epidemic

Brepols Publishers: Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages

dIS-9782503551852-1

The Ordered Universe Project: New Publication: Grosseteste and Religious and Scientific Learning

CUP: The Once and Future Turing

 

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Garry’s Soapbox: John Dee at the Royal College of Physicians

Oxford Thinking: Cook-Voyage collection goes on display at the Pitt Rivers Museum

Uzeeum: House of Wax: Anatomical, Pathological, and Ethnographic Waxworks from Castan’s Panopticum, Berlin, 1869–1922

The Guardian: Totally cosmic science festival for blue-sky thinkers

The Wall Street Journal: Turning Science into Art

Amritt Museum: Beatrix Potter – Image & Reality

Science Museum: Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph

Until Darwin: Maria Martin Bachman’s sketches and paintings for Audubon: On-line Exhibition from the Charleston County Public Library

Historiens de la santé: Sexual Forensics in Victorian and Edwardian England: Age, Crime and Consent in the Courts

History Today: Maria Merian’s Butterflies

Science Museum: Robots

Natural History Museum: Dippy on tour

The Royal Society of Medicine: Exhibition: Charcot, Hysteria & La Salpetiere 3 May–23 July 2016

Australian National Maritime Museum: Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude 5 May30–October 2016

Morbid Anatomy Museum, Brooklyn: House of Wax: Anatomical, Pathological, and Ethnographic Waxworks from Castan’s Panopticum, Berlin, 1869–1922 Closes 30 May 2016

Harvard Magazine: Before Social Media: Radio was the medium that broke the silence

Horniman Museum & Gardens: H Blog: Tyrannosaurus and Tarbosaurus

The Houston Museum of Natural Science: Cabinet of Curiosities Opens 6 May 2016

Reviews in History: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee (Royal College of Physicians, 18 January – 29 July 2016)

Broadway World.com: Met Museum Exhibition to Celebrate Artistic, Technological, Cultural Legacy of the Seljuqs

Grup d’estudis d’història de la cartografia: Exhibition about Renacentrist cartography in Bergamo 16 April–10 July 2016

Bonner Sterne: “Argelanders Erben” im Universitätsmuseum Bonn bis 31 Juli 2016

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

Exhibition Nancy

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Globe Exhibition

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Hunterian Museum: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Natural History Museum: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017 

Science Museum: Information Age

Wellcome Library: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

CLOSING SOON: Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: YOUTOPIA: VISIONS OF THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: THE MAUDSLEY AT WAR 25 May–20November 2016 

Herschel Museum: Science and Spirituality: Astronomy and the Benedictine Order 4 May–12December

Science Museum: Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph 14 April–11 September 2016

Herschel Museum: Science and Spirituality: Astronomy and the Benedictine Order 4 May–12 December 2016

COMING SOON: Centre for Contemporary Arts is Glasgow: Intermedia Beyond Epilepsy 9-19 June 2016

COMING SOON:  The Royal College of Surgeons of England: Reframing disability: Hidden histories from the Royal College of Physicians

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Deadline Hollywood: Richard Goodwin’s ‘The Hinge of the World’ About Epic Clash Between Church and Galileo Being Developed as Feature

Discover Medical London: Medicine at the Movies 16 June 2016

The Old Vic: Jekyll and Hyde 20-28 May 2016

Royal Opera House: Frankenstein, 4 – 27 MAY 2016

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016

EVENTS:

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Women And Medicine 9 June 2016

CHF: First Friday: Between Food and Medicine 3 June 2016

Royal College of Physicians: John Dee: art, science, magic 11 July 2016

TNMOC: Lecture: The Roots of Data Processing 9 June 2016

Science Museum: Frankenstein – From Literature to Myth to Bogeyman of Science

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: “London’s Plagues”

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

Royal College of Physicians: Medicinal plant lecture: The realty and the bizarre 13 June 2016

University of Utrecht: Descartes-Huygens Lecture by J.B. Shank on ‘Newtonian’ Mechanics in France around 1700

