Whewell’s Gazette: year 2, Vol. #23

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #23

Monday 21 December 2015

EDITORIAL:

Christmas is coming and the goose is getting fat and here is a fat edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you all the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the Internet over the last seven days, to give you something to read whilst you’re trying to digest all of that food you’ve stuffed in over Christmas.

Most of the celebrations at this time of year are actually not connected with the birth of Christ but with the Winter Solstice, which this year is on the 22 December. On this day the sun reaches the southern most point on its yearly journey over the Tropic of Capricorn, turns (the word tropic derives from the Greek topikos meaning ‘of or pertaining to a turn’) and starts its long trek back up to the north bringing first spring and then summer to the northern climes and leaving those in the south their winter.

wintersolstice

Solstice is a more better day to celebrate than 25 December or 1 January being a natural end and beginning to the annual solar cycle, so all of the owls here at Whewell’s Gazette wish all of our readers all the best for the holiday season and look forward to greeting you again after this years Christmas weekend.

Owl

MHS Oxford Advent Calendar

Day 14: Marble Copy of John Dee’s 1582 Holy Table, English, Mid C.17th

Day 15: Gelatine Print of Henry Moseley, Balliol-Trinity Labs, Oxford,1910

Day 16: Exploding Horizontal Cannon Dial, English?, c.1900

Day 17: Astrolabe, by Muhammad Muqim, Lahore, 1641/2

imu-media.php

Day 18: Instruction Booklet For Aircraft Wireless Telephone Transmitter

Day 19: Armillary Orrery, by Richard Glynne, London, c. 1710-30

Day 20: “Chemical Magic” Chemistry Set, by F. Kingsley, London, c. 1920

Culham Research Group: Advent Calendar

Day 14: the Olive

Day 15: Mahleb

Day 16: Straw or Hay, which will make Dr M’s day?

Loose stacked hay built around a central pole, Romania

Loose stacked hay built around a central pole, Romania

Day 17: Sgan t’sek

Day 18: The Tangerine – Just Like a Virgin

Day 19: Popcorn tree decorations

Day 20: Sugar

Quotes of the week:

Merry X-mas

“We all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible player”. – Albert Einstein h/t @phalpern

“To fathom hell or soar angelic

Just take a pinch of psychedelic.” – Adam Lagerqvist (@adamlagerqvist)

Banker

This is my favorite Hindi curse: “Why are boring me with all this useless narrative?” – Gabriel Finkelstein (@gabridli)

“We become what we pay attention to, so we must be careful what we pay attention to.” – Kurt Vonngut

Kim Robinson

Joseph Stalin and Keith Richards

were born on Dec. 18th.

Can you guess which one

was born 137yrs ago? – @Marcywords2

Planck quote

Men: Not ALL men.

Men to their daughters: Yes, all men. Every single one of them. – @ChiefElk

Birthday of the Week:

 Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, Marquise du Châtelet born 17 December 1706

Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, marquise du Châtelet  Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, marquise du Châtelet
Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A feminist Newtonian

Yovisto: A great man whose only fault was being a woman – Émilie du Châtelet

Tycho Brahe Born 14 December 1546

Tycho Brahe (1596) Artist unknown Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tycho Brahe (1596) Artist unknown
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 The Renaissance Mathematicus: Financing Tycho’s little piece of heaven

Yovisto: Tycho Brahe – The Man with the Golden Nose

Bildgeist: Tycho Brahe, Astronomical Instruments (1598)

The Royal Library: Astronomiæ instauratæ mechanica

esa: space for europe: 14 December

British Museum: Effigies Tychonis Brahe

Star Child: Tycho Brahe

BibliOdyssey: Tycho Mechanica

Humphy Davy born 17 December 1778

Sir Humphry Davy, Bt by Thomas Phillips Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sir Humphry Davy, Bt
by Thomas Phillips
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Science and Celebrity: Humphry Davy’s Rising

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: The Invention of the Davy Lamp

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

JJ Tho

Yovisto: Max Planck and the Quantum Theory

History Extra: Life of the Week: Albert Einstein

Muslim Heritage: The Armillary Sphere: A Concentration of Knowledge in Islamic Astronomy

AIP: N. G. Basov

Yovisto: Nikolay Basov and the Development of the Maser and Laser

Museum Victoria Collections: Great Melbourne Telescope

Erection of Great Melbourne Telescope, 1869 Source: Museum Victoria This image is: Public Domain

Erection of Great Melbourne Telescope, 1869
Source: Museum Victoria
This image is: Public Domain

3 Quarks Daily: Maxwell and the Mathematics of Metaphor

Atlas Obscura: Leiden Observatory

Leaping Robot: Astronomers and the Art of Reconciliation

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Carl Higby’s Interview

Somnuium Project: Project the First Interactive Rudolphine (Under Construction)

The Saturday Evening Post: “Imagination Is More Important than Knowledge”

AHF: Nuclear Reactors

Living in the Chinese Cosmos: The Chinese Cosmos: Basic Concepts

The Yinyang Symbol Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate, from the Compendium of Diagrams (detail), 1623 Zhang Huang (1527-1608)

The Yinyang Symbol
Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate, from the Compendium of Diagrams (detail), 1623
Zhang Huang (1527-1608)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Franklin Mattias’s Interview

collections.ucolick.org: The Lick Observatory: Historical Collections

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Mensis or menstruation?

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Communications Satellite, SCORE

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The greatest villain in the history of science?

Andreas Ostinater by Georg Pencz Source: Wikimedia Commons

Andreas Ostinater by Georg Pencz
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alex Wellerstein: The Secrets Patents for the Atomic Bomb

AIP: David Bohm

AHF: Espionage

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Yovisto: Amundsen’s South Pole Expedition

Library of Congress: Putting Boston on the Map: Land Reclamation and the Growth of a City

Atlas Obscura: Maps of the World’s Most Cursed Destinations

Nuuk Marluk: Inuit Cartography

In English, the caption reads: "Kuniit's three wooden (tree) maps show the journey from Sermiligaaq to Kangertittivatsiaq. Map to the right shows the islands along the coast, while the map in the middle shows the mainland and is read from one side of the block around to the other. Map to the left shows the peninsula between the fjords Sermiligaaq and Kangertivartikajik." From "Topografisk Atlas Grønland", published by Det Kongeglige Danske Geografiske Selskab, 2000 (pg 171).

In English, the caption reads: “Kuniit’s three wooden (tree) maps show the journey from Sermiligaaq to Kangertittivatsiaq. Map to the right shows the islands along the coast, while the map in the middle shows the mainland and is read from one side of the block around to the other. Map to the left shows the peninsula between the fjords Sermiligaaq and Kangertivartikajik.” From “Topografisk Atlas Grønland”, published by Det Kongeglige Danske Geografiske Selskab, 2000 (pg 171).

Atlas Obscura: The Hidden Bolts That Drive Manhattan’s Infrastructure Nerds Nuts

Atlas Obscura: How the World Looked When Jesus was Born According to Roman Geographers

The Tablet: The Priest who Mapped the World

Haaretz: Old Maps of Jerusalem Combine the Sacred With the Realistic

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: There was an old woman who swallowed a fork…

The Kansas City Star: Kansas City’s nuclear legacy trails weapon makers and their families

Fugitive Leaves: Letting Fall Grains of Sand or Pins into a Glass: Finding the Poetry of René Laennec at the Historical Medical Library

The Champlain Society: Performing Blindness: A Postcard of the Taylor Concert Company, c1910, and the Canadian History of Disability

Taylor-Concert-Co-postcard-scan

Med. Hist: Digitisation, Big Data, and the Future of the Medical Humanities

Yovisto: Niels Ryberg Finsen and the Phototherapy

The Recipes Project: Van Helmont on the Plague Again!

Thomas Morris: A beetle in the bladder

Wellcome Library Blog: A gift for Disability History Month

Thomas Morris: Death by Christmas dinner

History of Medicine in Ireland: Medical Practitioners in Early Modern Irish Wills

Res Obscura: The Alchemy of Madness: Understanding a Seventeenth-Century “Brain Scan”

"Le Médecin guérissant Phantasie," Mattheus Greuter, 1620 (Bibliothèque nationale de France).

“Le Médecin guérissant Phantasie,” Mattheus Greuter, 1620 (Bibliothèque nationale de France).

Irish Philosophy: Frozen in Time the Edward Worth Library

The Guardian: Britain’s teeth aren’t that bad – but what do you know of their rotten history?

Atlas Obscura: Peek Inside the Grisly, Salacious Case Files of NYC’S Head Coroner in the Early 1900s

Emory News Center: Vaccines in U.S. have complex history, says Emory expert

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Hans von Ohain and the Jet Engine

Los Angeles Times: Weekend: Looking at aerospace’s place in history

Conciatore: Glass Beads

Six-layer glass chevron trade beads (photo attr. unknown)

Six-layer glass chevron trade beads
(photo attr. unknown)

Conciatore: Roasting the Frit

Conciatore: Neri the Scholar

Historic England: Navel and Maritime Military Heritage

Medievalists.net: Food and technology – Cooking utensils and food processing in medieval Norway

Wired: The Secret History of World War II-Era Drones

Yovisto: The Wright Brothers Invented the Aviation Age

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: 1903 Wright Flyer

http___airandspace.si.edu_webimages_collections_full_A19610048000CP15.jpg

Ptak Science Books: The Horizontal Section of the Deep Dark (1887)

Smithsonian.com: Did John Deere’s Best Invention Spark a Revolution or an Environmental Disaster?

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Edwin H. Armstrong

columbia.edu: History of Science, Mathematics, Technology, #171

264

Attack: The World’s Most Desirable (and Valuable) Electronic Music Gear

Ptak Science Books: Blowing Up Hell(gate), 1876

distillatio: Using Oak Galls to dye wool

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Geologists

Yovisto: Sir William Hamilton and the Volcanoes

rs21: A homosexual Christmas in 1905 Berlin

Slate Vault: Poe’s Only Bestseller as a Living Author Was This Schoolbook About Seashells

conchologistsfir00poeed_0007

A Lance Eye View: Alfred Russel Wallace

Yovisto: Margaret Mead and Modern Anthropology

Yovisto: Alexander Ross Clarke and the true Shape of the Earth

The New York Times: Evelyn Witkin and the Road to DNA Enlightenment

Imperial Weather: New Paper: meteorology as an imperial science

Forbes: How Creationism Has Evolved Since The Dover Trial

Public Domain Review: The Snowflake Man of Vermont

Bentley Snowflake

Bentley Snowflake

The New Yorker: Humboldt’s Gift

Heavenfield: The Bavarians from the Ground Up

umich.edu: Obituary: Jack McIntosh

Biodiversity Library: BHL Isn’t Just for Biologists

ars technica: Scientific Method/Science & Exploration: An evolutionary analysis of anti-evolution legislation

BioLogos: The First Major Evolution Controversy in America

CHEMISTRY:

Yorkshire Evening Post: Leeds scientists who discovered the atomic world to be honoured 100years after 1915 discovery

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Harold Urey’s Interview

CHF: Harold C. Urey: Science, Religion, and Cold War Chemistry

After helping create the atom bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, Harold Urey focused on uncovering the age and origins of Earth and the solar system. In this 1951 photo Urey inspects a 'fossilized thermometer' of belemnite (a prehistoric squid-shaped creature). Urey used information from these fossils to estimate the temperature of oceans from as far back as 100 million years. (USC Digital Library)

After helping create the atom bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, Harold Urey focused on uncovering the age and origins of Earth and the solar system. In this 1951 photo Urey inspects a ‘fossilized thermometer’ of belemnite (a prehistoric squid-shaped creature). Urey used information from these fossils to estimate the temperature of oceans from as far back as 100 million years. (USC Digital Library)

Research Gate: The discovery of the periodic table as a case of simultaneous discovery

newser: A Sophomoric Prank Lurks on the Periodic Table

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Not-So-Great Moments in Chemical Safety

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ether Wave Propaganda: Against Methodology by Cryptic Aphorism

Nautilus: Living in the Long: Art & Engineering Peers Into Our Future

University of Zurich: Corpus Corporum

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys and the Royal Society

Lady Science: Issue 15: Gender in the Mid-Century Kitchen

JHI Blog: Thinking About Knowledge in Motion and Social Engagement at HSS

Sandwalk: Did Michael Behe say that astrology was scientific in Kitzmiller v. Dover?

Ptak Science Books: Table of the Compass of Voices and Instruments (1814)

HuffPost Science: Blog: What Science Is – and How and Why It Works

Histoire, médicine et santé n° 7: New Issue

Commission for the History and Philosophy of Computing: Special Issue HPL on History and Philosophy of Computing Contents

Museums Association: Report finds lack of diversity in curators at Major Partner Museums

h-madness: Obituary: Gerald N. Grob (1931–2015)

635858802429544084-grobcr

Recipes Project: Searching for Recipes: A Glimpse of Early Modern Upper Class Life

Warburg Institute News: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize 2016 awarded to Professor Dr Dag Nikolaus Hasse, an Alumnus of the Warburg Institute

The Ordered Universe Project: Generating sounds: help us write our next paper!

OUP Blog: Eric Scerri: A new philosophy of science

The #EnvHist Weekly

Inside MHS Oxford: Christmas has come early for MHS!

homunculus: Talking about talking about history

December HPS&ST Note: is on the web

Capitalism’s Cradle: AI and the Problem of Ideology

The Ordered Universe Project: Unity in Diversity

Medievalists.net: The Medieval Magazine: The Top 50 Medieval Books of 2015 (Issue 46)

The Public Domain Review: Japanese Prints of Western Inventors, Artists and Scholars

The Englishman Watt wanted to make a steam engine. He spent so much time on it that he upset his aunt. Finally, however, he was successful.

The Englishman Watt wanted to make a steam engine. He spent so much time on it that he upset his aunt. Finally, however, he was successful.

ESOTERIC:

Correspondence: Volume 3 (2015) Contents

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The Secrets of Alchemy

Detail from The Alchemist. Francois-Marius Granet, 19th century. (Gift of Roy Eddleman, CHF Collections/Will Brown)

Detail from The Alchemist. Francois-Marius Granet, 19th century. (Gift of Roy Eddleman, CHF Collections/Will Brown)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Remaking the John: The Invention and Reinvention of the Toilet

idées.fr: Cette médicine qu’on dit « parallèle »

Nature: the view from the bridge: The top 20: a year of reading immersively

Science Book a Day: Life on a Young Planet: The First Three Billion Years of Evolution on Earth

Some Beans: The Invention of Nature by Andrea Wolf

Symmetry: Physics books of 2015

Science Book a Day: The Triumph of Seeds: How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses, and Pips Conquered the Plant Kingdom and Shaped Human History

triumph-of-seeds

Cambridge News: Cambridge historian Ruth Scurr on her Costa Awards-shortlisted book, John Aubrey: My Own Life

Brain Pickings: Buckminster Fuller’s Manifesto for the Genius of Generalities

idées.fr: Le corps de la science

Diebedra.de Prof Alan Turing decoded

Science Book a Day: Inventions That Could Have Changed the World… But Didn’t!

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Contagious Communities: Medicine, Migration, and the NHS in Post War Britain

OUP: The History of Chemistry: A Very Short Introduction

OUP: Essays in the Philosophy of Chemistry

Amazon: Science and Empire: Knowledge and Networks of Science across the British Empire, 1800–1970

MIT Press: Anachronic Renaissance

Historiens de la santé: Révélations: Iconographie de la Salpêtrière. Paris, 1875–1918

Amberley Publishing: Historical Falconry

516RvKSmyRL._SX346_BO1,204,203,200_

Palgrave: Why We Need the Humanities

University of Chicago Press: Life Atomic: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Oxford Thinking: ‘Dear Harry…’ An exhibition of a scientist lost to war

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

ICE: ICE Christmas Exhibition Past, Present and Future 4–18 December 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

ImageHandler.ashx

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

bauer-exhibition-birds

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

EVENTS:

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

11th Cambridge Wellcome Lecture in the History of Medicine: Michael Stolberg: Curing Diseases and Exchanging Knowledge: Sixteenth-Century Physicians and Their Female Patients 14 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Event ad

Royal Astronomical Society: RAS Public Lecture: 100th Anniversary of the election of Women to the RAS Fellowship 12 January 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

Royal Institution: Christmas Lecture 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Louis Pasteur (1885), by A. Edelfeldt

Louis Pasteur (1885), by A. Edelfeldt

TELEVISION:

io9: The Inside Story of Manhattan, the Best TY Show You Haven’t Been Watching

inpiwlyvtcjaq2yolvf2

National Trust for Historical Preservation: Trinity Test, Gadget, Spies: What’s True in Season 2 of Manhattan?

Je Suis, Ergo Sum: Gone fission: WGN’s Manhattan brings something new into the world

SLIDE SHOW:

Scientific American: Aviation in 1913: Images from Scientific American’s Archives [Slide Show]

VIDEOS:

Youtube: God, Science and Atheism

Youtube: Globus Weigla

Youtube: Steps to Flourishing Sessions 3: Anton Howes present his thesis

Youtube: Fighting Firedamp – The Lamp that Saved 1,000 Lives

 

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

npr: ‘Map’ Is An Exquisite Record of the Miles – And The Millennia

9780714869445_custom-31db5d6691d3420fa55b89a2bc27bf63b4f0de8d-s400-c85

Virginia Campbell MD: Matthew Cobb on “Life’s Great Secret”

Science Friday: Do Scientists Have the Duty to Speak Out?

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Durham: Workshop: The Graphic Evidence of Childhood, 1760–1914 15 April 2016 (N.B several #histsci papers)

German Historical Institute Paris: CfP: Masculinity(/ies) – Femininity(/ies) in the Middle Ages 2–3 March 2016

Notches Blog: Call for Submissions: The History of Venereal Disease Deadline 15 January 2016

University of Vienna: CfP: Claiming authority, producing standards: The IAEA and the history of radiation protection

Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ: CfP: Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice (SPSP) Sixth Conference 17–19 June 2016

Joint conference of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) and European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST). CfP: What is a Problem? Problematic Ecologies, Methodologies and Ontologies in Techno-science and Beyond Barcelona 31 August–3 September 2016

Institute of Historical Research: University of London: CfP: International Postgraduate Port and Maritime History Conference 14–15 April 2016

University of Shanghai: CfP: International Health Organizations (IHOs): People, politics and practices in historical perspective 21–24 April 2016

University of Bucharest: Institute of Research in the Humanities: An Interdisciplinary Master class on the Nature and Status of Principles in Western Thought 15–18 March 2016

Barts Pathology Museum and the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, London: Call for participation: Corpses, Cadavers and Catalogues: The Mobilities of Dead Bodies and Body Parts, Past and Present 17–18 May 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Summer Research Fellowships: History of Women in Medicine

University of Twente: Two Assistant Professors Philosophy of Science

Pembroke College Cambridge: Abdullah Al-Mubarak Research Fellowship in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

QMUL: Three new Wellcome funded PhD Studentships in History of Emotions

University of Cambridge: UL in Philosophy of Life Sciences

University of Cambridge: UL in Science, Technology, and Medicine before 1800

University of Southern California: One Year Mellon Sawyer Postdoctoral Fellowship Visual History: The Past in Images

University of Notre Dame: Two Postdoctoral Fellowships in History and/or Philosophy of Science

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarships

Brunel University London: The Leverhulme Trust – Early Careers Fellowships

UCL: CELL: Research Assistant

BSHS: Part-time BSHS Intern

CHF: Fellowships

ChoM News: 2016–17 Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

LMU Munich: 10 Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #22

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #22

Monday 14 December 2015

EDITORIAL:

Running awfully late here is the latest edition of the weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all the fascinating posts, articles and other offerings in the histories of science, technology and medicine that our legions of Internet elves could find in the second week of advent.

