Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #34

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #34

Monday 07 March 2016

EDITORIAL:

Another week and another edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list bringing you all the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could find in cyberspace over the last seven days.

As I type this it is International Women’s Day and March is Women’s History Month so today’s edition of Whewell’s Gazette is dedicated to the women in #histSTM. When I first became interested in #histSTM women almost didn’t feature at all. Things have improved in more recent decades but we still have a long way to go. Women have played a role in #histSTM since antiquity in numerous capacities and for all too long #histSTM has been dominated almost exclusively by stories of men and their contributions, this is changing but it still needs to change more. If you blog about #histSTM include women in your blog posts, if you teach #histSTM include women in your courses, if you write about #histSTM write about women and if you talk about #histSTM talk about the women and not just the men.

Lady Science: Bibliography

Women You Should Know: Lady Science: Ladies First… History and the Phenom

AMNH: Celebrating Women’s History Month

Curator of Micropaleontology Angelina Messina

Curator of Micropaleontology Angelina Messina

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: The Stethoscope Sorority: Stories from the Archives for Women in Medicine

Myrtelle M. Canavan was a pathologist at Boston State Hospital

Myrtelle M. Canavan was a pathologist at Boston State Hospital

EE Times: 13 Women Who Changed Science

Edith Clarke was the first woman to earn a master's degree in electrical engineering from MIT

Edith Clarke was the first woman to earn a master’s degree in electrical engineering from MIT

JSTOR Daily: Mary Somerville, Queen of 19th Century Science

Mary Somerville (1780 - 1872), portrait by Thomas Phillips (1833). WikiMedia Commons

Mary Somerville (1780 – 1872), portrait by Thomas Phillips (1833).
WikiMedia Commons

The Institute: How Marie Curie Helped Save a Million Soldiers During World War I

Marie Curie [right] and her teenage daughter, Irène, operated the "Petite Curies" and established a program to train other women to use the X-ray equipment.

Marie Curie [right] and her teenage daughter, Irène, operated the “Petite Curies” and established a program to train other women to use the X-ray equipment.

ODNB: Podcast: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836-1917), first woman physician in Britain

Letters from Gondwana: Women in the Golden Age of Geology in Britain

Mary Elizabeth (née Horner) Lyell, (1808–1873), wife of Sir Charles Lyell, by Horatio Nelson King © National Portrait Gallery, London, and Mary Ann (née Woodhouse) Mantell (1795–1869), wife of Dr. Gideon Mantell, © 2014 The Natural History Museum, London.

Mary Elizabeth (née Horner) Lyell, (1808–1873), wife of Sir Charles Lyell, by Horatio Nelson King © National Portrait Gallery, London, and Mary Ann (née Woodhouse) Mantell (1795–1869), wife of Dr. Gideon Mantell, © 2014 The Natural History Museum, London.

BHL: Celebrating Women in Science and Museum Day Live

Monsonia speciosa illustrated by Henrietta Maria Moriarty. Fifty plates of green-house plants, drawn and coloured from nature (1807).

Monsonia speciosa illustrated by Henrietta Maria Moriarty. Fifty plates of green-house plants, drawn and coloured from nature (1807).

Biodiversity Library Exhibition: Early Women in Science

Florence Merriam Bailey

Florence Merriam Bailey

Youtube: English Heritage: Can You Name Three Women From History

Atlas Obscura: How Female Computers Mapped the Universe and Brought America to the Moon

image

Quotes of the week:

“Lifetime Achievement Award for Bringing the Same Paper to Conferences for More Than 20 Years – #AcademicOscars” – Travis Stern (@TravisStern)

“People have forgotten this truth … You become responsible forever for what you’ve tamed.” – Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince h/t @annegalloway

“On This Day in 1813 [1 March]: We appointed Michael Faraday as a laboratory assistant. The rest is history…” – Royal Institution

Baby on Board

“never, never, never trust someone else’s footnotes as a source for your citations. Amazing how often silly mistakes become re-cited ‘canon’”. – Vanessa Heggie (@HPS_Vanessa)

“In all science error precedes the truth, and it is better it should go first than last.” –Horace Walpole

“What is the First Law of Robotics?”

“Don’t talk about robotics” – Melissa Kaercher (@chebutykin)

Epigram quote

Sobel – “Longitude”

Pumfrey – “Latitude”

Brok – “Lassitude”

Nah, can’t be bothered. – Peter Brok (@peterbrok)

“Szilard phoned Edward Teller and reported his news in a single sentence in Hungarian. ‘Megtaláltam a neutronokat.’ I have found the neutrons” – Gene Dannen (@GeneDannen)

“Why didn’t Newton discover group theory?

Because he wasn’t Abel”. – Erica (@17Random)

Hippo

“Libraries are always bigger on the inside because every book has an entire world inside of it” – R Arger

  1. What do you call alternative medicine that actually works?
  2. Medicine. – Jim al-Khalili (@jimalkhalili)

 

Your chief sub-editor after posting a week's edition

Your chief sub-editor after posting a week’s edition

Birthdays of the Week:

 1 March 1896 Henri Becquerel discovered radioactivity

 Yovisto: Henri Becquerel and Radioactivity

Henri Becquerel in his Lab

Henri Becquerel in his Lab

Instagram: On this day, 120 years ago, Physicist Henri Becquerel discovered radioactivity.

John Murray born 3 March 1841

Yovisto: John Murray and the Oceanography

Letters from Gondwana: The Challenger Expedition and the Beginning of Oceanography

The science and ship crew of the HMS Challenger in 1874.

The science and ship crew of the HMS Challenger in 1874.

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – John Murray

Gerard Mercator born 5 March 1512

 The Renaissance Mathematicus: It’s not the Mercator projection; it’s the Mercator-Wright projection!

gerardus_mercator_3

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The “first” Atlas

mercator_-_atlas_-_1595

TIME: Google Doodle Honors Inventor of Flat Map Gerardus Mercator

History Today: The Flemish cartographer was born on March 5th, 1512

British Library: The Mercator Atlas of Europe

Mercator-Atlas England C29 c 13

British Library: Collection Item: Mercator’s atlas of Europe

 

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

France Wonder

The Statesman: Astronomy’s first revolutionary

World Digital Library: Mysteries of Celestial Phenomena: 8 Juan

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Jane M. Amenta

Astrolabes and Stuff: Leap years and astrolabes

PLOS Blogs: Lawrence and the Cyclotron: the Birth of Big Science

The Getty: The Aztec Calendar

tumblr_o38gmzGYPA1r1io1co1_1280

Fraunhofer Gesellschaft: Joseph von Fraunhofer (pdf)

dannen.com: Leo Szilard Online

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Norris Bradbury’s Interview

Yovisto: John Flamsteed – Astronomer Royal

Royal Museums Greenwich: An account of the Revd John Flamsteed, the first Astronomer-Royal

Yovisto: Georg Gamow and his fundamental Views on the Foundations of Science

AHF: Robert Wilson

Alessandro Volta: Volta’s Life and Works

alessandro_volta_giovane

arXiv: Gerbert of Aurillac: astronomy and geometry in tenth century Europe

Society for the History of Astronomy: Happy 229th Birthday Joseph von Fraunhofer

Darin Hayton: Edmond Halley Complains about the Clouds

AHF: Hans Bethe

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Rerum Romanarum: Mappa di Roma di John Senex (1721)

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Henry Kellett

Instagram: A 19th century map of Moscow

The Public Domain Review: Maps from Geographicus

Atlas Obscura: Maps of the Moon Mountains Once Thought to be the Source of the Nile

A map from 1805 show the fictional Mountains of the Moon bisecting the African continent. (Photo: Wikipedia)

A map from 1805 show the fictional Mountains of the Moon bisecting the African continent. (Photo: Wikipedia)

Motherboard: Rare Globes From the 1600s are Being Digitized So You Can Spin Them On Line

Yovisto: Henry the Navigator

Marks of Genius: London

Royal Museums of Greenwich: John Cabot

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Colon Health

Thomas Morris: An intestinal…mouse?

Nature: A tumour through time

The History of Modern Biomedicine: A Wellcome leap year day?

Perceptions of Pregnancy: ‘The Wages of Sin is a Month in the Locke’: Irish Modernism and the Politics of Venereal Disease

L0038208 Illustration of baby diseased with hereditary Syphilis Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

L0038208 Illustration of baby diseased with hereditary Syphilis
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

Notches: Moral Panic and Syphilis in Jamaica

HNN: Historian and physician Vanessa Worthington Gamble interviewed about the disturbing story of the founder of gynecology

BBC Future: The gruesome and mysterious case of exploding teeth

Advances in the History of Psychology: JHBS Early Views: “Blots and All” a History of the Rorschach in Britain

Notches: “The Unreasonable Indulgence of that Appetite”: Cancer as a Venereal Disease in the Nineteenth Century

Yovisto: Fritz Schaudinn and the ‘French Disease’

Thomas Morris: Lost and Found

CHF: Sickening Sweet

Popular Archaeology: Archaeologist investigate early 19th century asylum of old Tasmania

The barracked bulding of Williow Court as it appears today. Courtesy K. Leonard

The barracked bulding of Williow Court as it appears today. Courtesy K. Leonard

Thomas Morris: ‘Powder a Toad’ – Wesley’s Primitive Physick

NYAM: “Solving Woman’s Oldest Hygienic Problem in a New Way”: A History of Period Products

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: James Sadler – the First English Aeronaut

FACT: A guide to Pierre Schaeffer, the godfather of sampling

Conciatore: Antonio Neri’s Birthday

Grace’s Guide: Grace’s Guide to British Industrial History

The New York Times: When ‘Symptoms of Television’ Began Their Inexorable Spread

Nautilus: The Most Important Object In Computer Graphics History Is This Teapot

Yovisto: Robert Cornelius shoots the very first SelfieRobertCornelius-229x300

The New York Times: Relics of the Space Age

Yovisto: Walter Bruch and the PAL Color Television System

Yovisto: Seymour Papert’s Logo Programming Language

The National Museum of Computing: Lost Dead WITCH portrait rediscovered

The National Museum of American History: Hammond No. 12 Quadruple Shift Typewriter

The Register: Reelin’ in the years: Tracking the history of magnetic tape

Historical Climatology.com: Did the Spanish Empire Change Earth’s Climate

Textilis: Waterproof Garments – The Long Nineteenth Century

Atlas Obscura: The Lonely Launchpads and Rusted Rockets of America’s Abandoned Space Facilities

image-3

Internet Hall of Frame: Official Biography: Raymond Tomlinson

Ptak Science Books: A Simpler Explanation in a Complicated Print

The New York Times: Cryptography Pioneers Win Turing Award

Medievalists.net: Medieval Eyeglasses: Wearable Technology of the Thirteenth Century

Yovisto: Herman Hollerith and the Mechanical Tabulator

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Sliding to mathematical fame

William Oughtred Inventor of the Slide Rule Source: Wikimedia Commons

William Oughtred Inventor of the Slide Rule
Source: Wikimedia Commons

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Yovisto: Sir Peter Medawar – The Father of Transplantation

The New York Times: Five Minutes to Moonflower

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Robert Hooke

Back to the Sustainable Future: The War Machine in the Garden

Science & Religion Exploring the Spectrum: What’s in a name? Does Darwin hinder the acceptance of evolution?

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Hugh Strickland

Smithsonian.com: A Brief History of the St. Bernard Rescue Dog

Dogs of the St. Bernard Hospice during a walk organized by their trainers with tourists. (MicheleVacchiano/iStock)

Dogs of the St. Bernard Hospice during a walk organized by their trainers with tourists. (MicheleVacchiano/iStock)

The Atlantic: How Ancient Coral Revealed the Changing Length of a Year

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – William Stukeley

AMNH: The Butterflies of North America

The Guardian: Which came first: the butterfly or the flower?

Smithsonian.com: A Brief History of Twin Studies

The Guardian: How cars ruined our love of the countryside

The New Yorker: The Stress Test

Underworlds: Fossils and Geology: What Lies Beneath?

Duria Antiquior – A More Ancient Dorset, 1830 Watercolor by Henry De la Beche Courtesy National Museum of Wales

Duria Antiquior – A More Ancient Dorset, 1830
Watercolor by Henry De la Beche
Courtesy National Museum of Wales

CHEMISTRY:

IWCH 2015 Tokyo: Transformation of Chemistry from the 1920s to the 1960s: Proceedings

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Now Appearing: A popular science blooper that stands on the shoulders of giants

Symptoms Of The Universe: “You’re a professor at university for f**k’s sake. Stop wasting your time on YouTube and do research”

University of Rochester: Newscenter: Taking a ‘look’ at historical hoaxes

BioLogos: Scripture and Science: A Long History of Conversation

WordPress Discover: Medieval History, Illuminated: Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Uncovers the Past Through Books

BuzzFeed: If Male Scientists Were Written About Like Female Scientists

CHF: Chemical Heritage Foundation–Life Sciences Foundation Merger Questionnaire

Early Modern Letters Online: The Correspondence of Giovanni Antonio Magini (100 letters)

CHoM News: Processing of the Myron “Max” Essex papers has begun

Ptak Science Books: The Tools of A Scientist

6a00d83542d51e69e2014e8c396863970d-500wi

The New York Times: Notes from Psychiatry’s Battle Lines

The Recipes Project: On Close Reading and Teamwork

The #EnvHist Weekly

Springer Link: Journal of the History of Biology: Volume 49, Issue 1, February 2016 ToC

Isis CB: On the Scholarly Merit of Creating Your Own Research Tool: An Interview with Jennifer Rampling

The Atlantic: The Problem With History Classes

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Caterina Sforza

Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi (now in the Museum of Forlì.)

Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi
(now in the Museum of Forlì.)

Conciatore: Women in Alchemy

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Cultural History of Philosophy Blog: Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?

Women-in-Philosophy-cover-image-199x300

Physics Today: Tunnel Vision: The Rise and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

HNN: The Medieval Christian King Inspired by the Muslim World

Chemistry World: Early responses to the periodic system

Retro-Forteana: What Makes a Great Physicist?

 

Smithsonian.com: Ben Franklin Was One-Fifth Revolutionary, Four-Fifths London Intellectual

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Les bains d’al-Andalus. VIIIe-XVe siècle

Éditions Matériologiques: Qu’est-ce que la technologie?

The Open Notebook: Science Blogging: The Essential Guide

Bloomsbury Academic: From a Photograph: Authenticity, Science and the Periodic Press, 1870–1890

Amberley Publishing: 30 Years of Mobile Phones in the UK

Historiens de la santé: Leprosy and Charity in Medieval Rouen

Seuil.com: Des sexes innombrables: Le genre à l’épreuve de la biologie

Historiens de la santé: Nature’s Path: A History of Naturopathic Healing in America

CUP: Moral Authority: Men of Science, and the Victorian Novel

9781316600948

Historiens de la santé: Air Pollution Research in Britain c.1955–c.2000

ART & EXHIBITIONS

boingboing: Secret museum on the moon’s surface

Greenwich Historical Society: Upcoming Exhibitions: Close to the Wind: Our Maritime History

Royal Society of Chemistry: Our 175 faces of chemistry exhibition

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

University of Delaware: UDaily: Alchemy and Mineralogy 26 February–31 March 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Colonial Williamsburg: We are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence Opening 5 March 2016

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Queens’ College Cambridge: ‘The Rabbi & The English Scholar’ exhibition in the library 22 February–24 March 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Macrobert Arts Centre: The Trials of Galileo

Perth Concert Hall: The Trials of Galileo

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

French Event

Royal College of Surgeons of England: Skeletons in the Closet: The Grant Museum

QMUL Centre for the History of the Emotions: Work in Progress Seminar: 9 March 2016

Wellcome Trust: Pharmacy history: sources and resources 18 April 2016

UCL: STS: Haldane Lecture: Helen Longino ‘Underdetermination in science:  a dirty little secret?’! 16 March 2016

Science Museum: Women Engineers in the Great War and after 23 April 2016

British Society for the History of Pharmacy: Pharmacy History: sources and resources 18 April 2016

Leeds Health Event

Wren Library Lincoln Cathedral: Lecture: Anna Agnarsdóttir – Sir Joseph Banks and Iceland 28 April 2016

Atlas Obscura: OBSCURA SOCIETY NY: AFTER-HOURS AT THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE “EAST MEETS WEST” 10 March 2016

Cambridge Bright Club: 10 March 2016 Featuring Seb Falk and his Astrolabe

The Royal Society: Workshop: The Politics of Academic Publishing 1950–2016 22 April 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Map Event

RCP: Dee late: rediscovering the lost world of John Dee 10 March

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Mental Maps of the World in Great Britain and France, 1870–1914

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Waterhouse Room Gordon Hall Harvard Medical School: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

Boole-Shannon

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Workshop RS

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Louis Jean Marie Daubenton 1716-99 in his Laboratory by Benjamin Eugene Fichel

Louis Jean Marie Daubenton 1716-99 in his Laboratory by Benjamin Eugene Fichel

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

BBC: Future: The computer designed in the 1800s

Youtube: Wellcome Collection: Omniskop X-ray machine

Vimeo: Linnean Society: Ancient Oaks in the English Landscape

RADIO & PODCASTS:

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: The Dutch East India Company

CHF: Episode 164: Bones#

PBS Newshour: Author explores life on the expanding autism spectrum

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal Statistical Society: The Impact of Statisticians, Actuaries and Economists during the Second World War 21 April 2016

Conf. People Places

Butser Ancient Farm (UK): Experimental Archaeometallurgy Course 13–16 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: One-Day Symposium: People-Powered Medicine 7 May 2016

Eidyn Research Centre: Workshop: Relativism in Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science, 16 March 2016

Institut d’Anatomie Pathologique, Hôpital Civil – Strasbourg: Mardis de l’Histoire Médicale Programme 2015-2016

(HSTM) Network Ireland: CfP: Annual conference of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (HSTM) Network Ireland in association with Celsius 11–12 November 2016

Descartes event

American Printing History Association: CfP: The Black Art & Printer’s Devils: The Magic, Mysticism, and Wonders of Printing History Huntingdon Library 7–8 October 2016

CHPHM Blog: Crossing Boundaries: The Histories of First Aid in Britain and France, 1909–1989

University of Leeds: CfP: Telecommunications in the Aftermath of WW1: Civilian and Military Perspectives (Deadline 30 March) 10 August 2016

The Renaissance Society of America: CfP: Early Modern Works by and about Women: Genre and Method McGill University Montreal 4–6 November 2016

Galerie Colbert, Auditorium Paris: Un régime de santé du Moyen Âge, le Tacuinum sanitatis 15 mars 2016

Hist Geo Conf

NEASEC Amherst MA: CfP: The Globe, the World, and Worldliness: Planetary Formations of the Long Eighteenth Century

EHESS; Paris: Appel à communications: Santé au travail, santé environnementale : quelles inclusions, quelles exclusions ? 29 juin 2016

