Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol: #40

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #40

Monday 16 May 2016

EDITORIAL:

It’s that time of the week once more for a new edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list, which brings you all the histories of science, technology and medicine that washed up on the shores of cyberspace over the last seven days.

The scientific event of  the week was without doubt the Transit of Mercury that took place on Monday 9 May and was followed live with telescopes with sun filters and indirectly through numerous Internet feeds by people all over the world. Whilst by no means as spectacular or as rare as a Transit of Venus, which can be followed with the packed-eye (protected of course with transit glasses) the Transit of Mercury remains a symbol of the seventeenth-century transition from a geocentric to a heliocentric world view.

Observations Mercury and of the Transits of Mercury did not begin in the twenty-first century so it is only natural that the historians of astronomy got in on the act last week, too. In the selection of posts and articles that follow we have, the historical background to the first transit observation by Pierre Gassed in 1631. We also have a post on the role that early observations  of Mercury played in Copernicus’ De revolutionibus. There are also posts on historical transit observations by Edmond Halley and Captain James Cook.

If you missed out on the excitement on Monday then you will only have to wait until 11 November 2019 to make your own historical observations.

Mesopotamian cuneiform clay fragment regarding the visibility of Mercury, c. late 1st millennium BCE

Mesopotamian cuneiform clay fragment regarding the visibility of Mercury, c. late 1st millennium BCE

The H-Word: Before the Transit of Mercury: forgotten forerunners of an astronomical revolution

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Tracking the Messenger of the Gods

Position of the planet Mercury in the 6th house at the moment of Prince Iskandar's birth, 1411

Position of the planet Mercury in the 6th house at the moment of Prince Iskandar’s birth, 1411

New Zealand History: Captain Cook observes transit of Mercury 9 November 1769

Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage: Transits of Venus and Mercury as Muses

Motions of Mercury in Georg Peuerbach's, Theoricae novae planetarum (Venice, 1537)

Motions of Mercury in Georg Peuerbach’s, Theoricae novae planetarum (Venice, 1537)

The Catholic Astronomer: Priests, Deacons, and Religious of Science: Meet the Priest who First Recorded the Transit of Mercury – Pierre Gassendi

Personification of Mercury in Turkish version of the 'Wonders of Creation' by al-Qazwini, 1717

Personification of Mercury in Turkish version of the ‘Wonders of Creation’ by al-Qazwini, 1717

Youtube: Royal Society: Transit Telescope – Objectivity #69

All Mercury Illustrations Courtesy of @HistAstro

All Mercury Illustrations Courtesy of @HistAstro

Quotes of the week:

 “I like my pronouns like I like my restrooms: gender-neutral” – Shit Academics Say (@AcademicsSay)

 “I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.” – Douglas Adams (1952-2001)

“In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.” – Douglas Adams

“Could God create a Wikipedia article so notable even He couldn’t delete it?” – John Overholt (@john_overholt)

Edington Quote

“Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible” – Richard Feynman h/t @ferwen

“The first principle is that you must not fool yourself — and you are the easiest person to fool” – Richard Feynman (1918-1988)

“Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.” – Richard Feynman (1918-1988)

KV QUOTE

“The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language.” – Richard Feynman (1918-1988)

“Gods and angels do not come bearing perfectly formed theories to disembodied prophets who instantly write textbooks.” – Louisa Gilder h/t @fadesingh

“In mathematics you don’t understand things. You just get used to them” – John von Neumann

Nothing Stone

Science: “the only human activity that is truly democratic, truthful, apolitical, rational & self-regulation.” James Burke, 1985. Discuss. – Stephen Curry (@Stephen_Curry)

SChrödinger's Cat

Birthdays of the Week:

Dorothy Hodgkin born 12 May

22947

The Guardian: Dorothy Hodgkin: The only British woman to win a Nobel science prize gets a doodle

Royal Society of Chemistry: Professor Dorothy Hodgkin OM

The Guardian: Colouring by letters: the life of Dorothy Hodgkin

Nobelprize.org: Enhancing X-ray Vision

Science Life and Times: A blue plaque for Dorothy

odgkin

Science Museum: Celebrating Dorothy Hodgkin

Dorothy Hodgkin was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1964 for her studies using X-ray crystallography, with which she worked out the atomic structure of penicillin, vitamin B-12 and insulin. Image credit: Science Museum / SSPL

Dorothy Hodgkin was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1964 for her studies using X-ray crystallography, with which she worked out the atomic structure of penicillin, vitamin B-12 and insulin. Image credit: Science Museum / SSPL

MHS Collection: Model of the Structure of Penicillin, by Dorothy Hodgkin, Oxford, c.1945

University of Oxford: Hodgkin gets stamp of approval

1996_1114_l

Royal Society: Women’s work: Dorothy Hodgkin and the culture and craft of X-ray crystallography

Facebook: Dorothy Hodgkin: A celebration of a pioneering biochemist

Florence Nightingale born 12 May 1820

1024px-Florence_Nightingale_three_quarter_length

Science Museum Group Journal: A statistical campaign: Florence Nightingale and Harriet Martineau’s ‘England and her Soldiers’

Yovisto: Florence Nightingale – The Lady with the Lamp

British History Online: Nos. 4–12 South Street

The Public Domain Review: The Voice of Florence Nightingale

NYAM: “A Passionate Statistician”: Florence Nightingale and the Numbers Game

Chart from NYAM’s copy of Florence Nightingale’s A contribution to the sanitary history of the British army during the late war with Russia (London, 1859).

Chart from NYAM’s copy of Florence Nightingale’s A contribution to the sanitary history of the British army during the late war with Russia (London, 1859).

The British Museum: Collection Online: “The Lady with the Lamp” (Florence Nightingale at Scutari A.D. 1856.)

The Economist: Worth a thousand words

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

APS: Physics: Viewpoint: Particles Move to the Beat of a Microfluid Drum

Figure 1: (Top) When dark particles are placed on the back of a violin vibrating on resonance, the particles move to the vibrational nodes. The resulting patterns, known as Chladni figures, depend on the vibrational frequency and provide a visual manifestation of each resonance. (Bottom) Poulain and colleagues [1] observed Chladni patterns when they placed microparticles within a liquid above a thin oscillating plate in a microfluidics device. Because of the fluid dynamics in their device, the particles were, unlike the particles on the violins, transported away from the nodes (dashed white lines) and towards the vibrational antinodes.

Figure 1: (Top) When dark particles are placed on the back of a violin vibrating on resonance, the particles move to the vibrational nodes. The resulting patterns, known as Chladni figures, depend on the vibrational frequency and provide a visual manifestation of each resonance. (Bottom) Poulain and colleagues [1] observed Chladni patterns when they placed microparticles within a liquid above a thin oscillating plate in a microfluidics device. Because of the fluid dynamics in their device, the particles were, unlike the particles on the violins, transported away from the nodes (dashed white lines) and towards the vibrational antinodes.

The Guardian: Sir Denys Wilkinson obituary

Yovisto: Cecilia Payne-Gasposchkin and the Composition of Stars

Kongernes Samling Rosenborg: Astronomical Clock

Yovisto: Surely You’re Joking, Mr Feynman

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Isaac and the apple – the story and the myth

The Woolsthorpe Manor apple tree Source:Wikimedia Commons

The Woolsthorpe Manor apple tree
Source:Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Houston, we have a Problem

Yovisto: Please Don’t Ignite the Earth’s Atmosphere…

AHF: Stanislaus Ulam

OUP Blog: A brief history of corpuscular discoveries

AHF: Nicholas Kurti

Laboratory Equipment: Astronomy Specifically Dates 2,500-year-old Poem by Sappho

Astronotes: Skylab: Everything You Need to Know

An overhead view of the Skylab Orbital Workshop in Earth orbit as photographed from the Skylab 4 Command and Service Modules (CSM) during the final fly-around by the CSM before returning home.  Source: Wikimedia Commons

An overhead view of the Skylab Orbital Workshop in Earth orbit as photographed from the Skylab 4 Command and Service Modules (CSM) during the final fly-around by the CSM before returning home.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Ptak Science Books: Neutrons, Positrons, & Hell–the Epic of the Fall of Man Suggested in the Physics of 1932

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Yovisto: Jules Dumont d’Urville and his South-Pacific Voyages

HNN: One Reason the Story of the Explorer Hernando de Soto is Memorable

National Geographic: If You Love Maps, This Blog is for You

Swann Auction Galleries: Dutch East India Company – Java Sea

Atlas Obscura: The Hidden History of America’s 19th-Century Mania for Panoramic Prints

Des Moines, Ia. (Image: A. Ruger/Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division)

Des Moines, Ia. (Image: A. Ruger/Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division)

Yovisto: Arthur Phillip – Commander of the First Fleet

The National Museum of American History: Lewis and Clark Expedition Pocket Compass

that’s: This WWII-era map of China just might change the way you view the country

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Hermann Historica Archiv: Geheimer Giftschrank in Buchform

Imperial Measures: New Blog: Alcohol, Health & Medicine in Colonial India

CHoM News: Processing of the Harvard School of Public Health Longitudinal Studies of Child Health and Development Records

Nursing Clio: The Gendered Politics of Sweat

Braille

The Recipes Project: Workhouse Diets: Paucity or Plenty [Part I]

The Recipes Project: Workhouse Diets: Paucity or Plenty [Part II]

Thomas Morris: A rotten trick

Anita Guerini: History, animals, science, food: The Secret Horror of Dissection

Skeleton with rickets.  Histoire naturelle, tome III, Pl. I.   BNF

Skeleton with rickets. Histoire naturelle, tome III, Pl. I. BNF

Smithsonian.com: How Tuberculosis Shaped Victorian Fashion

Harvard Medicine: Line Art: The work of Andreas Vesalius fascinated, and inspired neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing

Conversant: Hidden on the Horizon: A View of the New England Throat Distemper Epidemics from Salem

JRSM: ‘An innocent deception’: placebo controls in the St Petersburg homeopathy trial, 1829–1830

Thomas Morris: Boiling water and birch twigs

Fugitive Leaves: Bringing Out the Dead: Adventures in Cataloging, Part I

Nurcing Cio: “For Poor or Rich”: Handywomen and traditional Birth in Ireland

flickr: Wellcome Images: International Nurses Day

NYAM: Edward Jenner and the Development of the Smallpox Vaccine

Circulating Now: A Universal Code: Nurse Uniforms of all Nations

Peter McCandless, Author, Editor, Historian: Anatomy Illustrated (1543–2007)

Anat8

Thomas Morris: The fire-proof man

The Victorian Web: Another Florence Nightingale? The Rediscovery of Mary Seacole

Pilgrimrose.com: Holding Their Breath

Thomas Morris: The hearing-aid chair

Smithsonian.com: Before Dr. Mutter, Surgery was a Dangerous and Horrifically Painful Ordeal

The New York Times: Unearthing the Secrets of New York’s Mass Graves

TECHNOLOGY:

Kelvin Marconi

Yovisto: Nikolaus Otto and the Four Stroke Engine

Otto-Langen gas engine 1867. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Otto-Langen gas engine 1867.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

JSTOR Daily: Cracking Enigma: The Polish Connection

Open Culture: How the Moog Synthesiser Changed the Sound of Music

Global Urban History: From Lancashire to the World: The Manchester Ship Canal and Globalization

The National Museum of Computing: Early Computer Showroom Chic

Creative Review: Historic computers look super sexy in this new photo series by Docubyte and Ink

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Z3 or not Z3 that is the question?

DW: Konrad Zuse and the digital revolution he started with the Z3 computer 75 years ago

ZusePortrait

History Computer: Konrad Zuse – the first relay computer

Yovisto: Theodore von Kármán and his Advances in Aerodynamics

Yovisto: Igor Sikorsky and the Helicopter

Ptak Science Books: Stem-Punk Tee-Shirt Rocket Ship Pilots (1932)

Damn Interesting: The Atomic Automobile

flickr: Binocular compound microscope, Carl Zeiss Jena, 1914

The New York Times: What Was the Greatest Era for Innovation? A Brief Guided Tour

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Apes

Michelle Marshall: A Duke Deceived

Yovisto: James Pollard Espy – the Storm King

Clerk of Oxford: ‘Summer, sun-brightest’: An Anglo-Saxon Summer

The Guardian: The foul reign of the biological clock

Notches: “A Poison More Deadly”: Defining Obscenity in the West

Yovisto: Johann Friedrich Blumenbach and the Human Race

Blumenbach’s Five Races

Blumenbach’s Five Races

The Embryo Project: Johann Friedrich Blumenbach (1752–1840)

Medievalists.net: Earthquakes in Medieval Sicily (A Historical Revision 7th–13th Century)

Natural History Museum: Diplodocus: this is your life

Science League of America: Who Was the Occupant? Part 2

Niche: Portal to the Pyrocene

CHF: Man Made: A History of Synthetic Life

Atlas Obscura: Meet the Fish that Made America Great

The New York Times: The Lost Gardens of Emily Dickinson

Smithsonian Collections Blog: The Tradescant Museum: A Proto-Smithsonian in London?

Academia: The Ethics of Animal Experimentation in Seventeenth-Century England

Science Friday: A Tale of Two Glassmakers and Their Marine Marvels

The New York Times: In Maritime Logbooks, a Trove of ‘extraordinary’ Imagery

OMNI Q&A: John Lilly on Dolphin Consciousness

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac and his Work on Gasses

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

Chemistry World: Harry Kroto 1939–2016

Chemistry World: Timms’ reactor

The metal vapour reactor was invented by Peter Timms, British chemist (1937-2005)

The metal vapour reactor was invented by Peter Timms, British chemist (1937-2005)

Yovisto: Justus von Liebig and the Agricultural Revolution

 

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Calvin historiography

NCSE: Friend of Darwin and Friend of the Planet awards for 2016

Canadian Bulletin of Medical History / Bulletin canadiene d’histoire de la medicine: Inaugural Edition now available

The Conversation: The philosophy of chemistry … and what it can tell us about life, the universe and everything

ABC: Why Einstein didn’t wear socks and the nature of scientific inquiry

Le Ruche: AVIS DE PARUTION. JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY. VOL. 1 – 2016

Associations Now: Beer Group Helping to Brew Up a History Lesson

The #EnvHist Weekly

Electrifying the Country House: Notes from an Intern: Stories from the Archives

Smithsonian Institution Archives: Joseph Henry 1797–1878

Joseph Henry Portrait, by Ulke, Henry, 1879, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 10191or AI-10191.

Joseph Henry Portrait, by Ulke, Henry, 1879, Smithsonian Archives – History Div, 10191or AI-10191.

Academia: The Role of the Author in Constructing the History of Science

J.F: Penn: Talking About Death and Morbid Anatomy with Joanna Ebenstein

AEON: Anthropocene fever

ESOTERIC:

Chronologia Universalis: Beware the Rheticus’s prophecy!