In any given week the balance of the number of posts in the various rubrics in our humble Gazette varies, with sometimes Physics, Astronomy and Space Science dominating, as this week, or on other occasions the Earth Sciences or Technology having the most entries. However over time I have noticed that there are always relatively few posts on the history of chemistry. I don’t know whether this is due to a paucity of history of chemistry material on the web or whether I am just not catching enough of what is out there.

If you post on the history of chemistry or know somebody who does and the posts are failing to appear here on Whewell’s Gazette then please draw attention to this deficit in some way. Join Twitter and tip me off so that I follow you or send me an email with a list of your posts and links. I would like to see more history of chemistry here at the Gazette so make it your #histSTM charitable act for Christmas to draw my attention to all those post that I sure I’m missing.

MHS Oxford Advent Calendar

Day 7: Paper Astrolabe, by Johann Krabbe, German, 1583

Day 8: Diptych Dial, by Thomas Tucher, Nuremberg, c. 1620

Day 9: Mural Quadrant, by John Bird, London, 1773

Day 10: Parts of Difference Engine, by Charles Babbage, c. 1822-30

Day 11: Crescent Moon Amulet, Southern Italian

imu-media.php

Day 12: Astrolabe Quadrant, by Giovanni Antonio Magini, Italy, Late 16th Century

Day 13: Radio Valve R5V, by Marconi Osram Valve Co., London, c. 1923

Culham Research Group: Advent Calendar

Day 7: Saffron: A light in the darkness

Day 8: Wassailing

Day 9: Reindeer Moss

Looking festive and tasty! Cladonia rangiferina has been collected and vouchered in California only twice, in 1999 by Ronald and Judith Robertson, and in 1975 in Del Norte Co., in the Smith River canyon. The Robertsons collected Cladonia rangiferina once in Humboldt County in the remnant forest of Lanphere Dunes, a US Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Looking festive and tasty! Cladonia rangiferina has been collected and vouchered in California only twice, in 1999 by Ronald and Judith Robertson, and in 1975 in Del Norte Co., in the Smith River canyon. The Robertsons collected Cladonia rangiferina once in Humboldt County in the remnant forest of Lanphere Dunes, a US Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Day 10: Rice Pudding

Day 11: Sweet Chestnuts

Day 12: Anyone can grow paperwhites but their taxonomy is a different story

Day 13: Putting Christmas on the Map

Quotes of the week:

mathematician quote

“Digital information lasts forever or five years. Whichever comes first”. – RAND researcher Jeff Rothenberg h/t @johannaberg

“Anthropologists stand in the position of molecules of paint on a picture’s surface, striving to catch the artist’s design”—Pitt-Rivers h/t @ProfDanHicks

“For people writing about the topic—”interment” means burial. “Internment” means detaining a group of people”. – Laura (@ophiliacat)

Absent minded prof

“Parts of London are so radicalised that most of the atoms and molecules there have unpaired valency electrons”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“The “Asian Values” trope as Orientalism appropriated by the Orientals”. – @struthious

“If I’m descended from my parents, why do I still have cousins?” Owain Griffiths (@OwainGriffiths)

Hoyle quote

“The essence of genius is to know what to overlook”. – William James

Study shows a result you like: “see, I base my views on science!”

 

Study shows a result you dislike: “I’ve got issues with their methodology” – Existential Comics (@existentialcomics)

Alice Quote

Birthdays of the Week:

 Grace Hopper born 10 December 1908

 Grace Murray Hopper at the UNIVAC keyboard, c. 1960. Credit: Unknown (Smithsonian Institution)


Grace Murray Hopper at the UNIVAC keyboard, c. 1960.
Credit: Unknown (Smithsonian Institution)

Yovisto: Grace Hopper and the Programming Languages

Annie Jump Cannon born 11 December 1863

tumblr_nz5gyjSngl1ry3nado1_500

Yovisto: Annie Jump Cannon and the Catalogue of Stars

sdsc.edu: Annie Jump Cannon Theorist of Star Spectra

Smithsonian Institute Archives: Annie Jump Cannon (1863–1941)

Linda Hall Library: Annie Jump Cannon

Gemma Frisius was born 9 December 1508

Gemma Frisius, Holzschnitt (17. Jh.) von Esme de Boulonois Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gemma Frisius, Holzschnitt (17. Jh.) von Esme de Boulonois
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: The Most Accurate Instruments of Gemma Frisius

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Mapping the history of triangulation

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

 

Renowned quantum physicist Niels Bohr with acclaimed jazz trumpeter, composer and singer Louis Armstrong h/t Paul Halpern Source: Unknown

Renowned quantum physicist Niels Bohr with acclaimed jazz trumpeter, composer and singer Louis Armstrong h/t Paul Halpern
Source: Unknown

Yovisto: Arnold Sommerfeld and the Quantum Theory

Yovisto: Omar Khayyam – Mathematics and Poetry

Popular Science: A Brief History of Space Stations Before the ISS

arXiv.org: Early Telescopes and Ancient Scientific Instruments in the Paintings of Jan Brueghel the Elder (pdf)

Ptak Science Books: Found Poetry in the Sciences (1610 and 1698)

Sue Kientz: Spacecraft Galileo at Jupiter

Ipi.usra.edu: Probe Mission Successful

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Walter Goodman’s Interview

arXiv.org: A brief history of the multiverse (pdf)

BBC: Future: Eight objects that define the Soviet space race

Titov's movie camera

Titov’s movie camera

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The story behind the IAEA’s atomic logo

March to the Moon: Gemini VII

Berliner Zeitung: Albert Einstein war in Berlin nur relative glücklich

World Socialist Web Site: 100 years of General Relativity – Part One

World Socialist Web Site: 100 years of General Relativity – Part Two

World Socialist Web Site: 100 years of General Relativity – Part Three

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Philip Abelson’s Interview (2002)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Aristotle Killer of Science!

Atlas Obscura: Vintage Images of Canine Cosmonauts from the USSR

A matchbox label from 1959, showing a space dog flying to the Moon. (Photo: © FUEL Publishing/Marianne Van den Lemmer)

A matchbox label from 1959, showing a space dog flying to the Moon. (Photo: © FUEL Publishing/Marianne Van den Lemmer)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Leona Marshall Libby’s Interview

AHF: Leo James Rainwater

The Conversation: The life-changing love of one of the 20th century’s greatest physicists

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Theodore Rockwell’s Interview

Yovisto: The Last Men on the Moon…so far

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Gabriel Bohnee’s Interview

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The curious death of Oppenheimer’s mistress

Astronomy Now: Astronomers recall discovery of Phaethon – source of the Geminid meteors

AHF: Rotblat Account

CHF: Laws of Attraction

Open Mind: Kepler, the Father of Science Fiction

Tech Times: Black History Month: & Ways Albert Einstein Supported the Civil Rights Movement

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: Digitisation of the Klencke Atlas

Swann Auction Galleries: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books, Featuring the Mapping of America

The American Military Pocket Atlas

The American Military Pocket Atlas

Peter S. Clarke: A Christmas Santa Map

Slate Vault: An Early-20th-Century British Map of the Global Drug Trade

Ptak Science Books: Bombing Britain, 1940 – a View of the Battle of Britain from Germany

The Bodleian’s Map Room Blog: Ships

IMG_0214-300x225

Giornalè Nuovo: A Map of Schlaraffenland

Stanford University Library: Adventures in oversized imaging: digitizing the Ōmi Kuni-ezu 近江國絵圖 Japanese Tax Map from 1837

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: The man with the rubber jaw

The Conversation: Remind me again, what is thalidomide and how did it cause so much harm?

O Can You See?: Combating infectious disease and slaying the rubella dragon, 1969–1972

Atlas Obscura: Maps of 19th-Century New York’s Worst Nuisances

A "Sanitary and Social Chart" of New York's 4th Ward. (Photo: Courtesy the New York Academy of Medicine)

A “Sanitary and Social Chart” of New York’s 4th Ward. (Photo: Courtesy the New York Academy of Medicine)

BBC News: Cookbook features recipes to cure the plague

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘In a most handsome and thriving condition’: Samuel Pepys’s Health

Thomas Morris: A bad use for good wine

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: A Doctor’s View of Industrial Manchester

Nursing Clio: Baby Parts for Sale – Old Tropes Revisited

Circulating Now: A Portrait of the Medical World of 1911

Silas Weir Mitchell

Silas Weir Mitchell

Thomas Morris: All hail the strawberry

Yovisto: Robert Koch and Tuberculosis

Thomas Morris: Somewhat silly in his manner

TECHNOLOGY:

Brown: Steward Delaney’s New Clock

Verso: Look>>A Historiscope

Forbes: This Week in Tech History: The Mother of All Demos

BBC News: Volunteers aid pioneering Edsac computer rebuild

Each of the 140 chassis that form Edsac takes upwards of 20 hours to build and test

Each of the 140 chassis that form Edsac takes upwards of 20 hours to build and test

The National Museum of Computing: Edshack: a workshop time capsule

Atlas Obscura: Soviet Scenesters Used X-Rays to Record Their Rock and Roll

Yovisto: Maria Telkes and the Power of the Sun

Yovisto: Guglielmo Marconi and his Magic Machine

Yovisto: My Hovercraft is full of Eels

MAA100: Mathematical Treasures: Early Calculating Machines

Leibnitzrechenmaschine

Leibnitzrechenmaschine

Ptak Science Books: A World Map of Heavy (1922)

A Wireless World: The origins of radio

Ptak Science Books: Balloons I Know But Do Not Love – Death From Above, Ads and Bombs

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Sometimes I'm asked what is the difference between a raven and a crow, well here it is. h/t @ravenstonetales

Sometimes I’m asked what is the difference between a raven and a crow, well here it is. h/t @ravenstonetales

Letters from Gondwana: The Bernissart Dinosaurs

Notches: Coming Oot! A Fabulous Gay History of Scotland

Hyperallergic: How Audubon Pranked a Fellow Naturalist with a Bulletproof Fish

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: The London Baedeker for the Darwin enthusiast

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: An Ottoman response to Darwinism: Ísmail Fennî on Islam and evolution

Atlas Obscura: The Ghost Forest of Christmas Past: How a Fungus Stole Roasted Chestnuts

Naturalis Historia: The Earth on Show: Encountering Lost Worlds Through Fossil Displays

A “Young Mammouth” unearthed by Charles Willson Peale on display at the Philadelphia museum in 1821.

A “Young Mammouth” unearthed by Charles Willson Peale on display at the Philadelphia museum in 1821.

National Geographic: Meet Grandfather Flash, the Pioneer of Wildlife Photography

Gizmodo: These Dogs are Honorary Geologists for their Early Exploration of Alaska

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac and his Work on Gases

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

CHF: True Blue: DuPont and the Color Revolution

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Birkbeck: Early Modern History Website

Public Disability History: New blog

NYAM Library: Discover the Past Inform the Future

PISO_005

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: The ESD in early modern Spain: taking stock

CIA: The Directorate of Science and Technology Historical Series: The Office of Scientific Intelligence, 1949–68

Conciatore: Francesco’s Studiolo

Conciatore: Neri’s Travels

Conciatore: Fall from Grace

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Library of the Royal College of Surgeons

PSA Women: Female-Authors-Only Philosophy of Science

OUP: The Monist: The History of Women’s Ideas Contents

University of Oxford: Research: Ursula Martin

Irish Philosophy: Frozen in Time: the Edward Worth Library

The Edward Worth Library (c) Irish Philosophy (CC BY)

The Edward Worth Library
(c) Irish Philosophy (CC BY)

AEON: What if?

PhilSci Archive: An Archive for Preprints in Philosophy of Science

The New York Times: Amir Aczel, Author of Scientific Cliffhanger, Dies at 65

The Economist: In search of serendipity

Yovisto: Melvil Dewey and the Dewey Decimal System

Scistarter: Purposeful Gaming: Help improve access to historic biodiversity texts!

Age of Revolutions: A HistorioBLOG

Lisa Tenzin-Dolma: Interview with Paul Halpern

Corpus Newtonicum: Isaac Newton moves to Oxford

#EnvHist Weekly

AEON: Why physics needs art to help picture the universe

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CUP: Medical History Vol. 60 Issue 01: Contents

Motherboard: Ada Lovelace and the Impossible Expectations We Have of Women in STEM

Chicago Journals: Osiris Vol. 30, No. 1 Scientific Masculinities Contents

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: How widespread were alchemical books in Britain in Medieval times and who owned them?

The Recipes Project: Temporality in John Dauntesey’s Recipe Book (1652–1683)

The Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Manuscript MSS 2/0070-01 (Signature Page), Photo included with permission.

The Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Manuscript MSS 2/0070-01 (Signature Page), Photo included with permission.

Spacewatchtower: 50th Anniversary: Kecksburg, Pa. “UFO” Incident

The Public Domain Review: Worlds Without End

Detail from a depiction of thought-transference, the man behind dictating the movement of the other, from Magnetismus und Hypnotismus (1895) by Gustav Wilhelm Gessmann

Detail from a depiction of thought-transference, the man behind dictating the movement of the other, from Magnetismus und Hypnotismus (1895) by Gustav Wilhelm Gessmann

BOOK REVIEWS:

Brain Pickings: Alexander von Humboldt and the Invention of Nature: How One of the Last True Polymaths Pioneered the Cosmos of Connections

MedHum Monday Book Review: Riotous Flesh

Popular Science: Kepler and the Universe

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Brain Pickings: The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate That Changed Our Understanding of Time

Sun News Miami: Celestial Cartography

New Statesman: A true scientific revolution: the triumph of mathematicians over philosophers

Reviews in History: To Explain the World: the discovery of Modern Science

Nature: Books in Brief: Tunnel Vision: The Rise and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider, The Hunt for Vulcan…

NEW BOOKS:

Plagrave: Technology, Self-Fashioning and Politeness in Eighteenth-Century Britain

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Paradox of Evolution: The Strange Relationship Between Natural Selection and Reproduction

Amazon: More Passion for Science: Journeys into the Unknown

Wiley: A Companion to Intellectual History

The Dispersal of Darwin: Darwin’s Sciences

1444330357

The University of Chicago Press: Foucault and Beyond

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Story of Life in 25 Fossils

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

ICE: ICE Christmas Exhibition Past, Present and Future 4–18 December 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Muslim Heritage: Allah’s Automata – A Review of the Exhibition

automata02

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

Upcoming: The Old Operating Theatre: Surgeon to the Dead 10-12 & 15-17 December 2015

SpArC Theatre: Opéra National De Paris: La Damnation De Faust 17 December 2015

EVENTS:

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Royal Astronomical Society: RAS Public Lecture: 100th Anniversary of the election of Women to the RAS Fellowship 12 January 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

Event ad

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

Royal Institution: Christmas Lecture 2015

A Forgotten Hero – Now Remembered: Dr John Rae (LRCSEd): Arctic Explorer 

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Dr William Gilberd 1540-1603 showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court by Arthur Ackland Hunt

Dr William Gilberd 1540-1603 showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court by Arthur Ackland Hunt

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Atlas Obscura: 100 Wonders: The Desertron

Centre for Global Health Histories: Youtube Channel

The New York Times: Animated Life: Mary Leakey

RADIO:

BBC World Service: Discovery: Humboldt – the Inventor of Nature

The Guardian: Occam’s Corner: Will Self’s forceful search for the genius behind a scientific giant

BBC Radio 4: Self Drives: Maxwell’s Equations

PODCASTS:

Mosaic: The ingenuity of Gordon Vaughan

Soundcloud: John Aubrey, My Own Life by Ruth Scurr – audio extracts

John Aubrey. Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Aubrey.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

British Museum: CfP: Objectively Speaking 4 April 2016

Graz, Austria; CfP: STS Conference: The Role of Webvideos in Science and Research Communication 9–19 May 2016

UCL: CfP: Science/Technology/Security: Challenges to global governance? 20–21 June 2016

University of Edinburgh: Science, Technology and Innovation Studies Seminar Series, Semester Two 2015-16

Sam Houston State University: CfP: The 8th Annual Medicine and the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference 17–18 March 2016

H/SOZ/KULT: Playing with Materials and Technology. 7th Symposium on Playing with Technology – Part of the 43rd Symposium of the Internationl Committeee for the History of Technology 2016 Porto 26 July–30 July 2016

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin: Workshop: From Knowledge to Profit? Scientific Institutions and the Commercialization of Science 10–12 October 2016

Dresden Summer – International Academy for the Arts: Collecting: 27 August – 03rd September 2016

University of Durham: Workshop: The Graphic Evidence of Childhood, 1760–1914 15 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

British Library: Curator of Medieval Historical Manuscripts 1100–1500

University of Freiburg: Chair for Science and Technology Studies: Wissenschaftliche(r) Mitarbeiterin/Mitarbeiter (Assistant Professor Equivalent)

University of Kent: Centre for the History of Science: Postgrad funding

University of Swansea: Fees Only PhD Studentship: Mapping the Historic Landscape Character of the South Wales Region

Mississippi State University: History of Modern Europe and Science/Technology/and/or Medicine

University of Oxford: Faculty of Theology and Religion: Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship 2016

University of Notre Dame: History and Philosophy of Science Program Two Postdoctoral Positions

MIT: Calling all Science Journalists: Applications for 1016-17 KSJ Fellowships Open January 11

Durham University: Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies: Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships

Trinity College Dublin: Ussher Assistant Professor in Environmental History

Drexel University College of Medicine: Summer Research Fellowship: History of Women in Medicine

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #21

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #21

Monday 07 December 2015

EDITORIAL:

The season of Advent has started and Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list rolls relentlessly towards Christmas carrying with it, as always, a sledge full of the best history of science, technology and medicine that our ever assiduous elves could package up from the far flung corners of the Internet.

Our mailbox received a mysterious missive from one David Haden, which we reproduce below for all of our readers:

Dear Ghost,

 Be it advised that a fellow ghost has spirited together all the spectral

shades who name themselves ‘open access journals’.  Further, that this

fellow ghost has laboured for many years to seal each and every one of these

into a most marvellous spirit-bottle.  Said bottle may be obtained at

http://www.jurn.org/  The manner of uncorking is of the simplest, yet an

adept seeker may then command a performance of the most marvellous gyrations

and revelations.  Be pleased to note that no spirits are caused to be

summoned if they be weighed down in chains, or if they moan for payment, or

are of a false and predatory cast.

 Yours,

 David Haden.

If you follow the link you will be rewarded with a cornucopia of links to gladden the heart of every science fan.

Having no Advent calendar of our own we have stolen borrowed two excellent ones for your delectation. The first is from the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford and the second is from the Reading University Herbarium So get those chestnuts roasting, sit down under a sprig of holly and read your way through the first Advent edition of your favourite #histSTM gazette.