University of Oxford: Call for Registration: Oxford Scientiae 5–7 July 2016

AAAS: History and Philosophy of Science at AAAS call for symposia proposals for 2017 AAAS Meeting

La mort en Europe du XVIIe au XXIe siècle. Représentations, rites et usages: Appel à contribution

University of St Andrews: Mathematical Biography: A Celebration of MacTutor 16–17 September 2016

Budapest: CEU Summer University: Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe 18–27 July 2016

Amsterdam: Conference by Women in Philosophy #3 1 July 2016

University of Oklahoma: Midwest Junto for the History of Science: 1–3 April 2016

University of Plymouth: CfP: One-Day Symposium: Pilgrimage, Shrines and Healing in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe 24 June 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Bridging the Divide: Literature and Science 3 June 2016

23 Things for Research: Book now for a Women in Wikipedia edit-a-thon, 23 March 2016

Vatican Library Conference

NYAM: Scientific Illustration: A Workshop Using the Collections of the Academy 7 April 2016

University of Kassel: CfP: Workshop: Representing Scientific Results 18–19 November 2016

Victoria University of Wellington: CfP: The New Zealand Polymath – Colenso and his contemporaries 17–19 November 2016

Rio de Janeiro: 25th International Congress for the History of Science and Technology: CfP: Global Mathematics 23–29 July 2017

Berlin: Call for Participants: Convening for three workshops in Berlin, 2016-2017 Accounting for Health: Economic Practices and Medical Knowledge, 1500–1970

Public Communication of Science and Technology: Conference program (Draft: PCST Conference Istanbul 26–28 April 2016

AAR: Western Esotericism Group: CfP: AAR Annual Meeting San Antonio 19–22 November 2016

University of Warsaw: CfP: Interim Conference of ISA Research Committee on the History of Sociology 6–8 July 2016

BSHS: Call for Papers and Panels: Science in Public 2016

Science in Public

University of Sussex: CfP: SPRU 50th anniversary conference on ‘Transforming Innovation’

Mexico City: CfP: The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T²M) 14thAnnual Conference 27–30 October 2016

NACBS, Washington DC: CfP: Early Modern History Workshop on “Networks of Knowledge” November 2016

UCL: STS: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2016

Rutgers University: Workshop for the History of Environment, Agriculture, Technology, & Science (WHEATS) 30 October–2 October 2016

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: The Museum as Method: Collections, Research, Universities 14–15 March 2016

University of Zürich: Conrad Gessner Congress Program 6–9 June 2016

University of Kent: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference Programme (DRAFT as at Feb 15, 2016) 7–10 July 2016

London Metropolitan University: CfP: ‘Made in London’: Makers, designers and innovators in musical instrument making in London, from the 18th to 21st centuries

Summer School: Rethinking Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 23–25 July 2016 Part I Lisbon 26–30 July 2016 Part II Porto

Istanbul: XXXV Scientific Instrument Symposium: CfP: Instruments between East and West 26–30 September 2016

University of York: Conference: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences 7-8 April 2016

Harvard University: 51st Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 2 April 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP Teaching and Learning in Early Modern England: Skills and Knowledge in Practice

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: The 131st Annual Meeting Call for Proposals and Theme Denver CO 5–7 January 2017

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Call for Submissions: Book: Historical Epistemology of Science/Philosophy of Science, Torricelli

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

University of Western Ontario: CfP: Philosophy of Logic, Mathematics, and Physics Graduate Conference

Institut d’Études Scientifiques de Cargèse, Corsica: CNRS School “BioPerspectives” Philosophy of Biology 29 March–1 April 2016

Klosterneuburg: CfP: European Advanced School in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) 59 September 2016

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester: Lunchtime Seminar Series Feb–June 2016

AIP: Lyne Starling Trimble Science Heritage Public Lectures Feb–Sept 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: ICOHTEC Symposium in Rio de Janeiro on 23-29 July 2017

Asian Society for the History of Medicine: Call for Submissions: Taniguchi Medal 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Essay

International Committee for the History of Technology: CfP: 43rd Annual Meeting in Porto, Portugal Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

University of York 7–8 April 2016

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: CfP: Maculinity, health and medicine, c.1750–present 28–29 April 2016

Effaced Blog: CfP: History of Facial Hair

Sidney Sussex College: University of Cambridge: Programme and Registration Treasuries of Knowledge: 8 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Middlesex University London: David Tresman Caminer Studentship for the History of Computing

Imperial War Museum: Collaborative Doctoral Awards

AIP: Two Research Assistants: Research and develop information on the history of women and minorities in physics and allied sciences.

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Call for Applications: Travel Fellowships in the History of the Academic Health Center & Health Sciences at the University of Minnesota

University of Leeds: PhD Project: Making the Pulse: The Reception of the Stethoscope in Nineteenth-Century Britain, 1817–1870 (pdf)

University of Sheffield: Lecturer in the History of Medicine, Science or Technology

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #33

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #33

Monday 29 February 2016

EDITORIAL:

 The year rolls on and we roll with it. It’s time once again for your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all the histories of science, medicine and technology that we could scoop up in the far reaches of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Over the weekend there was a minor flurry in the Internet #histSTM and #scicomm communities cause by an opinion piece from the new President of the Royal Society, Vanki Ramakrishnan on The Guardian Website with the seemingly harmless title More than ever, science must be central to our lives. Like many of my Internet friends I felt my self thrown back in time to C. P. Snow’s legendary Two Cultures lecture from 1959, in which the chemist and novelist Charles Snow complained about the gulf between the arts and the sciences as he saw it and the fact that it was socially acceptable to admit ignorance of the science, but not of the (highbrow) arts.

Ramakrishnan’s Guardian piece reads like a cheap copy of Snow’s legendary Reith Lecture and was made all the worse by his extraordinary claim that the arts are privileged today in our society vis-à-vis the sciences. A claim that appears to be more than ridiculous in a time when politicians throughout the so-called developed world are calling the existence of humanities departments in universities into question whilst promoting spending on the sciences.

#histSTM is of course the seam where the humanities and the sciences meet and I am not alone in thinking that it is ridiculous for anybody involved in research or education to try and drive a wedge between them, as Ramakrishnan appears to be doing in his opinion piece. A cultured society needs all of the academic disciplines, which should compliment and not rival each other and I find it depressing when somebody in as influential a position as Ramakrishnan tries to pit the sciences and the humanities against each other. Whewell’s Gazette is a symbol of the unity that can and should exist between them and we hope that all our readers will continue to fight to support that unity.

Two Cultures

 Quotes of the week:

“Wait. If autism-spectrum people are over-represented in the sciences… wouldn’t that imply that… autism causes vaccines?!” – Zach Wienersmith (@ZachWeiner)

Unsubscribe

“The different branches of Arithmetic – Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision.” – Lewis Carroll

Book joke

“Some details are enormously important.

Some are absolutely worthless.

“Attention to detail” means nothing without context”. – John D Cook (@JohnDCook)

“Jan 1790, Thomas Mann lodges a patent for “a certain instrument for assisting the human body in walking (and which I call an artificial leg)” – Alun Withey (@DrAlun)

Giveup technology

“All human thought, all science, all religion, is the holding of a candle to the night of the universe.” – Clark Ashton Smith h/t @cratylus

Social Media

“Seems to me that kids get taught plenty about writing but not so much about storytelling, which is really its own distinct discipline” – Adrian Bott (@Cavalorn)

Library quote

 

Birthday of the Week:

Camille Flammerion born 26 February 18

Nicolas Camille Flammarion Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nicolas Camille Flammarion
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

Today in Science History: Flammarion The Astronomer

Shareok: Boldly Explore: Camille Flammarion (1888)

Flammarion engraving, Paris 1888, for Flammarion's 1888 L'atmosphère : météorologie populaire (p. 163) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Flammarion engraving, Paris 1888, for Flammarion’s 1888 L’atmosphère : météorologie populaire (p. 163)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Matter Joke

Geographicus: 1801 Bode Celestial Hemispheres or Star Maps

American Astronomical Society: James B. Pollock (1938 – 1994)

AHF: Fritz Strassmann

The Public Domain Review: Self-Portrait by Ernst Mach (1886)

Yovisto: Carl Friedrich Gauss – The Prince of Mathematicians

Yovisto: The Sky Disc of Nebra

Time: How to Watch the Solar Eclipse Like a 1960s School Kid

Caption from LIFE. Fifth-graders at the Emerson School in Maywood, Ill. line up with backs to the sun and their eclipse-watching boxes over their heads. Francis Miller—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Caption from LIFE. Fifth-graders at the Emerson School in Maywood, Ill. line up with backs to the sun and their eclipse-watching boxes over their heads.
Francis Miller—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Paul Tibbets – Reflections on Hiroshima

The Sphere of Sacrobosco: The First (Printed) Portuguese Sphere

irf.se: Viking – Sweden’s first satellite

Astrolabes and Stuff: Medieval (g)astronomy: my PhD in biscuit form

Edible equatorium

Edible equatorium

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Christoph and the Calendar

The Atlantic: A Murder at the American Physical Society

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Kenneth Nichols’ Interview

Royal Society: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: About the Cover

UCL: STS Observatory: Britain’s Oppenheimer?

Atlas Obscura: Dwingeloo Radio Observatory

AHF: James Chadwick

Anna Belfrage: No nose & a burst bladder – poor man!

Ladd Observatory Blog: An Astronomical Blunder

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Cartographia: Archive for the ‘Charles Joseph Minard’ Category: Mondays with Minard: Cotton and Wool Comparisons

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Little-known African-American among Peary’s North Pole explorers

In this May 14, 1926, photo, Matthew Henson, in New York, points to a map of the North Pole. He was part of the expedition of Robert Peary to the Pole. Associated Press

In this May 14, 1926, photo, Matthew Henson, in New York, points to a map of the North Pole. He was part of the expedition of Robert Peary to the Pole.
Associated Press

Slate: The Vault: A Colorful Late-19th-Century Map of Native American Languages

Yovisto: Amerigo Vespucci and the New World

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The naming of America

Atlas Obscura: Can You Spot The Monsters in This Medieval Map of The World

New York Public Library: Open Access Maps at NYPL

Brilliant Maps: An Incredibly Detailed Map of the Roman Empire At Its Height in 211 AD

British Library: Maps and views blog: ‘Whither the Fates Carry Us’: Bermuda goes Off the Map

Mappa ÆSTIVARUM Insularum, alias BERMUDAS dictarum [BL: Maps K Top 123.127]

Mappa ÆSTIVARUM Insularum, alias BERMUDAS dictarum [BL: Maps K Top 123.127]

National Library of Scotland: Scotland – Land Use Viewer

BnF: Gallica: 55 Digitised 3D Globes

Hyperallergic: A Map Library Is Digitizing Its Rarest Globes as 3D Models

The Australian: Finally, history at all our fingertips at National Library

BBC News: What books were taken to the Antarctic 100 years ago?

The National: The Great polish Map of Scotland is shown in great detail by drone image

Tabletop Whale: Here there be robots: A medieval map of Mars

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Leeches for everybody

Penn Libraries Manuscripts: A 15c Italian Herbal with Male & Female Mandrake Plants

NYAM: A Medical Symphony: Celebrating African Americans in New York Medicine

Georgian Gentleman: A method of preventing a Miscarriage, given by Mrs Stringer

Nursing Clio: “She Did It to Herself”: Women’s Health on Television and Film

Thomas Morris: The man with a tooth in his ear

NCBI: Early victims of X-rays: a tribute and current perception

The Public Domain Review: Frederik Ruysch: The Artist of Death

Detail from Jan van Neck’s Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Frederick Ruysch (1683), showing Ruysch in the centre with an infant cadaver  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Detail from Jan van Neck’s Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Frederick Ruysch (1683), showing Ruysch in the centre with an infant cadaver
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Andover Townsman: Illuminating the darkness

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: The College Library: William Macewen, Glasgow Police Surgeon

Circulating Now: Pubmed Central: Visualizing a Historical Treasure Trove

University of Queensland: UQ News: Ancient medicines and bone lever in rare Roman medical kit

Medicine, ancient and modern: Blog Facelift!

The H-Word: How to spot a doctor before the invention of the stethoscope

Nursing Clio: Flowers and Lady Charlotte: Talking about Menstruation, Past and Present

O Can You See?: Kids pitched in to defeat disease and advance medical research

Ida A. Bengston National Library of Medicine #101410279

Ida A. Bengston National Library of Medicine #101410279

 

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: The Battle over Bodies: A History of Criminal Dissection

The Huntingdon: Major History of Medicine Collection Comes to the Huntingdon

Yovisto: Giovanni Battista Morgagni and the Science of Anatomy

Yovisto: The Flaked Cereal turns 128 – thanks to John H. Kellogg

Thomas Morris: Mütter’s operation – plastic surgery 19th-century style

Royal Museums Greenwich: The Great Plague of London in numbers

TECHNOLOGY:

Farmhouse Lighting

Conciatore: Reticello

Conciatore: Glass or Rock

Literacy of the Present: Nothing Left to Invent: Victorian visions of the future

Two Nerdy History Girls: Fashionable Technology, c.1740

New Scientist: Old Scientist: Do you really want this computer?

Ptak Science Books: An Escher-Like Non-Escher Architectural Image

6a00d83542d51e69e201b8d1a2b441970c-500wi

Mental–floss: The Electrifying Rivalry of History’s Greatest Frenemies

Yovisto: Jacques de Vaucanson and his Miraculous Automata

The Atlantic: Hearing the Lost Sounds of Antiquity

Daily Kos: The Baghdad Battery: An Update

The Recipes Project: Making ‘Powder for Hourglasses’ in the Early Modern Household

Shropshire Star: £1.25 million renovation for Shropshire’s Iron Bridge

The Iron Bridge in Ironbridge. Photo by Jamie Ricketts.

The Iron Bridge in Ironbridge. Photo by Jamie Ricketts.

National Railway Museum: Pulling Flying Scotsman off the Drawing Board

Royal Museums Greenwich: St. Michael – identifying the mysterious ship from 1669

Yovisto: Thomas Newcomen and the Steam Engine

Yovisto: Robert Alexander Watson-Watt and the Radar Technology

Upworthy: These 6 women got written out of tech history. They’re finally being recognised

Photo of "the world's first computer" via International Communications Agency/Wikimedia Commons.

Photo of “the world’s first computer” via International Communications Agency/Wikimedia Commons.

The New York Times: Wesley A: Clark, Made Computing Personal, Dies at 88

Ptak Science Books: History of the Future of Massiveness: Stadium-Seating Skyscrapers, NYC, 1938 Imaginary New York City Landscapes from CON-ED, 1938

Sarnof Quote

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

jamesungureanu: Visions of Science: Charles Lyell

evolution-institute.org: Was Hitler a Darwinian? No! No! No!

National Graphic: The Plate: Like Sushi? Thank a Female Phycologist for Saving Seaweed

National Geographic: ‘Shark Lady’ Eugenie Clark, Famed Marine Biologist, Has Died

Eugenie Clark examines deep water sharks from Suruga Bay, Japan.  PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DOUBILET

Eugenie Clark examines deep water sharks from Suruga Bay, Japan.
PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DOUBILET

Yovisto: Andrea Cesalpino and the Classification of Plants

Mental_floss: The King of Scotland’s Peculiar Language Experiment

Notches: Catholicism, Contraception, and The History of Sexuality

The Guardian: Lost Worlds Revisited – an introduction to our new palaeontology blog

BHL: We Need Books to…Identify New Species

The Public Domain Review: Extracts from the Endeavour Journal of Joseph Banks (1769)

JHI Blog: Aldo Leopold and the History of Environmental Ideas

Smithsonian.com: How the Gold Rush Led to Real Riches in Bird Poop

A 19th-century illustration depicts a scene off the coast of Peru, where bird poop, or guano, was harvested as a valuable agricultural fertilizer. (Corbis)

A 19th-century illustration depicts a scene off the coast of Peru, where bird poop, or guano, was harvested as a valuable agricultural fertilizer. (Corbis)

Notches: Gay Politics and Police Politics in the American City

Hindustan Times: Not so dumb: Dodos may have been fairly smart, says study

The Thrifty Traveller: In Search of Wallace – Gading & Ayer Panas

Earth and Planetary Science: Clyde Wahrhaftig (1919–1994)

Seismo Blog: Deep Earthquakes and The King

Understanding Society: History of sociology

Herbarium

CHEMISTRY:

about education: Who is the Father of Chemistry?

about education: Aqua Regis Definition

Royal Society: Glenn Theodore Seaborg 19 April 1912– 25 February 1999

Seaborg in his lab Source: Wikimedia Commons

Seaborg in his lab
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: Plutonium

AHF: Glen Seaborg

Compound Interest: A Periodic Table of Rejected Element Names

Othmeralia: Georg Washington Carver

CHF: Dangerous Materials?

Chem quote

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Harvard Magazine: The Science of History

The Recipes Project: A Recipe for Recipe Research: The Making and Knowing Project

People’s History of the NHS: People’s History of the NHS Introduction

psych.yoku.ca: Partial Bibliography of the History of Black Women Psychologists

The Nation: Ibn Rushd vs Ghazali: Did the Muslim world take a wrong turn?

Niche: #EnvHist Daily

Ambitious about Autism: Guide to an Autism Friendly Museum

HNN: Elizabeth Eisenstein, Trailblazing Historian of Movable Type, Dies at 92

The New York Times: Elizabeth Eisenstein, Trailblazing Historian of Movable Type, Dies at 92

Elizabeth Eisenstein Source: NYT

Elizabeth Eisenstein
Source: NYT

The #EnvHist Weekly

Science Gossip: A Year of Science Gossip

Slate The Vault: Timeline Lets You Browse Hundreds of Historical Documents From The Vaults Blog

Cultures of Knowledge: Giovanni Antonio Magini and the dawn of EMLO’s thematic clusters

Global Dialogue: The Strange History of Sociology and Anthropology

Lady Science: Pitch an article for Lady Science

ESOTERIC:

The Casebook Project: Introduction to the edition of The Astrologicalle Judgmentes of phisick and other Questions

The Casebook Project: The Astrologicalle Judgmentes of phisick and other Questions: witnesses and dating

Heterodoxology: The scholastic imagination

Wellcome Collection Blog: The Hand and the Eye: the story of an amulet

Amulets and charms in Medicine Man gallery.

Amulets and charms in Medicine Man gallery.

distillatio: The part medieval alchemy played in the scientific revolution

Conciatore: Friar Mauritio

PIT Journal: Lead to Gold, Sorcery to Science: Alchemy and the Foundations of Modern Chemistry

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: The Mysterious Universe

npr: ‘Pandemic’ Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens of Million Coming?