The most reliable witness to Rheticus’s horoscope – MS Wrocław, University Library, Akc. 1949/594, fol. 56v, fragment

The most reliable witness to Rheticus’s horoscope – MS Wrocław, University Library, Akc. 1949/594, fol. 56v, fragment

distillatio: Why I’ve not been posting so much recently

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: The 100 best nonfiction books: No 15 – The Double Helix by James D Watson (1668)

Project Muse: 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed: Turning Points in Ancient History by Eric H. Cline

Nature: Genetics: On the heredity trail

The Irish Catholic: The universe and Katharine Kepler

The New York Times: ‘The Gene,’ by Siddhartha Mukherjee

the-gene-9781476733500_lg

Science Book a Day: Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Suiting Up

Smithsonian.com: The Science Behind Nature’s Patterns

Smithsonian.com: The Bizarre Tale of the Tunnels, Trysts and Taxa of a Smithsonian Entomologist

Contagions: Environment, Society and the Black Death in Sweden

NEW BOOKS:

University of Oklahoma Press: The Greatest Show in the Arctic: The American Exploration of Franz Josef Land, 1898–1905

Hodder & Stoughton: Rebecca Rideal ­– 1666 Plague, War and Hellfire

University of Chicago Press: Huxley’s Church and Maxwell’s Demon: From Theistic Science to Naturalistic Science

Cork University Press: The Booles & the Hintons

Routledge: Explorations in History and Globalization

9781138639607

Ithaque: Le Cas Paramord. Obsession et contrainte psychique, aujourd’hui

University of Chicago Press: Ex Voto. Votive Giving Across Cultures

ART & EXHIBITIONS

History Today: Maria Merian’s Butterflies

Science Museum: Robots

University of Oklahoma: University Libraries: Galileo’s World: Virtual Exhibit

Natural History Museum: Dippy on tour

The Royal Society of Medicine: Exhibition: Charcot, Hysteria & La Salpetiere 3 May–23 July 2016

Australian National Maritime Museum: Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude 5 May30–October 2016

Morbid Anatomy Museum, Brooklyn: House of Wax: Anatomical, Pathological, and Ethnographic Waxworks from Castan’s Panopticum, Berlin, 1869–1922 Closes 30 May 2016

Harvard Magazine: Before Social Media: Radio was the medium that broke the silence

Horniman Museum & Gardens: H Blog: Tyrannosaurus and Tarbosaurus

Bodleian: Marks of Genius

The Houston Museum of Natural Science: Cabinet of Curiosities Opens 6 May 2016

Reviews in History: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee (Royal College of Physicians, 18 January – 29 July 2016)

Broadway World.com: Met Museum Exhibition to Celebrate Artistic, Technological, Cultural Legacy of the Seljuqs

Grup d’estudis d’història de la cartografia: Exhibition about Renacentrist cartography in Bergamo 16 April–10 July 2016

Bonner Sterne: “Argelanders Erben” im Universitätsmuseum Bonn bis 31 Juli 2016

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

Bridging the World: Benjamin Baker of Frome 5 March–21 May 2016

Exhibition Nancy

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Globe Exhibition

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

CLOSING SOON: New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

CLOSING SOON: National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Natural History Museum: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017 

Science Museum: Information Age

Cambridge ScienceCentre: Cosmic Runs still 30 Jun 2016

Wellcome Library: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: YOUTOPIA: VISIONS OF THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: THE MAUDSLEY AT WAR 25 May–20November 2016 

Herschel Museum: Science and Spirituality: Astronomy and the Benedictine Order 4 May–12December

Science Museum: Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph 14 April–11 September 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Old Vic: Jekyll and Hyde 20-28 May 2016

 

Royal Opera House: Frankenstein, 4 – 27 MAY 2016

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016

EVENTS:

Museum of the History of Science, Oxford: Talk: Buckets, Bollards and Bombs 23 May 2016

The National Museum of Computing: Guided Tours

Café 1001, Brick Lane: Museum Showoff, May 24 2016

Royal Museums of Greenwich: Talk: In the Steps of Shackleton 1 June 2016

CHF: Cain Conference Public Lecture: Life in the Universe Past and Present 26 May 2016

Gresham College: Lecture: The Expanding Universe 26 October 2016

University of Greenwich: Seminar: ‘Mag. and Met.’: the origins and early years of the Magnetic and Meteorological Department at Greenwich Observatory 25 May 2016

Royal College of Nursing: Lecture: Joyous and deliberate motherhood: birth control nursing in the Marie Stopes Mothers Clinic, 1921-1931 26 May 2016

Royal College of Nursing: Lecture: The Northern Powerhouse: Cottontown Nurses who shaped the Profession 8 June 2016

 

Brompton Cemetery: London Alchemy: Socery, Gin and Spooky Music in a Cemetery Chapel 4-5 June 2016

 

 

Glasgow: Science on the Streets – City Centre Tour 11 June 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and The History of Understanding

BSHS: Upcoming Lecture: Henry Wellcome Pharmacist Royal Pharmaceutical Society 23 May 2016

London Fortean Society: Snake Oil! The Golden Age of Quackery in Britain and America 26 May 2016

 

V&A: Courses: Sensing Time: The Art and Science of Clocks and Watches 18 June 2016

Things

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

Boston Medical Library: Lecture: Prescription Drug Abuse in American History:

 

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

SciFRi talks

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal Pharmaceutical Society: Henry Wellcome, Pharmacist 23 May

Royal Pharmaceutical Society: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Edward Jenner 17 May

The Royal College of Physicians: Discover Medical London: Walking Tour:  “Sex and The City”

Cambridge Science Centre: LATES: A HISTORY OF ROCKETRY 19 May 2016 

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Pavel Kaplun: Science

Pavel Kaplun: Science

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: First Flight Over North Pole (1926)

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: Exhibitions 18 Videos!

RADIO & PODCASTS:

L.I.S.A: Tobias Linden: Das ‘Verbogene’ in der Geisterfotographie des 19. Jahrhunderts

Distillations: The Ancient Chemistry Inside Your Taco

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Library and Archives: History of Medicine: Audio and Video

Distillations Podcast: Is Space the Place? Trying to Save Humanity by Mining Asteroids

University of Oxford: ‘Death Masks: Facing the Dead’

BBC RADIO 4: Florence Nightingale: Statistician

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Pittsburgh Center for Philosophy of Science: Upcoming Events

University of Edinburgh: Workshop: Philosophy of biology meets social studies of biosciences 24 May 2016

University of Paderborn: Seminar: Women in the History of Philosophy: Diotima and Hannah Arendt 17-19 May 2016

HSS: The Nathan Reingold Prize for an original graduate student essay on the history of science and its cultural influences. Deadline 1 June 2016

Fórum Lisboa (Antigo Cinema Roma): CFP: Lisbon International Conference on Philosophy of Science 14–16 December 2016

University of Cambridge: Symposium: Science and Culture in Theory and History: Latin America, France and the Anglophone World 2–3 July 2016

Everything Early Modern Women: CfP: The Body and Spiritual Experience: 1500–1700 (RSA 2017)

Wellcome Library: Workshop: Incunabula and medicine: a workshop 20 May 2016

Calenda: Le Calendrier des Lettres et Sciences Humains et Sociales: Appel à contribution « Les sciences du vivant. Imaginaire et discours scientifique »

Western Michigan University: Call for Abstracts: Sixth Annual Medical Humanities Conference 15–16 September 2016

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Undergraduate Essay Prize Deadline 1 October 2016

Kunsthistorisches Institut In Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut: CfP: Photo-Objects. On the Materiality of Photographs and Photo-Archives in the Humanities and Sciences 15–17 February 2017

Osiris Call for Papers

University of Bordeaux: Seminar: Philosophy & Biology 27 May 2016

University of Leuven: CfA: The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences 12–13 October 2016

Science Museum: Artefacts Meeting 2–4 October 2016: CfP: Understanding Use: Science and Technology Objects and Users

Cambridge: CfP extended: Science and Islands in the Indo-Pacific World 15–16 September 2016

Singapore: Society for the History of Technology: Annual Meeting 22–26 June 2016

Columbia University: Exploring the Philosophy of Émile du Châtelet 1–3 June 2016

Conférence des étudiant.e.s du NHRU-URHN: Briser les silences de l’histoire du nursing et de la santé 19 Mai 2016

Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey: SPSP Pre-Conference Workshop: Empirical Methodology for Philosophy of Science in Practice 16 June 2016

University of Bristol: Centre for Science and Philosophy: Events

BSHS: Singer Prize: The Singer Prize, of up to £300, is awarded by the British Society for the History of Science every two years to the writer of an unpublished essay, based on original research into any aspect of the history of science, technology or medicine.

University of Oxford: John Wallis (1616–1703) Mathematics, Music Theory, and Cryptography, 1n 17th Century 9 June 2016

Society for the Social History of Medicine: 2016 Undergraduate Essay Prize Deadline 1 October

BJHS Themes: We are calling for proposals for Issue 3 (2018) of BJHS Themes, the annual open-access journal that is a companion to the British Journal for the History of Science. Like the BJHSBJHS Themes is published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the BSHS.

St Michaels College, Cardiff University: Conference: Bodily Fluids/Fluid Bodies in Greek and Roman Antiquity 11–13 July 2016 Programme

H-Pennsylvania: Philip J. Pauly Book Prise Nominations Sought for Histories of Science in the Americas

British and European History of Medicine Conference: Registration: Medicine in Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts University of Kent 7-10 July 2016

BSHS: Prizes

Three Societies Meeting: University of Alberta, Edmonton 22–25 June 2016 Only two weeks left for hotel conference rates!

Staffordshire University: Workshop: Deleuze, Entropy and Thermodynamics 19 May 2016

Trinity College Cambridge: The Venues of Scholarly Output: Collections, Treatises, Textbooks, Archives 25 June 2016

Let’s Talk About Sex: CfP: History of Sexuality PGR/ECR Workshop University of Exeter 26–27 June 2016

Queen Mary University of London:Upcoming History of Emotions Work in Progress Seminars

Conferene

University of Reading: CfP: Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums  23 September 2016 Deadline: 15 June 2016

BSHS: Registration Open: The Body and Pseudoscience in the Long Nineteenth Century Newcastle University 18 June 2016

University of St. Andrews: Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy (SSEMP VII) 5–6 May 2016 Programme

Barts Pathology Museum: CfP: The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries 24 September 2016

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Leicester: Centre for Medical Humanities: Seminars:

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware: CfP: Making Modern Disability: Histories of Disability, Design, and Technology 28 October 2016

EHESS, Paris: Journée d’étude: Genre, humeurs et fluides corporels. Moyen Âge & Époque moderne 19 Mai 2016

New York City: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 30 September–1 October 2016

Columbia University: The Center for Science & Society: Exploring the Philosophy of Émilie du Châtelet 1–3 June 2016

Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology (Rio de Janeiro, 23-29 July 2017): CfP: Blood, Food, and Climate: Historical Relationships Between Physiology, Race, Nation-Building, and Colonialism/Globalization

CFP Early Modern World

History at the Open University: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland: A Conference in Honour of Anne Laurence Institute of Historical Research London 4 June 2016

IHPST, Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques, Paris: CfP: International Doctoral Conference in Philosophy of Science 29-30 September 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Ian Ramsey Centre Conference, University of Oxford: Workshop “Early Modern Laws of Nature: Secular and Divine” 7 July 2016 Call for Abstract: deadline 30 April 2016

History and Philosophy of Science Department, University of Cambridge: Workshop: Informal Aspects of Uncertainty Evaluation 20 May 2016

Annals of Science: Annals of Science Essay Prize for Young Scholars

Religion & Medicine

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CFP: Blood, Food & Climate – Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology

2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics Pöllau, Austria 5–7 September 2016

University of Cambridge: Cabinet of Natural History: Seminars Easter Term 2016

Science in Public

The International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST): Invites submissions for the fourth DHST Prize for Young Scholars, to be presented in 2017.

Warburg Institute: ESSWE Thesis Workshop 7 July 2016

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Society and th Sea

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

University of London: Birkbeck: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2016: 11 July 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Annual Conference Programme 28–30 May 2016

Women hist phil

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

irkbeck, University of London: CfP: Embarrassing Bodies: Feeling Self-Conscious in the Nineteenth Century 17 June 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Leeds: Fully funded AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Studentship: Making the Pulse: the Reception of the Stethoscope in nineteenth century Britain, 1817-1870.

The Royal Society: Archivist & Digital Resources Manager

University of Strathclyde Glasgow: Lecturer in the History of Health and Medicine since 1800

ODNB: Oxford DNB research bursaries in the humanities 2016–17

Academic Job Wiki: History of Science, Technology, and Medicine 2015–2016

University of Oxford: Research Associate – The History of Dyslexia

Leibniz Universität Hannover and Bielefeld University: 4 Doctoral Candidate Positions (65% TV-L 13) in Philosophy of Science and/or Ethics of Science

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Job: Assoc. Director/Oral Historian, Hagley Center

University of Liverpool: PhD studentship: ‘Changing Cultures in Health and Medicine’

University of Avignon: Contrat doctoral en histoire de la médecine médiévale: Histoire de la médecine médiévale; histoire de la santé (Occident médiéval, XIIe – XVe siècles)

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #39

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #39

Monday 09 May 2016

EDITORIAL:

Another week, another edition of the weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you as much of the histories of science, Technology and medicine out of the depths of cyberspace as you could read in a month of Sundays.

For me one of the principle functions of #histSTM is #scicomm. That is using the histories of the various disciplines to try and communicate their function, importance, relevance or whatever. One of the greatest communicators of science who ever lived is without any doubt whatsoever David Attenborough, who turned ninety on Sunday 8 May 2016.

I very much doubt if there are many British* scientists, science communicators, science journalists, historians of science or just fans of science, for that matter, who were not touched, moved, motivated, fascinated, educated, inspired or sometimes even totally floored by one or other of the multitude of science programmes that Attenborough has made over the last almost seventy years. *(This is probably true of lots of other countries too, but I don’t know how much of Attenborough’s work has been broadcast in any other countries. I do know that there are Wikipedia article on him in lots of different languages!) Attenborough broadcasts mostly over the natural world but it is safe to say that he himself is a force of nature.

If that wasn’t enough in his role as a manager of the then relatively new BBC 2 television channel Attenborough was responsible for introducing the world to Monty Python’s Flying Circus, Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation, Jacob Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man, Pot Black (the Snooker World Championship) and The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures. Being responsible for those series alone is enough to make him a living legend but this was merely a small side line in his extraordinary live.

Just by existing he last week rescued the British Government from a very sticky situation. Somebody came up with the (not so) bright idea of asking the Internet to choose a name for a new research ship. A journalist in a moment of childish irresponsibility suggested the name Boaty McBoatface! The Internet pounced and by a margin of a zillion to one Boaty McBoatface won the popular vote. Enter stern Conservative Government Minister, “We are NOT going to name a mega-million pound research vessel Boaty McBoatface!” The Internet fumed! Then came the Solomonic decision, the vessel will be named “Sir David Attenborough”. To protest against this decision would have been sacrilege.

The Internet is full of birthday tributes to the great man of which I have only included a small random selection below. If you read or look at nothing else you should look at the three BBC One web exclusive Youtube videos at the end of the list, they are made in co-operation with Aardman! However in honour of his ninetieth birthday I dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to:

David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough BBC / Sophie Lanfear

Sir David Attenborough BBC / Sophie Lanfear

“I suppose they would need a bigger ship if they had to paint “Attenborough McAttenboroughface” along the side” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

 David Attenborough at 90

Huff Post: Happy 90th Birthday David Attenborough!

Independent: Sir David Attenborough interview: The one question about life that still baffles him

New Scientist: David Attenborough: We’re suffocating ourselves

The Guardian: Dinosaurs and David Attenborough at the Natural History Museum

In the Dark: Sir David Attenborough at 90, Boaty McBoatface, and the song of the Lyre Bird

BBC News: Sir David Attenborough: Tributes paid as he turns 90

The Conversation: Sir David Attenborough at 90: the mesmerising storyteller of the natural world

Ri Channel: Christmas Lectures 1973: The Language of Animals

The Guardian: So you think you know David Attenborough? – video

BBC iPlayer: Happy Birthday to Sir David Attenborough

The Atlantic: Every Episode of Davis Attenborough’s Life Series, Ranked

Youtube: Nature Video Part 1: David Attenborough on Darwin

Youtube: Nature Video Part 2: David Attenborough on Birds of Paradise

Youtube: Nature Video Part 3: David Attenborough: Scientist or Broadcaster?