MHS Oxford Advent Calendar

 Day 1: Celestial Table Globe by Johannes Schöner, Nürnberg 1531

imu-media.php

 

Day 2: Cuff-Type Compound Microscope by Dollond, London c. 1761

Day 3: Pocket Horizontal Sundial, by Augustine Ryther, London, 1585

Day 4: Collection of Sterol Chemicals Belonging to Dorothy Hodgkin, c.1934

Day 5: Painting (Oil on Canvas, Framed) of Rudolph II and Tycho Brahe in Prague, by Edouard Ender, 1855

Day 6: Dr James’s Fever Powder Medicine, by R. James, Oxford c. 1770

Culham Research Group: Advent Botany

 Day 1: Balsam Fir – a popular Christmas tree in Canada

Day 2: Yule Log – a carbon neutral heat source?

Day 3: Galanthophilia

Galanthus reginae-olgae flowers in the autumn

Galanthus reginae-olgae flowers in the autumn

Day 4: Lore of Hazelnuts, Corylus avellana

Day 5: Walnuts

Day 6: White Cedar

Quotes of the week:

 Math with Bad Drawings: Report Cards for Famous Mathematicians

Go read them all!

Go read them all!

“Given ships or sails adapted to the breezes of heaven, there will be those who will not shrink from even that vast expanse.” – Johannes Kepler in a Letter to Galileo 1610 h/t @TychoGirl

“Apparently, if you take STEM & add the Art, Humanities, and Social Sciences, Performance…you get a STEAMSHIP”. – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

Steamship

“I don’t want to go to heaven. None of my friends are there.” – Oscar Wilde

“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.”― Mark Twain

A lunatic in Bedlam was asked how he came there. He answered, “The world said I was mad; I said the world was mad; and they outvoted me.” – @18thCenturyJoke

“I actually think that the difference between hallmark cards and “serious” euro-american ‪philosophy is solely stylistic”. – @replicakill

Shit Academics Say

Shit Academics Say

“Statistically, bouncy castles are more dangerous than sharks”. – Kylo Hill (@Sci_Phile)

“Mein Kampf is set to be re-published, although is still expected to be marginally less right wing than most Facebook posts about refugees”. – James Martin (@Pundamentalism)

“You’re Never Going To Kill Storytelling, It’s Built Into The Human Plan.” – Margaret Atwood h/t @JonathanGunson

“Whenever things sound easy, it turns out there’s one part you didn’t hear.” — Donald Westlake h/t @divbyzero

Calvin and Hobbes

Birthday of the Week:

John Ray was born on 29 November 1627

 

John Ray, by unknown artist. National Portrait Gallery Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Ray, by unknown artist. National Portrait Gallery
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: John Ray and the Classification of Plants

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A boy from Essex who made good

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Venus Transit

Yovisto: Christian Doppler and the Doppler Effect

AHF: Isotope Separation Methods

Universe Today: Who is Stephen Hawking?

Slate: 60 Years Ago Today: The Day a Meteorite Hit Ann Hodges

True: An impact crater is also called an “astrobleme.” Getting a bruise from a meteorite would then be an astroblemish.

True: An impact crater is also called an “astrobleme.” Getting a bruise from a meteorite would then be an astroblemish.

Yovisto: Ernst Chladni – The Father of Acoustics

Atlas Obscura: A Short History of Martians

Discover: Probing Einstein’s Brain for Clues to His Genius

Yovisto: The Fist Self-Sustained Nuclear Reactor

The Somnium Project: New Pages: On Summoning Daemons & Dangers of Daemonic Space Travel

Taylor & Francis Online: Physics: Advances in optics in the medieval Islamic world (oa)

ESA: SOHO Celebrates 20 Years of Discoveries

University of Cambridge Digital Library: Philosophiæ naturalis principia mathematica

The Sydney Morning Herald: Molongo Observatory Synthesis Telescope celebrates 50 years with a relaunch

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ruth Kerr Jakoby’s Interview

Muslim Heritage: The Astronomical Clock of Taqi Al-Din: Virtual Reconstruction

Skulls in the Stars: Marguerite O’Loghlin Crowe steps from the shadows

Marguerite O’Loghlin Crowe, from her later years in Florida. Via the George A. Smathers Libraries Digital Collections.

Marguerite O’Loghlin Crowe, from her later years in Florida. Via the George A. Smathers Libraries Digital Collections.

Graphic Arts: The Comet of 1789

Silicon Ireland: Did you know that an Irish scientist discovered why the sky is blue

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Engineering Model, Lander, Mars, Pathfinder

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Why spy?

Smithsonian.com: How Twitching Frog Legs Help Inspire ‘Frankenstein’

The Conversation: Meet the real Frankenstein: pioneering scientist who may have inspired Mary Shelly

AHF: Werner Heisenberg

AIP: George Uhlenbeck

Public Domain Review: Transit of Venus 1882

7341257008_70258dbdb9_o

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Intelligent Life: Time Travel

Huffpost: Arts & Culture: They Don’t Make Maps Like this Anymore

British Library: Maps and views blog: The British Library Publishes War Office Archive Maps Online

M Library: Online Exhibits: Rediscovering the Jansson and Hondius Atlases of Henry Vignaud

Atlas Obscura: The Psychedelic Moon Maps of the 1970s

image

Progressive Geographies: Digital Map of the Roman Empire

Boston Globe: At BLP, sharp eye steers missing map home

Atlas Obscura: Found: A 17th Century Map Stolen from a Library by a Notorious Art Thief

Maui Time: Story of Hawaii Museum in Kahului adds new Japanese strategic maps from World War II

Fanny at 21,000 feetcourtesy Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540

Fanny at 21,000 feetcourtesy Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540

Science: 150-year-old map reveals that beaver dams can last centuries

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Is that it?

Freud Quotes: A Clinical Lesson at the Salpêtrière

André Brouillet's 1887 A Clinical Lesson at the Salpêtrière depicting a Charcot demonstration. Freud had a lithograph of this painting placed over the couch in his consulting rooms.

André Brouillet’s 1887 A Clinical Lesson at the Salpêtrière depicting a Charcot demonstration. Freud had a lithograph of this painting placed over the couch in his consulting rooms.

Motherboard: Switzerland Briefly Legalized LSD Therapy and Then Couldn’t Let It Go

Public Domain Review: Re-examining ‘the Elephant Man’

Yovisto: The Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Aids

 

Dr Jennifer Evans: Fabulous Facial Hair History

Recipes Project: Recipes to Entertain in an Exeter Cathedral Library Manuscript

Atlas Obscura: Objects of Intrigue: London’s Life-Saving Publicly Accessible Enema Kits

Dr Alun Withey: Healthy Beards? A ‘Decembeard’ Special

Yovisto: Christine Ladd-Franklin and the Theory of Colour Vision

Christine Ladd-Franklin Source: Wikimedia Commons

Christine Ladd-Franklin
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Glasgow Story: RCPSG: Illustrations in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow

History Today: The history of deafness is as old as humanity

Concocting History: Of mice and frogs

Yovisto: Christiaan Barnard and the First Heart Transplant

The Recipes Project: Wormy Beer and Wet Nursing in the Roman Empire

The H-Word: 54 years of the Pill (on the NHS), and how Birmingham women got it first

Atlas Obscura: The First Planned Parenthood Only Lasted for 10 Days but Started a Revolution

Conciatore: Royal Apothecary

Fresco, early 16th century speziale,Castello di  Issogne, lower Aosta Valley, Italy.

Fresco, early 16th century speziale,Castello di Issogne, lower Aosta Valley, Italy.

Reuters: Modern science detects disease in 400-year-old embalmed hearts

Thomas Morris: The case of the missing pen

Res Obscura: Why Did Seventeenth-Century Europeans Eat Mummies?

Thomas Morris: On leeches, and how to catch them

TECHNOLOGY:

 

Brian Eno

Brian Eno

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: John Fleming

Hackaday: The Antikythera Mechanism

Georgian Gentleman: The March of Intellect – another William Heath caricature…

Journal of Art in Society: Prussian Blue and Its Partner in Crime

Google.com: 1938–1945 The Women of Bletchley Park

West’s Meditations: Artillery in Melaka, 1511 CE

Hyperallergic: The 19th-Century Tomb That Inspired London’s Iconic Telephone Box

London telephone box and Eliza Soane’s tomb (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic unless otherwise noted)

London telephone box and Eliza Soane’s tomb (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic unless otherwise noted)

Collecting and Connecting: “Get Thee to a Nunnery”: Finding the History of Metallurgy in a Monastery

Conciatore: Yellow Glass

Yovisto: Merry Christmas or How the SMS was born

The Huntarian: Robert Stirling’s Model Air Engine

NMOC: Winter 1975/6 from the pages of Computer Weekly

Library of Congress: Flights of Fantasy and Fact: Man-made Wings in Literature and History

Lithograph of man who flies with wings attached to his tunic. From the Library of Congress Tissandier Collection.

Lithograph of man who flies with wings attached to his tunic. From the Library of Congress Tissandier Collection.

Google Patents: Space Vehicle

The New York Times: After 60 Years, B-52s Still Dominate U.S. Fleet

The New York Times: The Bullet That Changed History

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Yovisto: Pierre André Latrille – The Father of modern Entomology

UCL: Underwhelming Fossil Fish of the Month

Road to Paris: A very short history of climate change research

Paige Fossil History: Meet Mrs. Ples: 4 Facts about The Australopithecine Skull

Embryo Project: St. George Jackson Mivart (1827–1900)

The Friends of Charles Darwin: The great Darwin fossil hunt

AEON: Through a glass, sadly

A large travelling circus aquarium filled with sharks, alligators, seals, octopus, narwhal whale and a spouting sperm whale; lithograph, 1873. Photo by GraphicaArtis/Getty

A large travelling circus aquarium filled with sharks, alligators, seals, octopus, narwhal whale and a spouting sperm whale; lithograph, 1873. Photo by GraphicaArtis/Getty

Science Gossip: Decoration, Ornamentation, Illustration or why we classify on Science Gossip

The Sloane Letters Blog: Grading Sir Hans Sloane’s Research Paper

The Linnean Society: 1st December 2015: Alfred Russel Wallace Bronze arrives at the Linnean Society

Avacta Life Sciences: A History of Affinity Molecules – Infographic Poster

The Guardian: Fossils: Extinct thinking: was the hapless dodo really destined to die out?

PRI: What we can learn from the ancient Egyptian practice of beekeeping

Vintage Everyday: The Discovery of Tutankhamun in the 1920s in Color

29th November 1923, Tutankhamun's Tomb | Howard Carter (on the left) working with his friend and colleague Arthur Callender on wrapping one of two sentinel statues of Tutankhamun (Carter no. 22) found in the Antechamber, before their removal to the 'laboratory' set up in the tomb of Sethos II (KV 15). These statues had been placed either side of the sealed entrance to the Burial Chamber.

29th November 1923, Tutankhamun’s Tomb | Howard Carter (on the left) working with his friend and colleague Arthur Callender on wrapping one of two sentinel statues of Tutankhamun (Carter no. 22) found in the Antechamber, before their removal to the ‘laboratory’ set up in the tomb of Sethos II (KV 15). These statues had been placed either side of the sealed entrance to the Burial Chamber.

Making Science Public: Climate science and climate fiction: Alarmist, really?

Independent: Historic hunting ponds uncovered in Kent marshes

CHEMISTRY:

Victorian Web: The Chemistry of the Candle Percival Leigh and Charles Dickens

Yovisto: Ellen Swallow Richards and Home Economics

Piedmont College home economics lab circa 1909

Piedmont College home economics lab circa 1909

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

American Science: HSS 2015: A Roundtable Review

Anne Krook: Writing our history is part of our jobs

The Guardian: Science: Not just for scientists

The Guardian: Why the history of maths is also the history of art

 Reza Sarhangi (Iranian-born American, b. 1952) and Robert Fathauer (American, b. 1960), Būzjānī’s Heptagon, 2007. Digital print, 13 × 13 in. (33 × 33 cm). Courtesy of the artists.

Reza Sarhangi (Iranian-born American, b. 1952) and Robert Fathauer (American, b. 1960), Būzjānī’s Heptagon, 2007. Digital print, 13 × 13 in. (33 × 33 cm). Courtesy of the artists.

Science League of America: Say What? The Theory of the Terrible MinutePhysics Video

The Royal Society: The Repository: Hooke’s books and ‘the man who got everything wrong’

CHoM News: In Memory of Kathryn Hammond Baker

Source: CHoM News

Source: CHoM News

Sandwalk: Facts and theories of evolution according to Dawkins and Coyne

The #EnvHist Weekly

Blink: The Platonic Verses

Zoomorphic calligraphy Here script transforms into an elephant Courtesy Bibliodyssey

Zoomorphic calligraphy Here script transforms into an elephant Courtesy Bibliodyssey

The Forgotten Sciences: First Issue of “History of Humanities” is in Production

Smithsonian Libraries: Smithson’s Library

Bible, Archaeology, Travel with Luke Chandler: Walk through the British Museum without going to London

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: The Knights

History Extra: What would your face and body have said about you in the 19th century

phrenology_quiz

distillatio: When did Medieval Europeans think that Hermes was alive? And a new question.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Quill & Pad: The Mastery of Time by Dominique Fléchon

The Dispersal of Darwin: Alfred Wegener: Science, Exploration, and the Theory of Continental Drift

Washington Post: Long before Pluto, a false planet confused scientists

The New York Times: ‘Map: Exploring the World,’ ‘The Curious Map Book’ and More

Science Book a Day: Spaceshots and Snapshots of Projects Mercury and Gemini: A Rare Photographic History

Notches: Found in Translation: How Sexual Debates Developed Across the Modern World

Screen-Shot-2015-11-04-at-7.43.46-AM

Public Books: The Inventor of Nature

Five Books: Matthew Cobb on the History of Science

Landscape Notes: A Natural History of English Gardening

Brain Pickings: Hidden Treasures: 10 Centuries of Visualising the Body in Rare Archival Images

Physics World: Top physics books 2015

History News Network: Herodotus Lives!

Geographical: The London County Council Bomb Damage Maps 1939–1945

NEW BOOKS:

Springer: The Lost Constellations: A History of Obsolete, Extinct, or Forgotten Star Lore

The Voorhes: Malformed: The forgotten Brains of Texas State Mental Hospital

Amazon: Time and a Place: An Environmental History of Prince Edward Island

Springer: The History of Physics in Cuba

NHM: Rare Treasures

Anita Guerrini: The Courtier’s Anatomists

screen-shot-2015-03-10-at-1-56-05-pm-2

NYAM: A Coloring Book from our Collections

The History Press: Edward Jenner: pocket Giants

Historiens de la santé: Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform

University of Pennsylvania Press: Sociable Knowledge: Natural History and the Nation in Early Modern Britain

Amazon: The Greatest Show in the Arctic: The American Exploration of Franz Josef Land, 1898–1905 (American Exploration and Travel Series)

ART & EXHIBITIONS

The Scotsman: Killer of an exhibition about deadliest plagues

1260996789

Wellcome Collection: States of Mind: Tracing the edges of consciousness

ICE: ICE Christmas Exhibition Past, Present and Future 4–18 December 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope Runs till 17 December 2015

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Henry Moseley Source: Wikimedia Commons

Henry Moseley
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Chemistry World: Weapons of mass discussion

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

Upcoming: The Old Operating Theatre: Surgeon to the Dead 10-12 & 15-17 December 2015

SpArC Theatre: Opéra National De Paris: La Damnation De Faust 17 December 2015

The Guardian: Tom Stoppard’s Hapgood comes in from the cold

 

 Lisa Dillon as Hapgood at Hampstead theatre. Photograph: Manuel Harlan

Lisa Dillon as Hapgood at Hampstead theatre. Photograph: Manuel Harlan

EVENTS:

Royal Society: Lifting the lid – the Royal Society since 1960 10 December 2015

Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford: Ada Lovelace Symposium 8–10 December 2015

Science Museum: In Conversation with Alexei Leonov 15 December 2015

CVioacnU8AAt7NE

Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution: The Legacy of the Enlightenment 11 December 2015

Glam Café, Philadelphia: Building a Digital Repository from Scratch 8 December 2015

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci

TELEVISION:

io9: In This Week’s Manhattan, the Most Crucial Bomb Is the One That Doesn’t Go Off

AHF: Manhattan Season 2, Episode 8: Let’s Make a Deal

BBC: James Clerk Maxwell

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Astronomy Central: Great Astronomers from the Medieval Islamic World – Islamic Astronomers Documentary

Youtube: Gresham College: 1295: The Year of the Galleys – Dr Ian Friel FSA

Youtube: AHF: Dimas Chavez supports AHF!

Youtube: Pathe: Excavation (1957)

Youtube: Steps to Mass Flourishing Session 3

Youtube: Kepler’s Third Law of Motion (Astronomy)

Sploid: Gorgeous video shows just how incredible the Apollo missions were

Youtube: Gresham College: Harnessing the Power of Chant – Professor Christopher Page

Youtube: Geological Society: Apollo and the Geology of the Moon

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: The Beauty of Equations

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Voyages of Captain Cook

PODCASTS:

WUWM: Wisconsinite Henrietta Swan Leavitt’s Impact on Astronomy

Science & Religion Exploring the Spectrum: Science & Secularisation John Hedley-Brooke

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Archives nationales Pierrefitte-sur-Seine: Colloque: Santé et environnement : Parcours et constructions historiques 9 et 10 décembre 2015

University of Galway: CfP: 6th International Conference on the Science of Computus in the Middle Ages

ESHS Prague: CfP: The Power of the Historiography of Science

SHOT: Dibner Award for Excellence in Museum Exhibits Deadline 15 December 2015

Boole/Shannon: Compute and Communicate Upcoming Evens 2016

St. Cross College, Oxford: One-Day Conference: Medieval Physics in Oxford 27 February 2016

merton-calculator

Birkbeck College: CfP: Sensing the Early Modern Birkbeck EMS’s 9th Annual Student conference 20 February 2015

Graz: 15th Annual STS Conference Graz 2016 Critical Issues in Science, Technology and Society Studies 9-10 May 2016

Royal Anthropological Institute: History of the RAI: 1871 to 1918 8–9 December 2015

University Portucalense, Portugal: CfP: History of Psychopathology and Psychotherapy: Iberoamerican Theories and Practices 4–6 May 2016

SHOT: CfP: Society for the History of Technology Annual Meeting – Singapore 22–26 June 2016

University of Birmingham: The EAHMH Bok award 201: Granted for best medical history monograph

CEU Summer University: Call for Applications: Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe 1827 July 2016

H-Environment: CfP: Business and Environment in History Portland Oregon 28–30 2016

MPIWG: Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe Colloquia 2015/2016

Zooniverse: Help us expand our knowledge of historical star mapping by identifying constellations and marking stars in celestial maps from the Adler’s collection!

