Category Archives: Early Scientific Printing

Acceptance, rejection and indifference to heliocentricity before 1610.

Johannes Petreius published Copernicus’ De revolutionibus in 1543 how was this major new cosmological and astronomical work with its heliocentric hypothesis actually received in the first approximately seventy years after it appearance?  Michael Fugate and others continue to enquire about or insist … Continue reading

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Hans Peter from Langendorf

On this day in 2009 The Renaissance Mathematicus first crept warily out into the vast depths of cyberspace. As it’s our third birthday I decided it’s about time to talk about our blog banner. With the exception of a short … Continue reading

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Midwifery in the evolution of science

Georg Joachim Rheticus who was born 16th February 1514 was responsible for persuading Copernicus to publish his De revolutionises but who was he? to find the answer go here

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Reformation, revolutions and social media

Can one draw parallels between the use of the printing press during the Reformation and the use of the Internet during the Arab Spring? What role did cheap astrological pamphlets play in the Astronomical Revolution? For some thoughts on these … Continue reading

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The astronomical revolution didn’t start here!

In the usual collection of myths that passes for history of science in our culture the astronomical revolution (and the so-called scientific revolution for that matter) is considered to have started with the publication of Copernicus’ De revolutionibus in Nürnberg … Continue reading

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A maths book from a painter

The first book of mathematics to be printed and published in German was writen by a painter who is 540 years old today.

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Mr X

There is a scholar, call him Mr X, who received his training within the academy, but who found it wasn’t enough. He wanted more: to move outside of his wonky circle of colleagues, to engage the public, to communicate ideas … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Early Scientific Printing, History, Mathematics, Physics, Science | 2 Comments

Where the pictures came from.

If you look at the science books that were printed in the 16th and 17th centuries you will notice that many of them have lavish and impressive illustrations to find out what had to be invented to make them possible … Continue reading

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