Backlist: Histories of the Scientific Revolution by Deborah Harkness

Advances in the History of Psychology: New Books Network: Interview Round Up

Nature: History of Science: When eugenics became law

Deseret News: The Mapmakers of New Zion tells the story of Mormonism through maps

1663796

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: The World of Plants in Renaissance Tuscany: Medicine and Botany

Historiens de la santé: The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science During the Third Reich

Historiens de la santé: Therapoetics after Actium: Narrative, Medicine, and Authority in Augustan Epic

Historiens de la santé: Spannungsherde. Psychochirurgie nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg

Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine: Air Pollution Research in Britain c.1955–2000 Free Download

Historiens de la santé: Nurse Writers of the Great War

413fheY5glL._SX300_BO1,204,203,200_

G.T. Labs: The Imitation Game: Alan Turing Decoded

Harvard University Press: Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums

Historiens de la santé: Suicide in Twentieth-Century Japan

OUP: Essays in the Philosophy of Chemistry

Historiens de la santé: La folle clinique sexuelle du Professeur Pxxx, de la Belle époque aux Années folles

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Londonist: 5 Excellent Reasons to Catch the Pepys Show at Greenwich

issuu.com: Pepys Show

Royal Society of Chemistry: Our 175 faces of chemistry exhibition

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

Griseda Heppel: The lost library of Dr Dee

New Scientist: The maddeningly magical maths of John Dee

Towering figures: Euclid’s Elements in a sumptuous edition from 1570 John Chase/RCP

Towering figures: Euclid’s Elements in a sumptuous edition from 1570
John Chase/RCP

University of Delaware: UDaily: Alchemy and Mineralogy 26 February–31 March 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Colonial Williamsburg: We are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence Opening 5 March 2016

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

SciArt in America: Traces of the Space Age and Memories of Tragedy in Robert Rauschenberg’s “Stoned Moon” 

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

gq-magazine: Leonardo da Vinci Will Make You Feel Terrible About Your Career

Queens’ College Cambridge: ‘The Rabbi & The English Scholar’ exhibition in the library 22 February–24 March 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

Watercolour on vellum by James Bolton. Bolton was born in West Yorkshire, England and was the son of a weaver. He was a self- taught botanist, artist and engraver. His brother Thomas Bolton (1722-1778) was also a naturalist. James Bolton was highly successful as a mycologist and author of several botanical books including the first British book on fungi. James and Thomas Bolton were both sponsored by the art and natural history collector Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1715-1785). Painting date c.1790s.

Watercolour on vellum by James Bolton. Bolton was born in West Yorkshire, England and was the son of a weaver. He was a self- taught botanist, artist and engraver. His brother Thomas Bolton (1722-1778) was also a naturalist. James Bolton was highly successful as a mycologist and author of several botanical books including the first British book on fungi. James and Thomas Bolton were both sponsored by the art and natural history collector Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1715-1785). Painting date c.1790s.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Closing Very Soon: Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

Closing soon: British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

JHI Blog: Brave Entertainments

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Early Modern Medicine: Review: Mr Foote’s Other Leg

Restricted Data: The nuclear Secrecy Blog: Historical thoughts on Michael Frayn’s Copenhagen

Harvard Observatory History in Images: The Harvard Observatory Pinafore

Actors: Peter Millman, Leon Campbell, [Ransom or Wheelwright], Henrietta Swope, Cecilia Payne, Mildred Shapley, Helen Sawyer, Sylvia Mussels, Adelaide Ames. Characters: William A. Rogers, Arthur Searle, [Pickering or Upton], computer, Josephina, computer, computer, computer, Rhoda Saunders

Actors: Peter Millman, Leon Campbell, [Ransom or Wheelwright], Henrietta Swope, Cecilia Payne, Mildred Shapley, Helen Sawyer, Sylvia Mussels, Adelaide Ames.
Characters: William A. Rogers, Arthur Searle, [Pickering or Upton], computer, Josephina, computer, computer, computer, Rhoda Saunders

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

Descartes event

British Society for the History of Pharmacy: Pharmacy History: sources and resources 18 April 2016

Wren Library Lincoln Cathedral: Lecture: Anna Agnarsdóttir – Sir Joseph Banks and Iceland 28 April 2016

Atlas Obscura: OBSCURA SOCIETY NY: AFTER-HOURS AT THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE “EAST MEETS WEST” 10 March 2016

Cambridge Bright Club: 10 March 2016 Featuring Seb Falk and his Astrolabe

Boole-Shannon

The Royal Society: Workshop: The Politics of Academic Publishing 1950–2016 22 April 2016

The Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine: Lecture: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

RCP: Dee late: rediscovering the lost world of John Dee 10 March

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Mental Maps of the World in Great Britain and France, 1870–1914

University of Greenwich: Greenwich Maritime Centre Launch 8 March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

CRASSH: Cambridge: Genius in History: A Public Conversation: 2 March 2016

University of Manchester: Master’s Study Information Day: Science communication; History of science, technology and medicine; Medical humanities 2 March 2016

Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine: Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England 8 March 2016

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Waterhouse Room Gordon Hall Harvard Medical School: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

University of York: Lecture: “Not Everyone Can Be Gandhi”: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post WWII Era 3 March 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

Glasgow histmed events

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin. The Attributes of the Sciences. 1731.

Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin. The Attributes of the Sciences. 1731.

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

Ordered Universe: Lessons for Interdisciplinary Working from Medieval Science

VIDEOS:

Youtube: MHS Oxford: Animate It – Diptych Dial

Youtube: Gauss and Germain – Professor Raymond Flood

WIMP: 1930: Rare Footage of Helen Keller Speaking With the Help of Anne Sullivan

RADIO & PODCASTS:

V&A Podcast: What was Europe? A New Salon

Ben Franklin’s World: Episode 070: Jennifer Morgan, How Historians Research

University of Cambridge: Sandars Lectures 2016: 3 Adam Winthrop: History of Resource Anthony Grafton

History of Alchemy: Abufalah, Soul Dust, and making a Basilisk

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Oxford: Call for Registration: Oxford Scientiae 5–7 July 2016

AAAS: History and Philosophy of Science at AAAS call for symposia proposals for 2017 AAAS Meeting

Workshop RS

La mort en Europe du XVIIe au XXIe siècle. Représentations, rites et usages: Appel à contribution

University of St Andrews: Mathematical Biography: A Celebration of MacTutor 16–17 September 2016

Budapest: CEU Summer University: Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe 18–27 July 2016

Conf. People Places

Amsterdam: Conference by Women in Philosophy #3 1 July 2016

University of Oklahoma: Midwest Junto for the History of Science: 1–3 April 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Music and Sexuality

Hist Geo Conf

University of Plymouth: CfP: One-Day Symposium: Pilgrimage, Shrines and Healing in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe 24 June 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Bridging the Divide: Literature and Science 3 June 2016

23 Things for Research: Book now for a Women in Wikipedia edit-a-thon, 23 March 2016

Vatican Library Conference

NYAM: Scientific Illustration: A Workshop Using the Collections of the Academy 7 April 2016

University of Kassel: CfP: Workshop: Representing Scientific Results 18–19 November 2016

Victoria University of Wellington: CfP: The New Zealand Polymath – Colenso and his contemporaries 17–19 November 2016

Rio de Janeiro: 25th International Congress for the History of Science and Technology: CfP: Global Mathematics 23–29 July 2017

Berlin: Call for Participants: Convening for three workshops in Berlin, 2016-2017 Accounting for Health: Economic Practices and Medical Knowledge, 1500–1970

Public Communication of Science and Technology: Conference program (Draft: PCST Conference Istanbul 26–28 April 2016

University of York: Research Masterclass: Death of the king: smallpox vaccination and diplomacy in Nepal in 1816 9 March 2016

AAR: Western Esotericism Group: CfP: AAR Annual Meeting San Antonio 19–22 November 2016

University of Warsaw: CfP: Interim Conference of ISA Research Committee on the History of Sociology 6–8 July 2016

Boston University: Conference: How Can HPS Contribute to Science Literacy and Policy? 26–27 February 2016

BSHS: Call for Papers and Panels: Science in Public 2016

Science in Public

University of Sussex: CfP: SPRU 50th anniversary conference on ‘Transforming Innovation’

Mexico City: CfP: The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T²M) 14thAnnual Conference 27–30 October 2016

NACBS, Washington DC: CfP: Early Modern History Workshop on “Networks of Knowledge” November 2016

UCL: STS: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2016

Rutgers University: Workshop for the History of Environment, Agriculture, Technology, & Science (WHEATS) 30 October–2 October 2016

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: The Museum as Method: Collections, Research, Universities 14–15 March 2016

University of Zürich: Conrad Gessner Congress Program 6–9 June 2016

University of Kent: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference Programme (DRAFT as at Feb 15, 2016) 7–10 July 2016

University of York: History of Medicine Masterclass – Smallpox Vaccination and Diplomacy in Nepal 9 March 2016

London Metropolitan University: CfP: ‘Made in London’: Makers, designers and innovators in musical instrument making in London, from the 18th to 21st centuries

Summer School: Rethinking Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 23–25 July 2016 Part I Lisbon 26–30 July 2016 Part II Porto

Istanbul: XXXV Scientific Instrument Symposium: CfP: Instruments between East and West 26–30 September 2016

University of York: Conference: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences 7-8 April 2016

Harvard University: 51st Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 2 April 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP Teaching and Learning in Early Modern England: Skills and Knowledge in Practice

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: The 131st Annual Meeting Call for Proposals and Theme Denver CO 5–7 January 2017

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Call for Submissions: Book: Historical Epistemology of Science/Philosophy of Science, Torricelli

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

University of Western Ontario: CfP: Philosophy of Logic, Mathematics, and Physics Graduate Conference

Institut d’Études Scientifiques de Cargèse, Corsica: CNRS School “BioPerspectives” Philosophy of Biology 29 March–1 April 2016

Klosterneuburg: CfP: European Advanced School in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) 59 September 2016

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester: Lunchtime Seminar Series Feb–June 2016

AIP: Lyne Starling Trimble Science Heritage Public Lectures Feb–Sept 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: ICOHTEC Symposium in Rio de Janeiro on 23-29 July 2017

Asian Society for the History of Medicine: Call for Submissions: Taniguchi Medal 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Essay

International Committee for the History of Technology: CfP: 43rd Annual Meeting in Porto, Portugal Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

University of York 7–8 April 2016

UCL: London Ancient Science Conference: 15–18 February 2016

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: CfP: Maculinity, health and medicine, c.1750–present 28–29 April 2016

Effaced Blog: CfP: History of Facial Hair

Sidney Sussex College: University of Cambridge: Programme and Registration Treasuries of Knowledge: 8 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Queen Mary University of London: Applications Invited for AHRC CDP with British Library: Hans Sloane’s Books

Scientific Instrument Society: SIS grants

Univesity of Umeå: PhD student in History of Science and Ideas

Science Museum: Assistant Curator, Technologies and Engineering (maternity cover)

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh: Library and Archive: Wellcome Trust Research Bursaries

University of Leeds: AHRC Funded PhD Studentship: “The Working Life of Evolutionary Biologists: Exploring the Culture of Scientific Research Through the Personal Archive of John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)”

AIP: Director of Niels Bohr Library

AHA Today: Cornell University History of Home Economics Fellowship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #32

 

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #32

Monday 22 February 2016

EDITORIAL:

 Seven days seems to go by in a flash and once again we are back with the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list bringing you, as always, all we could find throughout cyberspace over the last seven days of the histories of science, technology and medicine.

Last week our short editorial concerned the death of the great historian Elizabeth Eisenstein, unfortunately we have again a death to report that of the much better known semiotician, essayist and novelist Umberto Eco. Officially Eco was not even a historian let alone a historian of science but his novels reveal an intellect that knew no boundaries when it came to investigating and describing the world of human thought throughout a vast swath of history. As I wrote on Twitter upon reading of his death, Eco’s novels drove my desire to be a historian as least as much as any academic history book that I read. Reading one of Eco’s novels made me want to go into a library and fetch fifty books to examine in detail all aspects of the historical setting that he was writing about. Judging by the response from my fellow STM historians on Twitter I was not alone in having these feelings. What follows are some of the comments and tributes that appeared on the web on the day that his death was announced.

Umberto Eco 1932–2016

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Umberto Eco 2005 Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

“I think that writing is an act of love.” —Umberto Eco

“When men stop believing in God, it isn’t that they then believe in nothing: they believe in everything.” – Umberto Eco

“People are never so completely and enthusiastically evil as when they act out of religious conviction.” ― Umberto Eco, The Prague Cemetery

When we consider a book, we mustn’t ask ourselves what it says but what it means. – Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco is like one of those amazing tool boxes that always have the right tool for every job – Joserra Marcaida (@JoserrMarcaida)

Eco intellectual

storify: Remembering Umberto Eco

The New York Times: Umberto Eco, 84, Best-Selling Academic Who Navigated Two Worlds, Dies

The Guardian: Umberto Eco, Italian novelist and intellectual, dies aged 84

The Guardian: Umberto Eco in quotes – 10 of the best

The Guardian: Umberto Eco: ‘People are tired of simple things. They want to be challenged’

boingboing: Umberto Eco, 1932–2016

Eco stories

BBC News: Italian writer Umberto Eco dies at 84

npr: Italian Author and Philosopher Umberto Eco Dead at 84

The New Yorker: A Guide to Thesis Writing That is a Guide to Life

The Paris Revue: Umberto Eco, The Art of Fiction No. 197

io9: Umberto Eco Asked the Hard Questions About the Myths We Can’t Help Believing In

Medievalist.net: Umberto Eco, medievalist and novelist, passes away

Yovisto: Umberto Eco and The Name of the Rose

Eco enigma

Vimeo: A Conversation With Umberto Eco

Quotes of the week:

“Dear students: the hardest part of making writing a career is not convincing someone to publish you. It’s convincing them to pay you. So if you want to be a writer, don’t practise writing (though it helps). Practise getting paid”. – Frank Swain (@SciencePunk)

“Reviewer 2 to author:

I’m doing you a favour by rejecting your paper. Rejection builds character.

You can thank me later”. – Grumpy Reviewer (@GrumpyJReviewer)

“Today is the birthday of Galileo. Unfortunately we do not know the birthdays of his two main collaborators, Figaro and Magnifico”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

New favorite response after telling someone I’m a historian:

“You’re a historian? So you know about conspiracy theories?” – Maria R. Montalvo (@MariaRMontalvo)

Book quote

“Those who control their passions do so because their passions are weak enough to be controlled” – William Blake h/t @MistressRougeUK

“Global temperatures are skyrocketing!”

“I’m sure it’s fine”

“No evidence links mobile phones to cancer”

“You can’t prove they’re safe!” – Katie Mack (@AstroKatie)

“People don’t buy the best product. They buy the product they can understand the fastest.” – Donald Miller h/t @JohnDCook

Birthdays of the Week:

 René-Théophile-Hyacinthe Laennec born 17 February 1781

Google Stethoscope

The H-Word: René Laennec’s stethoscope: giving doctors a new way to listen to patients

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Stethoscope

Stethoscope

Monaural stethoscope as devised by Laennec. It could be unscrewed in the middle for carrying in the pocket Source: RCPSG Library

University of Cambridge: Medical Library: The inventor of the stethoscope

Galileo Galilei born 15 February 1564

Galileo Ladybird

Source: Ladybird Books

Smithsonian.com: Happy 452nd Birthday, Galileo

Linda Hall Library: The Face of the Moon: Galileo Galilei (1564–1642)

NYAM: The Private Lives of Galileo

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Extracting the Stopper

Nicolaus Copernicus born 19 February 1473

Copernicus

Graphic courtesy of @UrbanAstroNYC

Lind Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Nicolaus Copernicus

Encyclopædia Britannica: Nicolaus Copernicus

British Library: Collection items: Copernicus’ celestial spheres

The Beacon: Copernicus’s 543rd Birthday Reveals the Date of His Death

Space Coast Daily: NASA History: Revolutionary Astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus Was Born in 1473

Georg Joachim Rheticus born 16 February 1514

Rheticus 

Yovisto: Georg Joachim Rheticus’ Achievements for Astronomy

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Midwifery in the evolution of science

Ernst Haeckel born 16 February 1834

450px-radiolaria

Radiolaria illustration from the Challenger Expedition 1873–76. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Letters from Gondwana: Ernst Haeckel, the Scientist as an Artist

Letters from Gondwana: Haeckel and the Legacy of Early Radiolarian Taxonomists

History of Geology: A Geologist’s Dream: The Lost Continent of Lemuria

Kuriositas: Art Forms of Nature – The Ernst Haeckel Collection

AMNH: Happy Birthday Ernst Haeckel!

The Public Domain Review: Ernst Haeckel and the Unity of Culture

Youtube: Proteus 2004

Tobias Mayer born 17 February 1723

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Tobias Mayer Source: Tobias Mayer Verein Marbach

The Renaissance Mathematicus: How far the moon?

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: John Wilkins and the Universal Language

Atlas Obscura: Until 1958, The FBI Followed Physicist Richard Feynman Very Closely

Yovisto: Herman Kahn and the Consequences of Nuclear War

math.buffalo.edu: From Banneker to Best: Some Stellar Careers In Astronomy and Astrophysics

The PI’s Perspective: Nine Mementos Headed to the Ninth Planet

NOVA: My Dad Discovered Pluto

PACHSmörgåsbord: Interview with Clyde Tombaugh

BBC News: Watching the heavens: The female pioneers of science

_88201294_fiammettawilson

Fiammetta Wilson: She opened the door to women in professional astronomy but her name has largely been forgotten Source: BBC

Yovisto: Pierre Bouger – Child Prodigy and ‘Father of Photometry’

University of Cambridge: Astronomical Images “Diagrams, Figures, and the Transformation of Astronomy, 1450-1650”: Erasmus Reinhold, Theoricae novae planetarum Georgii Purbacchii

The New York Times: When Einstein Was Wrong

The National Library of Israel: UNESCO recognizes Newton’s theological manuscripts as “Memory of the World”

npr: Was Einstein Wrong?

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Peter Lax’s Interview

Spacewatchtower: Comet of 1491: Self-Correction of Science

Ptak Science Books: The Building that Toppled the Earth

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Source: NYPL Digital Collections

AHF: Ernest O. Lawrence

The City Lab: This Old Map: The Moon, 1647

AHF: Maria Goeppert-Mayer

The Ordered Universe Project: Gravitational Waves and the Cosmic ‘Sonativum’

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

AEON: Fantasy North

Atlas Obscura: The Perfect 22-Foot Map for Your Ancient Roman Road Trip

Ptak Science Books: History of Lines – the Use of Thick and Bold Lines in Information, 1862

The Press and Journal: Bizarre map of Aberdeenshire drawn by “conman Craftsman” on display

Cultures of Knowledge: A call across ‘The Theatre of the World’: Abraham Ortelius

OrteliusWorldMap1570_small

‘Typvs Orbis Terrarvm’, by Abraham Ortelius. 1570. (The Library of Congress; source of image: Wikimedia Commons)

British Library: Asian and African studies bog: Kaempfer’s cat

Library of Congress: Worlds Revealed: Geography & Maps: Deciphering the Land: An Unknown Estate Survey Book from Late Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Century Italy

The Map Room: George Washington, Mapmaker

 

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Trees do not grow in humans

The Scotsman: Weird and wonderful Scottish treatments of the past revealed

Two Nerdy History Girls: Germs Discovered in 1835

The Guardian: Cancer moonshot? It’s not rocket science!