LOOKING FOR WORK:

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Research Fellow on a project on sex, drugs and HIV/AIDS in prison since the 1980s

University of Edinburgh: Research Fellow position in Science, Technology and Innovation Studies

University of Edinburgh: Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Synthetic Yeast in Context)

Niels Bohr Archive, Copenhagen: Archivist

Cambridge: Lloyd-Dan David Research Fellowship at the Needham Research Institute and Darwin College Cambridge

University of Liverpool: 2 Stipendiary Graduate Teaching Fellowships

University of Pittsburgh: Center for Philosophy of Science: Visiting Fellows Program

University of Durham: PhD Position in Philosophy of Social Technology

LAHP: Apply for a Studentship

University of South Carolina: PhD positions in Philosophy

Birkbeck University of London: Senior Lecturer/Reader/Professor in the History and Theory of Photography/Digital Culture

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year2, Vol. #20

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #20

Monday 30 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you all that we could gather together of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the four corners of the Internet over the last seven days cruises into December.

For the second week running we feature Einstein and his General Theory of Relativity, this time celebrating its official one-hundredth birthday. The current (understandable) dominance in the #histsci news of Einstein at the moment leads to thoughts of the Einstein-Currie syndrome, phenomenon or problem as it is variously known. This is the fact that Einstein and Currie are so well known that other important scientists tend to disappear in their shadows. The same phenomenon occurs with Galileo and Newton in the seventeenth century. In fact there is an excellent book by Lesley Murdin titled Under Newton’s Shadow that highlights the other seventeenth English astronomers who were unfortunate enough to be Newton’s contemporaries.

A second unfortunate phenomenon resulting from the dominance in #histSTM of a handful of big names are the articles with titles like “the most important scientist you’ve never heard of!” These are particularly prevalent amongst those trying to promote the role of women in #histSTM. In principle the idea is good but unfortunately the authors almost always choose one of a group of names of women scientist who are in the meantime very well known indeed. A good example this week is an article to be found in our technology rubric, There’s a Navy Destroyer & a Tech Conference Named After This Person But You’ve Probably Never Heard of Her, which is an article about Grace Hopper. Now anybody who is remotely interested in the history of computers and computer science, who doesn’t know about Grace Hopper has being living under a stone. Grace Hopper is one of the most well known computer scientists in the world.

This is just one example and I could go on to list quite a lot more and I think we need a change in the way we approach the subject. Instead of writing the two-hundredth article about Grace Hopper, Lise Meitner, Jocelyn Bell Burnell or whoever we should concentrate on making the many not quite as famous women in #histSTM better known and showing that the spread is much wider than just a few star names.

That this is possible is excellently demonstrated by blogs/websites such as TrowelBlazers or Lady Science. A good example of this by a non-women-specialist blog in this week’s new post at Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog, Women, Minorities and the Manhattan Project. These historians are showing the way. Let’s get away from emphasising the same small handful of star names and start looking at the underbelly and bringing the not quite as famous to the fore.

Quotes of the week:

Bose Quote

We humans have not been around long enough yet to see the trees get really angry. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

Henry Moseley

Should have died cosily

At home aged 93, Nobel laureate, former PRS

And not in that mess. – James Sumner (@JamesBSumner)

“History of science became legend, legend became myth, and some prior work that should not have been forgotten was lost.” – Jeremy Yoder (@JBYoder)

“A creationist commenter gets to the heart of the problem: “I would rather believe and be wrong, than not believe and be right.”” – Richard Carter (@friendsofdarwin)

Miller Quote

“John Oliver: “There was only one time in US history when refugees actually did wipe everyone out—and we’ll be celebrating it on Thursday.”” – h/t @Pogue

“I’ve sorted all my Richard Dawkins books in condescending order”. – Paraic O’Donnell (@paraicodonnell)

Scared of clocks:

Hates a young boy:

Very well educated but weirdly obsessive:

Richard Dawkins is Captain Hook – Clee ((@jmclee)

“Ignorance is not so incurable as error.” George Berkeley (1724) h/t @MichelleDiMeo

‘The first act of compassion is to relieve the fool of his folly’ Robert Grosseteste h/t @mcleish_t

“Time Doesn’t Exist Clocks Exist” – Philosophical Graffiti h/t @williamcrawley

“Tang alchemists accidentally invented a primitive form of gunpowder while trying to create an elixir of youth. Ironic”. – Jill Levine (@jilldlevine)

“Chimps are our closest relatives, and yet they never send us Christmas cards. – Chris Addison” h/t @DarwinMonkey

“Dear world, I’d like to unsubscribe from your mailing list. Thanks”. – Finn Arne Jørgensen (@finnarne)

“Actually Wittgenstein is the name of the philosopher not the monster”. – James (@ApathTea)

“I have been trying to think the Unthinkable. But it turns out you can’t”. – @historyscientis

PHILOSOPHY  h/t @replicakill

PHILOSOPHY
h/t @replicakill

Birthday of the Week:

Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity born 25 November 1915

 

Spacetime curvature schematic Source: Wikipedia Commons

Spacetime curvature schematic
Source: Wikipedia Commons

The New Yorker: The Space Doctor’s Big Idea

The New York Times: A Century Ago, Einstein’s Theory of Relativity Changed Everything

Huff Post Science: The Blog: Gaga for Gravitation

Forbes: General Relativity and the ‘Lone Genius’ Model of Science

The Washington Post: Einstein’s General Relativity at 100: Put that in your pipe and smoke it

The New York Times: Albert Einstein and Relativity in the Pages of The Times

Articles in The Times from Nov. 10, 1919, left; Nov. 16, 1919, center; and Dec. 3, 1919.

Articles in The Times from Nov. 10, 1919, left; Nov. 16, 1919, center; and Dec. 3, 1919.

Science Museum: The past, present and future of general relativity

In the Dark: 100 Years of General Relativity

SpaceWatchtower: Centennial: Einstein’s General Theory of Gravity

Scientific American: Einstein’s Unfinished Dream: Marrying Relativity to the Quantum World

BBC: Does Einstein’s general theory of relativity still mater?

BBC: What is Albert Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity?

Science Daily: What Did Einstein Mean By ‘Curved’ Spacetime?

National Science Foundation: Albert Einstein, in his own words

Albert Einstein developed the theories of special and general relativity. Picture from 1921. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein developed the theories of special and general relativity. Picture from 1921.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Economist: General Relativity at 100

Youtube: BackstromGroup: Happy Thanksgiving & Happy 100th Anniversary

Youtube: Einstein 100 – Theory of General Relativity

ESA: Lisa Pathfinder: 100 Years of General Relativity

NASA illustration of LISA, taken from http://lisa.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/lisa-waves.html.

NASA illustration of LISA, taken from http://lisa.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/lisa-waves.html.

Perimeter Institute: General Relativity from A to Z

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Relativity

AMNH: General Relativity

Popular Science: General Relativity: 100 Years Old and Still Full of Surprises

Scientific America: 100 Years of General Relativity: Scientific American Special Issue

Slate: On the Anniversary of Two Scientific Revolutions

BuzzFeed: 14 Rare Photos of Albert Einstein

Here he is having a picnic in the woods near Oslo, 1920. Albert Einstein Archives / Princeton University Press

Here he is having a picnic in the woods near Oslo, 1920.
Albert Einstein Archives / Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press: Thanks Einstein: Alice Calaprice on the man behind the myth

Princeton University Press: Blog: Was Einstein the First to Discover General Relativity?

Open Culture: Albert Einstein On God: “Nothing More Than the Expression and Product of Human Weakness”

The Guardian: My hero: Albert Einstein by Graham Farmelo

Nature: History: Einstein was no lone genius

 Marcel Grossmann (left) and Michele Besso (right), university friends of Albert Einstein (centre), both made important contributions to general relativity. Grossmann, Einstein: ETH-Bibliothek Zürich/Bildarchiv; Besso: Besso Family/AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives


Marcel Grossmann (left) and Michele Besso (right), university friends of Albert Einstein (centre), both made important contributions to general relativity.
Grossmann, Einstein: ETH-Bibliothek Zürich/Bildarchiv; Besso: Besso Family/AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Alfonso from Spain and the Alfonsine Tables

Yovisto: Johannes van de Waals – A Pioneer of the Molecular Sciences

BackRe(Action): Dear Dr B: Can you think of a single advancement in theoretical physics, other than speculation, since the early 1980s?

AHF: Herbert York

True Anomalies: The Meteorite Crater that Wasn’t: Reflections on SPECTRE

Smithsonian.com: How NASA’s Flight Plan Described the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

The Somnium Project: Johannes Kepler: Somnium (The Dream)

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alembic Rare Books: Bringing Some Culture to the Physicists: Nina Byers & Richard Feynman

Smithsonia.com: The World’s First Nuclear Reactor was Built in a Squash Court

JHI Blog: The “Conquest of the Sun” and Ideas About Energy

Ri-Science: Charte der Gebirge Des Mondes, 1878

AHF: William “Deak” Parsons

AHF: Moving Forward – 1941

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Women, minorities, and the Manhattan Project

A relatively young Katharine (“Kay”) Way, one of the many female scientists of the Manhattan Project, and one of the rare few scientists whose work took her to all of the major Manhattan Project sites. Source: Emilio Segrè Visual Archives.

A relatively young Katharine (“Kay”) Way, one of the many female scientists of the Manhattan Project, and one of the rare few scientists whose work took her to all of the major Manhattan Project sites. Source: Emilio Segrè Visual Archives.

BBC: Jocelyn Bell Burnell

The Washington Post: A ground zero forgotten

EXPLORATION, CARTOGRAPHY AND NAVIGATION:

Medievalists.net: The Use of Lead and Line by Early Navigators in the North Sea

MBS Birmingham: Amateur gentlemen, Everest, and the Science of Foie Gras

L0035747 Tabloid medicine chest used on 1933 Mount Everest Expedition Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

L0035747 Tabloid medicine chest used on 1933 Mount Everest Expedition
Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

New South Wales: State Library: Discover Collection: In search of rich lands: The Dutch

Icelandic Saga Map: Mapping the Icelandic Sagas

Boston 1775: Mapping Out a Map-Filled Visit to Boston

The Recipes Project: A Recipe for Teaching Atlantic World History: Food and the Columbian Exchange

Polly Platt, Map sampler (1809), Made in Dutchess County, Pleasant Valley, New York, United States, Purchase, Frank P. Stetz Bequest, in loving memory of David Stewart Hull, 2012, 2012.64, Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Polly Platt, Map sampler (1809), Made in Dutchess County, Pleasant Valley, New York, United States, Purchase, Frank P. Stetz Bequest, in loving memory of David Stewart Hull, 2012, 2012.64, Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Instagram: Embroidered Globe by Lydia Satterthwaite, 1817

British Library: Maps and views blog: Magnificent Maps of New York

National Library of Scotland: Blaeu Atlas Maior, 1662-5

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Bleeding you well

Neuroscientifically Challenged: History of Neuroscience: The mystery of trepanation

Archaeology: Paleo-dentistry

Collectors Weekly: War and Prosthetics: How Veterans Fought for the Perfect Limb

Left, this Civil War era portrait shows a veteran with a typical wood and leather prosthetic leg. Image courtesy the National Museum of Health and Medicine. Right, this Anglesey-style wooden leg was produced in Britain around 1901, and features a jointed knee and ankle and a spring-fitted heel. Image courtesy of the Science Museum / SSPL.

Left, this Civil War era portrait shows a veteran with a typical wood and leather prosthetic leg. Image courtesy the National Museum of Health and Medicine. Right, this Anglesey-style wooden leg was produced in Britain around 1901, and features a jointed knee and ankle and a spring-fitted heel. Image courtesy of the Science Museum / SSPL.

The Recipes Project: Van Helmont’s Recipes

Early Modern Medicine: Understanding Anger

University of Glasgow: UofG shines light on Erskine archive

Freud Quotes: 1938: Sigmund Freud Arrives in London as Refugee

Nursing Clio: Nursing Thanksgiving

Thomas Morris: Struck dumb

The Guardian: Man stole brains from medical museum and put them on eBay

The Walrus: Doctors Without Science: A brief history of quackery, from leeches to ostrich eggs

1 An arsenic bottle. 2 Eighteenth-century European engraving of Egyptian bloodletting. 3 A 1930s bag advertising purgative medicine. 4 Lobotomy instruments.

1 An arsenic bottle. 2 Eighteenth-century European engraving of Egyptian bloodletting. 3 A 1930s bag advertising purgative medicine. 4 Lobotomy instruments.

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: Hold the Butter! A Brief History of Gorging

University of Toronto: PhD Thesis: From the Hands of Quacks: Aural Surgery, Deafness, and the Making of a Surgical Specialty in 19th Century London by Jaipreet Virdi-Dhesi Free online as pdf

Thomas Morris: Nothing to worry about

The Public Domain Review: The Science of Life and Death in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Dittrick Medical History Center: Todd’s Head Spanner 1930

History Extra: Your 60-second guide to the Black Death

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Lead Crystal

 

99% Invisible: Episode 157: Devil’s Rope

Barbs Courtesy of The Devil’s Rope Museum

Barbs
Courtesy of The Devil’s Rope Museum

Medium: Clipping the Devil’s Rope

Science at Play: Fingerprinter

ReadThink: There’s a Navy Destroyer & a Tech Conference Named After This Person But You’ve Probably Never Heard of Her

Atlas Obscura: The Telharmonium was the Spotify of 1906

Historically Speaking: Desperately Seeking Ernest

Ptak Science Books: Gear, Teeth, Minie Bullets, Cloth Bindings (1864)

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

PRI: When Ireland gathered around ‘the Wireless’ in the dark, one boy saw the light

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Atlas Obscura: See a 400-Year-Old Book Made Entirely from Feathers

History of Geology Group: A contemporary William Smith map

NCSE: The Plane Truth at Last Free online web and ebook

Notches: Histories of Sexualities in Central and Eastern Europe

British Library: Discovering Literature: Romantics and Victorians: Darwin and the theory of evolution

The Telegraph: First picture of young Charles Darwin on HMS Beagle reveals shipmate squabbles

Charles Darwin on board the Beagle, painted off the coast of Argentina on 24th September, 1832 Photo: Sotheby's

Charles Darwin on board the Beagle, painted off the coast of Argentina on 24th September, 1832 Photo: Sotheby’s

artlyst: Charles Darwin Watercolour Painted On the Ship Beagle Discovered

The Guardian: Unique watercolour of Darwin on HMS Beagle tipped to fetch upwards of £50,000 at auction

History: This Day in History: Origin of Species is published

abc.net: News: London skeletons reveal British capital’s 2,000-year history as ethnic melting pot

Niche: “Two chemical works behind him, and a soap factory in front”: Living and Working in London’s Industrial Marshlands

The Walrus: The Roughneck Diaries

Colossal: Art Meets Cartography: The 15,000-Year History of a River in Oregon Rendered in Data

Naturalis Historia: Dinosaurs, Dragons and Ken Ham: The Literal Reality of Mythological Creatures

A 40 million year old whale fossil from “whale valley” in Egypt not far from Cairo. Here hundreds of whale fossils lie exposed in this wind eroded valley. These whales where large headed toothed whales that are not alive today.  Many of these would have been exposed for ancient Egyptians to see and wonder what animal they were associated with.  (AFP/File/Cris Bouroncle)

A 40 million year old whale fossil from “whale valley” in Egypt not far from Cairo. Here hundreds of whale fossils lie exposed in this wind eroded valley. These whales where large headed toothed whales that are not alive today. Many of these would have been exposed for ancient Egyptians to see and wonder what animal they were associated with. (AFP/File/Cris Bouroncle)

SNAP.PA: The history of climate change summed up in 10 key dates

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Dunkinfield Henry Scott

Thinking Like a Mountain: The Decline of Natural History & the Rise of Biology in 19thc Britain

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: Six of the best from Stella

National Geographic: An 80-Year-Old Prank Revealed, Hiding in the Periodic Table!

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

JHI Blog: Hellenism and the Materiality of Greek Books in Renaissance Italy

A copy of the Anthologia Graeca (1494) printed by Lorenzo de Alopa in 1494. Notice the raised bands on the spine, non-projecting endbands, and how the bookblock is smaller than the boards.

A copy of the Anthologia Graeca (1494) printed by Lorenzo de Alopa in 1494. Notice the raised bands on the spine, non-projecting endbands, and how the bookblock is smaller than the boards.

Science Museum: Volunteering for the Cosmonauts exhibition

The Guardian: Scientists finally get under the skin of a 13th century publishing mystery

Phy.org: Getting under the skin of a medieval mystery

University of York: Getting under the skin of a Medieval mystery

University of Cambridge Department of History and Philosophy of Science: John Forrester 25/08/1949–24/11/2015

John Forrester 25/08/1949–24/11/2015

John Forrester 25/08/1949–24/11/2015

University of Cambridge Department of History and Philosophy of Science: Obituary John Forrester (25 August 1949–24 November 2015)

U.S. National Library of Medicine: Images from the History of Medicine

History of the Human Sciences: December 2015; 28 (5) Visibility matters: Diagrammatic Renderings of Human Evolution and Diversity in Physical, Serological and Molecular Anthropology: Table of Contents

The #EnvHist Weekly

The Telegraph: Duncan White, Catherine Nixey and Thomas Morris [historian of medicine] win 2015 Jerwood Awards

History of Psychiatry: December 2015: 26 (4) Table of Contents

The Vintage Scientific Instruments of Brown University: We’re looking for old scientific instruments at Brown!

Smithsonian Science News: Smithsonian Libraries’ Rare Texts Include Early Superstars of Science

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: The Sincerest Form of Flattery

Conciatore: Veins of the Earth

Antonio Neri, "The Mineral Gold" Neri 1598-2000 (Ferguson 67), f. 5r.

Antonio Neri, “The Mineral Gold”
Neri 1598-2000 (Ferguson 67), f. 5r.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Nature: Books in Brief: Thunder and Lightning: Weather Past, Present and Future; The Orange Trees of Marrakesh: Ibn Khaldun and the Science of Man etc.

New Scientist: How a creationist instinct stops us seeing evolution everywhere

Science Book a Day: The Man Who Flattened the Earth: Maupertuis and the Sciences in the Enlightenment

man-who-flattened-the-earth

Science Book a Day: My Sister Rosalind Franklin: A Family Memoir

The Independent: Christmas 2015: The best 6 nature books

The Guardian: The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution by David Wootton review – a big bang moment

The Wall Street Journal: The Shape of Obsession (Google title then click on first link to surmount paywall!)

American Scientist: SCIENTISTS AT WAR: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research.

American Scientist: In Defence of Pure Mathematics

NEW BOOKS:

Cork University Press: The Booles & The Hintons9781782051855-2T

 

Ashgate: Geography, Technology and Instruments of Exploration

Amazon: Deadly Victorian Remedies

Hermann: La critique de la science depuis 1968

The MIT Press: Make It New: The History of Silicon Valley Design

ART & EXHIBITIONS:

The Guardian: My highlights: The Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution exhibition by Michael Prodger

Samuel Pepys by John Hayls, 1666. Illustration: courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London

Samuel Pepys by John Hayls, 1666. Illustration: courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

The Architects Newspaper: Not Dead Yet

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Nature: A view from the bridge: On Reflection: the art and neuroscience of mirrors

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope Runs till 17 December 2015

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

DPLA: From Colonialism to Tourism: Maps in American Culture

"Folklore Music Map of the United States." Courtesy the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.