Youtube: An evening with Sir David Attenborough

 

BBC One: Web exclusive: The day I met Attenborough – Penguins

BBC One: Web exclusive: The day I met Attenborough – Lyrebird

BBC One: Web exclusive: The Gorillas Meet Attenborough

Quotes of the week:

Shit in the bed

Here’s what Hillsborough taught me. It’s just a game. It should never be a death sentence. And football rivalry NEVER trumps humanity. Ever. – Stephen McGann (@StephenMcGann)

“One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important”. – Bertrand Russell h/t @HambuloN

Gang of Phil

Just read the line “I am not interested in a hermeneutics, or an erotics, or a metaphorics of my anus.” – Sarah Ditum (@sarahditum)

Shaw Quote

“History is written by the Victors. No one ever got their last names, though”. – Brian Switek (@Laelaps)

“Personally I think a quid is a reasonable price for a quo, as long as it’s a genuine quo”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

Book Cartoon

“I would rather have question that can’t be answered than answers that can’t be questioned” – possibly Richard Feynman

 

“I think God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability.” ― Oscar Wilde h/t @Libroantiguo

“Best C17 name seen today: Mr Polycarpus Wharton (for all your gunpowder requisites)” – Kate Morant (@KateMorant)

Giordano Bruno’s self-description in opening of application to Oxford for a teaching position (Rowland 2008)

Giordano Bruno’s self-description in opening of application to Oxford for a teaching position (Rowland 2008)

Birthdays of the Week:

Athanasius Kircher born 2 May 1602

Portrait of Kircher at age 53 from Mundus Subterraneus (1664) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Kircher at age 53
from Mundus Subterraneus (1664)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Athanasius Kircher – A Man in Search of Universal Knowledge

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Athanasius Kircher

History of Geology: Damned Souls and Fiery Oceans – Early Views of Earth’s Core

Bircher Section of the Earth from "Mundus Subterraneus", first edition published in 1664-1665. -

Bircher Section of the Earth from “Mundus Subterraneus”, first edition published in 1664-1665. –

Sigmund Freud born 6 May 1856

Freud with his father Jakob in 1864. In The Freud centenary exhibit of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 1956.

Freud with his father Jakob in 1864. In The Freud centenary exhibit of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 1956.

Yovisto: Freudian Slips and other Trifles

Haaretz: The Close Relationship Between Einstein and Freud, Relatively Speaking

NYAM: Young Man Freud

Open Culture: Download Great Works by Sigmund Freud

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Heinrich Gustav Magnus and the Magnus Effect

nasaonline: Robert Williams Wood 1868–1955 A Biographical Memoir

AHF: Philip Abelson

Pickle: Melbourne’s greatest telescope

http---prod.static9.net.au-_-media-Network-Images-160502vintagetelescope

1001 Inventions: The World of Ibn al-Haytham

Voices of the Manhattan Project: J. Samuel Walker’s Interview

OMNI Q&A: Ilya Prigogine on the Arrow of Time

Ilya Quote

Yovisto: Steven Weinberg and the Great Unifying Theory

Cosmos: Six physics equations that changed the course of history

APS News: This Month in Physics History: May 5 1933: The New York Times Covers Discovery of Cosmic Radio Waves

https://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201505/physicshistory.cfm

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Tracking the Messenger of the Gods

Pierre Gassendi after Louis-Édouard Rioult. Source: Wikimedia Common

Pierre Gassendi
after Louis-Édouard Rioult.
Source: Wikimedia Common

Muslim Heritage: The Stellar and Lunar Keys to Medieval Muslim Agriculture

The Telegraph: How British scientist Hertha Marks Ayrton discovered the secrets of ripples

Atlas Obscura: Ancient Aboriginal Astronomy

Popular Science: NASA renames Building After ‘Human Computer’ Katherine Johnson

Mental_floss: Decimal Time: How the French Made a 10-Hour Day

Royal Museums Greenwich: History of the Royal Observatory

Royal Observatory, Greenwich c. 1902 as depicted on a postcard Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal Observatory, Greenwich c. 1902 as depicted on a postcard
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ted Taylor’s Interview – Part 3

Perimeter Institute: Pioneering Women of Physics

O Say Can You See?: What emerging science got the public excited in the 1880s? Spectroscopy!

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Siegfried Hecker’s Interview – Part 3

The Ordered Universe Project: Grosseteste at Georgetown

Forgotten Faces of Science: The Women Who Classified the Stars

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Royal Museums Greenwich: John Cabot

British Library: Maps and views blog: Less of a Random Mapper: a new feature for Georeferencer

Atlas Obscura: Found: Captain Cook’s Ship

BBC News: Endeavour: Has the ship Captain Cook sailed to Australia been found?

The Telegraph: Archaeologists move a step closer to finding wreck of Captain Cook’s ship Endeavour

HNN: Legendary Explorer’s Long-Lost Ship May Have Been Found Off Rhode Island

Earl of Pembroke, later HMS Endeavour, leaving Whitby Harbour in 1768. By Thomas Luny, dated 1790. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Earl of Pembroke, later HMS Endeavour, leaving Whitby Harbour in 1768. By Thomas Luny, dated 1790.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Guardian: Captain Cook’s Endeavour: from the Great Barrier Reef to Rhode Island?

boingboing: Where is Captain Cook’s HMS Endeavour? Science can almost tell us!

Yovisto: How the Pope divided the New World among Spain and the Rest of the World

Conversant: “That Country is my Country” Loyalism and Maps of British America

Cynefin: The Tithe Maps of Wales: Cynefin Project

The Saleroom: American Civil War Era Manuscript Map

National Museum of Scotland: Portrait of Alexander Dalrymple

Live Sciences: 7 Extreme Female Explorers

Jackie Ronne and her husband Finn on skis in Antarctica during an expedition from 1946-1948. Credit: Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition

Jackie Ronne and her husband Finn on skis in Antarctica during an expedition from 1946-1948.
Credit: Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition

Gizmodo: These Stunning Maps Show the Final Months of the First World War

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

eä: The first national tuberculosis congress in Portugal (1895)

Morbid Anatomy: Public Dissections, Frederik Ruysch and the Theatrum Anatomicum: Touring the Waag at Amsterdam Anatomy Weekend

Flickering Lamps: The Abandoned Temperance Hospital in Euston

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fugitive Leaves: From ‘Bicephalic Monsters’ to ‘Brains of the Insane’: How Anatomists Built Evolutionary Hierarchies

storify: Nursing Medical Research Museum

Scientific American: Arsenic’s Afterlife: How Scientists Learned to Identify Poison Victims [Excerpt]

SHM Oxford: Medicine and Charity in Eighteenth-century Northumberland: The Early Years of the Bamburgh Castle Dispensary and Surgery c. 1772–1802

Wellcome Library: Views of Harbin (Fuchiatien) taken during the plague epidemic, December 1910 – March 1911

Thomas Morris: Champagne ad libitum

NYAM: Counterfeiting Bodies: Examining the Work of Walther Ryff

Circulating Now: A Mughal Era Manuscript Curiously Illustrated

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: International Day of the Midwife

Perceptions of Pregnancy: Midwives Behaving Badly? Complaints against Lying-In Charity Staff, c. 1800–1834

From the Hands of Quacks: The Pulsator: How a Portable artificial Respirator Saved the Lives of Children

The Iron Lung Ward at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital in California during the height of a polio epidemic, c.1953.

The Iron Lung Ward at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital in California during the height of a polio epidemic, c.1953.

The Recipes Project: ‘Recipes for Relationships’: Food, Medicine, Families and Cultural Engagement

Milk: Dissecting the Morbid Beauty of 18th Century Anatomical Figures

Yovisto: Dorothea Erxleben – Germany’s First Female Medical Doctor

Thomas Morris: Mass delusions

The Establishment: Weird Beliefs About Women’s Bodies

Société Binet-Simon: Histoire du test de IQ

Wellcome Library Blog: The origins of the English almanac

h/t Thomas Morris

h/t Thomas Morris

Dr Alun Withey: ‘Weird’ remedies and the problem of ‘folklore’

Remedia: ‘The Touch of a Man’: Gender and Male-Caregiving in the Royal Army Medical Corps in WW1

Histories of Emotion: Early Modern Mothers, in Their Own Words

Thomas Morris: Plum stone colick

Nursing Clio: Sunday Morning Medicine

TECHNOLOGY:

The Guardian: Who invented the cash machine? I did – and all I earned was £10

Conciatore: Pebbles from Pavia

Conciatore: Scraping the Barrel

Conciatore: Glass from Tinsel

IMechE Archive and Library: One Birdcage Walk

AMS Blogs: Happy Birthday, Claude Shannon

New Republic: How Literature Became Word Perfect

Independent.ie: To the 19th Century genius who began the digital revolution – Prof Boole, take a bow

London Reconnections: London’s First Highway

Original Canary Wharf ‎Pier for RiverBus services. Courtesy Darryl Chamberlain,

Original Canary Wharf ‎Pier for RiverBus services. Courtesy Darryl Chamberlain,

Yovisto: The Sinking of the H.L. Hunley

The Met: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Piano: The Pianofortes of Bartolomeo Cristofori (1655–1731)

Distillations Blog: The Art of Metal Filaments

Distillations Blog: The Transnational Light Bulb

distillatio: And another one bites the dust

Yovisto: Gustav Eiffel and his Famous Tower

The Devil’s Take: Daisy, Daisy…

1900-Columbia-bicycle-from-Baden

Yovisto: You Press the Button and We do the Rest – George Eastman revolutionized Photography

The Maintainers: Creating a Factory-based Repair System in a Chinese Industrial Enterprise, 1961

The New York Times: Solving the Mystery of Ancient Ink Origins

Alembic Rare Books: Two Georgian Era Magnifying Glasses

Boston Globe: The qwerty history of the word processor

Scientific Instrument Society: Reverse Printed Paper Instruments [pdf]

Engineering Timeline: Thames Flood Barrier

The Huffington Post: London Would Have Been Submerged Without Thames Barrier Shocking Picture Reveals

Ancient Origins: The ancient invention of the steam engine by the Hero of Alexandria

The Public Domain Review: Frolicsome Engines: The Long Prehistory of Artificial Intelligence

Illustration from an 1851 English edition of Hero’s Pneumatica, in which he describes machines working on air, steam or water pressure

Illustration from an 1851 English edition of Hero’s Pneumatica, in which he describes machines working on air, steam or water pressure

Bristol Scout: 1 May 1916

Cambridge University Library Special Collections: Manuscript Image of the Month – The Maxim Airplane

Smithsonian.com: 26 Inventions Mothers Can Appreciate

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Glow Worm Quote

Atlas Obscura: Here Are the Medals Given to Eugenically Healthy Humans in the 1920s

BBC News: DNA secrets of Ice Age Europe unlocked

Natue: The quiet revolutionary: How the co-discovery of CRISPR explosively changed Emmanuelle Chapentier’s life

Scientific American: Laelaps: There’s Something Fishy about This Fossil Bird

Scientific American: Laelaps: Paleo Profile: The Light-Footed Lizard

The Guardian: John James Audubon and the natural history of a hoax

 A page from Constantine Rafinesque’s field notebook, with a ‘big-eye jumping mouse’, a ‘lion-tail jumping mouse’, a ‘three-striped mole rat’ and a ‘brindled stamiter’. Photograph: Smithsonian Institution Archives. Image # SIA2012-6065.

A page from Constantine Rafinesque’s field notebook, with a ‘big-eye jumping mouse’, a ‘lion-tail jumping mouse’, a ‘three-striped mole rat’ and a ‘brindled stamiter’. Photograph: Smithsonian Institution Archives. Image # SIA2012-6065.

Atlas Obscura: Audubon Made Up at Least 28 Fake Species to Prank a Rival

NYAM: “How Many Stamens Has Your Flower?” The Botanical Education of Emily Dickinson

From Shanklin: From Shanklin

Science League of America: Who Was the Occupant? Part 1

Atlas Obscura: Scientists Uncover a Huge Trove of Dinosaur Fossils in Antarctica

Yovisto: On the Road with Alexander von Humboldt

Matteo Farinella: Alexander von Humboldt

Wildlife Article: Celebrating the legacy of John Muir

TrowelBlazers: Lady Rachel Workman MacRobert

Lady MacRobert

Lady MacRobert

Phys Org: Endangered venomous mammal predates dinosaurs’ extinction, study confirms

All Things Georgian: Reports of seismic activity in 18th century England

Smithsonian.com: The Story Behind Those Jaw-Dropping Photos of the Collections at the Natural History Museum

giphy

CHEMISTRY:

Kroto Quot

The Telegraph: Sir Harry Kroto – obituary

The Guardian: Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel prize-winning chemist, dies at 76

NCSE: Harry Kroto dies

University of Sussex: Tribute to Sir Harry Kroto

Kroto Picture

BBC News: Tributes for Nobel prize chemist Harry Kroto

The Guardian: Sir Harry Kroto obituary

The New York Times: Harold Kroto, Nobel Prize-Winning Chemist, Is Dead at 76

The Guardian: Letters: Harry Kroto: scientist with the common touch

Youtube: Chemistry World: Remembering Harry Kroto

UCR Today: UC Riverside Professor Robert Haddon Advocated for the Smallest of Particles

Science life and times: A blue plaque for Dorothy

odgkin

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Academia: The Scientific Education of a Renaissance Prince: Archduke Rudolf at the Spanish Court

Yovisto: The Great Exhibition and the Crystal Palace

The transept façade of the original Crystal Palace Source: Wikimedia Commons

The transept façade of the original Crystal Palace
Source: Wikimedia Commons

OUP Blog: What is really behind Descartes’ famous doubt?

Plato’s Footnote: Progress in Science – I

JHI Blog: We Have Never Been Presentist: On Regimes of Historicity

Physics Central: Physics Buzz Blog: Like Parent, Like Child

The Maintainers: A Conference

Creating a knowledge society in a globalizing world 1450–1800

The Way of Improvement Leads Home: What Should Historians be Thinking About – Part 5 (Link to other four parts)

JHI Blog: Shame, Memory, and the Politics of the Archive

Wellcome Library: Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Online Free Texts

Historiann: Wikipedia in the classroom: check out these new bios of early American women!

Slate: Is History Written About Men, by Men?