The Public Domain Review: Sketches in Bedlam (1823)

The Anatomy Lab: Pathological Spotlight: What becomes of the broken hearted?

img_7551

Boston University: The Florence Nightingale Digitization Project

Thomas Morris: The man who ate chalk

University of Glasgow Library: Vision of Health: The Wellcome UK Medical Heritage Library Project

The McGill Tribune: The History of Eugenics in Quebec and at McGill

Nursing Clio: “The Only Menstrual Murderess”: Blood, Guns, and a Theory of Female Crime

Borden-murder-trial-illustration-for-1893-magazine-LOC-3c23237v

Illustration of the Borden trial for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper in 1893. (Benjamin West Clinedinst/Library of Congress | Public domain)

The H-Word: From Rubella to Zika: pregnancy, disability, abortion and the spectre of an epidemic

Thomas Morris: The mystery of the exploding teeth

Medievalists.net: Uterine cancer in the writings of Byzantine physicians

New Republic: Getting Clean, the Tudor Way

National Republic: Lemons, Sponges, and Other Old Forms of Birth Control

Atlas Obscura: Opium Soaked Tampons Were the Midol of Ancient Rome

Thomas Morris: Oshkosh, by gosh

Diseases of Modern Life: The Menace of the Barber Shop

Thomas Morris: The electric scalpel

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Nikolaus Wirth and PASCAL

Yovisto: Henry Steinway and the Grand Pianos

Conciatore: Early Modern Glass Furnace

Conciatore: Gold Ruby Glass

Conciatore: Filigrana

Smithsonian.com: Abraham Lincoln Is the Only President to Have a Patent

nmah-2009-5611.jpg__800x600_q85_crop

Lincoln’s original patent model was acquired by the Smithsonian in 1908. This replica was built by the Smithsonian in 1978 for long-term display to preserve the fragile original. (NMAH/SI)

Yovisto: The Letters of Giambattista Bodoni

Smithsonian.com: The Innovative Spirit: Can You Guess the Inventions Based on These Patent Illustrations

Yovisto: Frederick Eugene Ives and the Halftone Printing Process

Yovisto: The Sinking of the H.L. Hunley

Smithsonian.com: Texting Isn’t the First New Technology Thought to Impair Social Skills

Cambridge University Library Special Collections: The first slide rule: a discovery in the Macclesfield Collection

Oughtred-and-Allen-1024x679

William Oughtred and Elias Allen, portraits by Wenceslaus Hollar. Public domain.

Public Domain Review: Edison reading Mary Had a Little Lamb (1927)

O Say Can You See?: Power from the people: Rural Electrification brought more than lights

Ptak Science Books: The British Bicycle Airborne, 1944

Digital Trends: Before Gates, Zuckerberg, or Jobs, 6 Women Programmed The First Digital Computer

ICE: Image Library

Open Culture: The World’s Oldest Surviving Pair of Glasses (Circa 1475)

Smithsonian.com: Steve Wozniak’s Apple I Booted Up a Tech Revolution

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Animal barometer

Animal Barometer: Lady’s Magazine Jan 1814

Yovisto: The Great Paris Academic Dispute of 1830

Yovisto: Robert Malthus and the Principle of Population

Brown University: Miller reviews Dover model of standing up for science

Yovisto: Sir Francis Galton – Polymath

Brain Pickings: Charles Darwin’s Touching Letters of Appreciation to His Best Friend and Greatest Champion

The New Yorker: The Making of the American Museum of Natural History’s Wildlife Dioramas

319969.tif

Fossil shark-jaw restoration, 1909. COURTESY AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Colanizing Animals: Getting the Wasp into the Cyanide Jar

Niche: Greatest Hits in Canadian Environmental History Part I

Niche: Greatest Hits in Canadian Environmental History Part II

The Public Domain Review: The History of Four-footed Beasts and Serpents (1658)

BBC Earth: Beatrix Potter: Pioneering scientist or passionate amateur?

Academia: Art and Science in Landscape Painting: Alexander von Humboldt (pdf)

Ptak Science Books: A Beautiful Infographic With Little Info to “Graph” (1835)

Wonders & Marvels: The Short and Wondrous Career of Harry Glicken

HarryGlicken

Harry Glicken in the field, 1980s

Notches: Inventing the Family Farm: Towards a History of Rural Heterosexuality

Nature: What sparked the Cambrian explosion

Science League of America: Tyndall Twice Twisted, Part 1

Science League of America: Tyndall Twice Twisted, Part 2

Atlas Obscura: The Doomed Blind Botanist Who Brought Poetry to Plant Description

image

The Atlantic: How the Idea of a ‘Normal’ Person Got Invented

History of Geology: Bailey Willis – The Man who made Mountains

Lady Science: No. 17: Embracing Nature: The Women of the Eco-Feminist Movement

Rick Allmendinger’s Stuff: Darwin’s Description of the 1835 Concepción Earthquake

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: Flashback: 25 years ago

CHF: Svante August Arrhenius

arrhenius3

“Charged Croquet Balls.” Drawing by William B. Jensen. Courtesy Oesper Collection, University of Cincinnati.

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Chronicle Live: Bede’s World visitor attraction in Jarrow closes due to cash problems

Victorian Research Web: The Curran Index 19th-century English periodicals

The February HPS&ST Note is on the web

Historians in Residence: Will Thomas on What Historians Shouldn’t Moan About

The Recipes Project: Networking Recipe Writers with “Networking Early Modern Women”

Drugs & Poisons in World History: Some advice about academic writing

British Library: Untold live blog: Let the people speak: history with voices

Ptak Science Books: Potentially Useless Info Dept.: Scientists Quoted in Definitions in the OED

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Scientists and Saints’ Days

Scientific American: Is There Really a War on Science?

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Belonging to country

My Sense of Place: Galileo Galilei

The #EnvHist Weekly

Occult Minds: Project Update and Relocations

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: Trying to work out practical recipes from 15th century English Alchemy poetry

BOOK REVIEWS:

Library Journal Reviews: Medicine, February 2016 – Best Sellers includes #histmed

Science Book a Day: Electronic Dreams: How 1980s Britain Learned to Love the Computer

Roots of Unity: Black Mathematical Excellence: A Q&A with Erica Walker

BSHS: Pickstone Prize Shortlist

SomeBeans: The Honourable Company by John Keay

thehonourablecompany_thumb

 

Five Books: Steve Silberman on Autism: top five new books on autism

Live Mint: A Numerate Life

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: The Germ of an Idea: Contagionism, Religion, and Society in Britain, 1660–1730

Palgrave Macmillan: Italian Psychology and Jewish Emigration under Fascism

Morbid Anatomy: New Morbid Anatomy Book on the Allure of the Anatomical Venus

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 6.04.56 AM

University of Chicago Press: The Great Devonian Controversy

Bloomsbury Publishing: The Birth of the English Kitchen, 1600–1850

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

SciArt in America: Traces of the Space Age and Memories of Tragedy in Robert Rauschenberg’s “Stoned Moon” 

Opus 39 Gallery, Nicosia: Small treasures on display: Exhibition of engravings, maps, books and decorative items 10–29 February 2016

Royal College of Physicians: John Dee exhibition: late opening 18 February

Daily Grail: The Lost Library of John Dee, Advisor to Queen Elizabeth I and Confidant of Angels

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

gq-magazine: Leonardo da Vinci Will Make You Feel Terrible About Your Career

Queens’ College Cambridge: ‘The Rabbi & The English Scholar’ exhibition in the library 22 February–24 March 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

 

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

CLOSING SOON: Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

Closing Very Soon: Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

Closing soon: British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Closing soon: Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

JHI Blog: Brave Entertainments

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Henry Walter Bates Until 26 February:

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Harvard Observatory History in Images: The Harvard Observatory Pinafore

http://hea-www.harvard.edu/~fine/Observatory/pages/play.html

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

 

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

EVENTS:

Boole-Shannon

Museum of the History of Science: Calendar Curiosities 28 February 2016

The Royal Society: Workshop: The Politics of Academic Publishing 1950–2016 22 April 2016

The Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine: Lecture: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

RCP: Dee late: rediscovering the lost world of John Dee 10 March

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Cartography in the Sands: Mapping Oman 25 February 2016

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Mental Maps of the World in Great Britain and France, 1870–1914

University of Greenwich: Greenwich Maritime Centre Launch 8 March 2016

Sam Noble Museum: Galileo’s World Symposium 25 February 2016

Glasgow histmed events

The London PUS Seminars: Atoms, Bytes and Genes – Public Resistance and Technoscientific Responses 24 February 2016 LSE

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

CRASSH: Cambridge: Genius in History: A Public Conversation: 2 March 2016

University of Manchester: Master’s Study Information Day: Science communication; History of science, technology and medicine; Medical humanities 2 March 2016

Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine: Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England 8 March 2016

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Waterhouse Room Gordon Hall Harvard Medical School: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

Royal Holloway – Management Building Lecture Theatre: Public History and Fiction 25 February 2016

University of York: Lecture: “Not Everyone Can Be Gandhi”: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post WWII Era 3 March 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

Workshop RS

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

humb11

Alexander von Humboldt und Aimé Bonpland “Urwaldlaboratorium am Orinoco” (“Jungle lab on the Orinoco“) By Eduard Ender

 

TELEVISION:

Channel 4: Walking Through Time

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Dawin on the Palouse’s Channel: Glenn Branch – After Kitzmiller, What’s Next for Creationism?

Youtube: The Quicksilver Experiment

TestTube Plus: Galileo Didn’t Invent the Telescope… Sorry

Youtube: A Brief History of Industrial Revolutions – W. Patrick McCray

The Atlantic: Why ROYGBIV Is Arbitary

DES Daughter Network: Pesticides – DDT – Rachel Carson – Silent Spring

Youtube: Berkeley Lab: Berkeley Lab Founder Ernest O. Lawrence Demonstrates the Cyclotron Concept

RADIO & PODCASTS:

npr: Hidden Brain: Episode 20: Remembering Anarcha

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Robert Hooke

BBC Radio 4: Book of the Week: Benjamin Franklin in London

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Boston University: Conference: How Can HPS Contribute to Science Literacy and Policy? 26–27 February 2016

BSHS: Call for Papers and Panels: Science in Public 2016

Science in Public

University of Sussex: CfP: SPRU 50th anniversary conference on ‘Transforming Innovation’

Vrije University of Amsterdam: CfP: Conference by Women in Philosophy #3

Mexico City: CfP: The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T²M) 14thAnnual Conference 27–30 October 2016

NACBS, Washington DC: CfP: Early Modern History Workshop on “Networks of Knowledge” November 2016

UCL: STS: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2016

Rutgers University: Workshop for the History of Environment, Agriculture, Technology, & Science (WHEATS) 30 October–2 October 2016

Descartes event

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: The Museum as Method: Collections, Research, Universities 14–15 March 2016

University of Zürich: Conrad Gessner Congress Program 6–9 June 2016

University of Kent: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference Programme (DRAFT as at Feb 15, 2016) 7–10 July 2016

University of York: History of Medicine Masterclass – Smallpox Vaccination and Diplomacy in Nepal 9 March 2016

London Metropolitan University: CfP: ‘Made in London’: Makers, designers and innovators in musical instrument making in London, from the 18th to 21st centuries

Hist Geo Conf

Summer School: Rethinking Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 23–25 July 2016 Part I Lisbon 26–30 July 2016 Part II Porto

Istanbul: XXXV Scientific Instrument Symposium: CfP: Instruments between East and West 26–30 September 2016

University of York: Conference: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences 7-8 April 2016

Harvard University: 51st Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 2 April 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP Teaching and Learning in Early Modern England: Skills and Knowledge in Practice

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: The 131st Annual Meeting Call for Proposals and Theme Denver CO 5–7 January 2017

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Call for Submissions: Book: Historical Epistemology of Science/Philosophy of Science, Torricelli

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

University of Western Ontario: CfP: Philosophy of Logic, Mathematics, and Physics Graduate Conference

Institut d’Études Scientifiques de Cargèse, Corsica: CNRS School “BioPerspectives” Philosophy of Biology 29 March–1 April 2016

Klosterneuburg: CfP: European Advanced School in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) 59 September 2016

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester: Lunchtime Seminar Series Feb–June 2016

Vatican Library Conference

AIP: Lyne Starling Trimble Science Heritage Public Lectures Feb–Sept 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: ICOHTEC Symposium in Rio de Janeiro on 23-29 July 2017

Asian Society for the History of Medicine: Call for Submissions: Taniguchi Medal 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Essay

International Committee for the History of Technology: CfP: 43rd Annual Meeting in Porto, Portugal Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

University of York 7–8 April 2016

UCL: London Ancient Science Conference: 15–18 February 2016

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: CfP: Maculinity, health and medicine, c.1750–present 28–29 April 2016

Effaced Blog: CfP: History of Facial Hair

Sidney Sussex College: University of Cambridge: Programme and Registration Treasuries of Knowledge: 8 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Kent: Lecturer in the History of Medicine (1750 to the present)

Edward Worth Library, Dublin: One Month Research Fellowship 2016 #histmed

University of Lincoln: College of Arts: PhD Studentships Emanuel Mendes da Costa (1717–1791): multicultural and multinational networks in Georgian London

University of Sheffield: Lecturer in the History of Medicine, Science or Technology

Women in Technological History: Conference Grant 2016 Singapore

Indiana University Purdue University – Indianapolis: Medical Humanities & Health Studies: Visiting Assistant Professor

Environmental History: Book Review Editor Search

Harvard University: History of Science Lecturer, History of Modern Medicine

Middlesex University London: David Tresman Caminer Studentship for the History of Computing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette Year 2, Vol. #31

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #31

Monday 15 February 2016

 

EDITORIAL:

It’s time once again for this week’s edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list that bringing you a new bumper crop of articles and post on the histories of science, technology and medicine harvested in the infinite fields of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Almost unnoticed, I can’t find a single obituary, American historian Elizabeth Eisenstein slipped out of this world on 31 January 2016 at the age of 92. It is rare for a historian to write a book that fundamentally changes a discipline or sub-discipline of their profession and goes on to stand the test of time as a monument to scholarship, Elizabeth Eisenstein achieved this feat with her, by now almost legendary, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change, originally published in two volumes by the Cambridge University Press in 1979. At nearly 800 pages in the single volume paperback edition it is a weighty book in all senses of the word.

To quote the Wikipedia article, “In this work she focuses on the printing press’s functions of dissemination, standardization, and preservation and the way these functions aided the progress of the Protestant Reformation, the Renaissance, and the Scientific Revolution. Eisenstein’s work brought historical method, rigor, and clarity to earlier ideas of Marshall McLuhan and others, about the general social effects of such media transitions.“ It is a book, like all the best history books, that provoked a debate that is still going on. Although some of Einsenstein’s main contentions have been challenged, most notably by Adrian Johns in his equally monumental The Nature of the Book: Print and Knowledge in the Making (University of Chicago Press, 1998), it is a treasure trove of facts, ideas and stimulating thoughts and should have a place on the bookshelf of any serious historian of science.

 The week also saw a minor scandal in the proposal to put a famous face from STEM on the new RBS £10 note. Three names were presented for selection by popular vote, Mary Somerville, Thomas Telford and James Clerk Maxwell. Somerville was leading comfortably one day before the poll closed when Telford who was languishing in third place suddenly shot into first place with a massive surge of last minute votes. Suspecting foul play the RBS disqualified Telford and so for the first time ever a women other than the Queen will grace a British bank note.

Mary Somerville

Mary Somerville

The Herald Scotland: Scots scientist Mary Somerville set to be unveiled as new face of RBS £10 note

The Herald Scotland: RBS is investigating fraud in the £10 note poll in which Thomas Telford surged to lead over Mary Somerville

The Guardian: Scientist Mary Somerville to appear on Scottish £10 note

RBS: Mary Somerville to appear on new Royal Bank of Scotland 10 note

Quotes of the week:

“Szilard famously said of Los Alamos, ‘Everybody who goes there will go crazy.’ In some sense, they did”. – Gene Dannen (@GeneDannen)

“A scientist’s aim in a discussion with his colleagues is not to persuade, but to clarify.” – Leo Szilard

“Two black holes are like a couple on Valentine’s Day, the universe is a water bed, gravitational waves are… well you get the picture”. – @SarcasticRover

Gravity waves!

Humanity waves back!

Gravity was actually waving at neutron star behind us

Humanity is embarrassed for next 3 billion years – Dean Burnett (@garwboy)

“The man who invented predictive text died yesterday

His funfair is next monkey” – Malcolm Brown (@MalcolmBrown53)

“Historians of science, crushers of dreams”. – Audra J. Wolfe (@ColdWarScience)

“There is no such thing as philosophy-free science, there is only science whose philosophical baggage is taken on board without examination”. – Daniel Dennett h/t @cathyby

Evolution…is the most powerful and the most comprehensive idea that has ever arisen on Earth. – Julian Huxley h/t @FossilHistory

“Give a man a duck, he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to duck & he’ll avoid projectiles aimed at his head for a lifetime”. – Rachel axler (@rachelaxler)

“Don’t piss in my soup and tell me you’re cooling it down” – Rachel Williams (@billiwilliams)

Valentine’s Day!

Courting dance of the Blue Foote Booby

Courting dance of the Blue Foote Booby

 “A giant hug for anyone who has been made to feel lonely because of this preposterous manufactured abomination of a day”. – Ed Yong (@edyong209)

 “Valentine’s Day is just a made-up holiday manufactured by the greeting cardioid industry”. – Phil Plait (@BadAstronomer)

 Birthdays of the Week:

 ENIAC ‘born’ 14 February 1946

ENIAC  Source: Huffington Post

ENIAC
Source: Huffington Post

 Independent: The ENIAC machine: Rhodri Marsden’s Interesting Objects No.100

Philly Voice: 70 years ago, six Philly women became the world’s first digital computer programmers

AHF: Computing and the Manhattan Project

 

Agnes Clerke born 10 February 1842

Communicate Science: “She looks beneath the shadow of my wings”

Agnes Mary Clerke Source: Wikimedia Commons

Agnes Mary Clerke
Source: Wikimedia Commons

A&G: Agnes Mary Clerke: Real–time historian of astronomy

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A Lady of Science

archive.org: A Popular History of Astronomy during The Nineteenth Century by Agnes M. Clerke

Jan Swammerdam Born 12 February 1637

 

Happy Birthday Jan Swammerdam! 17th-C Dutch biologist, 1st to describe red blood cells. Pic of his work on the lungs Source: Science Museum

Happy Birthday Jan Swammerdam! 17th-C Dutch biologist, 1st to describe red blood cells. Pic of his work on the lungs Source: Science Museum

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A Biological Birthday

janswammerdam.org: Jan Swammerdam (1637–1680)

Charles Darwin born 12 February 1809 

Charles Darwin drawing by G Richmond Source: Wikimedia Commons

Charles Darwin drawing by G Richmond
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BBC: iWonder: Charles Darwin: Evolution and the story of our species

Yovisto: Charles Darwin and the Natural Selection

University of Cambridge: Darwin Correspondence Project

Geological Society of London: Happy Darwin Day!