“Folklore Music Map of the United States.” Courtesy the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs to 13 March 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

Hunterian Museum: Designing Bodies: Models of human anatomy from 1945 to now 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

Upcoming: The Old Operating Theatre: Surgeon to the Dead 10-12 & 15-17 December 2015

EVENTS:

The History of Science, Medicine, & Technology at Oxford University: Open Day 2 December 2015

National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin: Afternoon Lecture – Plant-hunters in Petticoats – a history of Irish women in botany 5 December 2015

Museum of the History of Science: Lightning Strikes! 5 December 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Samuel Crompton Inventing the Spinning Mule by Alfred Walter Bayes, 1895 (c) Bolton Library & Museum Services, Bolton Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Samuel Crompton Inventing the Spinning Mule by Alfred Walter Bayes, 1895
(c) Bolton Library & Museum Services, Bolton Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

AHF: Video from Manhattan Project Symposium Now Available

Youtube: Yale University: Becoming Darwin: History, Memory, and Biography, “Stories of a Scientific Life”

Youtube: AHF: Trinity Test Preparations

Youtube: Wellcome Collection: Tobacco resuscitation kit

Dispersal of Darwin: Janet Browne on becoming Darwin (3 lectures)

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Too Old to Be a Genius

BBC Radio 4: Self Drives: Maxwell’s Equations

James and Katherine Maxwell, 1869 Source: Wikimedia Commons

James and Katherine Maxwell, 1869
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

PODCASTS:

Londonist Out Loud: Pepys Show

Soundcloud: AMSEOnline: Century of the Atom…told through the voices of scientists who created the nuclear age

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

HOPOS: CFP: International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 11th International Congress Minneapolis 22-25 June 2016

World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine: 2016 Young Scholars Award Competition: Best original essay on any topic of relevance to the history of the veterinary field

Barts Pathology Museum and the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, London: CfP: Corpses, Cadavers and Catalogues: The Mobilities of Dead Bodies and Body Parts, Past and Present 17–18 May 2016

La Salle des Actes de la faculté de Pharmacie de Paris: Colloque: Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715), un savant en son siècle 9 Décembre 2015

St Anne’s College Oxford: CfP: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: Digital Editing Now 7–9 January 2016

Birkbeck Early Modern Society: CfP: 9th Annual Student Conference Sensing the Early Modern 20 February 2016

Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies: Vol. 47 (2016) Call for Papers

ICOHTEC: Maurice Dumas Prize

University of Durham: CfP: Interdisciplinary International Women’s Day Conference, Durham University, 8 March 2016 Re-Sounding Voices: Women, Silence and the Production of Knowledge

Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University: Symposium: Apps, Maps & Models: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies 22 February 2016

Villa Vigoni (Italy): CfP: Pseudo-Paracelsus: Alchemy and Forgery in Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy 25–28 July 2016

University of Oxford: St Cross College: Conference: Medieval Physics in Oxford 27 February 2016

University of Zurich: CfP: Objects of psychiatry: Between thing-making, reification & personhood 8–11 June 2016

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam: Symposium: Navies in Miniature 4–5 February 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Society for the History of Technology: The Hindle Fellowship

University of Huddersfield: Research Assistant in Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture (1400–1700)

Yale University: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library seeks Associate Director for Collections, Research & Education

University of Utrecht: PhD Candidate History of Art, Science and Technology

People’s History Museum: Archivist

University of Liverpool: History: Lecturer/Senior Lecturer – Medical Humanities

University of Glasgow: The 2016/17 round of Lord Kelvin/Adam Smith PhD Scholarships is open for applications until Friday 22 January 2016

University of Leeds: The School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science at the University of Leeds is pleased to inform potential applicants for postgraduate study that it has available up to 18 fully-funded PhD scholarships for UK/EU students for 2016-17 entry.

University of Notre Dame: Two Postdoctoral Fellowships in History and/or Philosophy of Science

Universität zu Lübeck: Juniorprofessor W1 “Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Psychologie”

University of Kent: Postgraduate Funding

Chalmers University of Technology: PhD student position in History of Technology

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year2, Vol. #19

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #19

Monday 23 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

The overly warm autumn weather has disappeared overnight and the first signs of winter are poking their nose around the door, so it’s time to curl up warm inside and enjoy the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list bursting at the seams, as always, with the collective wisdom of the Internet on the histories of science, technology and medicine from the last seven days.

In the last two weeks of November exactly one hundred years ago, in 1915, the German physicist, Albert Einstein put the finishing touches to the theory that would elevate him from being one of the leading European scientists to the status of a twentieth-century icon, the General Theory of Relativity. The last weeks have all seen a fair number of reports, essay and blog posts on the theory and its creator but I thought we could bring this week’s crop to the fore and honour the great man here at Whewell’s Gazette.

Albert Einstein during a lecture in Vienna in 1921 by F Schmutzer Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein during a lecture in Vienna in 1921 by F Schmutzer
Source: Wikimedia Commons

We celebrate the centenary of this milestone in the history of physics at a time when the chorus of critics is growing louder and louder with the cries of “was Einstein wrong?” It is the inability of researchers to find a way of combing the general theory of relativity with that other great pillar of twentieth-century physics, that Einstein helped to found, the quantum theory that has led to this question. Many of those who pose it seem to do so with a certain sense of schadenfreude, as if they hope to see Albert pushed from his pedestal.

If the general theory of relativity comes to be replaced by a new ‘better’ theory combining gravity with quantum theory, as it probably will, just as Einstein’s own theory of gravity toppled that of Newton, it won’t do anything to change the enormity of Einstein’s achievement in 1915. Historian of science, should they or indeed the world still exist, will celebrate the bicentenary of this theory just as fulsomely in 2115.

Tech Times: Theory of General Relativity Marks 100th Year: Origins, Political Connections and Other Facts About Einstein’s Theory

Nature: Special: General Relativity at 100

arkansasonline.com: Einstein’s century-old theory stands strong

Einstein Papers: Einstein telling David Hilbert that he had used the nascent general relativity to quantitatively describe the anomalous precession of Mercury 18 November 1915

AHF: Albert Einstein

Brain Pickings: Einstein on the Common Language of Science in a Rare 1941 Recording

Dispatch-Argus: 100 years later, Einstein’s theory stands strong

Science Museum: The past, present and future of general relativity

The New York Times: General Relativities Big Year?

The New Yorker: Albert Einstein’s Sci-Fi Stories

Republican Herald: Century later, relativity still stands strong

Quotes of the week:

Eddington Quote

“Don’t just do something, stand there and think!” – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“A university professor should “lead you to the fountain of knowledge”, but “whether you drink deeply or only gargle is entirely up to you””. – @GrrlScientist

“In a singing competition between Yoda and Steve Winwood, Steve win would”. – You can call me Q (@QuintinForbes)

“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free. Unless they’re darker than, say, beige.”- Statue of Liberty. – @TheTweetOfGod

“People really hate it when you point out that their rhetorical moves don’t advance their argument”. – Jonathan Dresner (@jondresner)

“Don’t discuss infinity with a mathematician. You’ll never hear the end of it”. – Laura Lang (@MathsforGrownups)

“Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?” — George Carlin h/t @berfois

“Is the cup half-full, or half-empty? Either way, it’s hemlock”. – Damon Young (@damonayoung)

“Let us not, in the eagerness of our haste to educate, forget all the aims of education” – William Godwin h/t @douglassilas

“Just noticed that business books are next to books on potty training in Dewey decimal classification”. – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“It may be said that the entire Renaissance was in Galileo’s library & more importantly in his Dialogue.” – Paula Findlen at HSS 2015 h/t @bhgross

“…when did the history of science society become the history of the scientific book society?” – Paula Findlen at HSS 2015 h/t @elizabeththeyale

“Philosophers often make better coffee than sense”. – Nigel Warburton (@philosophybites)

“Historians of science are not made, they are improvised.” – Robert Fox, Sarton Medalist. h/t @ColdWarScience

Q: “Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door”

A: “Build a better fence, and you can stop them” – Jon Agar (@jon_agar)

“Just don’t think there is a good reason to write ‘quinquennially’ instead of ‘every five years’”. – Dolly Jørgensen (@DollyJørgensen)

Birthday of the Week:

Edwin Hubble born 20 November 1889

Edwin Hubble, doing what he loved best at Mount Wilson Observatory

Edwin Hubble, doing what he loved best at Mount Wilson Observatory

ESA Space Science: 20 November

cosmology.carrnegiescience.edu: 1929: Edwin Hubble Discovers the Universe is Expanding

CUQpoiCVAAA1HRO

Popular Science: The 11 Most Important Cats of Science 2 of 12 Astronomy Cat

Wallifaction: Happy birthday to Edwin Hubble

Edwin Hubble! Seen here in 1923 at a Carnegie solar eclipse expedition to Point Loma, CA.

Edwin Hubble! Seen here in 1923 at a Carnegie solar eclipse expedition to Point Loma, CA.

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE

University of Roehampton: Hearth Tax discovery by Roehampton historians may illuminate Isaac Newton’s life story

AMNH: Shelf Life: Episode Five: How to Time Travel to a Star

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Leslie Groves’ Interview – Part 10

AIP: Eugene Wigner

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Dorothy McKibbin’s Interview (1979)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Evelyne Litz’s Interview

Yovisto: Eugene Wigner and the Structure of the Atomic Nucleus

The Guidon: Manila Observatory celebrates 150th anniversary

AHF: George Kistiakowsky

Pat’s Blog: The analemma is Gone, Oh How I Miss it

solar analemma

UCL: STS: Occasional papers: Huang, Hsiang-Fu (ed.) Ouranologia: an Annotated Edition of a Lenten Lecture on Astronomy with Critical Introduction (free pdf)

Ptak Science Books: Astronomy Board Games, 1661 & 1804

Ptak Science Books: Graphs of Astronomical Discoveries

Ptak Science Books: An Unusual Set of Astronomical Images

AHF: “Hanford’s Pioneers” Tour Launches

Kaleidoscope: Science and Invention: How Did the Ancient Chinese Measure Time?

how_did_the_ancient_chinese_measure_timef909427af8f54017b05d

The Guardian: Maxwell’s Equations: 150 years of light

The Independent: The end of an odyssey – Homer’s epic is finally pinned down

AHF: Soviet Hydrogen Bomb Progam

Teyler’s Museum: Tellurium, George Adams, London

Tor.com: Utopian Mars: From Aleriel to The Martian

The Nature of Reality: Schrödinger’s Cat Lives On (Or Not) at the Age of 80

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: A Glance – from a Safe Distance – at the Human Monsters on Pierre Desceliers’ World Map of 1550

Mammoth Tales: The White Elephant of Rucheni

Desceliers Arctic elephant. North is at the bottom of the page.

Desceliers Arctic elephant. North is at the bottom of the page.

Atlas Obscura: Hand-Drawn Maps That Jump Into the Geopolitical Fray

Royal Museums Greenwich: Christopher Columbus

Atlas Obscura: The Delights and Perils of Navigating New York City with a Guidebook from 1899

Dr. Caitlin R. Green: Some interesting early maps of Lincolnshire

It’s About Time: 1587 Sir Walter Raleigh & Roanoke Island, North Carolina

This illustration is a detail from a map in the 1590 edition of Thomas Hariot’s Briefe and True Account of the New Found Land of Virginia.

This illustration is a detail from a map in the 1590 edition of Thomas Hariot’s Briefe and True Account of the New Found Land of Virginia.

It’s About Time: 1590 John White’s Return to Roanoke – Where all had vanished

It’s About Time: 1586 Ralph Lane’s Report on the Colony of Roanoke

BBC News: Stark images of Shackleton’s struggle

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Iridology, a pseudomedical practice, involves reading the patient's iris for diagnosis  h/t @sunfilter

Iridology, a pseudomedical practice, involves reading the patient’s iris for diagnosis
h/t @sunfilter

 Thomas Morris: The eye-brush

Perceptions of Pregnancy: It’s all in the breasts: pregnancy aphorisms in the Hippocratic Corpus

Le Huffington Post: Portrait de médicin: Wilder Graves Penfield

The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates: Reading for Abortions in the Victorian Novel

Forbes: Here’s How Corsets Deformed the Skeletons of Victorian Women

From “Physiology for Young People” p. 84. Fig. 11.A purports to show the natural position of internal organs. B, when deformed by tight lacing of a corset. In this way the liver and the stomach have been forced downward, as seen in the cut. (Public domain image via wikimedia commons.)

From “Physiology for Young People” p. 84. Fig. 11.A purports to show the natural position of internal organs. B, when deformed by tight lacing of a corset. In this way the liver and the stomach have been forced downward, as seen in the cut. (Public domain image via wikimedia commons.)

Devient Maternity: ‘For shipping his corpse which was becoming very loathsome and nauseous’. The provision of care for the poor, sick and dying in the eighteenth-century

Haverford College News: Studying Historical “Madness”

 

AEON: Better Babies

Gizmodo: The Secret WWII Club That Healed Burned Pilots and Revolutionized Plastic Surgery

Nursing Clio: The History of a Wrist: When Historians Fall Over

The History Company: The Wee Glasgow women and the birth of Caesarian

M Library Blog: A New Acquisition: A Japanese Illustrated Book on Surgery

Woodcut from Irako Mitsuaki. Geka kinmō zui (Kyoto: Ebisuya Ichiemon, 1809)

Woodcut from Irako Mitsuaki. Geka kinmō zui (Kyoto: Ebisuya Ichiemon, 1809)

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: The Girton and Newnham Unit of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals in World War One

Thomas Morris: Pipe dreams

The Atlantic: Impregnated by a speeding Bullet, and Other Tall Tales

Notches: Bad for the Soul, Good for the Body: Religion, Medicine and Masturbation in the Middle Ages

Thomas Morris: In praise of temperance

Medievalists.net: The Sick and the Dead: Medieval Concepts of Illness and Spinal Disability

TECHNOLOGY:

The Ladybird Story of Radio (1968) knew about David Edward Hughes and e-m waves but didn't quite get his name right. h/t Iwan Rhys Morus

The Ladybird Story of Radio (1968) knew about David Edward Hughes and e-m waves but didn’t quite get his name right. h/t Iwan Rhys Morus

 Conciatore: Manganese Overload

The Ejection Site: 46.2Gs!!! The Story of John Paul Stapp “The Fastest Man On Earth”

Improbable Research: The Fastest Man on Earth (Part 2 of 4)

MAA 100: Mathematical Treasure: Polar Planimeter Invented by Jacob Amsler

The National Archives: ‘All change!’ on Britain’s railways

1812 The first effective locomotive-powered railway

1812 The first effective locomotive-powered railway

Yovisto: The X-43A and the Scramjet Technology

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: The Tizard Mission – 75 Years of Anglo-American Technical Alliance

The Public Domain Revue: Colour Wheels, Charts, and Tables Through History

Two Nerdy History Girls: The Amazing Félix Nadar

Nadar Self-Portrait in Balloon

Nadar Self-Portrait in Balloon

Yovisto: Doug Engelbart and the Computer Mouse

The Guardian: Barry Cooper obituary

The TZranscontinental Railroad: Time Standardization

The National Valve Museum: Website

Dolly Jørgensen: The Metamorphosis of Ajax, jakes, and early modern urban sanitation

Medievalists.net: Guns in Scotland: the manufacture and use of guns and their influence on warfare from the fourteenth century to c. 1625

Phys.org: What toilets and sewers tell us about ancient Roman sanitation

Ruin of a second-century public toilet in Roman Ostia. Credit: Fr Lawrence Lew, OP, CC BY-NC-ND

Ruin of a second-century public toilet in Roman Ostia. Credit: Fr Lawrence Lew, OP, CC BY-NC-ND

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Ascension of a Montgolfier Balloon

The Conversation: Building Hitler’s supergun: the plot to destroy London and why it failed

Graphic Arts Collection: The Principles of Static and Friction

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Making Science Public: Moderation impossible? Climate change, alarmism and rhetorical entrenchment

Making Science Public: Climate realism: What does it mean?

Occam’s Corner: Beard science: an examination of the power (and hazards) of Movember

The Dallas Morning News: Nearly pristine mammoth skeleton showcased at Perot Museum

Jae S. Lee/Staff Photographer Ellie May is showcased as if she is floating above the ground, in a similar position to the way she was found. The Columbian mammoth skeleton is about 80 percent or 85 percent intact and an estimated 40,000 years old.

Jae S. Lee/Staff Photographer
Ellie May is showcased as if she is floating above the ground, in a similar position to the way she was found. The Columbian mammoth skeleton is about 80 percent or 85 percent intact and an estimated 40,000 years old.

Gizmodo: Half the World’s Natural History Specimens Might Have the Wrong Name

Notches: Rape and the Sexual Politics of Homosexuality: The U.S. Military Occupation of Okinawa, 1955-56

NYAM: Extra, Extra, Get Your New Banana!

Yale Climate Connection: NYC Climate Museum

Inside Climate News: Climate Scientist Michael Mann: Exxon Story ‘Confirmed Things We Long Suspected’

Academia: Breaking down the body and putting it back: displaying knowledge in the ‘Francisc I. Rainer anthropological collection

Storia della Geologia: Storia della mineralogia – I primi passi

Atlas Obscura: Meet the Midwestern Pilots Who Risk Their Lives to Change the Weather

BHL: Travels in Southern Africa: William John Burchell

"A view in the town of Litakun." Engraved from a drawing by William John Burchell. Travels in the Interior of Southern Africa. v. 2 (1824). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/48905971. Digitized by: University of Pretoria.

“A view in the town of Litakun.” Engraved from a drawing by William John Burchell. Travels in the Interior of Southern Africa. v. 2 (1824). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/48905971. Digitized by: University of Pretoria.

Forbes: Half The World’s Museum Specimens are Wrongly Labeled, but Who is to Blame?

Open Sky: American Meteorological Society Oral History Project

Science League of America: Evolution for John Doe, Part 4

Niche: Workers as Commodities: The Case of Asbestos, Quebec

Jonathan Saha: Paratextual Pachyderms

lifeofelephant00eardrich_0052

NCSE: Excerpt Voyage of the Beagle: The Illustrated Edition

Geschichte der Geologie: Kunst & Geologie: Die Magie des Karfunkelsteins

Making Science Public: The book of life: Reading, writing and editing

BGS Geoheritage – images from the collections: Calx carbonata (calcite) from British mineralogy by James Sowerby 1802–1817

 

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Nicolas Lemery and the Acid-Base Chemistry

Gizmodo: Badass Historical Chemists: The Woman Behind Antoine Lavoisier

Portrait of M. and Mme Lavoisier, by Jacques-Louis David, 1788 (Metropolitan Museum) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of M. and Mme Lavoisier, by Jacques-Louis David, 1788 (Metropolitan Museum)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nature: thesis: Hard-luck Scheele

Situating Chemistry: Situating Chemistry Database 1760–1840

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Yovisto: Albertus Magnus and the Merit of Personal Observation

Wellcome Trust: Researcher Spotlight: Louise Powell

BBC: Culture: Did Dickens invent time travel?