IET Savoy Place London: Lecture: Preparing to lay a transatlantic telegraph table; an historical comparison 16 June 2016

Science Museum: Lecture: Leonardo and the Military 9 June 2016

Morbid Anatomy Museum: Anatomical Venus Symposium & Book Party 4 June 2016

Manchester Histories Festival: From Coal Mining to Data Mining: An experimental approach to the history of illness and pain 6 June 2016

Wellcome Library: Reframing Disabilities: Hidden histories from the Royal College of Physicians 7 June 2016

Linnean Society of London: The Lord Treasurer of Botany: Sir James Edward Smith and the Linnaean Collections 7 June 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: Object Handing at Beckenham Library 3 June 2016

Discover Medical London: Tour: Who needs doctors anyway? 26 May 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Exceptional & Extraordinary: unruly minds and bodies in the medical museum: two unique evenings of film, dance, performance and comedy inspired by museum collections exploring our attitudes towards difference: 13 & 20 June 2016

University College Cork: Walking Tours: A second chance to solve the mystery of ‘Being Boole’!

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow Science Festival: Goodall Lecture – 200th Anniversary of Laennec’s First Stethoscope 16 June 2016

The Brain Box: Manchester Day: History: Memory Lane: A History of Brain Science 19 June Town Hall

 

UCL: Lecture: Psychiatrists, psychiatry and the colonial state in the firsthalf of 20th century India 31 May 2016

The National Museum of Computing: Guided Tours

Royal Museums of Greenwich: Talk: In the Steps of Shackleton 1 June 2016

Gresham College: Lecture: The Expanding Universe 26 October 2016

Royal College of Nursing: Lecture: The Northern Powerhouse: Cottontown Nurses who shaped the Profession 8 June 2016

Brompton Cemetery: London Alchemy: Socery, Gin and Spooky Music in a Cemetery Chapel 4-5 June 2016

Ball event

Glasgow: Science on the Streets – City Centre Tour 11 June 2016

V&A: Courses: Sensing Time: The Art and Science of Clocks and Watches 18 June 2016

Things

SciFRi talks

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

The Royal College of Physicians: Discover Medical London: Walking Tour:  “Sex and The City”

Norcroft Auditorium, Norcroft Centre, University of Bradford: The secret chemistry of art: unravelling an age-old textile mystery / September 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Alchemist Heating a Pot, by David Teniers the Younger (1610 - 1690), oil on canvas.

Alchemist Heating a Pot, by David Teniers the Younger (1610 – 1690), oil on canvas.

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: A Marvellous Elephant – Waddesdon Manor

Youtube: In conversation with Helen Sharman and a galaxy of astronauts

Retro Report: The Shadow of Thalidomide

Youtube: Thomas Edison interviewed at the age of 84

The Ordered Universe Project: An Ordered Universe: Working with Medieval Scholars on Thirteenth Century Science Texts – A Scientist’s Tale

Museo Galileo: Historical Outline of Optics

Youtube: JHU Online Program in the History of Medicine

Youtube: Working for NASA: Space for Women – 1981 Educational Film – S88TV1

Youtube: Sally Ride on Dumb Questions

University of Cambridge: The John Forrester Case

Youtube: J. Robert Oppenheimer: “I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.”

Youtube: Scientist You Must Know: Arnold O. Beckman

Youtube: Historical Myths About Science by John L. Heilbron

Arts Hay Festival: Baillie Giffor Lecture: Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and How to Think Smarter About People Who Think Differently.

 

RADIO & PODCASTS:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories

BBC Radio 4: The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry

Professor Buzzkill: 1918 Flu Pandemic killed over 50 million people. Why was it called “The Spanish Flu?”