Science & Religion: Exploring the Spectrum: Darwin Day: Celebrating Without Deifying

University of Leiden: How Charles Darwin became an Honorary Doctor in Leiden

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Robert Hofstadter and controlled Nuclear Fission

The Sphere of Sacrobosco: Sacrobosco’s Sphere in Portugal and Spain

AHF: John von Neumann

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The orbital mechanics of Johann Georg Locher a seventeenth-century Tychonic anti-Copernican

AHF: J. Robert Oppenheimer

Voices of the Manhattan Project: David Hall’s Interview

Yovisto: Daniel Bernoulli and the Bernoulli Principle

Daniel_Bernoulli_001

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Orville Hill’s Interview

Yovisto: Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen – The Father of Diagnostic Radiology

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Wilhelm Röntgen

Yovisto: Leo Szilard and the Atomic Bomb

dannen.com: Leo Szilard – A Biographical Chronology

Mosaic Science Magazine: Pinning Down the Elusive G

Yovisto: Lost on Mars – The Beagle 2 Mission

Nature: The hundred-year quest for gravitational waves – in pictures

NASA: Oral History Project: Annie J. Easley

dwc.knaw.nl: Marcel Gilles Jozef Minnaert 1893–1970

Yale University Department of Physics: APS honors the Original Sloane Lab as an Historical Site in honor of Dr. Edward Bouchet

sloane_0

Physics Buzz Blog: A New Ninth Planet?

The Public Domain Review: Transit of Venus (1882)

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Solzhenitsyn and the Smyth Report

Chemistry World: Michelson’s interferometer

AIP: William Shockley

SPLC: William Shockley

Jalons: Version Découverte: La Bombe Française

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Spectrograph, Faint Object, Hubble Space Telescope (FOS)

AIP: Wallace Sargent

NASA: Billion Dollar Technology: A Short Historical Overview of the Origins of Communications Satellite Technology, 1945–1965

AHF: Walter Zinn

 

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Yovisto: Erich von Drygalski’s Antarctic Expeditions

jackroubaud.com: A recent discovery: Utopia by Abraham Ortelius

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Rare Books and Manuscripts Section: DCRM[C]: Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Catographic) available online free as pdf

dclibrary.org: Washington Map Collection

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Penis in a bottle

Galeno: Catalogo delle traduzioni latine di Galeno

PBS Newshour: Was Charles Dickens the fist celebrity medical spokesman?

Charles Dickens was a great supporter of the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital in London.

Charles Dickens was a great supporter of the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital in London.

Advances in the History of Psychology: APA time Capsule on the Bühlers

Technology’s Stories: What If Beddoes & Davy Had Attempted Surgical Anesthesia In 1799?

London Historic: The Old operating Theatre

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Must Have for Nursing Mothers

University of Leeds: Pasts, Presents and Futures of Medical Regeneration: Publications

Thomas Morris: Medicinal pancakes

Midlist Writer: Travel Tuesday: Disturbing Artifacts in the Royal College of Physicians, London

Thomas Morris: Curing conjunctivitis with frogspawn

Live Science: Oldest Medical Report of Near-Death Experience Discovered

The Public Domain Review: William Cheselden’ Osteographia (1733)

6069048341_9e5499e5f5_o

Remedia: What Kind of Morph Are You? Biotypology in Transit, 1920s–1960s

Notches: “She was both Poxt and Clapt together”: Confessions of Sexual Secrets in Eighteenth-Century Venereal Cases

Thomas Morris: The electric spectacles

The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh: Johann Freidrich Meckel (The Younger)

Dr Alun Withey: Robbing the Doctor: 17th-Century Medics as Victims of Crime

Oxford Science Blog: 75 years of penicillin in people

The H-Word: Hospital or Home: Who Cares?

Royal College of Physicians: Gone but not forgotten

Thomas Morris: Killed by shaving

Thomas Morris: King George’s heart

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Henri Giffard and the Giffard Dirigible

Sound on Sound: The Story of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop

Conciatore: Fabergé and Purpurine

Fabergé c.1900. Purpurine cherries, nephrite leaves, gold stalk, rock crystal pot.

Fabergé c.1900. Purpurine cherries,
nephrite leaves, gold stalk, rock crystal pot.

Slate: The Vault: How One Company Designed the Bookshelves that Made America’s Biggest Libraries Possible

South Wales Argus: Newport ship could last another 500 years thanks to new climate control unit

Scientific American: GPS and the World’s First “Space War”

Atlas Obscura: This Gritty Small Town in Michigan Became the World’s Gavel Capital

Yovisto: Auto Pioneer Wilhelm Maybach

Toronto: Bridging the Don: the Prince Edward Viaduct

Yovisto: Photographic Pioneer Henry Fox Talbot

Yovisto: Mary Had a Little Lamb – Edison and the Phonograph

Smithsonian Libraries: Collection of United States patents granted to Thomas A. Edison, 1869–1884

Yovisto: Richard Hamming and the Hamming Code

Smithsonian.com: Melt-Proof Chocolate, 3D Printed Gummies and Other Fascinating Candy Patents

The Guardian: Big computers, big hair: the women of Bell Labs in the 1960s – in pictures

4428

Jalopnik: The Technology That Helps Make Your Car More Aerodynamic? It’s Been Around Since the 1880s

Lemelson-MIT: George Ferris: The Ferris Wheel

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

CbGdIyRUAAAmQHU.jpg-large

Yovisto: Gregor Mendel and the Rules of Inheritance

The Atlantic: Natural History Museums Are Teeming with Undiscovered Species

Tallahassee Democrat: Kinsey Collection: Ioannis Africani Africae, 1632

 

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Henry Walter Bates

Conciatore: Botanical Gardens

The New York Times: Richard P. Von Herzen, Explorer of Earth’s Undersea Furnaces, Dies at 85

The New York Times: The Environmental Legacy of the Steel City

The Mountain Mystery: 100 years of Drift: Parts 1–4

Alfred Wegener, in Greenland, 1930  (photo by Fritz Loewe)

Alfred Wegener, in Greenland, 1930 (photo by Fritz Loewe)

the many-headed monster: A Walk in the Park: History from Below and the English Landscape

The Recipes Project: Reading the Landscape and a Dish of Weeds

Yovisto: Barnum Brown and the Tyrannosaurus Rex

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Barnum Brown

Atlas Obscura: Inside Atlas Obscura’s All-Night Adventure at the Explorers Club

BHL: Darwin’s Early Love

The Guardian: Fossils: Flightless bird with giant head roamed swampy Arctic 53m years ago

CHEMISTRY:

Medievalists.net: Saltpetre in medieval gunpowder: Calcium or Potassium Nitrate?

Method: Atom by Atom: Building Protein Models

Computer graphics console in the early 1970s.

Computer graphics console in the early 1970s.

Yovisto: Ira Remsen and Saccharin

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Amsterdam School of Communication Research (ASCoR): RPYS i/o: A web-based tool for the historiography and visualization of 
citation classics, sleeping beauties, and research fronts

MedHum Fiction–Daily Dose: MedHum Mondays: Museums, STEM, and the Vital Role of Humanities

albawaba: Qatar National Library organises the history of science and technology in the Middle East and the Islamic World Public Lecture

Method: Science in the Making: What is the world really like?

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Thousands of early English books released online to public by Bodleian Library and partners

The Atlantic: Stop Calling the Babylonians Scientists

homunculus: On being “harsh” to Babylonians

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Understanding Newton’s Principia as part of the Baconian Tradition

The #EnvHist Weekly

Blink: Radha and the space-time illusion

Before sunrise: The night sky in this 1650 painting betrays the artist’s ignorance of astronomy Rohit Gupta Business Line Rohit Gupta

Before sunrise: The night sky in this 1650 painting betrays the artist’s ignorance of astronomy
Rohit Gupta
Business Line Rohit Gupta

UCL: Museums & Collections Blog: Please don’t call us a Cabinet of Curiosity

 

ESOTERIC:

History Today: The Science of the Supernatural

Luther alchemy

Conciatore: The Duke’s Oil

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science: Tim Radford on Science Writing

The New York Times: ‘The Good Death’, When Breath Becomes Air’ and More

Science Book a Day: Art Forms in Nature: The Prints of Ernst Haekel

Art Forms in Nature von Olaf Breidbach

Art Forms in Nature von Olaf Breidbach

JHI Blog: Towards a Global Intellectual History?

The Spectator: Alexander Humboldt: a great explorer rediscovered

H-Net: Valerie Traub: Thinking Sex with the Early Moderns

PsychCentral: NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism & the Future of Neurodiversity

NEW BOOKS:

Niche: Mining and Communities in Northern Canada & Canadian Countercultures and the Environment

The Quack Doctor: The History of Medicine in 100 Facts

history-of-medicine-100-facts-cover

University of Chicago Press: Groovy Science

Brill: Frederick de Wit and the First Concise Reference Atlas

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Voyage of the Beagle: The Illustrated Edition of Charles Darwin’s Travel Memoir and Field Journal

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Opus 39 Gallery, Nicosia: Small treasures on display: Exhibition of engravings, maps, books and decorative items 10–29 February 2016

Royal College of Physicians: John Dee exhibition: late opening 18 February

Daily Grail: The Lost Library of John Dee, Advisor to Queen Elizabeth I and Confidant of Angels

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Engineer: The engineering genius of a Renaissance man

The Guardian: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius review – an eye for destruction

 An armoured vehicle by Leonardo da Vinci. Photograph: Alessandro Nassiri/Science Museum

An armoured vehicle by Leonardo da Vinci. Photograph: Alessandro Nassiri/Science Museum

Science Museum: Leonardo for a Time of Austerity

The Telegraph: Leonardo da Vinci: genius or humble draftsman?

History Extra: In pictures: Leonard da Vinci – The Mechanics of Genius

Queens’ College Cambridge: ‘The Rabbi & The English Scholar’ exhibition in the library 22 February–24 March 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Pangolin illustration on display at ZSL London Zoo

Pangolin illustration on display at ZSL London Zoo

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Closing very soon: British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Closing soon: Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

CLOSING SOON: Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

Closing soon: British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Closing soon: Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Henry Walter Bates Until 26 February:

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

ChoM News: Center for the History of Medicine: Screening of “Mystery Street” 24

February 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

EVENTS:

Boole-Shannon

The London PUS Seminars: Atoms, Bytes and Genes – Public Resistance and Technoscientific Responses 24 February 2016 LSE

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

CRASSH: Cambridge: Genius in History: A Public Conversation: 2 March 2016

University of Manchester: Master’s Study Information Day: Science communication; History of science, technology and medicine; Medical humanities 2 March 2016

Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine: Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England 8 March 2016

French seminar

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Waterhouse Room Gordon Hall Harvard Medical School: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

Royal Holloway – Management Building Lecture Theatre: Public History and Fiction 25 February 2016

University of York: Lecture: “Not Everyone Can Be Gandhi”: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post WWII Era 3 March 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

Glasgow histmed events

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Medical Museum Cafe

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Albert Einstein, Oil on Canvas

Albert Einstein, Oil on Canvas

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

The Society for Nautical Research: Ships, Clocks & Stars at Mystic Seaport

Youtube: The History of Photography in 5 Minutes

RADIO:

Lady Radio: Episode February 12, 2016: Listen to @AnnaNReser & @leilasedai talk about their motivations behind Lady Science (abt 30 mins in)

PODCASTS:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories

readara: Life’s Greatest Secret: The Race To Crack The Genetic Code: Interview with Matthew Cobb

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

 

University of York: Conference: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences 7-8 April 2016

Harvard University: 51st Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 2 April 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP Teaching and Learning in Early Modern England: Skills and Knowledge in Practice

Hist Geo Conf

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: The 131st Annual Meeting Call for Proposals and Theme Denver CO 5–7 January 2017

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Call for Submissions: Book: Historical Epistemology of Science/Philosophy of Science, Torricelli

HoS Conf

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

University of Western Ontario: CfP: Philosophy of Logic, Mathematics, and Physics Graduate Conference

Institut d’Études Scientifiques de Cargèse, Corsica: CNRS School “BioPerspectives” Philosophy of Biology 29 March–1 April 2016

Klosterneuburg: CfP: European Advanced School in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) 59 September 2016

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester: Lunchtime Seminar Series Feb–June 2016

Vatican Library Conference

AIP: Lyne Starling Trimble Science Heritage Public Lectures Feb–Sept 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: ICOHTEC Symposium in Rio de Janeiro on 23-29 July 2017

Asian Society for the History of Medicine: Call for Submissions: Taniguchi Medal 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Essay

International Committee for the History of Technology: CfP: 43rd Annual Meeting in Porto, Portugal Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

University of York 7–8 April 2016

Workshop RS

UCL: London Ancient Science Conference: 15–18 February 2016

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: CfP: Maculinity, health and medicine, c.1750–present 28–29 April 2016

Effaced Blog: CfP: History of Facial Hair

Sidney Sussex College: University of Cambridge: Programme and Registration Treasuries of Knowledge: 8 April 2016

Science in Public

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Munich: Assistant Professorship Philosophy of Physics

ChoM News: 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

University of Kent: School of History: Postgraduate Funding

University of Bordeaux: Postdoc: Philosophy of Biology

Ruhr-University Bochum: Fellowships: Mind, Brain, Cognitive Evolution; Philosophy, Neuroscience

University of Kent: Lecturer in the History of Medicine (1750 to the present)

Nazarbayev University (KAZ): Assistant Professorship: Hist Medicine, Public Health and/or Environmental History

pasold.co.uk: Textile History – Seeks a new Editor

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU): PhD position STS

University of Manchester: CHSTM: Fully Funded Studentship for Graduate Study in History of the Biological Sciences or Medicine after 1800

Royal Holloway University of London: AHRC Studentship: The indigenous map: native information, ethnographic object, artefact of encounter

University of Sheffield: Department of History: Lecturer in Medicine, Science and Technology

University of Umeå: PhD student in History of Science and Ideas

Middlesex University London: David Tresman Caminer Studentship for the History of Computing

University of Manchester: Research Associate: Medical Archive Collections

Birkbeck University of London: Post-doctoral Researcher: ‘Hidden Persuaders? Brainwashing, Culture, Clinical Knowledge and the Cold War Human Sciences, c. 1950-1990’.

The British Museum: Print Curator: Monument Trust

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #30

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #30

Monday 08 February 2016

EDITORIAL:

We are back again with the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you once again all the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could vacuum up out of cyberspace over the last seven days.

We are just five and a half weeks into the year and it’s already time to wish you a lucky New Year once again as 8 February is New Years Day on the Chinese lunar calendar. Like the Christian Easter the Chinese New Year is a movable feast falling on the first new moon following the 21 January. It is also known as the Spring Festival. Monday marks the beginning of the Year of the Monkey in the Chinese twelve-year cycle and year 4714, 4713 or 4653 depending on which system of counting you adhere to. It is also New Year in a large number of other Asian countries.

12710814_969973689743411_6503158767799354749_o

All of this just highlights how arbitrary our calendar systems are and to warn you to gear up for the Persian New Year that falls on 20 March this year, that’s in six weeks!

 Quotes of the week:

Blackwell Quote

“The west was not settled by men and women who had taken courses in ‘How to be a pioneer.'” – Unknown h/t @JohnDCook

Electric light

“Atheists believe in a God who does not exist“. – @fadesingh

Source: AsapSCIENCE

Source: AsapSCIENCE

“what idiot called them communion wafers and not Corpus Crispies” – John Gallagher (@earlymodernjohn)

Story of the Carbon Atom

Birthday of the Week:

Clyde Tombaugh born 4 February 1906

 

Clyde W. Tombaugh at his family’s farm with his homemade telescope in 1928, two years before his discovery of Pluto. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Clyde W. Tombaugh at his family’s farm with his homemade telescope in 1928, two years before his discovery of Pluto. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Aip: Clyde Tombaugh

KU History: Planetary Man

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EarthSky: This date in science: Clyde Tombaugh discoverer of Pluto

The Wichita Eagle: Arizona home of Pluto research dedicates year to icy world, Kansas discoverer

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Panorama Archives: Tombaugh Family Donates Astronomer’s Papers to NMSU
NASA: Happy Birthday Clyde Tombaugh: New Horizons Returns New Images of Pluto

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PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Sir George Stokes and Fluid Dynamics

Yovisto: Rudolf Mössbauer and the Mössbauer Effect

AHF: Marie Curie

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Mac and Vera Jo MacCready’s Interview

Yovisto: Nobel Laureate Emilio Segrè

Atlas Obscura: When The Pope Made 10 Days Disappear

A detail on Pope Gregory XIII's tomb, carved by Camillo Rusconi, shows the Pope being presented with a plan for what would become the Gregorian Calendar. (Image: WikiCommons )

A detail on Pope Gregory XIII’s tomb, carved by Camillo Rusconi, shows the Pope being presented with a plan for what would become the Gregorian Calendar. (Image: WikiCommons )

Atlas Obscura: Why Can’t We Get Rid of the 7-Day Week

Atlas Obscura: 100 Wonders: The Atomic Clock

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Colonel Franklin Matthias’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Sir Rudolf Peierls’s Interview

Ancient Origins: The Magnificent Observatory and Discoveries of Johannes Hevelius

AHF: Espionage

AIP: Ralph Alpher

AHF: Soviet Atomic Program – 1946

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Ulugh Beg

Ulugh Beg's Astronomical Observatory

Ulugh Beg’s Astronomical Observatory

Islamic Insights: Muslim Contributions to Astronomy

AHF: Niels Bohr

AIP: Vera Ruben

Palm Beach Post: Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell, 85, dies in West Palm Beach

AstroWright: Mercedes Richards (1955–2016)

Yovisto: Mariner 10 and the Swing-By at Planet Venus

Yovisto: The Quantum Hall Effect

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

USC Libraries: Online Asian Maps Collection

The Public Domain Review: Maps from Geographicus

Derry Journal: Ancient map paints fascinating picture of Derry and Inishowen

British Library: Online Gallery: Anglo-Saxon Mappa Mundi, 1025–1050

Mappa Mundi

The Guardian: Africa mapped: how Europe drew a continent

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

The Public Domain Review: The Science of Life and Death in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Musings: People’s History of the NHS

Thomas Morris: The woman whose skin turned blue

the institute: How Marie Curie Helped Save a Million Soldiers During World War I

Marie Curie [right] and her teenage daughter, Irène, operated the "Petite Curies" and established a program to train other women to use the X-ray equipment. Photo: Popperfoto/Getty Images

Marie Curie [right] and her teenage daughter, Irène, operated the “Petite Curies” and established a program to train other women to use the X-ray equipment.
Photo: Popperfoto/Getty Images

NIH U.S. National Library of Medicine: Gallery: Dream Anatomy

Thomas Morris: More astounding than true

Early Modern Medicine: Versatile Ear Wax

Philly.com: Lead in Flint: This is America

Providentia: The Horror of Alfred Binet

Thomas Morris: The man with the rubber jaw

The Recipes Project: All in the Mind? Competing Models of Hysteria in John Ward’s Diaries

Arnau: Quién es Arnau de Vilanova

The Walrus: This Might Hurt

STICK SHIFT (left to right) Glass irrigation syringe with cork stopper and coiled-thread seal, in use until the early twentieth century; large enema syringe from the late nineteenth century; and twentieth-century models with removable needles. The glass and metal one (bottom right) could be disassembled and disinfected for reuse. This killed some pathogens, but it made others more resilient. An increasingly sophisticated understanding of cross-contamination led to the disposable plastic syringe with removable needle (top right), and to the first fully disposable plastic syringe, invented in the 1950s but not used widely until the ’80s.