Niche: #EnvHist Daily

on display: Moving a Museum

018

 

ESOTERIC:

Drive.google.com: Depicting the Medieval Alchemical Cosmos: George Ripley’s Wheel of Inferior Astronomy

Social Epistemology: Was Feyerabend Right in Defending Astrology? A Commentary on Kidd, Massimo Pigliucci

Paul Feyerabend's Horoscope

Paul Feyerabend’s Horoscope

Yovisto: The Prophecies of Nostradamus

BOOK REVIEWS:

Scientific American: Constructing the Modern Mind

ISIS: Picture and Conversations: How to Study the Visual Cultures of Science

Medievalists.net: Medieval Medicine: Its Mysteries and Science by Toni Mount

51wmsobs3DL._SX310_BO1204203200_

MeHum Fiction – Daily Dose: Medieval Robots

Berfois: The Story of Napalm

Notches: The Religious Right and the Politics of Sexuality: An Interview with Neil J. Young

The Spectator: Steve Jones’s chaotic theory of history

Nature: Physics: Material to meaning

THE: The Experimenal Self: Humphry Davy and the Making of a Man of Science, by Jan Golinski

The New York Times: ‘Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?’ and ‘The Genius of Birds’

 

NEW BOOKS:

Nouveautés Éditeurs: La Peur: Etude psychologique des effets et de la cause

puf: La mort et le soin

Princeton University Press: The Mushroom at the End of the World

k10581

University of Wales Press: Robert Recorde: Tudor Scholar and Mathematician

L’Harmattan: Les Médecines À Travers Les Réseaux Sociaux

L’Harmattan: Santé Riche et Médecine Pauvre

Historiens de la santé: Weill Cornell Medicine: A History of Cornell’s Medical School

ART & EXHIBITIONS

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: Captain Cook By Nathaniel Dance Holland

480px-Captainjamescookportrait

The Royal Society of Medicine: Exhibition: Charcot, Hysteria & La Salpetiere 3 May–23 July 2016

Journal of Art in Society: Science Becomes Art

Australian National Maritime Museum: Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude 5 May30 October 2016

Morbid Anatomy Museum, Brooklyn: House of Wax: Anatomical, Pathological, and Ethnographic Waxworks from Castan’s Panopticum, Berlin, 1869–1922 Closes 30 May 2016

Harvard Magazine: Before Social Media: Radio was the medium that broke the silence

Horniman Museum & Gardens: H Blog: Tyrannosaurus and Tarbosaurus

Bodleian: Marks of Genius

The Houston Museum of Natural Science: Cabinet of Curiosities Opens 6 May 2016

Reviews in History: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee (Royal College of Physicians, 18 January – 29 July 2016)

Broadway World.com: Met Museum Exhibition to Celebrate Artistic, Technological, Cultural Legacy of the Seljuqs

Grup d’estudis d’història de la cartografia: Exhibition about Renacentrist cartography in Bergamo 16 April–10 July 2016

Bonner Sterne: “Argelanders Erben” im Universitätsmuseum Bonn bis 31 Juli 2016

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

Bridging the World: Benjamin Baker of Frome 5 March–21 May 2016

Exhibition Nancy

 

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Globe Exhibition

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

CLOSING SOON: National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Natural History Museum: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017 

Science Museum: Information Age

Cambridge Science Museum: Cosmic Runs still 30 Jun 2016

Wellcome Library: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: YOUTOPIA: VISIONS OF THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

 

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

University of Cambridge: Understanding gravity – from Newton to Hawking

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

 

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016

 

EVENTS:

NYAM: The Lilian Sauter Lecture: Twenty-Five Years into the Intersex Patients Rights Movement, Why Aren’t We Done? 18 May 2016

http://nyam.org/events/event/twenty-five-years-intersex-patient-rights-movement-why-arent-we-done/?utm_content=buffer4b65c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Gresham College: Lecture: The Expanding Universe 26 October 2016

http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/the-expanding-universe

University of Greenwich: Seminar: ‘Mag. and Met.’: the origins and early years of the Magnetic and Meteorological Department at Greenwich Observatory 25 May 2016

https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=mersenne;c476beef.1605&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Royal College of Nursing: Lecture: Joyous and deliberate motherhood: birth control nursing in the Marie Stopes Mothers Clinic, 1921-1931 26 May 2016

https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=mersenne;5ccd2669.1605&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Royal College of Nursing: Lecture: The Northern Powerhouse: Cottontown Nurses who shaped the Profession

https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=mersenne;5ccd2669.1605&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

The Royal Institution: Family Fun Day: Imaginative Inventions 15 May 2016

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-family-fun-day–imaginative-inventions

Brompton Cemetery: London Alchemy: Socery, Gin and Spooky Music in a Cemetery Chapel 4-5 June 2016

http://londonist.com/2016/05/london-alchemy-sorcery-gin-and-spooky-music-in-a-cemetery?utm_content=buffer5fcc0&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Leonardo da Vinci Society Annual Lecture: Art and Anatomy in the 15th and 16th centuries Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, Courtauld Institute, Somerset House, Strand, London 13 May 2016

http://histoiresante.blogspot.de/2016/05/art-et-anatomie-aux-15e-et-16e-siecles.html

Flamsteed Astronomy Society: “Fame, fortune, misery, disaster – the lives and times of the Royal Observatory’s nineteenth century Assistants and Computers” 10 May 2016

Royal Institution: Lecture: No Need For Geniuses 11 May 2016

The Royal College of Surgeons of England: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Edward Jenner 17 May 2016 

Glasgow: Science on the Streets – City Centre Tour 11 June 2016

Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Edinburgh: We’re Not in Kirkcaldy Anymore: Scottish Adventures in Medicine 15 May 2016 

Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Edinburgh: Polar Adventure: Explorations in Geology 13 May 2016

Almond Valley Heritage Centre Millfield Livingston: Terrible Consequences 14 & 15 May 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and The History of Understanding

BSHS: Upcoming Lecture: Henry Wellcome Pharmacist Royal Pharmaceutical Society 23 May 2016

London Fortean Society: Snake Oil! The Golden Age of Quackery in Britain and America 26 May 2016

Museum of History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Leeds University: History and Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects (Lecture 5) 10 May 2016

NYAM: Lecture: The Discovery of Insulin – A Miracle Drug, A Nobel Prize Controversy, and the Story of Elizabeth Hughes 10 May 2016

V&A: Courses: Sensing Time: The Art and Science of Clocks and Watches 18 June 2016

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Festival of Museums 2016 – Glasgow’s Marvellous Medicine 14 May 2016

Things

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

Boston Medical Library: Lecture: Prescription Drug Abuse in American History:

The Polar Museum: Lucky 13 Storytelling from the polar regions of the world 13 May 2016

Royal Society: Lecture: Hasok Chang: Who cares about the history of science? 10 May 2016

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

SciFRi talks

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

 

 PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

William Hunter lecturing, by Johan Zoffany, c.1770-2

William Hunter lecturing, by Johan Zoffany, c.1770-2

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Vimeo: Linda Hall Library: Karl Galle: The Unknown Copernicus: Spies; Printers, Amazons, and Body-Snatchers in an Age of Astronomical Revolution

Youtube: Philosophy: Margaret Cavendish, Part 1

Youtube: Philosophy: Margaret Cavendish, Part 2

RADIO & PODCASTS:

CHF: Episode 143: Fairyland of Chemistry

Stuff They Don’t Want You To Know: Alchemy with Damien Patrick Williams

Newsworks: From pages to pixels, the invention of the eReader

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Columbia University: Exploring the Philosophy of Émile du Châtelet 1–3 June 2016

Conférence des étudiant.e.s du NHRU-URHN: Briser les silences de l’histoire du nursing et de la santé 19 Mai 2016

Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey: SPSP Pre-Conference Workshop: Empirical Methodology for Philosophy of Science in Practice 16 June 2016

University of Bristol: History and Philosophy of Chemistry Workshop 11-12 May 2016

University of Bristol: Centre for Science and Philosophy: Events

BSHS: Singer Prize: The Singer Prize, of up to £300, is awarded by the British Society for the History of Science every two years to the writer of an unpublished essay, based on original research into any aspect of the history of science, technology or medicine.

University of Oxford: John Wallis (1616–1703) Mathematics, Music Theory, and Cryptography, 1n 17th Century 9 June 2016

Society for the Social History of Medicine: 2016 Undergraduate Essay Prize Deadline 1 October

BJHS Themes: We are calling for proposals for Issue 3 (2018) of BJHS Themes, the annual open-access journal that is a companion to the British Journal for the History of Science. Like the BJHS, BJHS Themes is published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the BSHS.

The deadline for abstract submission for the 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature, Poellau, Austria and the Workshop “Nature(s), Humans and God(s)” on Syros Island, Greece has been extended to 15th of May 2016.

St Michaels College, Cardiff University: Conference: Bodily Fluids/Fluid Bodies in Greek and Roman Antiquity 11–13 July 2016 Programme

H-Pennsylvania: Philip J. Pauly Book Prise Nominations Sought for Histories of Science in the Americas

British and European History of Medicine Conference: Registration: Medicine in Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts University of Kent 7-10 July 2016

BSHS: Prizes

Three Societies Meeting: University of Alberta, Edmonton 22–25 June 2016 Only two weeks left for hotel conference rates!

Wikipedia: Meetup/DC/Early Modern Edit-a-Thron

New York University Library: Manuscript Cookbooks Conference 12–13 May 2016

Durham University: Workshop: Utilitarianism and Medicine: Past and Tresent Perspectives 11 May 2016

Staffordshire University: Workshop: Deleuze, Entropy and Thermodynamics 19 May 2016

 

Trinity College Cambridge: The Venues of Scholarly Output: Collections, Treatises, Textbooks, Archives 25 June 2016

Let’s Talk About Sex: CfP: History of Sexuality PGR/ECR Workshop University of Exeter 26–27 June 2016

Queen Mary University of London:Upcoming History of Emotions Work in Progress Seminars

Conferene

University of Reading: CfP: Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums  23 September 2016 Deadline: 15 June 2016

BSHS: Registration Open: The Body and Pseudoscience in the Long Nineteenth Century Newcastle University 18 June 2016

University of St. Andrews: Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy (SSEMP VII) 5–6 May 2016 Programme

MSH Lorraine, Nancy: “Mathématiques et mathématiciens à Metz (1750-1870): dynamiques de recherche et d’enseignement dans un espace local” 12 Mai 2016

Barts Pathology Museum: CfP: The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries 24 September 2016

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Leicester: Centre for Medical Humanities: Seminars:

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware: CfP: Making Modern Disability: Histories of Disability, Design, and Technology 28 October 2016

EHESS, Paris: Journée d’étude: Genre, humeurs et fluides corporels. Moyen Âge & Époque moderne 19 Mai 2016

New York City: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 30 September–1 October 2016

Columbia University: The Center for Science & Society: Exploring the Philosophy of Émilie du Châtelet 1–3 June 2016

Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology (Rio de Janeiro, 23-29 July 2017): CfP: Blood, Food, and Climate: Historical Relationships Between Physiology, Race, Nation-Building, and Colonialism/Globalization

CFP Early Modern World

Organisé par Alexandre Klein (Université d’Ottawa): Histoire des relations de santé aux XIXe et XXe siècles 11 mai 2016

History at the Open University: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland: A Conference in Honour of Anne Laurence Institute of Historical Research London 4 June 2016

IHPST, Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques, Paris: CfP: International Doctoral Conference in Philosophy of Science 29-30 September 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Ian Ramsey Centre Conference, University of Oxford: Workshop “Early Modern Laws of Nature: Secular and Divine” 7 July 2016 Call for Abstract: deadline 30 April 2016

History and Philosophy of Science Department, University of Cambridge: Workshop: Informal Aspects of Uncertainty Evaluation 20 May 2016

Annals of Science: Annals of Science Essay Prize for Young Scholars

Religion & Medicine

 

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CFP: Blood, Food & Climate – Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology

2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics Pöllau, Austria 5–7 September 2016

University of Cambridge: Cabinet of Natural History: Seminars Easter Term 2016

Science in Public

University of Leeds: Northern Renaissance Seminar: Programme: Communication, Correspondence and Transmission in the Early Modern World 12-13 May 2016

The International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST): Invites submissions for the fourth DHST Prize for Young Scholars, to be presented in 2017.

Warburg Institute: ESSWE Thesis Workshop 7 July 2016

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Society and th Sea

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

University of London: Birkbeck: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2016: 11 July 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Annual Conference Programme 28–30 May 2016

Women hist phil

 

 

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

irkbeck, University of London: CfP: Embarrassing Bodies: Feeling Self-Conscious in the Nineteenth Century 17 June 2016

University of Warwick: Workshop: Early Modern Experimental Philosophy, Metaphysics, and Religion 10–11 May 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Notre Dame: Assistant Director of Education: This position supports the Directors of the History and Philosophy of Science Graduate Program

Science Museum: The Science Museum is looking for post-grads and early-career researchers to work on short research projects.

University of Oxford: Departmental Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Science Museum Group: Keeper of Technologies & Engineering

Durham University: Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded PhD at Durham University on ‘British Newsreels at War, 1939–1945’

TU Munich: New Masters Program in STS

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol: #38

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #38

Monday 02 May 2016

EDITORIAL:

 Another week has flown by and it’s time once again for a new edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list to bring you all that we could track down of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the furthest corners of cyberspace.

Thirty years ago on 26 April 1986 reactor number four at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in what is now Ukraine and was then part of the USSR caught fire and exploded causing the biggest nuclear disaster up to that time that the world had seen. It was by no means the first such disaster an experimental reactor in Switzerland having gone into meltdown in 1969 and reactor number two at the Three Mile Island having gone into meltdown in 1979. The latter incident produced one of my favourite jokes in my days as a reader of New Scientist. I paraphrase:

“Initially American authorities referred to what had happened as the Three Mile Island Disaster. After some time had passed, trying to quieten things down somewhat, they began to refer to the Three Mile Island Incident. After more time had passed it became in official references the Three Mile Island Experience. What did Jimi Hendrix know that we don’t?”

When reactor four at Chernobyl exploded it blew a massive cloud of radioactive particles into the atmosphere, which drifted southwards across central Europe. Due to a rain storm a large part of that cloud came down over the area of Southern Germany where I live. Even today, thirty years after the incident the wild mushrooms that grow in the forests of Bavaria are still too radioactive to eat according to official regulations. This, of course, doesn’t stop people collecting and eating them.

The Chernobyl disaster started an intense debate about the use of nuclear power that continues today, the flames being fanned further by the Fukushima disaster in 2011. Some like the German Government want to see the end of nuclear power as inherently too dangerous to be considered viable. Others wish to see an increase in the use of nuclear power to replace the climate damaging fossil fuel power.

These nuclear disasters, their aftermath and the debate on clean energy have already become a subject of historians of science, technology and medicine and at some distant, or maybe not so distant, point in the future a generation of historians will look back at the era and try to make some sense out of the conflicting and oft contradictory arguments put forward by the various participants on the debate, how to produce the clean, safe energy that humanity so desperately needs.

Event of the Week:

26 April 1986 the Chernobyl Meltdown Occurred

Aerial view of the damaged core on 3 May 1986. Roof of the turbine hall is damaged (image center). Roof of the adjacent reactor 3 (image lower left) shows minor fire damage. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Aerial view of the damaged core on 3 May 1986. Roof of the turbine hall is damaged (image center). Roof of the adjacent reactor 3 (image lower left) shows minor fire damage.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The New Yorker: The Battles of Chernobyl

Visual News: Haunting Graffiti in the Heart of Abandoned Chernobyl

Not Even Past: Remembering Chernobyl

New York Times: Chernobyl’s Silent Exclusion Zone (Except for the Logging)

Plate 1 from “The Atlas of Caesium-137 Contamination of Europe after the Chernobyl Accident.”

Plate 1 from “The Atlas of Caesium-137 Contamination of Europe after the Chernobyl Accident.”

Quotes of the week:

“Those who can’t do legislate”. – Guy Longworth (@GuyLongworth)

“I don’t block people for disagreeing with me. I block them for being jerks”. – Katharine Hayhoe (@KHayhoe)

“Sir, more than kisses, let us mingle souls.” – John Donne to Sir Henry Wotton 1597 h/t @rayneinverted

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“if it’s a murder of crows, an unkindness of ravens, a tiding of magpies… then it’s got to be a lifetime of egrets” – Margaret Killjoy (@magpiekilljoy)

“Mathematics is like childhood diseases. The younger you get it, the better”. – Arnold Sommerfeld h/t @OnThisDayinMath

“There’s only one method in social anthropology, the comparative method. And that’s impossible” – Evans-Pritchard h/t @ProfDanHicks

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Don’t write what you know, write what you’re willing to discover. – Yusef Komunyakaa h/t @snoopydroopied

“We would be in a nasty position indeed if empirical science were the only kind of science possible.” – Edmund Husserl (1859-1938)

“It’s been said that the dreariness of the thought of having to get dressed every day once drove an Englishman to suicide”. – Emil du Bois-Reymond

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“Either mathematics is too big for the human mind or the human mind is more than a machine.” Kurt Gödel (1906-1978)

“Geometry is not true, it is advantageous.” – Henri Poincaré (1854-1912)

“Thought is only a flash between two long nights, but this flash is everything.” – Henri Poincaré (1854-1912)

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Jeremy Renner gave the truest version of what I have sometimes called the “onomatopology.” It’s not an apology, but it makes apology noises. – Linda Holmes (@nprmonkeysee)

“A homeopathic health service – you don’t have a hospital, you just have the memory of a hospital” – Andy Hamilton, News Quiz (@BBCRadio4)

“We are an impossibility in an impossible universe.” ― Ray Bradbury.