BBC Radio 4: Paul Ehrlich’s ‘Magic Bullet’ and the Cure for Syphilis

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University Of Belgrade: CfP: Philosophy of Scientific Experimentation-5 22–23 September 2016

Mediterranean Institute at the University of Malta, and the University of Warwick: CfP: Beauty and the Hospital in History 6–8 April 2017

Institution of Engineering and Technology, London: Conference: Telecommunications in the Aftermath of World War 1: Civilian and Military Perspectives 10 August 2016

University of Oxford: Summer School and Conference: Mind Value and Mental Health: Philosophy and Psychiatry 13–15 July 2017

University of Columbia: The Center for Science & Society: Exploring the Philosophy of Émily du Châtelet

University of Vienna: Conference: “Claiming authority producing standards: The IAEA and the History of Radiation Protection” 3-4 June 2016

MedHum Fiction – Daily Dose: CfP: Medical Humanities

BSHS: The British Society for the History of Science Prize for Exhibits on the History of Science, Technology and Medicine 2016

University of Strathclyde: Preventing Mental Illness: Past, Present and Future 2–3 June 2016

University of Warsaw: Conference: Reassembling the Republic of Letters 11–15 June 2015

University of Bergen: Philosophy of Bergen Workshop 2016 14 June

University of Oxford: Registration for the HSMT Postgraduate Conference, Modern Bodies, Modern Minds, closes next Friday, 3 June.

University of Leeds: Round Table Discussion: “Victorians and History Writing Practices” Seminar: “Victorian Jesus: Imagining the Anonymous Author of Ecce Homo (1865)” 4 July 2016

Wellcome Library: Workshop: London Health Histories 17 June 2016

Royal Museums Greenwich: Conferences & study days: From Sea to Sky: The Evolution of Air Navigation from the Ocean and Beyond 9–10 June 2016

University of Oxford: John Wallis (1616-1703). Mathematics, Music Theory, and Cryptography in 17th Century Oxford.9 June 2016

University of Birmingham: Social Studies in the History of Medicine – ‘Forged by Fire: Burns Injury and Identity in Britain, c.1800-2000’

Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Oxford: Postgraduate Conference 2016: Modern Bodies, Modern Minds 10 June

University of Oxford: Draft Oxford Scientiae Conference Programme 5–7 July 2016

Radboud University Nijmegen: Conference Program: Space, Imagination, and the Cosmos, from Antiquity to the Early Modern Period 9–10 July 2016

University of Kent: Conference: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Material Culture: 9 June 2016

The Nobel Museum Stockholm: Prizes and Awards in Science before Nobel. 5th Watson Seminar in the Material and Visual History of Science 5 September 2016

Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry: Partington Prize

Commission for the History and Philosophy of Computing: Third Symposium for the History and Philosophy of Programming 25 June 2016

University of Glasgow: CfP: Discourse of Care: Care in Media, Medicine and Society 5-7 September 2016 Deadline 3 June 2016

Western Michigan University: CfP: Sixth Annual Medical Humanities Conference Deadline 1 June 2016

University of Lancaster: Conference: Does the philosophy of psychiatry need metaphysics? 3 June 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP: Medicine, Envirment, and Health In the Easterm Mediterranean World, 1400–1750 3–4 April 2017

Pittsburgh Center for Philosophy of Science: Upcoming Events

Fórum Lisboa (Antigo Cinema Roma): CFP: Lisbon International Conference on Philosophy of Science 14–16 December 2016

Everything Early Modern Women: CfP: The Body and Spiritual Experience: 1500–1700 (RSA 2017)

Calenda: Le Calendrier des Lettres et Sciences Humains et Sociales: Appel à contribution « Les sciences du vivant. Imaginaire et discours scientifique »

Western Michigan University: Call for Abstracts: Sixth Annual Medical Humanities Conference 15–16 September 2016

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Undergraduate Essay Prize Deadline 1 October 2016

Kunsthistorisches Institut In Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut: CfP: Photo-Objects. On the Materiality of Photographs and Photo-Archives in the Humanities and Sciences 15–17 February 2017

Osiris Call for Papers

University of Leuven: CfA: The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences 12–13 October 2016

Science Museum: Artefacts Meeting 2–4 October 2016: CfP: Understanding Use: Science and Technology Objects and Users

Cambridge: CfP extended: Science and Islands in the Indo-Pacific World 15–16 September 2016

Singapore: Society for the History of Technology: Annual Meeting 22–26 June 2016

Women's history ad

Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey: SPSP Pre-Conference Workshop: Empirical Methodology for Philosophy of Science in Practice 16 June 2016

University of Bristol: Centre for Science and Philosophy: Events

BSHS: Singer Prize: The Singer Prize, of up to £300, is awarded by the British Society for the History of Science every two years to the writer of an unpublished essay, based on original research into any aspect of the history of science, technology or medicine.