STICK SHIFT (left to right) Glass irrigation syringe with cork stopper and coiled-thread seal, in use until the early twentieth century; large enema syringe from the late nineteenth century; and twentieth-century models with removable needles. The glass and metal one (bottom right) could be disassembled and disinfected for reuse. This killed some pathogens, but it made others more resilient. An increasingly sophisticated understanding of cross-contamination led to the disposable plastic syringe with removable needle (top right), and to the first fully disposable plastic syringe, invented in the 1950s but not used widely until the ’80s.

Thomas Morris: A ludicrous mistake

Thomas Morris: Poisoning pooches in the park

The Recipes Project: Gluttony and “Surfeit” in Early Modern Europe

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Felix Wankel and the Rotary Engine

Yovisto: America’s First Movie Studio – the Black Maria

Edison’s Black Maria, the world’s first film studio, ca 1890

Edison’s Black Maria, the world’s first film studio, ca 1890

The Mary Rose: The Ship’s Bell

Conciatore: Incalmo

Conciatore: Alberico Barbini

Conciatore: Cousin Philip Neri

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Milestones: Development of the HP-35, the First Handheld Scientific Calculator, 1972

storify: CHF: Fellow Friday: Plastics Roksana Filipowska

EDN Network: Polygraph first used to convict criminals. February 2, 1935

Atlas Obscura: Astronomical Clocks are the Most Beautiful Way to Track Hours, Years, and the Moon

Atlas Obscura: Objects of Intrigue: Ancient Persian Water Clocks

It's like looking down at your watch. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

It’s like looking down at your watch. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

Atlas Obscura: The Robot Clocks of 12th-Century Turkey

Geekdad Passport: Bletchley Park

Computer History: Pixar’s Luxo Jr.

My medieval foundry: Modern information that helps us understand casting practices

Yovisto: The Chronometers of Thomas Earnshaw

 

Scottish Engineering Hall of Fame: Sir William Arrol (1839–1913)

Bodycote: An Interactive History of Metallurgy

Twisted Stifter: The Mystery of Prince Rupert’s Drop at 130,000 FPS

Curiosities and Wonders: Mildred Parson Burns

Mildred Parsons Burns became the first woman linotype operator at the Herald-Leader Company in April 1949.

Mildred Parsons Burns became the first woman linotype operator at the Herald-Leader Company in April 1949.

Atlas Obscura: Peek Inside a Private Clock Museum in Austria

ENIAC in Action: ENIAC Errors in Issacson’s “The Innovators”

Places: Indexing the World of Tomorrow

Tonbridge History: 1850: Dickens and the Telegraph

University of Reading: 155-year old mouse trap claims its latest victim

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Geological map of Anglesey John S. Henslow 1821

Geological map of Anglesey John S. Henslow 1821

 The Friends of Darwin: John Stevens Henslow

KEW Royal Botanic Gardens: Missing for a lifetime: the story of the “lost” orchid

The Conversation: Piping as poison: the Flint water crisis and America’s toxic infrastructure

Forbes: Charles Darwin and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life

Dart Blog: An Audience With – The Linnean Society

Notches: Operation Hyacinth and Poland’s Pink Files

Yovisto: Gideon Mantell and the Iguanodon

Yovisto: The Burst of the Tulip Bubble

The Atlantic: The Nitrous Oxide Philosopher

Molar Archaeology: The Archaeology of Greater London online map

Strange Science: John Gould

Forbes: De Loys’ Ape Was a Well Played Anthropological Fraud

The rare version of the complete photography of de Loys´ ape – “Ameranthropoides loysi”, from MONTANDON 1929 (image in public domain).

The rare version of the complete photography of de Loys´ ape – “Ameranthropoides loysi”, from MONTANDON 1929 (image in public domain).

Science League of America: The Three Balfours

AMNH: Six Extinctions in Six Minutes

Notches: Rape and Manhood in Nineteenth-Century Caucasus

Extinct: Casting Authority

The New York Times: The Explorers Club Once Served Mammoth at a Meal. Or Did It?

Yovisto: John Lindley and His Love for Plants

White Rose: eTheses Online: City of Beasts: Horses & Livestock in Hanoverian London

Wired: Twitter Nerd Fight Reveals A Long, Bizarre Scientific Feud

TrowelBlazers: Margaret Hems

Margaret Hems, with the pelvis of the Steppe Mammoth that she discovered in the cliffs at West Runton, Norfolk, in 1992

Margaret Hems, with the pelvis of the Steppe Mammoth that she discovered in the cliffs at West Runton, Norfolk, in 1992

Geographical: The Invention of Nature

A Clerk of Oxford: ‘Unwinding the water’s chain’: Spring, Thaw, and Some Anglo-Saxon Poems

Peddling and Scaling God and Darwin: Evolution and religion in Britain from 1859 to 2013

МУЗЕЙ МАМОНТА В ХАТАНГЕ: Siberian permafrost ice cave

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Dmitri Mendeleev and the Periodic Table of Elements

Wellcome Library: Madame Rupert’s beauty secrets

Photograph of Anna Ruppert from the Chemist and Druggist, 20 January 1894. Image credit: Wellcome Library.

Photograph of Anna Ruppert from the Chemist and Druggist, 20 January 1894. Image credit: Wellcome Library.

The Conversation: From chrome plating to nanotubes: the modern’ chemistry first used in ancient times

Heroes of History: Marie Curie

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The Character of DNE: Science Communication: Embrace the Mess

Historiens de la santé: La Fabrique de Vésale. La mémoire d’un livre Actes des journées d’étude Vésale du 21-22 novembre 2014 Contents

HSS: Lecturing on the History of Science in Unexpected Places: Chronicling One Year on the Road

Harvard Business Review: Renaissance Florence was a Better Model for Innovation that Silicon Valley Is

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Whipple Library Books Blog: Robert Whipple, scientific book and instrument collector

The Recipes Project: Transcribing early Modern Recipes With The Crowd on Shakespeare’s World

shakespearesworldzoo: On Close Reading and Teamwork

UCL: museums & Collections Blog: UCL students identify mystery specimens in the Grant Museum

Res Obscura: How to Write the History of Science

Yovisto: Johannes Gutenberg – Man of the Millennium

The Atlas of Early Printing

Gesellschaft Deutsche Chemiker: Geschichte der Chemie Mitteilungen Online

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: RCPE completes new online archive of 30,000 historical medical records

deadline: Scots female astronomer in lead for £10 note

HSS: IsisCB Explore History of Science Index (oa)

Chemistry World: Minsky’s microscope

The #EnvHist Weekly

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Nuclear history bibliography, 2015

Health, History and Culture: What does Health, History and Culture mean to you?

NICHE: Counterbalancing Declensionist Narratives in Environmental History

Nursing Clio: Sunday Morning Medicine: A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news

ESOTERIC:

The British Museum: A medieval alchemy book reveals new secrets

A page from the 18th-century copy of al-‘Irāqī’s Book of the Seven Climes (British Library, Add. MS 25724, fol. 50v)

A page from the 18th-century copy of al-‘Irāqī’s Book of the Seven Climes (British Library, Add. MS 25724, fol. 50v)

distillatio: Transmission of alchemical ideas via travellers and books

BOOK REVIEWS:

John Gribbin Science: Doomed: Dark Matter and Dinosaurs

Science Book a Day: Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale and How a 19th-Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry

Public Discourse: Science, Philosophy, and God

Geographical: The Mapmakers’ World: A Cultural History of the European World Map by Marjo T Nurminen

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Advances in the History of Psychology: A Critical History of Schizophrenia

Yale Climate Connections: Bookshelf: Engineering the Atmosphere

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Work, Psychiatry, and Society 1750–2010

Historiens de la santé: Localization and Its Discontents. A Genealogy of Psychoanalysis and the Neuro Disciplines

Egan History: History for a Sustainable Future

Advances in the History of Psychology: A History of ‘Relevance’ in Psychology

Historiens de la santé: History of Infectious Disease Pandemics in Urban Society

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New Books in Science, Technology, and Society: Back to the Breast: Natural Motherhood and Breastfeeding in America

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Jack’s Adventures in Museum Land: Scholar, Courtier, Sorcerer: The Magical World of John Dee

JHI Blog: Darkness Regained

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

Dee's obsidian Aztec "Scrying Mirror" Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dee’s obsidian Aztec “Scrying Mirror”
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018 

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Closing soon: Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

CLOSING SOON: Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

Closing soon: British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Closing soon: Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Closing Very Soon! Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Henry Walter Bates Until 26 February:

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

ChoM News: Center for the History of Medicine: Screening of “Mystery Street” 24 February 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

EVENTS:

Countway Library of Medicine Harvard Medical School: Talk: Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England 8 March 2016

Boole-Shannon

Waterhouse Room Gordon Hall Harvard Medical School: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

Royal Holloway – Management Building Lecture Theatre: Public History and Fiction 25 February 2016

University of York: Lecture: “Not Everyone Can Be Gandhi”: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post WWII Era 3 March 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

CHF: Joseph Priestly Society: Roger Nielson: Abbey Color: Entrepreneurship in a 150-Year-Old Industry 11 February 2016

Medical Museum Cafe

College of Charleston: Lecture: Steve Silberman Author of NeuroTribes 10 February 2016

NCSE: Darwin Day approaches

University of Leeds: Lecture: History & Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects (2) 16 February 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

 

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

 

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Bath Literary and Scientific Institution: Inaugural Darwin Day Lecture 12 February

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Lesson in Astronomy (ca. 1758) by Giuseppe Angeli

Lesson in Astronomy (ca. 1758) by Giuseppe Angeli

 

TELEVISION:

Channel 4: Walking Through Time Trailer

Channel 4: Walking Through Time

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Gresham College: Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace – Professor Raymond Flood

Museo Galileo: Kepler’s Laws

Gresham College: No Need for Geniuses: Scientific Revolutions and Revolutionary Scientists in the City of Light

Youtube: History of Women Philosophers: Who was Ada L?

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: A constellation for John Dee by Jeremy Millar, 2016

RADIO:

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

BBC Radio 3: Essay: Art The Secret Mathematicians

BBC Radio 3: Essay: Music The Secret Mathematicians

BBC Radio 3: Essay: Literature The Secret Mathematicians

BBC Radio 3: Essay: Secret Artist The Secret Mathematicians

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Chromatography

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: Einstein’s Fridge

PODCASTS:

Science Friday: A Science Hero, Lost and Found

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Picturing the Invisible Alchemy

Institute of English Studies: School of Advance Studies: University of London: A History of Maps and Mapmaking 20-24 June 2016

University of Liverpool: Workshop for Postgraduates and Early-Career Researchers: Philosophies of Nature: Schelling and his Contemporaries 14–126 June 2016

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series, Spring 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Notches: CfP: Histories of Music and Sexuality

University of Bristol: CfP: Philosophy of Biology in the UK 8–9 June 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

HoS Conf

University of Pittsburgh: Speakers series in the Philosophy of Science

University of Kent: CfP: Bridging the Divide: Literature and Science 3 June 2016

University of Denver: Symposium: Weapons of Mass Destruction: World War Two and the Cold War 16 March 2016

Early Science and Medicine: CFP: Matter and Perception Deadline 1 August 2016

Science in Public

Tallinn University of Technology: Estonian Philosophy Conference, Science, technology and society 3–4 June 2016

Leuphana University Lünaburg: Sommer School on Simulation in Science 26–30 September 2016

University of Twente, Enschede: How Philosophy Meets the World 20–22 April 2016

Hagley Museum & Library: Conference: CfP: Making Modern Disabilities: Histories of Disability, Design, and Technology 28 October 2016

University of California, Santa Cruz: Science Communication: Director and Teaching Professor

Descartes event

The National Museum of Computing: Call for Entries: 2016 Tony Sale Award for Computer Conservation

BSHM: Undergraduate Essay Prize

Hotel Bildungszentrum, Basel: Summer Institute: Reconceiving and Explaining the Success of Science 1–12 August 2016

Australian National University, Canberra: Environmental History PhD Workshop 23–27 May 2016

Vatican Library Conference

SIGCIS: Submissions: The Mahaney Prize: Outstanding article in the History of Computing and Information Technology

ICOHTEC: 43rd Annual Meeting: Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July Porto, Portugal

ANZAMEMS Inc: CfP: Translators and Printers In Renaissance Europe: Framing Identity and Agency IMLR University of London: 29–30 September 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Center for the History of Family Medicine (CHFM): 2016 CHFM Fellowship in the History of Family Medicine

Bletchley Park: Education Manager – Schools and Families

University of Groningen: Postdoc position Eighteenth Century Medicine

University of Stanford: Suppes Center for History and Philosophy of Science: Doctoral Fellowship

Smithsonian Institutions: Archives Specialist

British Library: Untold lives blog: Tracing Hans Sloane’s Books: A PhD Placement Opportunity

Scientific Instrument Society: SIS Grants

The Museum of Flight: Senior Curator and Director of Collections

Harvard University: Lecturer in History of Modern Medicine

University of Utrecht: Descartes Centre: Fellowships

King’s College London + Royal Air Force Museum: The Professor Sir Richard Trainor PhD Scholarships 2016–17: The Business History of the British Aircraft Industry

National Museum of American History: Arthur Molella Distinguished Fellowship: History of Technology etc.

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #29

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #29

Monday 01 February 2016

EDITORIAL:

We have already entered the second month of 2016 and it’s time for the next edition of your weekly #histSTM link list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could gather together in cyberspace over the last seven days.

On a fairly regular basis an academic paper or a press release appears announcing a new supposedly major discovery or advance in science or archaeology, which the media pounces on hyping and misrepresenting it in every possible imaginable way. The last week saw, for a change, this process taking place with relation to the history of ancient astronomy.

Historian of Babylonian astronomy, Mathieu Ossendrijver, from the Humboldt University of Berlin published and article in the journal Science, Ancient Babylonian astronomers calculated Jupiter’s position from the area under a time-velocity graph, which described his discovery that a series of cuneiform clay tablets, dated between 350 and 50 BCE, described the tracking of the planet Jupiter using a geometrical process. This in itself would be pretty impressive as it was generally thought that Babylonian astronomy, as opposed to Greek, was algebraic and not geometric. Even more astounding was the fact that the author of the tablets was basically graphing time against velocity in trapezoidal figures and then determining the area of the figure to determine the distance covered. This discovery was truly astounding because this geometrical form of proto-integral calculus was previously thought to have been first developed by the Oxford Calculatores in the fourteenth century CE.

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So far so good. If you have difficulty reading the fairly technical original paper then I recommend you read the Nature article, Babylonian astronomers used geometry to track Jupiter by Philip Ball, which is level headed and objective then having done so you can look at some of the other less well informed articles that spin off into the ridiculous. Possibly the most ridiculous was the BBC Science News Twitter account, which actually asked, “Babylonians, ‘first to use geometry’. Meaningless and ahistorical click bait of the worst order. There is a major difference between the use of a specific geometric process and the use of unqualified geometry something, which apparently the BBC Science News Twitter account doesn’t understand. There are other horrors contained in the various accounts of the original article, which I will leave it to the readers to discover but be warned, as Philip Ball expressed it so beautifully on Twitter:

Sometimes I feel sorry for the past: when we’re not patronising or denigrating it, we’re hyping it.

Gizmodo: This Babylonian Astronomy Text Changes History

Smithsonian.com: Babylonians Were Using Geometry Centuries Earlier Than Thought

New Scientist: Ancient maps of Jupiter’s path show Babylonians’ advanced mathematics

Popular Mechanics: Ancient Babylonians Geometrically Traced the Path of Jupiter

The New York Times: Signs of Modern Astronomy Seen in Ancient Babylon

BBC News: Ancient Babylonians ‘first to use geometry’

BBC Science in Action: iPlayer: Tracking Jupiter on clay tablets

Independent: Ancient Babylonians used early calculus to track path of Jupiter, study finds

The New York Times: Signs of Modern Astronomy Seen in Ancient Babylon

Times of India: Modern astronomy evolved in Babylon?

Science: Math whizzes of ancient Babylon figured out forerunner of calculus

ars technica: Babylonians tracked Jupiter with sophisticated geometrical math

Quotes of the week:

“We are more than our scientific parts, and if we are to respect humanity we have to find ways to understand” – Rob Townsend (@rbhisted)

Shadow Quote

“This must be the way most of us maneuver through the world, half knowing, half not, visited by memories that can’t possibly be true.” – Bejamin Dreyer (@BCDreyer)

“Contrariwise, if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic.” Lewis Carrol (1832-1898)

“I always feel people calling for a Muslim “Reformation” know very little about the destruction wrought by the Xian one”. – David M. Perry (@Lollardfish)

“Found a journal called Neuroquantology that ‘explores boundary betw consciousness & quantum phys’. More like boundary betw shite & bollocks”. – Jim Al-Khalili (@jimalkhalili)

“Thomas Orde-Lees, on Shackleton's Endurance, wrote this 101 yrs ago” h/t @matthewteller

“Thomas Orde-Lees, on Shackleton’s Endurance, wrote this 101 yrs ago” h/t @matthewteller

“philosophy of science that is not scientifically serious is not serious philosophy”—Clark Glymour h/t @bradweslake

“In 1800, the Holy Roman Empire could boast 45 universities. France had 22 – England had 2”. – Tom Holland (@holland_tom)

“And Scotland had 5! (Edinburgh, St Andrews, Glasgow, Marischal College Aberdeen, King’s College Aberdeen)” – Anton Howes (@antonhowes)

“I think God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability.”―Oscar Wilde

Leo Szilard, on fleeing the Nazis: “In this world you don’t have to be much cleverer than other people, you just have to be one day earlier” – Douglas O’Reagan (@D_OReagan)

The Vitruvianische Katze Peter Glaser (@peterglaser)

The Vitruvianische Katze Peter Glaser (@peterglaser)

Birthdays of the Week:

Robert Boyle born 25 January 1627

Robert Boyle by Johann Kerseboom, Gawthorpe Hall, 1689 CHF Source: Wikimedia Commons

Robert Boyle by Johann Kerseboom, Gawthorpe Hall, 1689 CHF
Source: Wikimedia Commons

“Happy Birthday Robert Boyle.