-273.15°C: Eminent Interview

The Bigger Picture: Looking Smithson’s Gift Horse in the Mouth

Edge Effects: Improving the Conversational Geography of Environmental Conferences

Science Museum Group Journal: Issue 4

Wikimedia Commons: Hooke’s Micrographia Diagrams from the National Library of Wales

Irish Philosophy: The “Incomparable Lady Ranelagh”

Katherine Jones, Lady Ranelagh: portrait in Lismore Castle Picture courtesy of Michelle DiMeo

Katherine Jones, Lady Ranelagh: portrait in Lismore Castle
Picture courtesy of Michelle DiMeo

The Harvard Crimson: A Forgotten Field

DSI: Database of Scientific Illustrators 1450–1950

IsisCB Explore: An open access discovery service for the history of science

Science Notes: November 20 in Science History

Science Notes: November 21 in Science History

Science Notes: November 22 in Science History

Society for the Social History of Medicine: The Gazette

Society for Renaissance Studies: Remembering Lisa Jardine

Professor Lisa Jardine in 2015, portrait from the Royal Society Source: Wikimedia Commons

Professor Lisa Jardine in 2015, portrait from the Royal Society
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nicholson’s Journal: Website

The #EnvHist Weekly

NYAM: Discover the Past Support the Future

Metascience: Vol.24, Issue 3 Contents

Academia: Scientific Celebrity: The Paradoxical Case of Emil du Bois-Reymond

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Alchemist Cardinal

The Recipes Project: The Curious Case of the Homunculus, and the Allegorical Recipe

6859587740_ee3f6bb363_o-296x300

Conciatore: The Paracelsans

The Truth Garden: Odd Truths: The alchemical life of glassmaker Antonio Neri

BOOK REVIEWS:

Wonder of Words: The Hunt For Vulcan

Chad Comello: The Hunt for Vulcan

Boston Globe: How Einstein ended hunt for planet that never was

Contagions: The Black Death in the Ottoman Empire and Ragusan Republic

Nature: Books in Brief: Spooky Action at a Distance, Ecology or Catastrophe: The Life of Murray Bookchin etc.

Science Museum Group Journal: The thrilling adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: the (mostly) true story of the first computer, by Sydney Padua

The Early Modern Intelligencer: The Royal Touch in Early Modern England: Politics, Medicine and Sin

9780861933372

idées.fr Le discours de la semence À propos de : L’usage du sexe. Lettres au Dr Tissot, auteur de L’Onanisme (1760). Essai historiographique et texte transcrit par Patrick Singy

Science Book a Day: What Galileo Saw: Imagining the Scientific Revolution

History Today: Books of the Year 2015

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society: Inside the Machine: Art and Invention in the Electronic Age

The Page 99 Test: Melinda Baldwin’s “Making Nature”

Women’s History Association of Ireland: Aphrodisiacs, fertility and medicine in early modern England.

The New York Times: ‘London Fog: The Biography,’ by Christine L. Corton

Central London at night, 1936. Credit Lacey/General Photographic Agency, via Getty Images

Central London at night, 1936. Credit Lacey/General Photographic Agency, via Getty Images

Book Q&As with Deborah Kalb: Q&A with Paul Halpern

NEW BOOKS:

Pool of London Press: The Mapmakers’ World

9781910860007

The Public Domain Review: Selected Essays, Vol. II

Historiens de la santé: Malades, soignants, hôpitaux, représentations en Roussillon, Languedoc & Provence

Johns Hopkins University Press: Alfred Wegener: Science, Exploration, and the Theory of Continental Drift

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Culture 24: A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January 2016–29 July 2016

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution exhibition 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Painting of Samuel Pepys by John Hayls Source: Wikimedia Commons

Painting of Samuel Pepys by John Hayls
Source: Wikimedia Commons

J D Davies: Pepys Show and Tell

Londonist: Largest Ever Pepys Exhibition Comes to Greenwich

Heinz Nixdorf Museums Forum: Paderborn, Germany: IT began with Ada. Women in Computer History 2 September 2015–10 July 2016

Explore Brooklyn: The Morbid Anatomy Museum: how to get there, what to do, where to go after

Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time: European Clocks and Watches

Hyperallergergic: Celestial Art and Science in Albrecht Dürer’s 1515 Star Charts

ActiveHistory.ca: Science, Technology and Gender in Canada: An AcitveHistory.ca Exhibit in Collaboration with the Canadian Science and Technology Museum

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope 17 December 2015

Hooke's microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hooke’s microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

LAST CHANCE TO SEE: University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs until 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs until 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Hunterian Museum: Designing Bodies: Models of human anatomy from 1945 to now 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Dream Team: Surgeon to the Dead The Old Operating Theatre London 10-12 & 15-17 December 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

EVENTS:

Institute of Historical Research: British Maritime History Seminar: Drawing and Photography in the History of Astronomy 24 November 2015

The Royal Society: Lecture: Lifting the lid – the Royal Society since 1960 10 December 2015

Salle des Fêtes, Hôpital civil, Strasbourg: Colloque: Retour sur le genre des biopics de grands scientifiques : Pasteur, Pavlov, Koch, Ehrlich 23 novembre 2015

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine Seminar: Humanist self-fashioning and ordinary medical practice. The Bohemian physician Georg Handsch (1529–c. 1578) and his notebooks 24 November 2015

medhumlabmanchester: Medicine in Art Society Launch Event Whitworth Art Gallery 26 November 2015

mia-flyer-01Gresham College: Was Einstein Right? 24 November 2015

Diseases of Modern Life: Seminar: Radical Requiems: The return of the past in British Agriculture, 1850–1950 St Anne’s College Oxford 25 November 2015

Morbid Anatomy: Upcoming Events

Natural History Museum: After Hours Lates 27 November 2015

Royal Society: Life through a lens: Celebrating science photography 26 November 2015

Wellcome Collection: Crucial Interventions with Richard Barnett 26 November 2015

Royal Institution: The Tsar’s cup 27 November 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Norbert Wiener by David Levine, New York Review of Books

Norbert Wiener by David Levine, New York Review of Books

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: Timeshift: How Britain Won the Space Race: The Story of Bernard Lovell and Jodrell Bank

Lovell Telescope, Jodrell Bank Observatory Source: Wikimedia Commons

Lovell Telescope, Jodrell Bank Observatory
Source: Wikimedia Commons

io9: On Manhattan, Terrible Things Happen When You “Wake The Dragon”

BFI Southbank: There is a curated selection of clips from TV programmes on the Bomb, computing, DNA and space, culminating in a complete showing of a 1959 programme about supersonic flight. Together, this is the essence of how TV saw science 50 years ago. 26 November 2015

Channel 4: Building Hitler’s Supergun

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: THUNK – 79: Science, Pseudoscience, & the Demarcation Problem

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Self Drives: Maxwell’s Equations

PODCASTS:

BBC Global News Podcast: Challenges of curating natural science collections from 23 mins

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Announcing the 4th Notes and Records Essay Award

H-Physical Sciences: CFP: The Third Biannual Early-Career Conference for Historians of the Physical Sciences

University of Edinburgh: Sixth International Conference on Integrated History and Philosophy of Science (in collaboration with the UK Integrated History and Philosophy of Science) 3-5 July 2016

University of Amsterdam & Utrecht University: CFP: Connecting Collections XVII Universeum Network Meeting 9-11 July 2016

The Bernard S. Finn IEEE History Prize 2016: The prize is awarded annually to the best paper in the history of electrotechnology—power, electronics, telecommunications, and computer science—published during the preceding year Deadline 15 December 2015

All Souls College, Oxford: Workshop: Charles Hutton (1737–1823): being mathematical in the Georgian period 17–18 December 2015

Portrait of Charles Hutton (1737–1823), English mathematician Source: Wikimedia Common

Portrait of Charles Hutton (1737–1823), English mathematician
Source: Wikimedia Common

University of Leiden: CfP: Gender, Power and Materiality in Early Modern Europe 1500–1800 7-9 April 20916

Stony Brook University: Periods and Waves: A Conference on Sound and History 29–30 April 2016

University of Leuven: CfP: Ancient Medicine 30–31 August 2016

Charles Schmitt Prize 2016: Submissions will be accepted in any area of intellectual history, broadly construed, 1500 to the present Deadline 31 December 2015

University of Cambridge: CfP: BSHS Postgraduate Conference 2016 6–8 January

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: CfP: Eighth Joint Meeting of the BSHS, CSHPS, and HSS, 22-25 June 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Context 7–10 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Liverpool: The University of Liverpool is planning to support a Medical Humanities University Award application to the Wellcome Trust and is seeking expressions of interest from dynamic and enthusiastic candidates with a strong research track record in this area.

Queen Mary University of London: Postgraduate Research Studentships

Canadian Association for the History of Nursing: Margaret M. Allemang Scholarship for graduate students

British Library: Curator, Map Collection

Royal Signals Museum: Museum Technical Curator

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #18

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #18

Monday 16 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days have flown past and it’s time once again for Whewell’s Weekly your #histSTM links list bringing you all the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could ferret out over the last seven days from the far reaches of cyberspace.

On the ninth of November Google celebrated the 101st birthday of Hedy Lamarr with a Google Doodle. This led to others perpetuating what is unfortunately something of a myth considering her contribution to the history of technology. This can be seen in the headline of the Sydney Morning Herald article, Google Honours Hedy Lamarr, inventor of technology behind Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

Now the technology behind Wi-Fi and Bluetooth is something known as frequency hopping and Hedy Lemarr was involved in the invention of one form of frequency hopping but it is not that used in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. During WWII Lemarr and the composer George Antheil filed a patent for a mechanical system of frequency hopping based on player piano rolls. However this was neither the first time that frequency hopping had been invented nor was the system suggested by Lemarr and Antheil ever actually put into practice.

The earliest known record of frequency hopping is from 1908 and the system was actively used by the German military during WWI. Several different patents for systems of frequency hopping were registered during the 1930s.

Hedy Lemarr was involved in the development and patenting of a system of frequency hopping but it is not the system used today in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. It is OK to point out that Hedy Lemarr was more than just a pretty face but it is bad history of technology to embroider the truth and make her seem more significant than she was.

Hedy Lamarr Publicity photo, c. 1940 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hedy Lamarr Publicity photo, c. 1940
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Science Friday: The Beauty and Brains Behind ‘Hedy’s Folly’

 

The Sydney Morning Herald: Google Honours Hedy Lamarr, inventor of technology behind Wi-Fi and Bluetooth

Quotes of the week:

Font Quote

“I’m not being pedantic about vocabulary: Chemistry isn’t an unnatural thing happens in labs. All life is chemistry. It’s not a threat”. – Katie Mack (@AstroKatie)

“If you can’t say anything nice1

1Say it in a foot note” – Shit Academics Say (AcademicsSay)

“Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they make it easier to do don’t need to be done.” – Andy Rooney h/t @JohnDCook

“Thinking is hard work, and it opens you up to criticism.” – David Draper h/t @JohnDCook

“Maybe Hitler grew up to be so hateful and paranoid because of all those time travellers who tried to kill him as a baby”. – Adam Rex (@MrAdamRex )

TA Quote

“Contrary to the myth of science, facts are not autonomous. They gain meaning from [our interpretive] frameworks” – Tom Levenson h/t @beckyfh

“Does he believe he knows the difference?

Or

Does he know he believes they are different?” – G.H. Finn (@GanferHaarFinn)

“There ain’t no God, just to-do lists”. – Joshua P. Preston (@JPPreston)

“We are here on Earth to fart around, and don’t let anybody tell you different.” – Kurt Vonnegut

“I can kill for Myself just fine, thanks”. – @TheTweetOfGod

Axila Tilt

 

Birthday of the Week:

Born 14 November 1797 Charles Lyell

Charles Lyell at the British Association meeting in Glasgow 1840. Painting by Alexander Craig. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Charles Lyell at the British Association meeting in Glasgow 1840. Painting by Alexander Craig.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

History of Geology: 14 November 1797: Happy Birthday Charles Lyell

History of Geology: In Search of… the Sea Snake

Paige Fossil History: Charles Lyell & the First Neanderthal

The frontispiece from Elements of Geology Source: Wikimedia Commons

The frontispiece from Elements of Geology
Source: Wikimedia Commons

William Herschel born 15 November 1738

 

A portrait of William Herschel by William Artaud, 1820

A portrait of William Herschel by William Artaud, 1820

Ptak Science Books: First Light to Good Night – Putting a Telescope to Sleep

The British Museum: View of Herschel’s forty foot reflecting telescope

AN01377473_001_l

National Geographical Channel: Sky Full of Ghosts

20ft telescope from The Scientific Papers of Sir William Herschel (London, 1912), Royal Soc and RAS

20ft telescope from The Scientific Papers of Sir William Herschel (London, 1912), Royal Soc and RAS

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Edmond Halley besides the Eponymous Comet

History Today: Science and Superstition: A Landmark Witch Trial

Teyler’s Museum: ‘s Gravesande’s ring & ball 1774

AFR Weekend: 100 years later, Einstein’s theory of relativity stands strong

KXLF.com: Albert Einstein’s colossal mistake

Princeton University: Princeton celebrates 100 years of Einstein’s theory of general relativity

Linn’s Stamp: Born Nov 9: Benjamin Banneker

benjamin-banneker-black-heritage

National Geographic: Einstein’s Magnum Opus

Atlas Obscura: Yerkes Observatory

Yovisto: Hermann Weyl – between Pure Mathematics and Theoretical Physics

World Digital Library: Newly Compiled Pocket Astrological Calendar

The Irish Times: Einstein and a scientific milestone

APS News: Einstein’s House in Bern: Joint EPS-APS Historic Site

Shapell: I have just completed the most splendid work of my life, Einstein says

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Hans Bethe’s Interview (1982)

Atlas Obscura: The Forgotten Kaleidoscope Craze in Victorian England

A portrait of Sir David Brewster, inventor of the kaleidoscope. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

A portrait of Sir David Brewster, inventor of the kaleidoscope. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

Universe Today: Who Was Sir Isaac Newton?

Gizmodo: The Real-Life Scientific Dilemma Behind the Latest Episode of Manhattan

Tech Insider: Here’s how Albert Einstein destroyed the planet Vulcan

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: When did the Allies know there wasn’t a German bomb?

AHF: Philip Abelson

The Mountain Ear: Great Lawyers in History: Edwin Hubble

 

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Christie’s The Art People: MARTINES, Joan (actif vers1556-1591), attribué à. Carte portulan de la côte atlantique de l’Amérique du Sud Messine : c1570-1591.

TeleGeography: Submarine Cable Map 2015

Atlas Obscura: America Got Her Name From This 1507 Map

Yovisto: Dr. Livingstone, I presume?

Library of Congress: James Wilson: America’s First Globemaker

Wilson’s three inch terrestrial globe, 182-. Geography & Map Division, Library of Congress.

Wilson’s three inch terrestrial globe, 182-. Geography & Map Division, Library of Congress.

Slate Vault: Maps Tracking Levels of Poverty in Victorian London, Block by Block

Hyperallergic: Why Cannibals Were on Every 16th-Century Map of the New World

 

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Medievalists.net: Top 10 Medical Advances from the Middle Ages

Migraine Histories: Finding the Patients in the Notes

Wellcome Library: Speaking of Trotula

An image of ‘Trotula’ from a 14th-century French encyclopedia; the caption translates: ‘How the woman teaches the clerk the secrets of nature’. Rennes, Bibliothèque municipale, MS. 593 (produced 1303), folio 532r. Image credit: Bibliothèque virtuelle des manuscrits médiévaux. © 2013 Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes.

An image of ‘Trotula’ from a 14th-century French encyclopedia; the caption translates: ‘How the woman teaches the clerk the secrets of nature’. Rennes, Bibliothèque municipale, MS. 593 (produced 1303), folio 532r. Image credit: Bibliothèque virtuelle des manuscrits médiévaux. © 2013 Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes.

Academia: Who/What is “Trotula”?

Early Modern Medicine: Flesh and Spirit

Thomas Morris: Medicine or marinade?

Remedia: Surgery for Desperadoes

Yovisto: Sir James Young Simpson and the Chloroform

Sir James Young Simpson, 1st Baronet (1811-1870)

Sir James Young Simpson, 1st Baronet (1811-1870)

Thomas Morris: The port-wine enema

Thomas Morris: The owl-eyed girl

Christie’s The Art People: ROESSLIN, Eucharius (d.1526). Der Swangern Frauwen und Hebammen Rosegarten. Strassburg: Martinus Flach iunior, correctore Joanne Adelpho physico, 1513.

woodlibrarymuseum.org: An Account of the First Use of Sulphuric Ether (pdf)

Royal Museums Greenwich: Plagues

Torontoist: Historicist: Body Snatchers, Grave Robbers, and Night Ghouls

The second-floor dissecting room of the Toronto School of Medicine’s Richmond Street building, showing: (1) Dr. John King, (2) Dr. George De Grassi, (3) Tom Hays, a lecturer at the school, (4) Old Ned, the janitor of the dissecting room, (5) Dr. W.W. [Billy] Francis of Toronto. Bernard Joseph Gloster, “Toronto School of Medicine, dissecting room, Richmond St. W., north side, between Yonge & Bay Sts.; interior, showing staff, 1856. Toronto Public Library, B 10-19a.

The second-floor dissecting room of the Toronto School of Medicine’s Richmond Street building, showing: (1) Dr. John King, (2) Dr. George De Grassi, (3) Tom Hays, a lecturer at the school, (4) Old Ned, the janitor of the dissecting room, (5) Dr. W.W. [Billy] Francis of Toronto. Bernard Joseph Gloster, “Toronto School of Medicine, dissecting room, Richmond St. W., north side, between Yonge & Bay Sts.; interior, showing staff, 1856. Toronto Public Library, B 10-19a.

TECHNOLOGY:

Motherboard: Celebrate the Saturn V’s Birthday by Watching the Largest Rocket in History Fly

Open Cultures: Download 10,000 of the first recordings of Music Ever Made, Courtesy of the UCSB Cylinder Audio Archive

ccrma.stanford.com: Cacophony or harmony? Multivocal logics and technology licensing by the Stanford University Department of Music (pdf)

Smithsonian.com: Divers Discover 102-Year-Old Shipwreck in Lake Huron

The Guardian: Betamax is dead, long live VHS

The Public Domain Review: The Telephonoscope (1879)

22922848315_df8612cdd1_o

Yovisto: Fred Cohen and the First Computer Virus

 

Yovisto: The Publication of the First Web Page

Conciatore: Neri’s Other Rubino

Open Culture: The Interior of the Hindenburg Revealed in 1930s Color Photos: Inside the Ill-Fated Airship

Ptak Science Books: On the Dreadful Nature of Unseen Point-Blank Racism

Scottish Engineering Hall of Fame: Sir George Bruce (c1550–1625), pioneering engineer who created a sophisticated offshore mining enterprise in the 16th century

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Artificial Clouds and Inflammable Air: The Science and Spectacle of the First Balloon Flights, 1783

An 18th-century hydrogen filled balloon takes off. (Library of Congress)

An 18th-century hydrogen filled balloon takes off. (Library of Congress)

Yovisto: Jacques Charles and the Hydrogen Balloon

Ptak Science Books: Great Cross Section of the HMS “Repulse”, 1939

The Washington Post: How Nazi scientists and their wind tunnels ended up in D.C.’s suburbs

Computer History Museum: 1971 – Microprocessor Integrates CPU Function onto a Single Chip

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: Where did Robert Fulton go?