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“A man ought to read just as inclination leads him; for what he reads as a task will do him little good”. – Dr Johnson h/t @welfordwrites

“In this universe, where the least things control the greatest…” – William Wordsworth h/t @telescoper

Birthday of the Week:

 Claude Elwood Shannon born 30 April 1916

 ClaudeShannon_MFO3807

“Thus we may have knowledge of the past but cannot control it; we may control the future but have no knowledge of it.” – Claude Elwood Shannon

“I’ve always loved that word, ‘Boolean.’” – Claude Elwood Shannon

The tragedy of Claude Shannon’s life is that the “inventor” of information died of Alzheimer’s. – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

 The Renaissance Mathematicus: Boole, Shannon and the Electronic Computer

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The New Yorker: Claude Shannon, The Father of the Information Age, Turns 1100100

A hundred years after his birth, Claude Shannon’s fingerprints are on every electronic device we own. CREDIT PHOTOGRAPH BY ALFRED EISENSTAEDT / THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION / GETTY

A hundred years after his birth, Claude Shannon’s fingerprints are on every electronic device we own.
CREDIT PHOTOGRAPH BY ALFRED EISENSTAEDT / THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION / GETTY

IEEE Spectrum: Claude Shannon: Tinkerer, Prankster, and Father of Information Theory

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Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Oral-History: Claude E. Shannon

OMNI: Interview Claude Shannon

IEEEXplore: The Bandwagon Claude E. Shannon

The Guardian: Without Claude Shannon’s information theory there would be no internet

Gizmodo: If it Weren’t for This Equation, You Wouldn’t be Here

AMS Blogs: Happy Birthday Claude Shannon

Yovisto: Claude Shannon – Father of Information Theory

Youtube: Claude Shannon demonstrates machine learning

Youtube: Claude Shannon Juggling

Hertha Marks Ayrton born 28 April 1854

 hertha-marks-ayrton-google-doodle

Independent: Hertha Marks Ayrton’s 162nd birthday: 5 facts about the British mathematician, engineer and inventor

International Business Times: Google marks award-winning mathematician, inventor and physicist Hertha Marks Ayrton

The Royal Society: The Repository: Almost a Fellow: Hertha Ayrton and an embarrassing episode in the history of the Royal Society

cwp.library.ucla.edu: Hertha Marks Ayrton (1854–1923)

Diagram of arc lighting electrodes from 1902 paper by Hertha Ayrton

Diagram of arc lighting electrodes from 1902 paper by Hertha Ayrton

The Guardian: Hertha Marks Ayrton: Guardian obituary of pioneering scientist, published 1923

 

Time: Google Doodle Honors Scientist Hertha Marks Ayrton

Yotube: The Fight for Fellowship (Hertha Marks Ayrton) – Objectivity #56

John James Audubon born 26 April 1785

John James Audubon 1826 Source: Wikimedia Commons

John James Audubon 1826
Source: Wikimedia Commons

British Library: Audubon’s The Birds of America

Facebook: American Museum of Natural History Audubon Video

Yale Alumni Magazine: Audubon’s works, off the endangered list

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

The Phnom Penh Post: Tech used to prove Angkor’s link to the sun

About Winfree Observatory: Some History

AHF: Mary Lou Curtis

io9: The Loneliness of the Long-Abandoned Space Observatory

198vcii86ycosjpg

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bill and Louise Cease’s Interview

Yovisto: Jan Hendrik Oort and the Oort Cloud

Ordered Universe: Time and Time Reckoning: Ordered Universe at Tor Vergata

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Astrolabe – an object of desire

Astrolabe Renners Arsenius 1569 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Astrolabe Renners Arsenius 1569
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Linda Hall Library: ‘Astronomer’ Doesn’t Begin to Cover Copernicus

Yovisto: Henri Poincaré – the Last Universalist of Mathematics

Science Alert: An ancient astronomer’s observations of a 1,000-year-old supernova have just been unearthed

National Catholic Observer: Mapping with the stars: Nuns instrumental in Vatican celestial survey

Members of the Sisters of the Child Mary use microscopes to review glass plates as they measure star positions. (CNS/Vatican Observatory)

Members of the Sisters of the Child Mary use microscopes to review glass plates as they measure star positions. (CNS/Vatican Observatory)

AHF: The Spy who Stole Urchin

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Humanities: The Osher Map Library invites the whole world in

Texas Public Radio: Rare Maps Confirm Texas’ Size and Boundaries

Yovisto: Edward Whymper and the Matterhorn

CHICC Manchester: New Japanese Maps Added to Our Digital Collections

Japanese 211 – Tokaido bunken ezu: animated view of 26 folds, 88 images.

Japanese 211 – Tokaido bunken ezu: animated view of 26 folds, 88 images.

Yovisto: Ferdinand Magellan and the first Trip around the World

Royal Museums Greenwich: Ferdinand Magellan: How did the Pacific Ocean get its name and what did this Portuguese explorer have to do with it?

Canadian Mysteries: Interpretations of the Franklin mystery

JRSM: Sir John Franklin’s last arctic expedition: a medical disaster

Library of Congress: Computing Space 0: From Hypersurfaces to Algorithms: Saving Early Computer Cartography at the Library of Congress

History Today: Fantasy Worlds: A Gallery of Mythical Maps

The Asahi Shimbun: 17th century map, color plates show how Japan viewed the world

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

NYAM: Medical Rhymes

Pulse: Fighting the Legend of the “Lobotomobile”

NYAM: Cupid Out of Sorts – Is Advised to Take a Turkish Bath

The Hammam. In: Urquhart, Manual of the Turkish Bath, 1865.

The Hammam. In: Urquhart, Manual of the Turkish Bath, 1865.

Thomas Morris: Dancing Testicles

Revue d’histoire de la protection sociale 2015/1 (N° 8): Handicap et dépendance. Perspectives historiennes

Embryo Project: Methymercury and Human Embryonic Development

Atlas Obscura. The Illegal Birth Control Handbook that Spread Across College Campuses in 1968

Big Picture: The history of vaccination

Thomas Morris: Eye eye

The Chirugeon’s Apprentice: The Mad Dogs of London: A Tale of Rabies

 

 A mad dog on the run in a London street: citizens attack it as it approaches a woman who has fallen over. Coloured etching by T.L. Busby, 1826 1826 By: Thomas Lord. BusbyPublished: 1826. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images


A mad dog on the run in a London street: citizens attack it as it approaches a woman who has fallen over. Coloured etching by T.L. Busby, 1826
1826 By: Thomas Lord. BusbyPublished: 1826.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

The Atlantic: How the Poor Get Blamed for Disease

The Recipes Project: Women’s Health in the South Slavic Orthodox Tradition

Wellcome Trust: Image of the Week: Temple of Vaccinia

Atlas Obscura: The First Woman to put her Face on Packaging got Trolled Like Crazy

Upworthy: 19 fascinating pictures to remind us what polio used to look like

A young patient getting fit with a respirator in 1955. Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images.

A young patient getting fit with a respirator in 1955. Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images.

Thomas Morris: The human pincushion

Thomas Morris: A head of wheat in the bladder

Empire de la Mort: Macabre New York: the charnel house that almost was

TECHNOLOGY:

Historic England: What’s New in the Archive? – New: The Shadbolt Collection

Yale University Art Gallery: Automaton Clock in the Form of Diana on Her Chariot

Historic England: What was Proclaimed the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’ on Completion in 1843, but ‘An Entire Failure’ Just a Decade Later?

The Thames Tunnel

The Thames Tunnel

Eternal Egypt: Water Clock

Slate: A Marvel of Victorian Engineering Reopens as a Concert Venue in London

We Make Money Not Art: Menace 2, An Artificial Intelligence Made of Wooden Drawers and Coloured Beads

Conciatore: Borgo Pinti (Part 2)

Conciatore: Rosichiero Glass

Ephemera Society: Strange Trains

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Yovisto: Dit dit dit da dit – the first Morse Telegram

historywomble: Boaty McWhoseface? Or, some thoughts on ships’ names

storify: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain

Yovisto: Karl Drais and the Mechanical Horse

University of Glasgow Library: Building Foundations: Early Books on Architecture

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Royal College of Physicians: The Little Green Parrot

The Irish Times: Environmentalist. Conservationist. What’s the Difference?

Notches: Archives of Desire: Soft-Core Pornography and Activism in the 1960s

The Linnean Society: Alfred Russel Wallace

The Guardian: Fire guts Delhi’s natural history museum

Reuters: Blaze guts Delhi museum housing dinosaur fossil

Ptak Science Books: How Fast Stuff Is: Thought (1870)

Yovisto: Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon-Tiki

Kon-Tiki, 1947

Kon-Tiki, 1947

Yovisto: Herbert Spencer and Social Darwinism

CSI: 10 Astounding Moments in a Creationist Textbook: Revisiting Of Pandas and People

AEON: The medieval senses were transmitters as much as receivers

Nautilus: The Day the Mesozoic Died

Verso: Thomas Pennant’s Literary Appeal

Smithsonian.com: The Scientific Daredevils Who Made Yale’s Peabody Museum a National Treasure

Corkboard of Curiosities: Taphonomy

UCL: Underwhelming Fossil Fish of the Month April 2016

Forbes: The Origins of Geological Terms: Diamonds

Typical crystal of diamond on matrix

Typical crystal of diamond on matrix

Wikiwand: John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury

Penn Biographies: Joseph Leidy (1823–1881)

New Scientist: The story of Dolly is about us as much as cloning

History of Geology: The Volcano as Crematory – Paolo Gorini’s strange geological-anatomical experiments

The Conversation: Two decades after his death, Gerald Durrell is still making the world a better place

Smithsonian.com: Over 1,00 Years Later, Kennewick Man will be Given a Native American Burial

CHEMISTRY:

about education: Phlogiston Theory in Early Chemistry History

New York Times: Walter Kohn, Who Won Nobel in Chemistry, Dies at 93

Walter Kohn receiving an honor from Harvard in 2012. “Physics isn’t what I do,” Dr. Kohn once said. “It is what I am.” Credit Steven Senne/Associated Press

Walter Kohn receiving an honor from Harvard in 2012. “Physics isn’t what I do,” Dr. Kohn once said. “It is what I am.” Credit Steven Senne/Associated Press

Yovisto: Wallace Hume Carothers and the Invention of Nylon

Othmeralia: Wallace Hume Carothers

Yovisto: Franz Archard and the Sugar Beet

In the Dark: R.I.P. Harry Koto (1939–2016)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Wellcome Trust: Wellcome appoints new Head of Public Engagement

The Maintainers: A Conference: Introducing the Maintainers Blog

NYAM: Preservation Week Quiz

Lady Science: Midwest Junto for the History of Science Recap

AEON: A science without time

Capitalism’s Cradle: The Dutch Golden Age

The H-Word: People Power: how citizen science could change historical research

Frontispieces for the Midland Naturalist, 1878, and Science-Gossip, 1892. Photograph: Biodiversity Heritage Library/Public Domain

Frontispieces for the Midland Naturalist, 1878, and Science-Gossip, 1892. Photograph: Biodiversity Heritage Library/Public Domain

The Guardian: Let’s keep talking: why public dialogue on science and technology matters more than ever

Literacy of the Present: 3G Science Communication

eä: New Issues Online: Table of Contents: Vol. 6 N° 2 – November 2014 etc

The #EnvHist Weekly

AAHM: Orals Bibliographies for Students

British Library: Victorian Britain: The Great Exhibition

'General View of the Exterior of the Building' of the Great Exhibition.  Dickinson's Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851

‘General View of the Exterior of the Building’ of the Great Exhibition.
Dickinson’s Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851

ESOTERIC:

Atlas Obscura: A 19th-Century Map of Our ‘Square and Stationary’ Earth

Royal College of Physicians: John Dee’s Books at Middle Temple Library

De pictura prae stantissima. Leon Battista Alberti, published Basel, 1540

De pictura prae stantissima. Leon Battista Alberti, published Basel, 1540

BOOK REVIEWS:

James Snell: John Aubrey and Prose Style

John Gribbin Science: Strange but True

LSE: Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia Participation, Ethics by Jenny Kidd

Chemistry World: The chemistry book: from gunpowder to grapheme – 250 milestones in the history of chemistry

0516CW_Reviews_ChemBook_300m

Nature: Technology: Beyond the ‘InterNyet’

Good Reads: The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself

NEW BOOKS:

The Guardian: Ruth Scurr: ‘I wanted to make John Aubrey present and vivid in our times’

Simon & Schuster: The Gene: An Intimate History

Verdier: Droiture et mélancolie: Sur les écrits de Marc Aurèle

University of Chicago Press: The Experimental Self: Humphry Davy and the Making of a Man of Science

9780226351360

University of Ottawa Press: Récits inachevés: Réflexions sur la recherche qualitative en sciences humaines et sociales

Columbia University Press: Stem Cell Dialogues: A Philosophical and Scientific Enquiry Into Medical Frontiers

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Harvard Magazine: Before Social Media: Radio was the medium that broke the silence

Scenes from an exhibition: “Radio Contact” at Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments Photograph by Samantha van Gerbig/Courtesy of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments

Scenes from an exhibition: “Radio Contact” at Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments
Photograph by Samantha van Gerbig/Courtesy of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments

Horniman Museum & Gardens: H Blog: Tyrannosaurus and Tarbosaurus

Bodleian: Marks of Genius

The Houston Museum of Natural Science: Cabinet of Curiosities Opens 6 May 2016

Reviews in History: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee (Royal College of Physicians, 18 January – 29 July 2016)

Broadway World.com: Met Museum Exhibition to Celebrate Artistic, Technological, Cultural Legacy of the Seljuqs

Leaping Robot Blog: From Laser Art to Laserium

Grup d’estudis d’història de la cartografia: Exhibition about Renacentrist cartography in Bergamo 16 April–10 July 2016

Bonner Sterne: “Argelanders Erben” im Universitätsmuseum Bonn bis 31 Juli 2016

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

Bridging the World: Benjamin Baker of Frome 5 March–21 May 2016

Exhibition Nancy

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Bay Area Reporter: Wonderful worlds of 17th-century China: Asian Art Museum Runs till 8 May 2016 

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Globe Exhibition

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

CLOSING SOON: National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Natural History Museum: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017 

Science Museum: Information Age

Cambridge Science Museum: Cosmic Runs still 30 Jun 2016

Wellcome Library: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Macrobert Arts Centre: The Trials of Galileo

Perth Concert Hall: The Trials of Galileo

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

BSHS: Upcoming Lecture: Henry Wellcome Pharmacist Royal Pharmaceutical Society 23 May 2016

The Leakey Foundation: The Curious Case of Homo naledi The California Academy of Sciences San Francisco 3 May 2016

London Fortean Society: Snake Oil! The Golden Age of Quackery in Britain and America 26 May 2016

Museum of History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Leeds University: History and Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects (Lecture 5) 10 May 2016

NYAM: Lecture: The Discovery of Insulin – A Miracle Drug, A Nobel Prize Controversy, and the Story of Elizabeth Hughes 10 May 2016

Museum of the History of Science, Oxford: Public Health and Private Pain: A Night of Medical History and Drama 5 May 2016

V&A: Courses: Sensing Time: The Art and Science of Clocks and Watches 18 June 2016

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Festival of Museums 2016 – Glasgow’s Marvellous Medicine 14 May 2016

Things

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: BETHLEM AND THE BRAIN: MUZZLING WILLIAM LAWRENCE’S MEDICAL MATERIALISM 7 May 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

Boston Medical Library: Lecture: Prescription Drug Abuse in American History:

The Polar Museum: Lucky 13 Storytelling from the polar regions of the world 13 May 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind 9 May 2016

Royal Society: Lecture: Hasok Chang: Who cares about the history of science? 10 May 2016

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

SciFRi talks

UCL: STS Haldane Lecture: Maja Horst, University of Copenhagen: Reframing Science Communication – Culture, Identity and Organisations 5 May 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal Society: Who cares about the history of science? 10 May 2016

Royal College of Physicians Museum: Dee Late: inside John Dee’s miraculous mind

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Leonardo da Vinci Gear Illustration

Leonardo da Vinci Gear Illustration

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

DocSlide: The Role of Hallucinogenic Plants in European Witchcraft

VIDEOS:

Museo Galileo: Globes

Facebook: DNALC Watson Base Pairing

Youtube: COPERNICUS –Animation Short Film 2013 – GOBELINS

Youtube: Albert Einstein in his office at Princeton University

RADIO & PODCASTS:

The Guardian: The Science of Shakespeare – Science Weekly Podcast

Institute of Historical Research: Citizen History and its discontents

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Euclid’s Elements

The Guardian: Revolutionary! Why was 1700s France such a fertile time for science?