Best known for promoting ties between religion and science

What do you mean he’s not remembered for that?” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

Irish Philosophy: Boyle’s Corpuscular Philosophy

CHF: Robert Boyle

CHF: Full Boyle

Youtube: University of Oxford: Robert Boyle’s Corpuscularian Theory

Johannes Hevelius born 28 January 1611

Image National Portrait Gallery

Image National Portrait Gallery

 Yovisto: Johannes Hevelius and his Selenographia

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The last great naked-eye astronomer

Encyclopedia.com: Johannes Hevelius

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Johannes Hevelius

The Face of the Moon: Hevelius, Johannes (1611–1687)

Voula Saridakis: Converging Elements in the Development of Late Seventeenth-Century Disciplinary Astronomy: Instrumentation, Education, Networks, and the Hevelius-Hooke Controversy (PhD thesis, pdf)

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Paul Langevin and the Langevin Dynamics

Perimeter Institute: Great Physicists and the Pets Who Inspired Them

The Public Domain Review: The Hyginus Star Atlas (1482)

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World Digital Library: Explanation of the Telescope Tang Ruowang (Chinese name of Johann Adam Schall von Bell, 1592–1666)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Isabella Karle’s Interview

Yovisto: The Hale Telescope at Palomar Observatory

Yovisto: Ilya Prigogine and the Role of Time

AHF: Niels Bohr Announces the Discovery of Fission

Nova Next: The Ninth Planet That Wasn’t

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Vincent and Claire Whitehead’s Interview

The History of Astronomy in Wales: Isaac Roberts (1829–1904)

The Independent: Beatrice Tinsley: 5 facts you need to know about the (uncelebrated) astronomer

New Zealand astronomer and cosmologist Beatrice Tinsley Source: Wikimedia Commons

New Zealand astronomer and cosmologist Beatrice Tinsley
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: Scientist Refugees and the Manhattan Project

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Sam Campbell’s Interview

Library of Congress Library: Newly Acquired Arabic Manuscript on Early Astronomy and Mathematics

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A misleading illustration

The State: Space Shuttle Challenger exploded 30 years ago over Florida with teacher on board

npr: 30 Years After Explosion, Challenger Engineer Still Blames Himself

American History: The Cosmos in Miniature: The Remarkable Star Map of Simeon de Witt

The Astrolabe of Simeon De Witt (Front view)

The Astrolabe of Simeon De Witt (Front view)

AHF: Klaus Fuchs

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Walt Grisham’s Interview

NASA: Jet Propulsion Lab: Ceres: Keeping Well-Guarded Secrets for 215 Years

esa: tribute to the space shuttle

Scientific American: The Fermi Paradox is not Fermi’s and it is not a Paradox

Atlas Obscura: The Famous Photo of Chernobyl’s Most Dangerous Radioactive Material Was A Selfie

Atlas Obscura: Astronomical Clock of Lyon

UT News: Ransom Center Receives $10,000 Grant To Catalog Collection of Science Materials

Physics Today: The peaceful atom comes to campus

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Yovisto: Fabian von Bellingshausen and the Discovery of Antarctica

Jisc: Old Maps Online

Smithsonian.com: Nellie Bly’s Record-Breaking Trip Around the World Was, to Her Surprise a Race

Atlas Obscura: Were Portuguese Explorers the First Europeans to Find Australia

Is this the first map of Australia? (Photo: Wikipedia)

Is this the first map of Australia? (Photo: Wikipedia)

Catalan Science Reviews: Tides and the Catalan Atlas [1375]

National Museum Australia: Western Hemisphere Map

BBC News: ‘Lost’ map of Cornwall found in collection

New York Public Library: Coming Soon: The Hunt-Lenox Globe, in 3D!

The Map Room: The Hunt-Lenox Globe

The Hunt-Lenox Globe

The Hunt-Lenox Globe

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

The H-Word: From Rubella to Zika: pregnancy, disability, abortion and the spectre of an epidemic

Yovisto: Hermann Ebbinghaus and the Experimental Study of Memory

Recommended Dose: A Blog About Teaching the History of Medicine: Brimstone and Treacle: Teaching History of Medicine with Recipes

UIC Special Collections: New finding aid available: Medical Pamphlet and Ephemera collection

Remedia: Denver’s One-Lung Army: Disease, Disability, and Debility in a Frontier City

Bartlett, Reuel, “Colorado for Consumptives, Asthmatics And Inquiring Invalids With Examination Chart.” Boulder, Colo. Daily Herald, 1888.

Bartlett, Reuel, “Colorado for Consumptives, Asthmatics And Inquiring Invalids With Examination Chart.” Boulder, Colo. Daily Herald, 1888.

Archaeology: Egypt’s Earliest Case of Scurvy Unearthed in Aswan

Two Nerdy History Girls: Mr. Curtis’s Acoustic Chair

Center for the History of Medicine: Edward Jenner

The Recipes Project: Hang Your Head: Mrs. Corlyon’s Unique Headache Treatment

Atlas Obscura: Gustavianum Anatomical Theater

Yovisto: Thomas Willis and the Royal Society

Thomas Morris: Dragging his bowels after him

Penn Medicine: Historic Tours of Pennsylvania Hospital

Notches: Sex, Disease, and Fertility in History

From the Hands of Quacks: The 20 Minute Surgery that Cured a Prince’s Deafness

Distillations Blog: A urine wheel from the 1506 book Epiphanie Medicorum by Ullrich Pinder.

tumblr_o1keihX1yp1swrkevo1_1280

Best Certified Nursing Assistant Programs: 10 Snapshots of Nursing in Nazi Germany

RCP: Cold cures and prevention in the UK Medical Heritage Library (UK-MHL)

Museum of Health Care: Curing Death: Plague Medicine and Medieval Doctors

The Recipes Project: Catch the Hare: Remedies for the Stone

H/SOZ/KULT: History of the Social Practice of Psychiatric Nursing and the Patients

Thomas Morris: Benjamin Rush in the Lancet

The Lancet: The body politic (oa)

The Recipes Project: On the “Oil of Swallows”, Part 1: Did Anyone Actually Use These Outrageous Remedies

Encyclopedia of Alabama: Graefenberg Medical Institute

BBC News: Donald Grey Triplett: The first boy diagnosed as autistic

Medievalists.net: Abortion Medieval Style? Assaults on Pregnant Women in Later Medieval England

Thomas Morris: Give that man a medal

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: What Goes Around Comes Around

Collectors Weekly: Antique Clocks

Medium: Craig Mod: 22 Years Ago I Used a Cellular Telephone

1*GlX_EUrxXixFMnhI1k-QJw

Atlas Obscura: The Women Who Rose High in the Early Days of Hot Air Ballooning

Londonist: See How London Might Have Been Rebuilt After the Great Fire

Science Museum: Researching the humble audio guide

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: John Logie Baird

All Day: These are the Oldest Photos Ever Taken

DigVentures: How Anglo-Saxon Glassmakers Brought Colour to the Dark Ages

Yovisto: Gustav Eifel and his Famous Tower

Yovisto: Karl Benz and his Automobile Vehicle

Distillations Blog: Glamorizing Musicals and Modernism

Jalopnik: What If Cars had Developed with the Horse and Buggy Model?

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Physics Today: The bicentennial of Francis Ronalds’s electric telegraph

Atlas Obscura: Why We Picture Bombs as Round Black Balls with a Burning Wick

Historic UK: SS Great Eastern’s Launch Ramp

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Public Domain Review: The Snowflake Man of Vermont

Paige Fossil History: The First Dinosaur Eggs: Meet Roy Chapman Andrews

Atlas Obscura: The Exquisite 19th-Century Infographics That Explained the History of the Natural World

Yovisto: The National Geographic Society

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Adam Sedgwick

Adam Sedgewick (1785-1873), British geologist, one of the founders of modern geology, at the age of 47 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Adam Sedgewick (1785-1873), British geologist, one of the founders of modern geology, at the age of 47
Source: Wikimedia Commons

ucmp.berkeley.edu: Adam Sedgwick (1785–1873)

Discovery: No, Earth isn’t Flat: Here’s How Ancients Proved It

Newsweek: Even in the Middle Ages. People Didn’t Think the Earth was Flat

Phys.org: Flat wrong: the misunderstood history of flat Earth theories

Roots of Unity: An Impractical, Ahistorical, Mathematically Elegant Way to Figure out Earth is a Sphere

The Public Domain Review: Phenomena Over and Under the Earth (1878)

Museum of Wales: A marriage of art and science – botanical illustrations at Amgueddfa Cymru

Natural History Museum: Why georeferencing is the most important thing for the Museum since sliced bread

Nautilus: The Day the Mesozoic Died

CfHoSTM: Between Cope and Osborn: the Role of the American Biological Discourse on the Public Debate on Evolution

 

Paige Fossil History: How to Find the Missing Link (According to Dubois)

Dubois & wife Anna, Source: Wikipedia Commons

Dubois & wife Anna, Source: Wikipedia Commons

Yovisto: Eugene Dubois and the Java Man

Niche: Turning off Niagara Falls …Again: 1969 Redux

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Dunkenfiled Henry Scott

History of Oceanography: The Origin of Oceans

A garden’s chronicle: A short visit to the Natural History Museum of London: meeting with the spirits of Wallace and Darwin

HiN: Zu einem unbekannten Porträt Alexander von Humboldts im Besitz des französischen Conseil d’État

CHEMISTRY:

 

Conciatore: Iron Into Copper

The recovery of copper from vitriolated waters, from De Re Metallica, 1556, by Agricola (Georg Bauer).

The recovery of copper from vitriolated waters,
from De Re Metallica, 1556, by Agricola (Georg Bauer).

The Culture of Chemistry: A universal hotness manifold

The Public Domain Review: Picturing Pyrotechnics

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

blogs.bodleian: Celebrating Ada Lovelace’s 200th Birthday

centraljersey.com: Notes on the humanities

 

SSHM: The Gazette

University of Sheffield: HRI Digital: HRI Online

The Royal Society: The Repository: A V Hill, refugees and the Royal Society

Leaping Robot: A Mountain of Magical Thinking

The New York Times: Marvin Minsky, Pioneer in Artificial Intelligence, Dies at 88

 More details Marvin Minsky at the KI 2006 artificial intelligence conference in Bremen Source: Wikimedia Commons


More details
Marvin Minsky at the KI 2006 artificial intelligence conference in Bremen
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Slate: This Is Not The Fourth Industrial Revolution

European Academic Heritage Network: Checklist for the Preservation and Access of Recent Heritage Science

European Academic Heritage Network: UNIVERSEUM’s Working Group on Recent Heritage of Science Literature on recent heritage of science

Huygens ING and the Scaliger Institute (Leiden University Libraries): present an ‘edition-in-progress’ of the correspondence of Carolus Clusius

The New York Times: Dr. Herbert L. Abrams, Who Worked Against Nuclear War, Dies at 95

Daily Sabah: Feature: Why Islamic world fell behind in science

Linnean News: February 2016

the alternative.in: 10 Indian women scientists you should be proud of

Anandibai Joshee (1865 – 1887)

Anandibai Joshee (1865 – 1887)

AHF: News Letter

Chemistry World: Once upon a time

The Guardian: Mary Somerville could be first woman other than Queen to feature on RBS banknote

The Sloane Letters Blog: Looking to the Edge, or Networking Early Modern Women

ESOTERIC:

The Guardian: Did a 16th-century magician inspire 007?

Conciatore: The Golden Sun

The Sun, Robert Fludd from Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.

The Sun, Robert Fludd
from Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.

distillatio: Things alchemy was related to and helped with and used by

Wellcome Library: Bond villains and criminal anthropology

BOOK REVIEWS:

Medical History: Christopher Hamlin, More Than Hot: A Short History of Fever

Wall Street Journal: Science, Sorcery and Sons (Google title and follow link to circumnavigate paywall)

AGU: Blogosphere: Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier

The Guardian: Planet of the Bugs by Scott Richard Shaw – evolution and the rise of insects

Insect nation … a swarm of locusts flies over a beach in the Canary Islands. Photograph: Carlos Guevara/Reuters

Insect nation … a swarm of locusts flies over a beach in the Canary Islands. Photograph: Carlos Guevara/Reuters

Physics Today: A Singularly Unfeminine Profession: One Woman’s Journey in Physics

NEW BOOKS:

Boydell & Brewer: Leprosy and Charity in Medieval Rouen

Chicago University Press: The Experimental Self: Humphry Davy and the Making of a Man of Science

Dr Alun Withey: Technology, Self-Fashioning and Politeness in Eighteenth-Century Britain

9781137467478.indd

Historiens de la santé: Quelle révolution scientifique? Les sciences de la vie dans la querelle des Anciens et des Modernes (XVIe-XVIIIe siècles)

I.B. Tauris: In Search of Kings and Conquerors: Gertrude Bell and the Archaeology of the Middle East

9781848854987

Amazon: A Critical History of Schizophrenia

Historiens de la santé: Hospitals and Urbanism in Rome, 1200–1500

Bloomsbury Publishing: Advances in Religion, Cognitive Science, and Experimental Philosophy

Culture 24: The Astronomer and the Witch: Paranoia, fear, imprisonment and a 17th century European witch trial

University of Pittsburgh Press: Science as It Could Have Been

ART & EXHIBITIONS

 

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The Shakespeare Blog: His most potent art: the library of John Dee

London Historian’s Blog: John Dee at the RCP

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Guardian: Scientific genius of Leonard da Vinci celebrated in new exhibition

The exhibition features wooden models based on Leonardo’s detailed mechanical drawings. Photograph: Philippe Levy/Science Museum

The exhibition features wooden models based on Leonardo’s detailed mechanical drawings. Photograph: Philippe Levy/Science Museum

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018 

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

CLOSING SOON: Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

 

Closing Very Soon! Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Henry Walter Bates Until 26 February

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

ChoM News: Center for the History of Medicine: Screening of “Mystery Street” 24 February 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

Last Chance! The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 4 February–4 August 2016

EVENTS:

Descartes event

Map History: Maps and Society Lectures: Dr Kevin Sheehan ‘Construction and Reconstruction: Investigating How Portolan Maps Were Produced by Reproducing a Fifteenth-Century Chart of the Mediterranean’. 04 February 2016

Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine: Talk: Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England 8 March 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

Shackelton Event

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

University of York: Lecture: Not Everyone Can Be A Gandhi: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post-WWII Era 3 March 2016

NCSE: Darwin Day Approaches

 

 

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Boole-Shannon

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

North-West Evening Mail: University of Lancaster: Antique maps reveal their secrets 6 February 2016

Wellcome Collection: AD Exploration: Spices, Smell and Disease 4 February 2016

Royal Institution: Christianity and the creation of modern science Short Course Every Thursday 4 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

The Alchymist (Joseph Wright of Derby, 1771) Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Alchymist (Joseph Wright of Derby, 1771)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

TELEVISION:

BBC: iPlayer: James Clerk Maxwell

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Richard Feynman debunks NASA

Youtube: James Clerk Maxwell – Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

Science Museum: Baird’s pioneering television apparatus

USGS: Evening Public Lecture Series:

Youtube: RCP: Jeanette Winterson’s opening speech at the launch of the RCP’s John Dee exhibition, 18 January 2016

Tech Insider: This epic video of every space shuttle ever launched might make you cry

Youtube: Old Fort Niagara Association: The Effectiveness of 18th Century Musketry

Luís Henriques: Music Printing in the Renaissance

Youtube: BBC Radio 4: Rene Descartes – “I think, therefore I am”

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: The Duchess Who Gatecrashed Science

BBC Radio 3: The Essay: Architecture: The Secret Mathematician

PODCASTS:

The Public Domain Review: Thomas Edison Tells a Joke about a Liver (1906)

Ben Franklin’s World: Episode 015: Joyce E. Chaplin, Round About the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit

Niche: Nature’s Past Episode 51: Has Environmental History Lost Its Way

Science Friday: For Planet-Seekers a Cautionary Tale

University of Cambridge: 2016 Sandars Lectures Anthony Grafton

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Kent: CfP: Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts 7–10 July 2016

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI): History of Science and Contemporary Scientific Realism Conference 19–21 February 2016

Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology Museum, Oxford: CfP: Gendering Museum Histories 7–8 September 2016

St Cross College Oxford: Conference: Medieval Physics in Oxford 27 February 2016

University of Chester: One Day Symposium: Pilgrimage, Shrines and Healing in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe 24 June 2016

Science in Public Research Network: CfP: Science in Public 2016 University of Kent 13–15 July 2016

Science in Public

Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University: Twenty-Eighth Annual Spring Symposium: CfP: Medieval Globalisms – Movement in the Global Middle Ages 8–9 April 2016

Leuphana University Lüneburg: CfP: Summer School: On Simulation in Science 26–30 September 2016

Institució Milà i Fontanals, Barcelona, Spain; Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe, Marburg, Germany: CfP: Urban Peripheries? Emerging Cities in Europe’s South and East, 1850–1945 26.09.2016-27.09.2016, Barcelona, Institució Milà i Fontanals

Institute of Historical Research, Senate House: CfP: Best-Laid Plans: a colloquium about schemers and their schemes 8–9 April 2016

University of Manchester: CHSTM Seminar Series February to May 2016

Vatican Library Conference

Notches: CfP: Histories of Music and Sexuality

Echo Physics Pöllau Austria: CfP: 2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics 5–7 September 2016

SIGCIS: Call for Submissions: Mahoney Prize for outstanding article in the history of computing and information technology

Kaap Doorn NL: CfP: Philosophy of Science in a Forest 19–21 May 2016

University of Valencia: Institute for the History of Medicine and Science: Spring 2016 Seminars

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Groningen: Postdoc History of Eighteenth Century Medicine

CHoM News: 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

Wellcome Library: Wikimedian in Residence at the Wellcome Library

The Francis A. Countway Library: Fellowships in the History of Medicine 2016-2017

Horniman Museum and Gardens: Deputy Keeper of Natural History

American Meteorological Society: Graduate Fellowship in the History of Science

University of Edinburgh: PhD Scholarship in the Philosophy of Science

University of Cambridge: PhD Studentship, HPS

University of York: Graduate Program in Science and Technology Studies

The Hakluyt Society Blog: Hakluyt Society Research Grants

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #28

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #28

Monday 25 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

 

 Another seven days have passed and the Internet has delivered up another bumper crop of post and articles on the histories of science, technology and medicine collected here in your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette.

There is a common misconception, shared on occasions by you friendly sub-editor, that history is something that happens in an undefined ‘distant’ past. However in realty the happenings of yesterday are already history. In the last days we were spectacularly reminded of this fact in a dispute over the history of one of the most recent discoveries/inventions in the history of the life sciences CRISPR.

What started as a dispute amongst specialists in genetic biology quickly attracted the attention of the mainstream media and the history of gene editing had, to quote Andy Warhol, its fifteen minutes of fame.