Society for the Social History of Medicine: 2016 Undergraduate Essay Prize Deadline 1 October

BJHS Themes: We are calling for proposals for Issue 3 (2018) of BJHS Themes, the annual open-access journal that is a companion to the British Journal for the History of Science. Like the BJHSBJHS Themes is published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the BSHS.

St Michaels College, Cardiff University: Conference: Bodily Fluids/Fluid Bodies in Greek and Roman Antiquity 11–13 July 2016 Programme

H-Pennsylvania: Philip J. Pauly Book Prise Nominations Sought for Histories of Science in the Americas

British and European History of Medicine Conference: Registration: Medicine in Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts University of Kent 7-10 July 2016

BSHS: Prizes

Three Societies Meeting: University of Alberta, Edmonton 22–25 June 2016 Only two weeks left for hotel conference rates!

Trinity College Cambridge: The Venues of Scholarly Output: Collections, Treatises, Textbooks, Archives 25 June 2016

Let’s Talk About Sex: CfP: History of Sexuality PGR/ECR Workshop University of Exeter 26–27 June 2016

Queen Mary University of London:Upcoming History of Emotions Work in Progress Seminars

Conferene

University of Reading: CfP: Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums  23 September 2016 Deadline: 15 June 2016

BSHS: Registration Open: The Body and Pseudoscience in the Long Nineteenth Century Newcastle University 18 June 2016

Barts Pathology Museum: CfP: The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries 24 September 2016

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Leicester: Centre for Medical Humanities: Seminars:

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware: CfP: Making Modern Disability: Histories of Disability, Design, and Technology 28 October 2016

New York City: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 30 September–1 October 2016

Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology (Rio de Janeiro, 23-29 July 2017): CfP: Blood, Food, and Climate: Historical Relationships Between Physiology, Race, Nation-Building, and Colonialism/Globalization

CFP Early Modern World

History at the Open University: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland: A Conference in Honour of Anne Laurence Institute of Historical Research London 4 June 2016

IHPST, Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques, Paris: CfP: International Doctoral Conference in Philosophy of Science 29-30 September 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Ian Ramsey Centre Conference, University of Oxford: Workshop “Early Modern Laws of Nature: Secular and Divine” 7 July 2016 

Annals of Science: Annals of Science Essay Prize for Young Scholars

Religion & Medicine

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CFP: Blood, Food & Climate – Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology

2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics Pöllau, Austria 5–7 September 2016

University of Cambridge: Cabinet of Natural History: Seminars Easter Term 2016

Science in Public

The International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST): Invites submissions for the fourth DHST Prize for Young Scholars, to be presented in 2017.

Warburg Institute: ESSWE Thesis Workshop 7 July 2016

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Society and th Sea

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

University of London: Birkbeck: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2016: 11 July 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

Women hist phil

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

irkbeck, University of London: CfP: Embarrassing Bodies: Feeling Self-Conscious in the Nineteenth Century 17 June 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Leeds: Faculty of Arts: 2016 Cheney Fellowships in Culture (includes #histSTM)

Royal Historical Society: Research Expenses

Fermilab: Science Writing Internship – Fall 2016

Science Museum: Keeper of Technologies and Engineering

University of Twente: Short-term postdoc appointments (2 months, full-time) in ethics, with a focus on technology

University of Pennsylvania: Postdoc: History and Sociology of Science Nature between Science and Religion: Jewish Culture and the Natural World

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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