Ben Franklin’s World: Episode 049: Malcolm Gaskill, How the English Became American

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Trinity College Cambridge: The Venues of Scholarly Output: Collections, Treatises, Textbooks, Archives 25 June 2016

Let’s Talk About Sex: CfP: History of Sexuality PGR/ECR Workshop University of Exeter 26–27 June 2016

Queen Mary University of London:Upcoming History of Emotions Work in Progress Seminars

Conferene

University of Reading: CfP: Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums  23 September 2016 Deadline: 15 June 2016

BSHS: Registration Open: The Body and Pseudoscience in the Long Nineteenth Century Newcastle University 18 June 2016

University of St. Andrews: Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy (SSEMP VII) 5–6 May 2016 Programme

MSH Lorraine, Nancy: “Mathématiques et mathématiciens à Metz (1750-1870): dynamiques de recherche et d’enseignement dans un espace local” 12 Mai 2016

Barts Pathology Museum: CfP: The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries 24 September 2016

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Leicester: Centre for Medical Humanities: Seminars:

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware: CfP: Making Modern Disability: Histories of Disability, Design, and Technology 28 October 2016

EHESS, Paris: Journée d’étude: Genre, humeurs et fluides corporels. Moyen Âge & Époque moderne 19 Mai 2016

New York City: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 30 September–1 October 2016

Columbia University: The Center for Science & Society: Exploring the Philosophy of Émilie du Châtelet 1–3 June 2016

Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology (Rio de Janeiro, 23-29 July 2017): CfP: Blood, Food, and Climate: Historical Relationships Between Physiology, Race, Nation-Building, and Colonialism/Globalization

CFP Early Modern World

 

Organisé par Alexandre Klein (Université d’Ottawa): Histoire des relations de santé aux XIXe et XXe siècles 11 mai 2016

History at the Open University: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland: A Conference in Honour of Anne Laurence Institute of Historical Research London 4 June 2016

IHPST, Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques, Paris: CfP: International Doctoral Conference in Philosophy of Science 29-30 September 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Ian Ramsey Centre Conference, University of Oxford: Workshop “Early Modern Laws of Nature: Secular and Divine” 7 July 2016 Call for Abstract: deadline 30 April 2016

History and Philosophy of Science Department, University of Cambridge: Workshop: Informal Aspects of Uncertainty Evaluation 20 May 2016

Annals of Science: Annals of Science Essay Prize for Young Scholars

Religion & Medicine

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CFP: Blood, Food & Climate – Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology

2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics Pöllau, Austria 5–7 September 2016

University of Cambridge: Cabinet of Natural History: Seminars Easter Term 2016

Science in Public

University of Leeds: Northern Renaissance Seminar: Programme: Communication, Correspondence and Transmission in the Early Modern World 12-13 May 2016

British Library: Conference: Transforming Topography 6 May 2016

he International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST): Invites submissions for the fourth DHST Prize for Young Scholars, to be presented in 2017.

Warburg Institute: ESSWE Thesis Workshop 7 July 2016

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Society and th Sea

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

Swansea University: Inaugural Lecture 5 May 2016: David Turner: Locating Disability in Britain’s Industrial Revolution

Notches: CfP. Histories of Music and Sexuality

Vatican Library Conference

University of London: Birkbeck: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2016: 11 July 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Annual Conference Programme 28–30 May 2016

Women hist phil

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

irkbeck, University of London: CfP: Embarrassing Bodies: Feeling Self-Conscious in the Nineteenth Century 17 June 2016

University of Warwick: Workshop: Early Modern Experimental Philosophy, Metaphysics, and Religion 10–11 May 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Wuppertal: Junior Professor in Philosophy with a specialization in Philosophy of Physics

Kuwait Science Museum: We are currently developing content for a set of national museums in Kuwait and are looking for experts to review some of the galleries for us, to make sure we are conveying the correct messages for visitors.

University of Edinburgh: Science, Technology and Innovation Studies: Senior Lecturer

National Media Museum: Bradford: Associate Curator of Science and Technology

University of Oxford: Departmental Lecturer in the History of Medicine

University of Leeds: History of Health, Medicine and Society MA

Sciences Po, Paris: Tenured Professorship in History

Kingston University London: Lecturer in Critical and Historical Studies Film-Making

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #37

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #37

Monday 25 April 2016

EDITORIAL:

Staying true to form your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette is already running late in only its second week back after its brief hiatus. But it is now here bringing you all that we could scoop up out of the Internet of the histories of science, technology and medicine over the last seven days.

Last week saw a possibly unique award ceremony, as the same house in London was graced not with one but two of those ubiquitous blue plaques signifying the presence in the past of some person of note. What made this particular double award so unique is that both of the notables were Nobel Laureates, however the one,

Caricature of Beckett by Edmund S. Veltman Source: Wikimedia Commons

Caricature of Beckett by Edmund S. Veltman
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Samuel Beckett, for literature,

Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett  Source: Nobel Prize org

Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett
Source: Nobel Prize org

and the other, Patrick Blackett, for physics.

BBC News: Rare double blue plaque award to home of Nobel Prize winners

Whewell’s Gazette friend, and one time Whewell’s Ghost co-founder, Rebekah Higgitt, who is since recent times a member of the blue plaque committee, as well as taking part in the unveiling ceremony wrote an interesting blog post on the always excellent H-Word #histsci blog at the Guardian, of which she in co-proprietor, London’s Blue Plaques: a ‘double blue’ for science and literature. In her post she analyses the prevalence of blue plaques for #histSTM people, rather low, and how many of those are for women, not surprisingly, even lower. She then goes on to briefly discuss what can or could be done to increase the number of #histSTM people so honoured.

I want to ask a heretical question, is honouring them in this way actually worthwhile? Do people actually go round towns and cities looking for the sites where famous #histSTM people once lived and worked? Is there really a demand to have these sites identified with blue plaques or whatever their equivalent is in your part of the world? I pose these questions as somebody who successfully conducts history of astronomy tours of the city of Nürnberg both for interested groups and individuals. I say successful because, firstly people want to take part in these tours and secondly I have received much positive feedback from those who have done so. However, and this is a very speculative however, I don’t have the feeling that there are many people who on holiday, or a business trip or whatever would, armed with a street map or smart phone, go out on their own to hunt down the house where some Nobel Laureate for chemistry lived whilst doing his doctoral studies at the local university.

These comments are of course designed to provoke and if you feel duly provoke please feel free to vent your spleen in the comments.

Another #histSTM blue plaque story Chemistry World: Flashback: 15 years ago

0516CW_Flashaback_300m

Quotes of the week:

“A witch said she couldn’t help find a silver spoon because the wind was wrong, the sun wasn’t shining and Jupiter wasn’t up” – Salisbury 1653 – h/t @witchcourt

“Women are evil, lecherous, vain & lustful. All witchcraft comes from carnal lust, which is, in women, insatiable” – Malleus Maleficarum 1486 h/t @WhoresofYore

A historian (who shall remain nameless) once told me: “Theory is like underwear. It should always be there & no one should ever see it.” – Nicole Hemmer (@pastpunditry)

“Whoever says Industrial Revolution says cotton, and whoever says cotton says Manchester” – Victoria Bateman (@vnbateman) quoting Hobsbawn h/t @joseph_lane

“I am a compost-ist, not a posthuman-ist: we are all compost, not posthuman.” – Donna Haraway h/t @profpeppard

On two occasions I have been asked “Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?“. In one case a member of the Upper, and in the other a member of the Lower, House put this question.

I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.

Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864)

Charles Babbage (1791-1871) h/t @ProfTomCrick

“Can we please stop with the ‘Rockstar’ historian shit please?” – Dr Steven Gray (@Sjgray86)

My morning typo, with so much to say: “bureaucrazy.” – Shannon Supple (@mazarines)

“A liberated woman is one who has sex before marriage and a job after”. ― Gloria Steinem h/t @berfois

“Sometimes I even doubt whether I have impostor syndrome”. – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“The more I see of men the more I like dogs.” – Madame de Staël (1766-1817) h/t @yovisto

“If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician”. I often think in music. – Albert Einstein h/t @phalpern

“Al-Kindi and the Brethren of Purity” would be a great band name – Jeffrey Rubinoff (@JeffRubinoff)

“If you’re thinking of writing a book on genes, better read Siddhartha Mukherjee’s magisterial The Gene before you decide if it’s worth it”. – Philip Ball (@philipcball)

“WHAT ARE WE TO TELL THE CHILDREN ABOUT GAYS MARRYING?”

“Dunno. I’ll ask my 5-year-old, who just married her stuffed bear to a stuffed pony”. – John Kovalic (@muskrat_john)

 

Math Definition I

Death of the Week:

 This week also saw the four hundredth anniversary of the death of one William Shakespeare, English Renaissance poet, actor and playwright. Not usually an occasion for a gazette dedicated to spreading the #histSTM gospel. However quite a few #histSTM historians wanted to get in on the act with new or recycled blog posts and articles about science, technology and medicine in the Bard’s times and in his works, so we have collected together those that we could find for your interdisciplinary delectation. A small word of caution upon entering and reading the material collected here, all that glitters is not necessarily gold, meaning that some authors tend to get a bit carried away with there #histSTM interpretations of Will’s dramatic works.

 William Shakespeare died 23 April 1616

The Chandos portrait, artist and authenticity unconfirmed. Courtesy of National Portrait Gallery, London. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Chandos portrait, artist and authenticity unconfirmed. Courtesy of National Portrait Gallery, London.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 “Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.” – Shakespeare

“Scholars agree that many of Shakespeare’s plays weren’t written by Shakespeare but by someone else who had the same name”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“I have tried lately to read Shakespeare, and found it so intolerably dull that it nauseated me.”— Charles Darwin

Royal College of Physicians: ‘Rapt in secret studies’: was Shakespeare’s Prospero inspired by John Dee?

Hyperallergic: The Poisons, Potions, and Charms of Shakespeare’s Plays

The Irish Astronomical Journal: The Astronomy of Shakespeare

Nature: Tudor technology: Shakespeare and science

Wellcome Collection Blog: The humours in Shakespeare

Faith and Wisdom in Science: Shakespeare and the Scientific Imagination

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Was Will a Copernican?

astro.ic.ac.uk: Shakespeare’s astronomy

Smithsonian.com: Was Shakespeare Aware of the Scientific Discoveries of His Time?

Youtube: Next – Aardman Animations (Lip Synch)

 

Birthdays of the Week:

Robert J. Oppenheimer was born 22 April 1904

J. Robert Oppenheimer, c. 1944 Source: Wikimedia Commons

J. Robert Oppenheimer, c. 1944
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: Remembering Oppenheimer

Voices of the Manhattan Project: J Robert Oppenheimer Interview

Max Planck born 23 April 1858

Planck as a young man, 1878 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Planck as a young man, 1878
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Max Planck

Hubble Space Telescope launched 24 April 1990

Exploded view of the Hubble Space Telescope Source: Wikimedia Commons

Exploded view of the Hubble Space Telescope
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 The Wire: 10 Iconic Images to Recall 26 Years of the Hubble Space Telescope

spacetelescope.org: Hubble Space Telescope

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

AHF: Albert Einstein

Forbes: Galileo and the ‘Myth’ That Won’t Go Away

University of Tartu Museum: Focault’s Pendulum

UT140826AT0009_0

AHF: Leslie R. Groves

AIP: Maurice Goldhaber

Voices of the Mahattan Project: Raymond Grills’s Interview

The Guardian: Blast off! Why has astronaut Helen Sherman been written out of history?

Yovisto: Pierre Curie and the Radioactivity

The Guardian: Gerald Hawkins

Space Flight Insider: Our Spaceflight Heritage: Descartes and the Voyage of Apollo 16

brainpickings: Don’t Heed the Haters: Albert Einstein’s Wonderful Letter of Support to Marie Curie in the Midst of Scandal

The Renaissance Mathematicus: DO IT!

Space.com: Obama to Shine Light on Unsung Hero of Astronomy

Henrietta Swan Leavitt working at her desk in the Harvard College Observatory. Credit: Public domain

Henrietta Swan Leavitt working at her desk in the Harvard College Observatory.
Credit: Public domain

maia.usno.mil: The Contributions of Women to the United States Naval Observatory: The Early Years

Nautilus: This Philosopher Helped Ensure There Was No Nobel for Relativity

Ptak Science Books: A Good Astronomical Bull’s-Eye (ca. 1850)

arXiv: Early Pioneers of Telescopic Astronomy in India

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Wilhelm Schickard

Houghton Library: Galileo’s Sunspots Gif

Source: Houghton Library

Source: Houghton Library

AHF: Emilio Segrè

Tamworth Herald: Tamworth scholar who fell out with Sir Isaac Newton

Journal of Art in Society: Comets in Art

Science News: Humans have pondered aliens since medieval times

 

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

New Scientist: 6 stunning maps uncover hidden details of the Earth and moon

Fine Books & Collection: Early 19th-Century Embroidered Map of D.C.

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 9.51.43 PM-thumb-400xauto-10623

Library of Congress: Worlds Revealed: Geography & Maps: British Spy Map of Lexington and Concord: A Detective Story

Yovisto: Jacques Cartier and the Discovery of Canada

Yovisto: Royal Botanist Charles Plumier

Open Culture: Download 67,000 Maps (in High Resolution) from the Wonderful David Rumsey Map Collection

Smithsonian.com: Eight Awesome Maps From Stanford’s New David Rumsey Map Center

The Denver Post: Lifestyles: Map quest: Old cartography a route to the past for Denver collector

Dayton News: Rare maps acquired by Texas General Land Office

Royal College of Physicians: A work by John Dee in Cambridge

Greater Greater Washington: Check out this DC bike map from 1896

Image from the DC Public Library.

Image from the DC Public Library.

The Map Room: A Look at the Osher Map Library

William Savage: Pen and Pension: Eighteenth-Century Patent Medicines: Kill or Cure?

Wall Street Journal: The Vatican’s Gallery of Maps Comes Back to Life

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Worms in the nose

Time, Trauma, History: So, Just What is the Point of the History of Medicine?

Yovisto: Happy Bicycle Day

Psychedelic-Library: LSD – My Problem Child

Yovisto: Gustav Fechner and Psychophysics

Regency Reader: Regency Health and Medicine: Herbs for Ague

flax--23-l

h-madness: Dissertations – Hans Asperger and the Ward for Therapeutic Pedagogy of the Viennese University’s Children’s Clinic

The Recipes Project: Controlled Substances in Roman Law and Pharmacy?