To prove that Whewell’s Gazette is on the ball and not stuck in the sixteenth century we bring you, hot off the digital presses, the contribution to this debate that our busy elves found on their searches through cyberspace this week.

Genotopia: A Whig History of CRISPR

Engineering Life: CRISPR In the history of science and intellectual property

SciRants: CRISPR Controversy and the Nobel Prize

The Washington Post: A social media war just erupted over the biotech innovation of the century

Genotopia: Criticism of Lander reaches mainstream media

Crispr-Cas9: Bitter row breaks out over ‘official history’ of gene-editing breakthrough

it is NOT junk: The Villain of CRISPR

STAT: In The Lab: Why Eric Lander morphed from science god to punching bag

Emmanuelle Charpentier, August 2015 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Emmanuelle Charpentier, August 2015
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

It would seem the problem started with a paper by Eric Lander on the history of CRISPR in which he tries to minimise the contributions of Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doubna in favour of Feng Zhang and George Church of Lander’s own Broad Institute. Although the motivation seems to be another is this yet another example of women being discriminated against in the history of science?

Jennifer Anne Doudna Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jennifer Anne Doudna
Source: Wikimedia Commons

One website dedicated to correcting the picture of women in #histSTM is Lady Science and Anna Resner and Leila McNeill have revamped their, in our opinion excellent blog, and issued the first Lady Science ebook, which you can download for free. You can read all about it in this Slate article by Bad Astronomer Phil Plait

home+logo

Quotes of the week:

Pooh quote

“When I was a kid, we had bloggers who could actually write and didn’t just post youtube videos”. – Jeet Heer (@HeerJeet)

“I cannot better describe walrus.. meat than by citing..tough Texas beef, marbled with fat and soaked in clam juice.” – Schwatka (1892) h/t @labroides

“Mathematicians stand on each other’s shoulders while computer scientists stand on each other’s toes”. – R. W. Hamming h7t @CompSciFact

“David Bowie dies and then a week later a whole new awesome planet just appears in space… coincidence? I think not”. – Sarcastic Rover (@SarcasticRover)

“The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders of the universe, the less taste we shall have for destruction.” – Rachel Carson h/t @SciHistoryToday

“Did you know that Heraclitus was a pre-Socratic philosopher? He didn’t”. – @historyscientis

“Hey guys I found a really big prime num—”

“WE FOUND A PLANET!”

“Aww.” – Andrew Taylor (@Andrew_Taylor)

“I miss the good old days at Davos when everyone wore flowing robes & the entrail readings were an intimate affair among friends”. – Scott Gosnell (@infinite_me)

MLK Science & Religion

Birthday of the Week:

 André Marie Ampère born 20 January 1775

 

Engraving of André-Marie Ampère (1775 – 1836) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Engraving of André-Marie Ampère (1775 – 1836)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: André-Marie Ampère and Electromagnetism

The British Museum: André Marie Ampère (mathématicien et physicien) / Collection de tous les portraits célèbres

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Medical physics quote

University Library Utrecht: Newton through the eyes of an amateur

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Christy’s Interview

Yovisto: Simon Marius and his Astronomical Discoveries

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Jerome Karle’s Interview

Online Archive of California: Otto Stern Photograph Collection, approximately 1895–1969

Nautilus: These Astronomical Glass Plates Made History

The Atlantic: The Women Who Would Have Been Sally Ride

Jerrie Cobb undergoing physiological testing (NASA).

Jerrie Cobb undergoing physiological testing (NASA).

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ralph Lapp’s Interview

Culture of Knowledge: ‘Skybound was the mind’: Johannes Kepler

Hyperallergenic: Rediscovered Glass Plate Photographs Show the Skies 120 Years Ago

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bill Hudgins’s Interview

NASA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Voyager Mission Celebrates 30 Years Since Uranus

Space.com: Clyde Tombaugh: Astronomer Who Discovered Pluto

Royal Museums Greenwich: Robert Hooke: the man who knew everything

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

National Geographic: Making Maps Under Fire During the Revolutionary War

Atlas Obscura: Found: A Very early and Very Rare Ottoman Atlas

Medievalists.net: Ten Beautiful Medieval Maps

Tabula Rogeriana

Tabula Rogeriana

Yovisto: The World According to Sebastian Münster

AEON: Sky readers

Atlas Obscura: 100 Wonders: The Mapparium

Dawlish Chronicles: A Forgotten Hero of Exploration: Vitus Bering

The Gabriel as drawn by Martin Spangsberg in 1827. Picture: Danish Geografisk Tidsskrift

The Gabriel as drawn by Martin Spangsberg in 1827. Picture: Danish Geografisk Tidsskrift

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Franklin health

Perceptions of Pregnancy: The Phantoms of Pregnancy

Wellcome Library: New database: Popular Medicine in America, 1800–1900

Advances in the History of Psychology: Surgery for Desperados: On Neurosurgical Solutions to Criminality

Thomas Morris: A dismal tail

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: Medicines of the 18th Century

henbanebelladonna

Remedia: Between Photography and Film: Early Uses of Medical Cinematography

Harvard Gazette: Did famine worsen the Black Death?

Science Museum: Thalidomide’s legacy

The Sunday Times: “I heard a baby cry and the doctors talking. I knew something wasn’t right”

The Guardian: Sixth-century wooden foot thought to be Europe’s oldest prosthetic implant

NYAM: The Nightmare of Imminent Baldness

Yovisto: Vladimir Bekhterev and the Bekterev’s Disease

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: H.T. Hamblin: Opthalmologist and Mystic

Thomas Morris: Suffocated by a fish

npr: Was Dr. Asperger A Nazi? The Question Still Haunts Autism

Dr. Hans Asperger with a young boy at the Children's Clinic at the University of Vienna in the 1930s. Courtesy of Maria Asperger Felder

Dr. Hans Asperger with a young boy at the Children’s Clinic at the University of Vienna in the 1930s.
Courtesy of Maria Asperger Felder

Thomas Morris: The man who fought a duel in his sleep

Cleveland Historical: The Cunningham Sanitarium

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: The Cullen Project: digitizing medical history

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Robert Burns and his medical biographer Dr James Currie

Early Modern Medicine: Frances’ Frigidity

emroc: Medicine in the Granville Family Manuscript

Randi Hutter Epstein: Elusive Powers of Estrogen

Anthropology Now: Zika and Microcephaly: Can We Learn from History?

Thomas Morris: Fruit, feathers and hair

Medievalists.net: 23 Medieval Uses for Rosemary

Rosemary illustrated in British Library MS Egerton 747 f. 85v

Rosemary illustrated in British Library MS Egerton 747 f. 85v

Cambridge Journals: Medical History: The Sources of Eucharius Rösslin’s ‘Rosegarden for Pregnant Women and Midwives’ (1513)

Wellcome Library: Linking letters across archives

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Thomas August Watson – Recipient of the Very First Phone Call

Medievalists.net: Printing with gold in the fifteenth century

Conciatore: Reflections on the Mirror

Conciatore: Like Snow From Heaven

JHI Blog: Hippie Bibliography

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Open Culture: Why Violins Have F-Holes: The Science & History of a Remarkable Renaissance Design

Morbid Anatomy: Midcentury Stereopanorama

Yovisto: Who remembers Apple’s Lisa?

Yovisto: The Steel of Sir Henry Bessemer

Yovisto: Ray Dolby and the Noise Reduction System

The Recipes Project: Searching, Sieving, Sifting, and Straining in the Seventeenth Century

 

Yovisto: Umberto Nobile and his Airships

Yovisto: John Fitch and the Steam Boat

Fact:Danish electronic music legend Else Marie Pade dies at 91

Academia: A natural draught furnace for bronze casting (pdf)

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Women Computers in World War II

Betty Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas (right) operating ENIAC's main control panel.

Betty Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas (right) operating ENIAC’s main control panel.

Atlas Obscura: The First Cross-Country Road Trip Took 2 Men and a Pitbull 63 Days

PM: The Obscure History of the World’s First Synth, Built in 1901

My medieval foundry: Ongoing bell posts – Part 2 – making small bells

Collecting and Connecting: The story that changed my mind

Atlas Obscura: 160-Year-Old Ganges Canal Super-Passages Are An Engineering Marvel

Science Museum: 30 Years On: The Rise of the Macintosh Computer

National Library of Scotland: Scottish glass industry

Science & Society: Picture Library Prints: De Dondi’s ‘Astrarium’, the world’s first astronomical clock, 1364

Tenby Observer: Pembroke Dock maritime museum reflects on first year of operation

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Linneas

Yovisto: Caspar Friedrich Wolff – the Founder of Embryology

 

This Day in Water History: January 14, 1829: First Slow Sand Filter in England

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘The Most ingenious book that ever I read in my life’ Pepys and Micrographia

Notches: The Cologne Sexual Assaults in Historical Perspective

The Public Domain Review: In Search of the Impossible: The Perfect English Rabbit

Genes to Genomes: Calvin Bridges: Bringing genes down to earth

Notches: After Roe: Engaging the Lost History of the Abortion Debate

BHL: Fantastic Worlds: Exploring the Ocean through Science and Fiction

The Public Domain Review: The Bestiarium of Aloys Zötl (1831–1887)

Mèthode: One of the foremost experiments on the 20th century: Stanley Miller and the origins of prebiotic chemistry

TrowelBlazers: Zelia Nutall La Reina de Arqueologiá

Zelia Nuttall Image by kind permission of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley CA.

Zelia Nuttall Image by kind permission of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley CA.

The Public Domain Review: The Embalming Jars of Frederik Ruysch

Understanding Race: Science 168s–1800s: Early Classifications of Nature

TrowelBlazers: Mary Ann Woodhouse Mantell

AMNH: How Hot is Hot? Chile Pepper in Our Global Kitchen

Atomic Surgery: The Life of Louis Agassiz (Real Life Comics, #30)

Joides Resolution: Happy Birthday Andrija Mohorovicic!

Naturally Curious: / Million Wonders: How natural history museums help people and nature flourish in the North West

Slate: The Vault: A Victorian Argument That Snow is Holy, Illustrated by a Beautiful Catalog of Flakes

Letters from Gondwana: The Geological Observations of Robert Hooke

Hooke’s drawing of fossil bivalves, brachiopods, belemnites, shark teeth and possibly a reptilian tooth (Copyright © The Royal Society)

Hooke’s drawing of fossil bivalves, brachiopods, belemnites, shark teeth and possibly a reptilian tooth (Copyright © The Royal Society)

Sinc: La ciencia es notica: The five bird species that Darwin couldn’t discover in Medeira and the Azores

Scripturient: The Flat Earthers Respawn

CHEMISTRY:

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Going to Pieces: A Detective Story

Muslim Heritage: From Alchemy to Chemistry

Front cover of Dix traités d'alchimie de Jâbir ibn Hayyân - Les dix premiers Traités du Livre des Soixante-dix (French translation by Pierre Lory). (Paris, 1983).

Front cover of Dix traités d’alchimie de Jâbir ibn Hayyân – Les dix premiers Traités du Livre des Soixante-dix (French translation by Pierre Lory). (Paris, 1983).

Scroll.in: How the romance between an Aligarh Muslim and a Lithuanian Jew has shaped an Indian pharma major

CHF: George Hitchings and Gertrude Elion

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

vistorica: Mathematics, science, engineering, 1500–1600 European

BBC News: Cash to preserve and digitise historical documents

The Public Domain Review: Japanese Prints of Western Inventors, Artists and Scholars

The Englishman Arkwright wanted to make a spinning-frame. It took him such a long time that he became very poor and so his wife got mad and broke his machine. Angry at her, he sent her away. But even after all this, he succeeded and became extremely rich.

The Englishman Arkwright wanted to make a spinning-frame. It took him such a long time that he became very poor and so his wife got mad and broke his machine. Angry at her, he sent her away. But even after all this, he succeeded and became extremely rich.

Wynken de Worde: what those libraries were in The Toast

Science, Spies, and History: Job Market Stats for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The Hindu: Scientific Histories

Melissa Terras: A Few Words for Professor Lisa Jardine

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The Arts Newspaper: The Buck Stopped Here: a grand send-off for the polymath powerhouse Prof Lisa Jardine

Avoiding the Bears: Multum in Parvo (said the cupcake toppers)

Cornell College: News Center: Alumna pursuing history career in collections

Londonist: London’s Entire History To Be Mapped By New Project

The H-Word: Flat-Earthers aren’t the only ones getting things wrong

Readex: Early American Newspapers, 1690–1922: By Series

Catholic Herald: Meet five Catholic heroes of science

SocPhilSciPract: January HPS&ST Note

Feministing: New Website Aims to Transform the Philosophy Canon by Highlighting Women

The Guardian: ‘People think curating just means choosing nice things’ – secrets of the museum curators

Darin Hayton: The Use and Abuse of Kuhn’s “Paradigm Shift”

ESOTERIC:

BOOK REVIEWS:

facebook: History Physics: Volume 1 of Tyndall project reviewed

THE: The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains, by Thomas W. Laqueur

Conciatore: CONCIATORE Book Excerpt

CONCIATORE, The Life and Times of 17th Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri, By Paul Engle

CONCIATORE, The Life and Times of 17th
Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri, By Paul Engle

The Guardian: Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs by Lisa Randall – when will anther asteroid wreak havoc on Earth?

Chemistry World: The birth of he pill – how four pioneers reinvented sex and launched a revolution

Science Book a Day: The Composition of Kepler’s Astronomia nova

Rhapsody in Books Weblog: Review of The Invention of Science by David Wootton

Science Book a Day: Empires of Food: Feast, Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilisations

Providence Journal: The genius of astronomer Johannes Kepler

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: The Antivaccine Heresy

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ART & EXHIBITIONS

Etcetera: Inside the lost library of John Dee, a Tudor wizard

Smithsonian.com: A Painting of John Dee, Astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I, Contains a Hidden Ring of Skulls

The Guardian: John Dee painting originally had circle of human skulls, x-ray imaging reveals

History Extra: In pictures: John Dee, the ‘Elizabethan 007’

streetsofsalem: John Dee, Renaissance Man

Culture 24: New John Dee discovery reveals resemblance to mother and a mysterious ‘dwarf’

The Spectator: John Dee though he could talk to angels using medieval computer technology

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise: Galileo exhibit to feature books, art at OU art museum

OU Lynx: Plan Your Visit

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

151223-ul-600th_0

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Historiens de la santé: Sang sens : observations médicales, interprétations fluides Exposition Bibliothèque Osler d’histoire de la médecine Le vernissage, qui aura lieu le 27 janvier

NewsOK: Galileo magnifico: University of Oklahoma continues yearlong ‘Galileo’s World’ project with exhibit ‘An Artful Observation of the Cosmos’

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The Telegraph: The best art exhibitions of 2016 (some #histSTM connections!)

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Last Chance: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Henry Walter Bates Until 26 February:

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Daily Motion: Life Story: The race for the Double Helix [1/2]

Daily Motion: Life Story: The race for the Double Helix [2/2]

The Denver Post: “Vera Rubin” performance a collaboration of the BETC and Fiske Planetarium

Vera Rubin measuring spectra, c. 1970

Vera Rubin measuring spectra, c. 1970

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

New Diorama Theatre: Reptember Reloaded 10 January–1 February 2016

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

EVENTS:

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

Descartes event

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Cardiff University: Lecture: Framing the Face: A History of Facial Hair, 1700–1900 20 January 2016

University of York: Lecture: Not Everyone Can Be A Gandhi: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post-WWII Era 3 March 2016

NCSE: Darwin Day Approaches

University of Leeds Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Lecture: Object 1. Horse and Rider 26 January 2016

London PUS Seminar: Celebrity Science – How Does Ancient DNA Research Inform Science Communication? 27 January 2016

University of Kent: Trial by water, or, seafarers’ perspectives on the quest for longitude, 1700–1830 27 January 2016

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Edge of Disaster – Vaccines and Epidemics 21 January 2016

UCL: Lecture: Henry Nicholls: The Galapagos. A Natural History 27 January 2016

The Washington Post: These are the most exciting museum happenings in 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

Shackelton Event

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Dr William Gilbert (1544-1603) showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court, 19th century (oil on canvas)

Dr William Gilbert (1544-1603) showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court, 19th century (oil on canvas)

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Simon Singh on Tudor code breaking and John Dee

Open Culture: Prize-Winning Animation Lets You Fly Through 17th Century London

London Live: John Dee exhibit opens at Royal College of Physicians

Niche: Clearing the Plains and Clearing the Air: Environmental History and National Memory

PBS Newshour: Author explores life on the expanding autism spectrum

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician the lost library of John Dee at the Royal College of Physicians

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: A constellation for John Dee by Jeremy Millar, 2016

Rune Soup: John Dee: Scholar, Courtier, Magician

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: The Meteorite and the Hidden Hoax

BBC Radio 4: An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin

PODCASTS:

Ben Franklin’s World: Bonus: Why Historians Study History

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Upcoming History of Medicine Events

University of Leeds: Workshop on Interwar Telecommunications History 29 January 2016

UCL: ERC Project Calendars in Antiquity and the Middle Ages Workshop 7: Al-Biruni and his world 15 February 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurs in Berlin. Perspectives on the Berliner Brachiosaurus brancai, 1906˗2015 10–11 March 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: CfP: Working on Things: On the Social, Political, and Economic History of Collected Objects 21–22 November 2016

University of Bristol: CfP: Philosophy of Biology in UK: 8–9 June 2016

Conference Centre Kaap Doorn, near to Utrecht: Philosophy of Science in a Forest 19–21 May 2016

Marsh’s Library: CfP: Newspapers and Periodicals in Britain & Ireland, 1641–1800

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Research in Progress 2016 Queen’s College Oxford 27 February

British Society for the History of Mathematics: History of Mathematics in Education: An Anglo-Danish collaboration Bath Spa University 21–24 August 2016

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Mathematics in the Enlightenment Rewley House Oxford 25 June 2016

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Celebrating the History of Women in Mathematics at Manchester: Manchester University 9 March 2016

University of Cumbria: CfP: The World of Outdoors 24 June 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: Book Prize

Birkbeck University of London: ‘Fluid Physicalities’ speaker programme 2016

European Society for Astronomy in Culture (SEAC): 24th SEAC Conference Bath 12–16 September 2016

The Royal Society: Call for Nominations: Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Prize

University of Nottingham: CfP: Medieval Midlands Postgraduate Conference 13 April 2016

New York University: Conference: Experimental Philosophy Through History 20 February 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2016
Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts 7–10 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin: Postdoctoral Fellowship

University of Westminster: Professor of Modern History of Science and Innovation

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: Collections Scholarships

Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin: Post-Doc Fellow, Archaeology Collection Research

CHoM News: 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

University of London: Alan Pearsall Postdoctoral Fellowship in Naval and Maritime History

Wellcome Library: Wikimedian in Residence at the Wellcome Library

Museum of Health Care: Margaret Angus Research Fellowship

 

 

 

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