Library of Congress: “What’s this Gadget?”: Solving Mystery Photos

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Notches: Stalling Civil Rights: Conservative Sexual Thought has been in the Toilet Since the 1940s

Science League of America: Evolution for John Doe, Part 3

Yovisto: Robert Morison and the Classification of Plants

Robert_Morison1

Plaeophile: Voyage of the Beagle (Non-fiction fan fiction)

Embryo Project: Wilhelm Johannsen’s Genotype-Phenotype Distinction

The Recipe Project: The Exotic Taste of Rice

Notches: Homophile Priests, LGBT Rights, and Scottish Churches 1967–1986

AMNH: How to Experiment Like Darwin

Natural History Museum: Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913)

pipra-manakins-wallace-full-width

Natural History Museum: Wallace Letters Online

Famous Scientists: Evolutionary Theories Before Darwin:

Social Evolution Forum: Shopping For a Von Humboldt Bust

Independent: Classroom posters get a design makeover: The one-man mission to transform the walls of our schools

CHEMISTRY:

Historical Notes: History of Medicine Collection spotlight: Lavoisier’s “Elements of Chemistry”

lavoisier-2

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Hisiheyah Arts: GIF Icons of women in science

tumblr_nwe7ldIfNc1thyvq2o2_1280

Conciatore: Benedetto Vanda

Ada Lovelavce: Celebrating 200 years of a computer visionary: Somerville, science and Wikipedia

Medievalists.net: Why the Scientific Revolution Did Not Take Place in China – or Didn’t It?

Social History of Medicine: Volume 28 Issue 4 November 2015 Contents

The Recipes Project: Leftovers: Cooking, Blogging, and Studying History from Old Recipes

The Guardian: On the Origin of Species voted most influential academic book in history

The H-Word: How do we decide which academic book is the ‘most influential’ ever written?

A classic on undergraduate reading lists long before the upstart ‘Origin’ was even published... Photograph: Jim Sugar/Corbis

A classic on undergraduate reading lists long before the upstart ‘Origin’ was even published… Photograph: Jim Sugar/Corbis

The Atlantic: Science Doesn’t Work the Way You Might Think: Not Even for Einstein

Chicago Journals: Osiris Vol. 30, No. 1, 2015 Scientific Masculinities Contents

Taylor And Francis Online: History of Science Free Access Articles

The Guardian: Don’t be a conference troll: a guide to asking good questions

E-International Relations: Interview – John R. Mitchell (environmental historian)

Tropics of Meta: Atlanta Loses Its Greatest Listener: Cliff Kuhn, 1952–2015 Executive Director of the Oral History Association

Technology Spectator: How computers broke science

Forum for History of Human Science: Website

Medievalists.net: Medieval and Renaissance Book Production

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Hans Holbein and the Nürnberg–Ingolstadt–Vienna Renaissance mathematical nexus

Nicholas Kratzer, 1528 painting by Hans Holbein the Younger Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nicholas Kratzer, 1528 painting by Hans Holbein the Younger
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Medievalists.net: Five Medieval Chronicles that you can read translated online

Taming the American Idol: 95 Theses on Innovation

Dana Research Centre and Library: Opened 9 November 2015 The Library offers 18 reading desks and around 5,500 volumes of books and recent journals in the history and biography of science, technology and medicine and in museology. 165 Queens Gate, London SW7 5HD

Medievalists.net: The Medieval Magazine: Animals in the Middle Ages (Issue 141)

The #EnvHist Weekly

Skulls in the Stars: “Science Chamber of Horrors” talk at the Schiele Museum

DSI: Database of Scientific Illustrators 1450–1950

History Buff: When Does Science Begin? A Conversation with David Wootton

Reader Project in the History of Science—Survey: Help us choose the 10 most influential articles in ‪#HistSTM during the last 25 years

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: A Dominican Connection

20th-century photograph of the old distillery at S.M. Novella.

20th-century photograph of the old distillery at S.M. Novella.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie

The Bookseller: Slack wins biennial Samuel Pepys Award

The Space Review: Kepler and the Universe

Chemistry World: Pyrite: a natural history of fool’s gold

ars technica: Scientific Method/Science & Exploration: The messy reality of science revealed by the long hunt for a missing planet

9780812998986

The Guardian: NeuroTribes: by Steve Silberman review – an enlightened take on autism and difference

Nature: History of science: Trial by gender

The Friends of Charles Darwin: The Invention of Science

The Guardian: The Invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science

The Dispersal of Darwin: Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation

The Dispersal of Darwin: Evolution: The Whole Story

 

NEW BOOKS:

Biographile: That Time Einstein Debunked Vulcan, a Planet That Never Existed

The Public Domain Review: Selected Essays, Vol II

University of Chicago Press: Groovy Science: Knowledge, Innovation, and American Counterculture

Historiens de la santé: The Corrigible and the Incorrigible: Science, Medicine, and the Convict in 20th Century Germany

9780472119653

Palgrave: Marine Insurance Origins and Institutions, 1300–1850

Yale University Press: Science Blogging: The Essential Guide

John Allen Paulos: A Numerate Life

 

ART & EXHIBITIONS

The New York Review of Books: Amazing Building Adventures

Ashmolean: Power and Protection: Islamic Art and the Supernatural 20 October 2016–15 January 2017

Power-and-Protection

The Guardian: Sex and the city: 1660s London brought to life at National Maritime Museum

CLOSING SOON: Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

CLOSING SOON: University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs until 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs until 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: The Luxury of Time: European Clocks and Watches 16 November 2015–27 March 2016

Clockmaker: Ferdinand Berthoud (French, 1727–1807); Case maker: Balthazar Lieutaud (French, ca. 1720–1780, master 1749). Longcase astronomical regulator (detail), ca. 1768–70. Case: oak veneered with ebony and brass, with gilt-bronze mounts; Dial: white enamel; Movement: gilded brass and steel; Height: 90.5 in. (229.9 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, (1982.60.50).

Clockmaker: Ferdinand Berthoud (French, 1727–1807); Case maker: Balthazar Lieutaud (French, ca. 1720–1780, master 1749). Longcase astronomical regulator (detail), ca. 1768–70. Case: oak veneered with ebony and brass, with gilt-bronze mounts; Dial: white enamel; Movement: gilded brass and steel; Height: 90.5 in. (229.9 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, (1982.60.50).

Royal Museums Greenwich: Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind:

THEATRE & OPERA & FILMS:

Houston Press: An Unsung Female Astronomer Gets Her Due in Main Street Theater’s Stirring Silent Sky

A galaxy of possibilities. Pin Lim/Forest Photography

A galaxy of possibilities.
Pin Lim/Forest Photography

Berkeley City Club: Ada and the memory machine Runs till 22 November 2015

Wonders & Marvels: The Black Stork: A physician’s cinematic argument for eugenics

CLOSING VERY SOON: Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

CLOSING VERY SOON: Blue Orange Theatre: Jekyll & Hyde 18-21 November 2015

EVENTS:

University of Manchester: Postgraduate taught courses open day 25 November 2015

BSHS: The History of Science Society presents Merchants of Doubt 2015 Elizabeth Paris Event Saturday, November 21 2015

University of Lincoln: MA Open Day School of History and Heritage 8 December 2015

British Library: Eccles Centre: The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World 18 November 2015

Natural History Museum: BBC Radio 4: Natural Histories The Big Story Hintze Hall 27 November 2015

Litteraturhuset i Bergen: Talk: Philip Ball The history of invisibility 28 November 2015

CHF: Not Just Fun and Games? STEM, Toys, and Gender 19 November 2015

Museum of Natural History, Oxford: The Oxford Dodo: Culture at the Crossroads 18 November 2015

Royal Society: Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell’s equations 16-17 November 2015

Royal Institution: The Tsar’s cup 27 November 2015

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: Explore Your Archive from 18 November 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Woodcut, The Physician, Hans Holbein the Younger, Dance of Death, 1538

Woodcut, The Physician, Hans Holbein the Younger, Dance of Death, 1538

 

TELEVISION:

AHF: “Manhattan” Season 2, Episode 5: Separation Anxiety

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Vimeo: The Plague – Dr Stanley B. Burns

Youtube: Gresham College: The Scientific Life of Ada Lovelace – Professor Ursula Martin

Youtube: Gresham College: Hanna Neumann: A Mathematician in Difficult Times – Dr Peter Neumann

Vimeo: The Legend of Mendeleev’s Dream

Vimeo: Mendeleev’s Chemical Solitaire

Youtube: Armillary Sphere animation

Youtube: Amazing piece of metal (speculum)

Youtube: Brian Greene Explains That Whole General Relativity Thing to Stephen Colbert

 

RADIO:

The Sloane Letters Blog: Sloane becomes a BBC Radio 4 Natural History Hero

PODCASTS:

History Today: A year in medieval England (with lots on Trotula)

Bottle Rocket Science: Startup Geometry Podcast EP 104: Renaissance Mathematicus Thony Christie

History of Philosophy without any gaps: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: Albert the Great’s Natural Philosophy

Environmental History Resources: Religion and the Origins of American Environmentalism

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

St Anne’s College, Oxford: CfP: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

BSHS: Ayrton Prize

Hertha Ayrton Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hertha Ayrton
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Courtauld Institute of Art: CfP: Placing Prints: New Developments in the Study of Print 1400–1800 12–13 February 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP: Treasuries of Knowledge: Collecting and Transmitting Information in the Early Modern Period 8 April 2016

British Society for Literature and Science: CfP: Annual Conference 2016 University of Birmingham 7–9 April 2016

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI): Final CFP: “The History of Science and Contemporary Scientific Realism” Conference 19-21 February 2016

University of Canterbury New Zealand: CfP: Histories of Forensic Psychology and Forensic Psychiatry 17–18 February 2016

Society for the History of Chemistry: CfP: Annual Meeting Singapore 2016

BSHS: The BSHS John Pickstone Prize Nominations Open

John Pickstone Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Pickstone
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Leeds: Workshop: Electrifying the country house 1 February 2016

University of Cambridge: Registration open for BSHS Postgraduate Conference 6–8 January 2016

McMaster University: Hannah History of Medicine Speaker Series 2015–2016 Schedule

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Cambridge: Isaac Newton Trust Research Fellowship 2016

TU Eindhoven: Assistant Professor in the History of Technology

Royal Society: Public Engagement Officer & Public Engagement Intern

The entrance to the Royal Society in Carlton House Terrace, London

The entrance to the Royal Society in Carlton House Terrace, London

University of Leeds: Postdoctoral Research Fellow – Men, Women and Care

University of Aberystwyth: Postdoctoral Research Assistant (‘Unsettling Science Stories’)

Annapolis: The Third Biennial Early-Career Conference for Historians of the Physical Sciences 6–10 April 2016

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #17

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #17

Monday 09 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

Assuming you didn’t blow yourself up on Guy Fawkes Night you are now reading the latest edition of the weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette going off in all directions with all the histories of science, technology and medicine ignited in cyberspace over the last seven days.

The second of November saw a very noteworthy anniversary with the bicentenary of the birth of the mathematician and logician George Boole. Boole’s life is a real rags to mathematical riches story. Born the son of a shoemaker and a housemaid his formal education reached an end at the age of fourteen. A bright lad he became an assistant schoolmaster at the age of sixteen and set up his own small private school whilst only just nineteen. However his true passion was mathematics. Having learnt Latin and Greek as a child he taught himself modern French, Italian and German in order to be able to read the latest continental mathematics; England lagging far behind the continent in mathematics in the early nineteenth century. Already at the age of twenty-four he began publishing papers on cutting edge subjects with the active assistance Of the Cambridge University fellow, Duncan Gregory, a great-great-grandson of Newton’s contemporary James Gregory.

In the late 1840s the British Government decide to set up new universities in Ireland, the Queen’s Colleges of Belfast, Cork and Galway. Boole by now an acknowledged mathematician with a solid reputation decided, with the support of his friends, to apply for a teaching position. One must remember that he had no formal qualifications but with an application that was supported by testimonials from the elite of the then British scientific establishment he was appointed to the professorship of mathematics at Queen’s College Cork in 1849.

Boole was a successful and respected university teacher and would go on to write and publish important textbooks on differential equations and the calculus of finite differences as well as about fifty papers on diverse topic, winning several important awards. If he had never written anything on logic he would still be counted as one of the leading nineteenth-century British mathematicians but is for his work in logic that he mainly remembered today.

In two works, The Mathematical Analysis of Logic from 1847 and An Investigation of The Laws of Thought from 1854, Boole set out his logical algebra, a two-valued logic of classes. Receiving scant attention before his untimely death in 1864 Boolean logic or Boolean algebra, as it is now known went on, in the hands of others, such as C. S. Peirce and Ernst Schröder, to become a powerful analytical tool before being superceded in the 1920s by the mathematical logic of Whitehead and Russell’s Principia.

Just as it seem destined to fade into obscurity it was rediscovered as a perfect medium for the design of electric switching circuits thus going on to become the design tool for the circuitry of the electronic computer on which I’m typing this editorial. As the circuitry of the hardware was two valued it followed that the programmes that run on that circuitry should also contain Boole’s logic at their core.

The self educated son of a cobbler unknowingly delivered the heart of the computer age, as he turned his attention to symbolic logic almost 170 years ago and so it was that the bicentenary of his birth was acknowledge and celebrated last Monday not only in his birthplace Lincoln and in Cork but all over the world.

 George Boole born 2 November 1815

 George_Boole_color

Google: George Boole’s 200th Birthday

george-booles-200th-birthday-5636122663190528.2-hp2x

George Boole 200: Celebrating George Boole’s Bicentenary

Yovisto: George Boole – The Founder of Modern Logic

Time: New Google Doodle Honors Prolific Mathematician George Boole’s 200th Birthday

Sydney Padua: Happy 200th Birthday George Boole!

Irish Philosophy: Ones and Zeros

The River-side: George Boole blog posts

Scientific American: The Bicentennial of George Boole, the Man Who Laid the Foundations of the Digital Age

UCC Library: Boole Papers

Dan Cohen: George Boole at 200: The Emotion Behind the Logic

BBC: Magazine Monitor: George Boole and the AND OR NOT gates

BBC: World at One: Marcus on Boole

Silicon Republic: 6 Disciplines Georg Boole revolutionised

Open Plaques: George Boole (1815–1864)

facebook: Capturing George Boole Day at UCC

Stephen Wolfram Blog: George Boole: A 200-Year View

Nature: Smooth operator

RTE Player: Film: The Genius of George Boole

Irish Philosophy: George Boole Day – Bicentenary Links [an even longer links list than the one here!]

IMG_20151103_134248812-1024x768

Quotes of the week:

Joseph Needham

Joseph Needham

“Thomas D’Urfey d.1723, poet, wit, author (e.g. of a book titled ‘The Fart’) who said that “the principle business of life is to enjoy it”!” – Alun Withey (@DrAlun)

“My computer is actually based on Babbage’s lesser known creation; “The Indifference Engine.”

Or maybe it isn’t. I don’t really care”. – Sarcastic Rover (@SarcasticRover)

“Don’t worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats.” – Howard Aiken h/t @JohnDCook

Last letter of Capt Charles Clerke to Joseph Banks always gets to me. Clerke died in the Bering Sea while commanding the last Cook Exped. His concerns are duty to country, getting specimens to Banks, and asking that Banks take on patronage for Clerke’s men. ‘Now my dear & honoured friend I must bid you a final adieu; may you enjoy many happy years in this world, & in the end ‘attain that fame your indefatigable industry so richly deserves.’ *sheds a tear* – Cathryn Pearce (@CathrynPearce)

“Though I love chemistry much – very much, I love botany more!” – John Torrey h/t

@KewDC

“Botany I assure you, my dear Sir, is with me a far more pleasant subject to write on, than Cholera” – Charles Short h/t @KewDC

A telegraph company's answer to Bell's offer to sell them the telephone patent

A telegraph company’s answer to Bell’s offer to sell them the telephone patent

“On this day in history, people who have since been forgotten created things that will never be found nor understood” – Night Vale Podcast

“The limits to my, and all historians’, knowledge and expertise. Lest we forget” – Tina Adcock (@TinaAdcock)

“Today I learned about chicken phrenology. This was a thing. It predicted chicken productivity. I don’t know what to do with this info”. – Michael Egan (@EganHistory)

“I said that the only thing to be learned from history is that there is nothing to learn”. – Emil du Bois-Reymond

“For the astronomer and the physicist may both prove the same conclusion — that the earth, for instance, is round.” – Thomas Aquinas h/t @JohnDCook

“There is TOO MUCH STUFF. Of all kinds. Please stop making/discovering it”. – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

“The outer circles of hell are slightly softer, while the centre remains quite firm to the bite” – Al Dente’s Inferno. – @NickMotown

Maria Mitchell Quote

Birthdays of the Week:

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 Lise Meitner born 7 November 1878

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Unsung! I hardly think so.

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AHF: Lise Meitner

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CHF: Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, and Fritz Strassmann

800px-Lise_Meitner_(1878-1968),_lecturing_at_Catholic_University,_Washington,_D.C.,_1946

Marie Curie born 7 November 1867

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CHF: We’re History: Marie Curie Led Science – and Women Scientists – to a New Age

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AHF: Marie Curie

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Brain Pickings: Radioactive: The Incredible Story of Marie Curie Told in Cyanotype

Pierre and Marie Curie Source: Wikimedia Commons

Pierre and Marie Curie
Source: Wikimedia Commons

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: The Arecibo Radio Telescope – Looking for Extraterrestrial Signals

Cosmology: Carnegie Science: 1920: Harlow Shapley Finds Our Place in the Milky Way

Physics Today: Arch and scaffold: How Einstein found his field equations

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Nobles and William Sturm’s Interview – Part 2

NASA: 15 Years of Station Told in 15 Gifs

Source: The Guardian

Source: The Guardian

The Guardian: 15 years of the International Space Station – in pictures

Yovisto: Howard Shapley and the Milky Way

FQXi Blogs: Losing Neil Armstrong

AHF: Plutonium

AIP: Nick Holonyak

Motherboard: Why We Still Want Laika the Space Dog to Come Home

Laika in her final resting place. Image: National Space Science Data Center

Laika in her final resting place. Image: National Space Science Data Center

NEWS! From the Naval Observatory: New Research Explains Moving Meridian Mystery

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Leslie Groves’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Paula and Ludwig Bruggemann’s Interview

Telegraph & Argos: Celebrating the life of Fred Hoyle, who coined the term Big Bang Theory

The New Yorker: Tangled Up In Entanglement

Quanta Magazine: Einstein’s Parable of Quantum Insanity

Institute of Advanced Studies: The Advent and Fallout of EPR

AHF: Norman Ramsey

Restricted Data. The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The doubts of J. Robert Oppenheimer

The New York Times: How Politics Shaped General Relativity

Motherboard: The Online Afterlife of Manhattan Project Physicist Philip Morrison

AHF: Phillip Morrison

Phys Org: On the 120th anniversary of the X-ray, a look at how it changed our view of the world

Hand mit Ringen (Hand with Rings): print of Wilhelm Röntgen's first "medical" X-ray, of his wife's hand, taken on 22 December 1895 and presented to Ludwig Zehnder of the Physik Institut, University of Freiburg, on 1 January 1896 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hand mit Ringen (Hand with Rings): print of Wilhelm Röntgen’s first “medical” X-ray, of his wife’s hand, taken on 22 December 1895 and presented to Ludwig Zehnder of the Physik Institut, University of Freiburg, on 1 January 1896
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Universe Today: Who Was Galileo Galilei?