The Heritage Consortium: Remploy: The Changing Face of Disability Employment in Britain 1944–2014

Nursing Clio: A Letter to the Lady in Pants: Dr. Mary Edwards Walker and the History of Women (Un)Worthies

Advances in the History of Psychology: New HoP: “Active Touch” Pre-Gibson, Health Psych & S. Africa, & Digital History

Medievalists.net: The Healing Power of a Garden – A Medieval View

A medieval garden – from British Library MS Royal 6 E IX f. 15v

A medieval garden – from British Library MS Royal 6 E IX f. 15v

Alabama Yesterdays: Cocaine Comes to Alabama in 1884

Newcastle University: University pays respects to eminent neurologist (John Walton)

Lord Walton of Detchant  1922–2016

Lord Walton of Detchant
1922–2016

TECHNOLOGY:

Toilet Roll

Fine Woodworking: The H.O. Studley Tool Chest

flickr: Construction of the Forth Road Bridge

My medieval foundry: Casting into powder, a method from Biringuccio

Pacific Standard: A History of Subtle Sexism of Home Technology

Yovisto: Marc Seguin and the Wire-Cable Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge over the river Seine connecting Saint-Denis and l’Île Saint-Denis, constructed in 1844 by Marc Seguin and his brothers

Suspension Bridge over the river Seine connecting Saint-Denis and l’Île Saint-Denis, constructed in 1844 by Marc Seguin and his brothers

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: Table Clock

Yovisto: Karl Ferdinand Braun – inventor of the famous Braun Tube

Conciatore: Don Antonio de’ Medici

Conciatore: Borgo Pinti

Open Culture: Behold the First Electric Guitar: The 1931 “Frying Pan”

Atlas Obscura: A 2,000-Year History of Alarm Clocks

HNN: Patent for Wright Brothers’ Flying Machine Rediscovered

Capitalism’s Cradle: How Innovation Accelerated in Britain 1651–1851

Ptak Science Books: An Imaginary Skyline: Comparative Chart of the World’s Tallest Structures, 1852

Damn Interesting: The Tragic Birth of FM Radio

BBC: Future: The Victorians who flew as high as a jumbo jet

When Glaisher released his pigeons from the basket, they "fell downwards as a stone" (Credit: Science Photo Library)

When Glaisher released his pigeons from the basket, they “fell downwards as a stone” (Credit: Science Photo Library)

IMechE Archive and Library: Catch Me Who Can

The History Press: Brunel: The second greatest Brit of all time?

Ptak Science Books: A Great Work of Artistic Display of Quantitative Data–German Losses in the Battle of Britain (1940)

ICE: ICE Image Library

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Esoteric Bosch: Bosch’s Owls: An informal analysis

The National Museum of American History: Mudd’s Tax Calculator

Niche: “Stumps”: Jane Rule on Galiano

Yovisto: John Graunt and the Science of Demography

The Natural History Museum: History and architecture

dippy-753x435

The H-Word: The tree of life: with Darwin from Genesis to genomics

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Sir Hans Sloane: Collector, Marmoset-Owner and Chocolate-Populariser

Atlas Obscura: Why Modern Meteorologists Use a 19th-Century Crystal Ball

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Sir William Logan

Lady Science no. 19: Science and Feminism in the Anthropocene

Science League of America: A Pseudo-Huxley Quotation, Part 2

Notches: Sexual Violence Against Children in the 1960s

PLOS Biology: Morton, Gould, and Bias: A Comment on “The Mismeasure of Science”

Sprinkler Valve Through Door: Bird Neighbors (1897)

tumblr_o5zn0zTyko1t47uapo1_1280

Atlas Obscura: Why 19th-Century Naturalists Didn’t Believe in the Platypus

More Insects: Without museums collections, there are no long-term natural history studies

TrowellBlazers: Tilly Edinger

BHL: Earth Day 2016!

New Scientist: Victorians experienced early climate change but missed the signs

OPB: What Do Long-Dead Whalers Have to do With Climate Change

Atlas Obscura: Audubon Made Up At Least 28 Fake Species to Prank a Rival

CHEMISTRY:

AHF: Glenn Seaborg

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Glenn Seaborg’s Interview

Chemistry World: Chemistry Nobel laureate Walter Kohn dies aged 93

Walter Kohn at the 62nd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting on July 3, 2012

Walter Kohn at the 62nd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting on July 3, 2012

c&en: Notable chemists who should have won the Nobel

about education: Pierre Curie – Biography and Achievements

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Unsettling Scientific Stories: A History of the Future: Welcome to Unsettling Scientific Stories Blog

The Ordered Universe Project: Ordered Universe goes west

Ether Wave Propaganda: For My Zilsel Friends, The Dissenting Sciences

tandonline: Discovering Science from an Armchair: Popular Science in British Magazines of the Interwar Years

Islamic Manuscripts: Reference Library

The Guardian: Sir David Mackay obituary

 David MacKay achieved cult status among climate and energy aficionados following the publication of Sustainable Energy: Without the Hot Air in 2008. Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian

David MacKay achieved cult status among climate and energy aficionados following the publication of Sustainable Energy: Without the Hot Air in 2008. Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian

History Workshop Online: Making a home for women’s history in London’s East End

Advances in the History of Psychology: Help Kickstart the National Museum of Psychology!

the many-headed monster: On periodisation: an introduction

Nature: Peer review: Troubled from the start

Chronologia Universalis: On card catalogues

Nautilus: Why Physics is Not a Discipline

Science League of America: Well Said! Carl Zimmer on Theories

JHI Blog: Historicizing Failure

The #EnvHist Weekly

HNN: Alan Turing was one of many persecuted by Whitehall for their sexuality

 

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Archiater

Tor.com: All the planets are But Rays: Victorian-era Magical Societies, Telepathy, and Interplanetary Space Travel

seance-table

The Recipes Project: In Search of Alchemy

Academia: Connecting Events: Experienced, Narrated, and Framed

BOOK REVIEWS:

brainpickings: Pioneering Astronomer Vera Rubin on Women in Science, Dark Matter, and Our Never-Ending Quest to Know the Universe

The Telegraph: Albert Einstein: he really was an egghead

Not Even Past: Global Indios: The Indigenous Struggle for Justice in Sixteenth-Century Spain, By Nancy van Deusen (2015)

The Nation: Hume’s Call to Action

MedHum Fiction – Daily Dose: Robert Burton and the Transformative Powers of Melancholy

Popular Science: The Tyrannosaur Chronicles

51EEQfiNH7L._SX313_BO1,204,203,200_

New Statesman: The joy of rex: why Tyrannosaurus rex casts a long shadow

Nature: Autobiography: A lab of one’s own

Dissertation Reviews: The Trabzon-Bayezid Road and Modernisation in the Late Ottoman Empire

Monoskop Log: Julia Kursell (ed.): Sounds of Science – Schall im Labor 1800–1930 [English, German]

NEW BOOKS:

Paradise Road: Up in Smoke: The Failed Dreams of Battersea Power Station

Up-in-Smoke-jacket-purchase-sm

berghahn: Series: Environment in History: International Perspectives

Princeton University Press: Controversy in Victorian Geology: The Cambrian-Silurian Dispute

IEA: Georges Politzer, le concret et sa signification

Dave Hone’s Archosaur Musings: The Tyrannosaur Chronicles is here!

CUP: The Cambridge Handbook of Western Mysticism and Esotericism

Wiley: A Companion to the History of Science

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Broadway World.com: Met Museum Exhibition to Celebrate Artistic, Technological, Cultural Legacy of the Seljuqs

x2BA4BE36C-DBBA-F765-297E4B761E1D47F6.jpg.pagespeed.ic.1MqDf2y6gc

Harvard Magazine: Before Social Media: Radio was the medium that broke the silence May–June 2016

Leaping Robot Blog: From Laser Art to Laserium

Grup d’estudis d’història de la cartografia: Exhibition about Renacentrist cartography in Bergamo 16 April–10 July 2016

Bonner Sterne: “Argelanders Erben” im Universitätsmuseum Bonn bis 31 Juli 2016

 

Daniels Dies & Das: Eröffnung von “Argelanders Erben”

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

Bridging the World: Benjamin Baker of Frome 5 March–21 May 2016

Dittrick Museum: Embracing Digital History: How Medicine Became Modern

Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée, Marsella: “Made in Algeria, généalogie d’un territoire” runs till 2 May 2016

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Bay Area Reporter: Wonderful worlds of 17th-century China: Asian Art Museum Runs till 8 May 2016 

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Natural History Museum: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017 

Science Museum: Information Age

Cambridge Science Museum: Cosmic

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Macrobert Arts Centre: The Trials of Galileo

Perth Concert Hall: The Trials of Galileo

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

Institute of Historical Research, University of London: Maritime History and Culture Seminar on ‘‘The Great Mars Boom’ of 1892: International Telegraphy and the Making of the Martian Canals’ 26 April 2016

Bede AD

Warburg Institute: Maps and Society Lectures: ‘Cartography and Captivity during the Napoleonic Conflicts, 1803-1815’. 28 April 2016

Museum of the History of Science, Oxford: Public Health and Private Pain: A Night of Medical History and Drama 5 May 2016

Royal Museums Greenwich: Of Rare Marvels: Celebrating the Transit of Venus 28 April 2016

V&A: Courses: Sensing Time: The Art and Science of Clocks and Watches 18 June 2016

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Festival of Museums 2016 – Glasgow’s Marvellous Medicine 14 May 2016

Things

Royal Institution: The extraordinary theorems of John Nash 29 April 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: THE MORE STRICTLY WE ARE WATCHED, THE BETTER WE BEHAVE: JEREMY BANTAM’S PANOPTICON 30 April 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: BETHLEM AND THE BRAIN: MUZZLING WILLIAM LAWRENCE’S MEDICAL MATERIALISM 7 May 2016

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Dr Elodie Duché ‘Cartography and Captivity during the Napoleonic Conflicts, 1803-1815’ 28 April 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

Boston Medical Library: Lecture: Prescription Drug Abuse in American History:

The Polar Museum: Lucky 13 Storytelling from the polar regions of the world 13 May 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind 9 May 2016

Royal Society: Lecture: Hasok Chang: Who cares about the history of science? 10 May 2016

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

UCL: STS Haldane Lecture: Maja Horst, University of Copenhagen: Reframing Science Communication – Culture, Identity and Organisations 5 May 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Ken Currie: Portrait of Peter Higgs, 2008

Ken Currie: Portrait of Peter Higgs, 2008

TELEVISION:

The Guardian: David Attenborough’s early films to be shown in colour for first time

BBC Four: The Silk Road

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Feynman: Mathematician versus Physicists

The Ordered Universe Project: Lecture: Wonders of the Universe

Los Angeles Times: Birthplace of atomic weaponry Manhattan Project National Historical Park, Hanford, Wash.

RADIO & PODCASTS:

The British Journal for the History of Science: J.G. Crowther’s War: Institutional strife at the BBC and British Council

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Library and Archives: The Bloody Fields of Waterloo: Medical Support for Wellington’s Greatest Victory

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Knowing and Selling Exotic Drugs in Paris c. 1700

Voices of the Manhattan Project: The Search for Atomic Power: 1954 Radio Program

ICI Radio-Canada: Le test de quotient intellectual, ou outil controversé

History of Philosophy: without any gaps: 252. Neverending Story: the Eternity of the World

Distillations: Power in the Blood: When Religion and Medicine Meet in Your Veins

BBC Radio 4: After Chernobyl

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Columbia University: The Center for Science & Society: Exploring the Philosophy of Émilie du Châtelet 1–3 June 2016

University of Reading: CfP: Object Lessons and Nature Tables 23 September 2016

Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology (Rio de Janeiro, 23-29 July 2017): CfP: Blood, Food, and Climate: Historical Relationships Between Physiology, Race, Nation-Building, and Colonialism/Globalization

CFP Early Modern World

Organisé par Alexandre Klein (Université d’Ottawa): Histoire des relations de santé aux XIXe et XXe siècles 11 mai 2016

History at the Open University: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland: A Conference in Honour of Anne Laurence Institute of Historical Research London 4 June 2016

IHPST, Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques, Paris: CfP: International Doctoral Conference in Philosophy of Science 29-30 September 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Ian Ramsey Centre Conference, University of Oxford: Workshop “Early Modern Laws of Nature: Secular and Divine” 7 July 2016 Call for Abstract: deadline 30 April 2016

History and Philosophy of Science Department, University of Cambridge: Workshop: Informal Aspects of Uncertainty Evaluation 20 May 2016

Annals of Science: Annals of Science Essay Prize for Young Scholars

Religion & Medicine

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CFP: Blood, Food & Climate – Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology

2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics Pöllau, Austria 5–7 September 2016

University of Cambridge: Cabinet of Natural History: Seminars Easter Term 2016

Science in Public

APS: Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Deadline 2 May 2016

University of Leeds: Northern Renaissance Seminar: Programme: Communication, Correspondence and Transmission in the Early Modern World 12-13 May 2016

British Library: Conference: Transforming Topography 6 May 2016

Society and th Sea

The International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST): Invites submissions for the fourth DHST Prize for Young Scholars, to be presented in 2017.

Warburg Institute: ESSWE Thesis Workshop 7 July 2016

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

Vatican Library Conference

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

Swansea University: Inaugural Lecture 5 May 2016: David Turner: Locating Disability in Britain’s Industrial Revolution

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Notches: CfP. Histories of Music and Sexuality

Women hist phil

University of London: Birkbeck: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2016: 11 July 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Annual Conference Programme 28–30 May 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

irkbeck, University of London: CfP: Embarrassing Bodies: Feeling Self-Conscious in the Nineteenth Century 17 June 2016

University of Warwick: Workshop: Early Modern Experimental Philosophy, Metaphysics, and Religion 10–11 May 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

European Commission: Research & Innovation: Marie Sklodowski-Curie Actions: European Fellowships

NYAM: Head of Preservation and Conservation

American Society for Environmental History: ASEH is offering two graduate student internships this summer – both in the Seattle area. Deadline for applications: May 31, 2016.

The Commission on Women and Gender Studies in History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Agnodike Research Travel Fellowship – 2016 Competition

University of York: MA in Medical History and Humanities

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Digitisation Project Intern with Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow 

School of History at the University of Leicester: Teaching Fellow in the Histories of Medicine and Welfare for one year from 1 October 2016

University of Leeds: Programmes in History and Philosophy of Science

University of Wuppertal: Junior Professor in the Philosophy of Physics

Smithsonian Institution: Museum Curator, in the National Air and Space Museum

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #36

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #36

Monday 18 April 2016

EDITORIAL:

Well we’re back and fighting fit well fighting not really fit but we are back.

Busy Owl

As you can see  our slaves staff are at their desks eager to bring you a new edition of your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette filled to the gunwales with all the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could trawl up out of the depths of cyberspace.

Quotes of the week:

“Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.” Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626)

“Edmond Halley described as a man who ‘warmed both hands before the fire of life’”. – Kate Morant (@HalleysLog)

Birthdays of the Week:

 12 April 1961 Yuri Gagarin first man in space

 

Gherman Titov, Nikita Khrushchev and Yuri Gagarin on the Red Square in Moscow 1961 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gherman Titov, Nikita Khrushchev and Yuri Gagarin on the Red Square in Moscow 1961
Source: Wikimedia Commons

U.S. News: From the Archives: Russia’s 1961 Triumph in Space

Royal Museums Greenwich: Yuri Gagarin Statue

Youtube: Public Service Broadcasting – Gagarin

BBC News: Yuri Gagarin: Russia marks cosmonaut anniversary

Christiaan Huygens born 14 April 1629

Christiaan Huygens. Cut from the engraving following the painting of Caspar Netscher by G. Edelinck, between 1684 and 1687. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Christiaan Huygens. Cut from the engraving following the painting of Caspar Netscher by G. Edelinck, between 1684 and 1687.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

History of European Space: Christiaan Huygens: Discoverer of Titan

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Huygens Enigma

Abraham Ortelius born 14 April 1527 

Ortelius World Map

Ortelius World Map

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Abraham Ortelius and the 16th-Centuy information age

Annie Maunder born 14 April 1868

Annie with her solar camera at the Canadian Eclipse Station in Labrador, August 1905

Annie with her solar camera at the Canadian Eclipse Station in Labrador, August 1905

 BBC Radio Ulster: Annie Maunder – The Lady Computer of Strabane

Leonardo da Vinci born 15 April 1452

 

Francesco Melzi - Portrait of Leonardo Source: Wikimedia Commons

Francesco Melzi – Portrait of Leonardo
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Medievalists.net: The Fables of Leonardo da Vinci

Forbes: Leonardo da Vinci’s Geological Observations Revolutionized Renaissance Art

The Telegraph: Leonardo da Vinci: genius or humble draftsman

The Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius

British Library: The Leonardo Notebook

Smithsonian.com: Historians Identify 35 Descendants of Leonardo da Vinci

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Pissing on a Holy Cow

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Is Leonardo da Vinci a great artist or a great scientists? Neither Actually.