Universe Today: Who Was Christiaan Huygens?

Popular Science: When We First Saw The Far Side of the Moon

Princeton University Press Blog: Feynman on the historic debate between Einstein & Bohr

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

 

Herbert G. Ponting (British, 1870 - 1935) "Vida", one of the best of the dogs used by Capt. Smith on his South Pole Expedition (1910 - 1913)., about 1912, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Herbert G. Ponting (British, 1870 – 1935)
“Vida”, one of the best of the dogs used by Capt. Smith on his South Pole Expedition (1910 – 1913)., about 1912,
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

 

 British Library: Maps and views blog: Magnificent Maps of New York

Ptak Science Books: The End is Near for You: Germany, May, 1945

Slate Vault: These 18th– and 19th-Century “Dissected Maps” Were the First Jigsaw Puzzles

Worlds Revealed Geography and Maps at The Library of Congress: Of Maps and Data

BBC News: National Library shares 2nd Century Ptolemy map image

_86547920_prima_europe_tabula

UVA Today: McGregor Library Offers Rare Digital History of the Americas

Christie’s The Art People: CAO, JUNYI (FL. 1644). TIANXIA JIUBIAN FENYIE RENJI LUCHENG QUANTU. [A COMPREHENSIVE MAP OF THE KINGDOM OF CHINA AND NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES.] NANJING: BEGINNING OF SUMMER IN THE 17TH YEAR OF THE REIGN OF EMPEROR CHONGZHEN [I.E. 1644].

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Hyperallergic: 15 Million Pages of Medical History Are Going Online

Dr Alun Withey: BBC Free Thinking Feature: Bamburgh Castle Surgery, c. 1770–1800

Remedia: Amateur Surgeon of Dutiful Citizen? The First Aid Movement in the Nineteenth Century

Cartoon from Punch , 1914. Doctor (at Ambulance Class) ‘My dear lady, do you realise that his lad’s ankle was supposed to be broken before you bandaged it?’ © Wellcome Images, Wellcome Library, London.

Cartoon from Punch , 1914. Doctor (at Ambulance Class) ‘My dear lady, do you realise that his lad’s ankle was supposed to be broken before you bandaged it?’ © Wellcome Images, Wellcome Library, London.

Fugitive Leaves: Louis Pasteur, Joseph Lister, and the Mystery of the Smudged Date

Atlas Obscura: Object of Intrigue: The Prosthetic Iron Hand of a 16th-Century Knight

Historic UK: The Reputed Plague Pits of London

Medical Library: The Bamberg Surgery: An early European surgical text

A Covent Garden Gilflirt’s Guide to Life: For the Patient Who Has Everything…

Hopes & Fears: From lemon rinds to knitting needles: A visual history of abortion and birth control

MOTHER SHOWER SYRINGES

MOTHER SHOWER SYRINGES

Medievalists.net: Nursing and Caring: An Historical Overview from Anciet Greek Tradition to Modern Times

Harvard School of Dental Medicine: History

Dangerous Minds: The Literal Origins of the Phrase ‘Don’t Blow Smoke Up My Ass’

Thomas Morris: The rocket man

BT: Ingenious: Remembering the Post Office’s role in creating the first NHS hearing aid

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘God preserve us all!’: Samuel Pepys and the Great Plague

Technological Stories: What If Beddoes & Davy Had Attempted Surgical Anesthesia in 1799?

Wonders & Marvels: The Unmanly Art of Breastfeeding in the Eighteenth Century

Library Company: The Library Company of Philadelphia Consults Aristotle’s Masterpiece

Origins of Science as a Visual Pursuit: Networking with a Book, or How Vesalius Gave away his Complimentary Copies of the Fabrica

The Public Domain Review: Georg Bartisch’ Ophthalmodouleia (1583)

L0078612 Folio 218 recto, Bartisch, Ophthalmodouleia, 1583. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Coloured woodcut of a woman with an enlarged and protruding eyeball. Coloured Woodcut 1583 Ophthalmodouleia. Das ist Augendienst. Newer vnd wolgegründter Bericht von Ursachen vnd Erkentnüs aller Gebrechen, Schäden vnd Mängel der Augen vnd des Gesichtes, wie man solchen anfenglich mit gebürlichen mitteln begegenen, vorkommen vnd wehren, auch wie man alle solche gebresten künstlich durch Artzney, Instrument vnd Handgrieffe curiren, wircken vnd vertreiben sol ... / George Bartisch Published: 1583. Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

L0078612 Folio 218 recto, Bartisch, Ophthalmodouleia, 1583.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
Coloured woodcut of a woman with an enlarged and protruding eyeball.
Coloured Woodcut
1583 Ophthalmodouleia. Das ist Augendienst. Newer vnd wolgegr√ºndter Bericht von Ursachen vnd Erkentn√ºs aller Gebrechen, Sch√§den vnd M√§ngel der Augen vnd des Gesichtes, wie man solchen anfenglich mit geb√ºrlichen mitteln begegenen, vorkommen vnd wehren, auch wie man alle solche gebresten k√ºnstlich durch Artzney, Instrument vnd Handgrieffe curiren, wircken vnd vertreiben sol … /
George Bartisch
Published: 1583.
Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Mental Floss: 6 Ways Europe’s Best Doctors Tried to Cure Beethoven’s Deafness

BuzzFeed: Morbidly Beautiful Pictures Reveal the Horror of Surgery in the Victorian Era

O Say Can You See: The peace gun

Mental Floss: 11 Weird Old-School Plastic Surgery Techniques

TECHNOLOGY:

Anita Guerrini: The Moving Skeleton

Conciatore: Galileo and Glass

Open Culture: How Film Was Made in 1958: A Kodak Nostalgia Moment

Yovisto: The first Worm hit the Internet 24 Years ago

Yovisto: The Dream of the Largest Aircraft ever built

H-4 Hercules “Spruce Goose”

H-4 Hercules “Spruce Goose”

Yovisto: Alexander Lippisch and the Delta Wing

Letters of Note: New Fangled Writing Machine

The Creators Project: Rediscover Failed Eastern Utopias in Stark Winter Photographs

Diseases of Modern Life: Captivating respiration: the ‘Breathing Napoleon’

Yovisto: Alois Senefelder revolutionized Printing Technology

Yovisto: The Cornier Do X – the World’s Largest Seaplane

Conciatore: Lake of Flowers

University of Washington: University Libraries: Digital Collections: Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collection

Design is Fine History is Mine: Joseph Edmonson Mechanical calculator

B1131-2 Calculator, mechanical, Edmondson's  Patent, for addition and substraction, brass and steel mechansim, in polished wooden case with brass handles, W F Stanley, London, England, 1880

B1131-2 Calculator, mechanical, Edmondson’s
Patent, for addition and substraction, brass
and steel mechansim, in polished wooden
case with brass handles, W F Stanley,
London, England, 1880

Ptak Science Books: Measuring Things with Mountains & the German Big Gun of WWI (1918)

Ptak Science Books: Sound Landscapes of Lost Acoustics

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Niche: When Blue Meets Green: The Intersection of Workers and Environmentalists

Niche: Seeing the Forest (Workers) for the Trees: Environment and Labour History in New Brunswick Forest

Science News: New fascination with Earth’s ‘Boring Billion’

Electronic Scholarly Publishing: Free Online Book: A History of Genetics by A. H. Sturtevent

histgene_f

AGU Blogosphere: Norman Bowen’s Papers

Letters from Gondwana: Darwin and the Flowering Plant Evolution in South America

Gizmodo: This Was the First Murder Solved Using Geology

Concocting History: The birth of roses

us10.campaign.com: Gertrude Bell: Archaeologist, Writer, Explorer

f4d83378-f46c-4b1a-85fb-7b3b374d512b

Science League of America: Evolution for John Doe, Part 2

Embryo Project: August Friedrich Leopold Weismann (1834–1914)

The Guardian: Scientists warned the US president about global warming 50 years ago today

Embryo Project: Oviraptor philoceratops Dinosaurs

York Dispatch News: Scientists discuss ‘What if?’ scenario in Dover intelligent-design case

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Henry Fairfield Osborn

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Wallace’s megapode mystery…

Active History: What about the people? Place, memory, and Industrial Pollution in Sudbury

Paige Fossil History: Murdering Their Child: Wallace, Darwin, and Human Origins

History of Geology: A.R. Wallace on Geology, Great Glaciers and the Speed of Evolution

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Antoine Lavoisier’s Theory of Combustion

Today in Science History: – November 2 – Thomas Midgely, Jr.

Label for Ethyl Gasoline Additive. Leaded gasoline was one of the major inventions of Thomas Midgley Jr.

Label for Ethyl Gasoline Additive. Leaded gasoline was one of the major inventions of Thomas Midgley Jr.

Academia: The Hidden History of Phlogiston (pdf)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Baconian Induction in the Principia

The People’s Daily Morning Star: World-Leading Mathematician and Activist Barry Cooper Dies

JISCM@il: New digital humanities tools

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: Newberry Library

Project Muse: Bulletin of the History of Medicine: Special Issue Communicating Reproduction Contents Page

The Recipes Project: Introducing… Graduate Student Posts!

BSHS: Reader Project in the History of Science – Survey

Medicine, ancient and modern: A post for the Day of the Dead (All Souls) and Remembrance Day: Galen, Classics and the First World War

Marburg, Issel’s native city, at the turn of the 20th c.

Marburg, Issel’s native city, at the turn of the 20th c.

Conciatore: Bibliomaniac

American Science: Can Contributors Change Journals?

Medievalist.net: The Medieval Magazine: Medicine in the Middle Ages (Issue 40)

Chicago Journals: ISIS: Focus: Bounded Rationality and the History of Science

The Recipe Project: Historical Recipes as Sources: A Special Series

History Today: A German scholar living in 17th-century London revolutionised the way scientists shared news of their latest advances

Publishing pioneer: Henry Oldenburg by Jan van Cleve, 1668.

Publishing pioneer: Henry Oldenburg by Jan van Cleve, 1668.

The H-Word: The best history of science fancy dress costumes

The #EnvHist Weekly

Royal College of Physicians: Wartime damage: evidence from the books

CHSTM: Science in the Jungle: The Missionary Mapping and National Imaging of Western Amazonia

Fistful of Cinctans: Subject Specialist Knowledge

Blink: Keepers of ancient peace

The National: Opinion: Recalling the science of Islam’s Golden Age is not enough

Alun Salt: Does history feel better when it has no connection to the past?

ESOTERIC:

Cambridge University Library Special Collections: A Book of Magic

Discover: The Crux: The Man Who Tried to Weigh The Soul

Robert Blair The Grave The Soul hovering over the Body reluctantly parting with Life

Robert Blair The Grave The Soul hovering over the Body reluctantly parting with Life

Penn Library: Penn in Hand: Selected Manuscripts: Alchemy

Steve Silberman has won the prestigious Samuel Johnson Prize for his book NeuroTribes

Youtube: Samuel Johnson Prize Winner Announcement 2015

Home

BBC Arts: Samuel Johnson Prize 2015: Steve Silberman

The Guardian: ‘Hopeful’ study of autism wins Samuel Johnson prize 2015

The Guardian: Steve Silberman on winning the Samuel Johnson prize: ‘I was broke, broke, broke’

‘Science is under attack’ … Silberman, whose book Neurotribes has won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

‘Science is under attack’ … Silberman, whose book Neurotribes has won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

The Independent: The publication of Steve Silberman’s Neurotribes will change how we understand autism

The Guardian: My hero: Allen Ginsberg by Steve Silberman

BBC News: Science author Steve Silberman on his book on autism

The Independent: Samuel Johnson Prize 2015: History of autism is first popular science winner of non-fiction book award

BOOK REVIEWS:

THE: Making Nature: The History of a Scientific Journal, by Melinda Baldwin

Science Book a Day: Chilled: How Refrigeration Changed the World and Might Do So Again

Brain Pickings: Nature Anatomy: A Glorious Illustrated Love Letter to Curiosity and the Magic of Our World

Science Book a Day: Genius at Play: The Curious Mind of John Horton Conway

genius-at-play

Centre for Medical Humanities: The Making of Modern Anthrax, 1875–1920 reviewed by Dr Anne Hanley

Science Book a Day: The Joy of X: A Guided Tour of Math, From One to Infinity

NEW BOOKS:

Rubedo Press: William Lilly’s History of his Life and Times 300 Anniversary Edition

University of Chicago Press: Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform

Gizmodo: How Ta-Nehisis Coates Inspired a Book About the Hunt for Vulcan

MIT News: 3Q: Thomas Levenson on the hunt for Vulcan, the missing planet

Soundcloud: The Hunt for Vulcan by Thomas Levenson, Narrated by Kevin Pariseau

National Geographic: Book Talk: The Hunt for Vulcan, the Planet That Wasn’t There

Harvard University Press: Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

9780674967984

Princeton University Press: An Einstein Encyclopedia

Wiley Online Library: A Companion to the History of American Science

Palgrave: Domesticity in the Making of Modern Science

Historiens de la santé: Les sources du funéraire en France à l’époque contemporaine

New Books in Science; Technology, and Society: The Courtiers’ Anatomists: Animals and Humans in Louis XIV’s Paris

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs until 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope

Hooke's microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia. Source Wikimedia Commons

Hooke’s microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia.
Source Wikimedia Commons

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs until 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Saturday

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA Source: Wikimedia Commons

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Gresham College: Lecture: Hamilton, Boole and their Algebras 17 November 2015

HSS: Free Showing: Merchants of Doubt Colonial Ballroom, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA 21 November 2015

Social Media Knowledge Exchange: Event: Can social media work for me? Cambridge 19 November

medhumlabmanchester: Launch Event 19 November 2015

ChoM News: Lecture: Studying Traumatic Wounds and Infectious Diseases in the Civil War Hospital Harvard Medical School 19 November 2015

UCL: STS: Talk: Professor Psillos Induction and Natural Necessities Gordon House 17 November 2015

University of London: School of Advanced Studies: Debate: Opening the book: reading and the evolving technology(ies) of the book 10 November 2015

Bodleian Library & Radclife Camera: John Aubrey and the idea of fame 10 November 2015

John Aubrey Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Aubrey
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Linnean Society: Explore Your Archive: Natural History on Record 16–20 November 2015

CHF: Rohm and Haas Fellow in Focus Lecture: William Newman, “New Light on Isaac Newton’s Alchemy”

UCLA Department of History: Lecture: Lorraine Daston: The Immortal Archives: Nineteenth-Century Science Imagines the Future 17 November 2015

Wellcom Library: Seminar: Executing magic: the healing power of criminal corpses in European popular culture 10 November 2015

The Indian Express: Film on Ramanujan to open IFFI this year, Spain is focus country

CHoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine “Madness and Mayhem in Maine: The Parkman-Portland Parley and a Mass. Murder” 12 November 2015

The Geological Society: The William Smith Map Bicentenary (1815–2015) Events

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Charles Lyell: Principles of Geology: Being an Attempt to Explain the Former Changes of the Earth's Surface, by Reference to Causes Now in Operation London, 1830–1833

Charles Lyell: Principles of Geology: Being an Attempt to Explain the Former
Changes of the Earth’s Surface, by Reference to Causes Now in Operation
London, 1830–1833

TELEVISION:

Forbes: The History Channel Delves Into Einstein’s Brain

BBC Arts: Samuel Johnson Prize 2015: Steve Silberman

io9: It’s a Fine Line Between Historical Fact and Fiction on Manhattan

AHF: “Manhattan” Series 2, Episode 4: The Indispensable Man

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: The Carbon Arc Lamp

Youtube: CRASSH: Simon Schaffer – Imitation Games: Conspiratorial Sciences and Intelligent Machines

Youtube: The Geological Society: Apollo and the Geology of the Moon

Youtube: Ralph Baer and Bill Harrison Play Ping-Pong Video Game, 1969

Bridgeman Footage: Clip of the Week: ‘[There is] nowhere I would rather be than in my lab, staining my clothes and getting paid to play’ – Marie Curie

Youtube: Einstein’s Miracle Year: The Road to Relativity

Youtube: Diary of a Snakebite Death

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Missed in History: Isaac Newton

Comparative Media Studies: MIT: Tom Levenson, Einstein, Mercury, and the Hunt for Vulcan

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Roy Porter Student Essay Prize

The Mindlin Foundation: Mindlin Science Communication Prize Deadline 15 November 2015

SocPhilSciPract: CfP: Graduate Journal in Hist/Phil/Soc of Science: Pulse

University of Leeds: Workshop 2016: Telecommunications expertise and technologies developed during the First World War

Johns Hopkins University: CfP: The Making of the Humanities V 5–7 October 2016

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: The Mater of Mimesis. Studies on mimesis and materials in nature, art and science 17–18 December 2015

LSE: The UK and European Conference on Foundations of Physics will take place this year on 16-18 July 2016

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology Halle/Saale Germany: CfP: Dispersion and Impact in the Indian Ocean World: 23–24 September 2016

BSHS: Call for Nominations: The BSHS John Pickstone Prize

John V Pickstone  Source: Wikimedia Commons

John V Pickstone
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Prague: Pariah sciences. Episteme, Power and Legitimization of Knowledge, from Animal Electricity to Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions. Symposium at the 7th International Conference of the European Society for the History of Science 22-24 September 2016

City University of New York: Earth and Environmental Scienvces: Fall 2015 Colloquium Schedule

Calgary Alberta: CfP: Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science (CSHPS) annual conference part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences meeting 28–30 May 2016

ESRC: CfP: Dietary Innovation and Disease in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries Venice 8–10 June 2016

University of Wuppertal: Workshop: Jesuit early modern science in a digital perspective 26–27 November 2016

Birkbeck College: CfP: After the End of Disease 26–27 May 2016

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences: Workshop: History of Scientific Publication 3–4 December 2015

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy Conference 3–6 June 2016

Salle des Actes de la faculté de Pharmacie, Paris: Journée d’études: Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715), un savant en son siècle 18 Novembre 2015

L’Université de Sherbrooke: Appel à communications: L’histoire extra-muros : des frontières qui s’élargissent. Regards croisés sur les approches émergentes et l’interdisciplinarité dans la pratique historique 25–26 Février 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Exeter: Associate Research Fellow The Medical World of Early Modern England, Ireland and Wales c. 1500–1750

Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia: Three-Year Post-doc fellowship on Vernacular Astronomy and Meteorology in Renaissance Italy

LMU Munich: The Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP) invites applications for Visiting Fellowships and Research Group Fellowships

London School of Tropical Hygiene and Medicine: Research Fellow

The Bodleian Library: Visiting Fellowships

University of Leeds: New Postdoctoral Position: Cultures of the Book

University of London: Institute of Historical Research (IHR) Librarian

Wellcome Trust: Special Collections manager X2 Deadline 11 November

University of Leeds: Men, Women and Care: Applications open for 2 ERC funded PhD studentships

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Travel Grants: Duke University’s History of Medicine Collection

Historic Britain: Assistant Science Advisor

Open University: History of Medicine PhD programme 2016

Universal Short Tittle Catalogue: PhD Studentship History of the Book

 

 

 

 

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