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Arizona Daily Sun: View from Mars Hill: Phoenix rising

Suhayl 14 (2015), pp.167-188: Bīrūnī’s Telescopic-Shape Instrument for Observing the Lunar Crescent

Daniel Crouch Rare Books: The most spectacular contribution of the book-maker’s art to sixteenth-century science: Hand Coloured Astronomicum Caesareum:

apianus-petrus-astronomicum-caesareum

Yovisto: Houston, we have a Problem

Atlas Obscura: This 17th Century Map of the Skies is Bursting with Mythological Creatures

AIP: E. Margaret Burbidge

Gizmodo: Astronomers Found Evidence of Exoplanets 100 Years Ago and Didn’t Know It

Smithsonian.com: Scientists Discovered Exoplanets More Than 70 Years Earlier Than Thought

AHF: Otto Frisch

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Well no, actually he didn’t

Atlas Obscura: Victorians Wanted to Contact Aliens Using Giant Mirrors

AHF: Jumbo

National Geographic: The Forgotten Soviet Space Shuttle Could Fly Itself

Space:com: Lost in Space Race: Women Denied Proper Place in History

Unsung heroes of the Space Race: A historic photo of women scientists at JPL. Credit: Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech

Unsung heroes of the Space Race: A historic photo of women scientists at JPL.
Credit: Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech

D News: Obama to Shine Light on Unsung Hero of Astronomy

The Atlantic: Astronomy’s Evolving Gender DynamicsThe Public Domain Review: Celestial Phenomenon Over Nuremberg, April 14th 1561

JSTOR Daily: The Star-Studded Life of Ms. Dorothy Bennett

Dorothy A. Bennett, Dr. Julio C. Tello, and Te Ata Fisher at Inka Wasi, Dr. Tello's home, Lima, Peru, 1937 George Clyde Fisher, AMNH Digital Special Collections

Dorothy A. Bennett, Dr. Julio C. Tello, and Te Ata Fisher at Inka Wasi, Dr. Tello’s home, Lima, Peru, 1937
George Clyde Fisher, AMNH Digital Special Collections

History of Physics: Newsletter

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bill Bailey’s Interview

AHF: Britain

Voices of the Manhattan Project: To Fermi – with Love – Part 2

Forbes: Galileo and the ‘Myth’ That Won’t Go Away

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Instagram: Cat on a map

British Art Studies: Looking for “the Longitude”

HNN: America’s Spanish origins confirmed

Jisc: Old Maps Online

Heritage Daily: The Roman World Interactive Map

Royal Museums Greenwich: Captain James Cook

James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance-Holland, c. 1775, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance-Holland, c. 1775, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Yovisto: Gregory Pincus and the Contraceptive Pill

Recommended Dose: Electrocardiogram and Diphtheria in the early 20th Century

Yovisto: James Parkinson and Parkinson’s Disease

Garland Hospital: A Unique Institution: The Cumberland and Westmorland Joint Lunatic Asylum

FullSizeRender (1)

Smithsonian.com: A Science Lecturer Accidentally Sparked a Global Craze for Yogurt

Wellcome Library: ‘Doctor’ Dee: John Dee and medical practice

Deaf History: an incomplete jigsaw: Curing deafness!

History of Medicine in Ireland: The Cost of Insanity

Early Modern Medicine: Have you got the Pox?

Yovisto: Sir James Mackenzie and the Study of Cardiac Arrhythmias

JAMA: A Harvey Anniversary: 1616–1916

medelita: 11 Ghastly Medical Instruments From the Past

Hyperallergic: Painstaking Portraits of 19th-Century Dermatology Patients

Impetigo, hand on book, from Thomas Bateman’s ‘Delineations of Cutaneous Diseases’ (1828) Image courtesy Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham

Impetigo, hand on book, from Thomas Bateman’s ‘Delineations of Cutaneous Diseases’ (1828)
Image courtesy Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham

The National Museum of American History: Surgical Instruments used at Lincoln’s Autopsy, 1865

CHoM News: Processing of the Harold Amos Papers Underway

Dr. Alun Withey: The Lost Children’s Drawings in a 19th-Century Medical Manuscript

Thomas Morris: A beetroot up the bottom

What’s Cooking @Special Collections?: A Tea, a Counter-top Ad, and a Dead President

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: The eighteenth century dispensary movement

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Salamander

Conciatore: Cross Pollination

Conciatore: Eyes of a Lynx

Conciatore: Washing Molten Glass

The Recipes Project: How to Avoid a Bad Buy and Anger Patrons: A Recipe for Pigment Testing

Royal Museums Greenwich: Shipbuilding: The earliest vessels

WayBack Machine: New York Times: ‘Spamming’ on the Internet

Ptak Science Books: A Note on the Future of the Future, 1911

This  cross section illustration ("Rue Future"/Future Street) is from Eugene Alfred Henard's1 (1849-1923) article, "The Cities of the Future", from American City, Volume 4, January, 1911.

This cross section illustration (“Rue Future”/Future Street) is from Eugene Alfred Henard’s1 (1849-1923) article, “The Cities of the Future”, from American City, Volume 4, January, 1911.

Strife: Attacks on Undersea Cables: a Victorian Legacy

The Transcontinental Railroad: It’s All About Steam

Smithsonian.com: 10 Bizarre, Vision-Enhancing Technologies From the Last 1,000 Years

Atlas Obscura: Inside the Spark-Filled Home of a Vintage Electrical Machine Collector

Gizmodo: London Just Opened the Entrance to This Underwater Tunnel for the First Time in 147 Years

Cutaway drawing of the tunnel-in-progress and the two entrance halls on either side of the Thames

Cutaway drawing of the tunnel-in-progress and the two entrance halls on either side of the Thames

Live Science: Lost Wright Brothers’ ‘Flying Machine’ Patent Resurfaces

Wired: From the Wurlitzer to the 808, Theses are the Greatest Drum Machines Ever Made

The Architects’ Journal: From the archive: 100 years of steel in architecture

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Atlantic: Most of the Tree of Life is a Complete Mystery

Development: Obituary: Hans Meinhardt (1938–2016)

Niche: #EnvHist Worth Reading March 2016

Academia: The History of Reindeer Herding on the Alaska Peninsula, 1905–1950

Figure 1. Frank Taller and his daughter sitting on a reindeer, Levelock area, circa 1930. Courtesy of Alex Tallekpalek and the National Park Service, Museum  Management Program and Katmai National Park and Preserve; H-410

Figure 1. Frank Taller and his daughter sitting on a reindeer, Levelock area, circa 1930. Courtesy of Alex Tallekpalek and the National Park Service, Museum Management Program and Katmai National Park and Preserve; H-410

Archiving Early America: Thomas Jefferson: Paleontologist

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Edouard Lartet

Notches: Wolfenden, Paederasty and Paedophilia

Inventory: Vere Gordon Childe British Historian and Archaeologist 1892–1957

History of Geology: Clash of the Titans: The Science behind the Iceberg that sank the Titanic

Forbes: How Animal Freakshows Helped the Science of Biology Develop

A two-headed calf from an Austrian taxidermy collection.

A two-headed calf from an Austrian taxidermy collection.

The Recipes Project: How to Fatten a Carp

Science League of America: A Pseudo-Huxley Quotation Part 1

Circulating Now: Some of the Most Beautiful Herbals

CHEMISTRY:

Learn Chemistry: African American chemist Percy Julian born 11 April 1899

Chemistry World: Gahn’s blowpipe

0416CW_Classic-Kit_630m

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The Atlantic: Innovation is Overrated

Yovisto: Henry Rawlinson and the Mesopotamian Cuneiform

The Behistun Inscriptions, Column 1 (DB I 1-15), sketch by Friedrich von Spiegel (1881)

The Behistun Inscriptions, Column 1 (DB I 1-15), sketch by Friedrich von Spiegel (1881)

Science Visions: Female-Authors-Only Philosophy of Science Syllabus

Platypus: The CASTAC Blog: Negotiating Expertise: The Case of Operational Research

Nautilus: It’s Time These Ancient Women Scientists Get Their Due

Historiens de la sante: Medical History Volume 60 Issue 2 April 2016 Table of Contents

HSS: Latest Issue of ISIS Volume 107 Number 1 March 2016

storify: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

The #EnvHist Weekly

Lady Science: PCA/ACA Conference Recap

Forbidden Histories: Can Psychotherapists Benefit from History of Science Scholarship? Open Access to my Article on the Psychology of Belief in Histories of Science and the Occult

The Guardian: Olive Anderson obituary

Olive Anderson

Olive Anderson

OUP: The invention of the information revolution

The Ragged School Museum: Just why does Victorian science rule?

VOX CEPR’s Policy Portal: Purpose-built versus serendipitous innovation links: New survey evidence

Forbidden Histories: Scientific Revolutions and the “Will to Believe”: The Birth of Heliocentrism.

TrowelBlazers: TrowelBlazers 2016 Big Project(s)! – Raising Horizons

bonæ litteræ: Confessions of a Manuscript Researcher

SocPhilSciPract: April History and Philosophy of Science and Science and Technology Notes

ESOTERIC:

Atlas Obscura: Found: Isaac Newton’s Recipe for the Philosopher’s Stone

The Washington Post: Isaac Newton spent a lot of time on junk ‘science’ and this manuscript proves it

Chemical Heritage Foundation

Chemical Heritage Foundation

Atlas Obscura: Witch Hunting for Dummies: The 15th-Century Witchcraft Manual

PBS: Benjamin Franklin: Inquiring Mind: Mesmer

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: The Age of Genius: The Seventeenth Century and the Birth of the Modern Mind by A C Grayling

New Statesman: The revolutionary science of eighteenth century France

Science Book a Day: Spirals of Time: The Secret Life and Curious Afterlife of Seashells

spirals-in-time

Science Book a Day: The Most Perfect Thing: Inside (and Outside) a Bird’s Egg

History Extra: The astronomer and the witch: Johannes Kepler’s fight to save his mother from execution

Chemistry World: Failure: why science is so successful

Academia: David Beck ed. Knowing Nature in Early Modern Europe

The Argus: Mother of modern witchcraft revealed as Bletchley Park codebreaker

Science: Of humans and mathematical symbols

Scientific American: April Book Reviews Roundup

brainpickings: The Rise of Rocket Girls: The Untold Story of the Remarkable Women Who Powered Space Exploration

NEW BOOKS:

The Hakluyt Society: Sir Joseph Banks, Iceland and the North Atlantic 1772–1820: Journals, Letters and Documents

Historiens de la santé: Feverish Bodies, Enlightened Minds: Science and the Yellow Fever Controversy in the Early American Republic 

Historiens de la santé: Immunity: How Elie Metchnikoff Changed the Course of Modern Medicine 

CUP: The Smoke in London: Energy and Environment in the Early Modern City

Bloomsbury: The Birth of the English Kitchen, 1650–1850

English Kitchen

Historiens de la santé: Cajal and de Castro’s Neurohistological Methods

The MIT Press: The Age of Electroacoustics: Transforming Science and Sound

L’Harmattan: Les Cuissons Alimentaires au Moyen Age

Springer: Early Geological Maps of Europe: Central Europe 1750 to 1840

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Grup d’estudis d’història de la cartografia: Exhibition about Renacentrist cartography in Bergamo 16 April–10 July 2016

Bonner Sterne: “Argelanders Erben” im Universitätsmuseum Bonn bis 31 Juli 2016

bp18808562

Daniels Dies & Das: Eröffnung von “Argelanders Erben”

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

548960-1439393882

Bridging the World: Benjamin Baker of Frome 5 March–21 May 2016

Dittrick Museum: Embracing Digital History: How Medicine Became Modern

Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée, Marsella: “Made in Algeria, généalogie d’un territoire” runs till 2 May 2016

 

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Bay Area Reporter: Wonderful worlds of 17th-century China: Asian Art Museum Runs till 8 May 2016 

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Discover Medical London: Medicine at the Movies

Science Museum: Ramanujan: Divining the origins of genius

Independent: Charles Darwin Disney film: Adventure movie will give naturalist the Indiana Jones treatment

The young sea-faring Charles Darwin – seen here in an 1809 portrait – is to be portrayed as an Indiana Jones-style adventurer Alamy

The young sea-faring Charles Darwin – seen here in an 1809 portrait – is to be portrayed as an Indiana Jones-style adventurer Alamy

 

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Macrobert Arts Centre: The Trials of Galileo

Perth Concert Hall: The Trials of Galileo

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Dr Elodie Duché ‘Cartography and Captivity during the Napoleonic Conflicts, 1803-1815’ 28 April 2016

CHF: Medicine 1776 24 April 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

Boston Medical Library: Lecture: Prescription Drug Abuse in American History:

Lessons from a Century of Failures and Occasional Successes 21 April 2016

The Polar Museum: Lucky 13 Storytelling from the polar regions of the world 13 May 2016

Frome Museum: Talk: Clash of the Walruses: Was Benjamin Baker Extravagant at his Forth Road Bridge? 27 April 2016

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Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind 9 May 2016

University of Leeds: Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Lecture: Object 4: Microscope 19 April 2016

Royal Society: Lecture: Hasok Chang: Who cares about the history of science? 10 May 2016

Restaurant & Weinbauernhaus “Im Sack”, Jena: Vorstellung der neuesten beiden Bücher über Erhard Weigel 23 April 2016

Museum of the History of Science: Marconi Day 23 April 2016

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

UCL: STS Haldane Lecture: Maja Horst, University of Copenhagen: Reframing Science Communication – Culture, Identity and Organisations 5 May 2016

The Royal Society: Workshop: The Politics of Academic Publishing 1950–2016 22 April 2016RS PUBLISHINGScience Museum: Women Engineers in the Great War and after 23 April 2016

Wren Library Lincoln Cathedral: Lecture: Anna Agnarsdóttir – Sir Joseph Banks and Iceland 28 April 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Delay Lines

Youtube: Ada Lovelace Day 2015

Electric Beats: Browse the History of Electronic Music from 1880 to 2015

Youtube: The Medieval Mind

Youtube: Einstein’s Miracle Year: The Road to Relativity

The Ordered Universe Project: Order, The Universe and Everything: The World of Robert Grosseteste

RADIO & PODCASTS:

The Story: Story about Science: Margaret Geller: Mapping the Universe

BBC Radio 4 Drama: Beyond Endurance

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

Conf. People Places

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

Vatican Library Conference

Swansea University: Inaugural Lecture 5 May 2016: David Turner: Locating Disability in Britain’s Industrial Revolution

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Things

Notches: CfP. Histories of Music and Sexuality

University of London: Birkbeck: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2016: 11 July 2016

Conference Portugal

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

Society and th Sea

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Annual Conference Programme 28–30 May 2016

CFP Early Modern World

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Birkbeck, University of London: CfP: Embarrassing Bodies: Feeling Self-Conscious in the Nineteenth Century 17 June 2016

Science in Public

University of Warwick: Workshop: Early Modern Experimental Philosophy, Metaphysics, and Religion 10–11 May 2016

Women hist phil

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Science Friday: Job: Podcast Producer/Reporter

University of Cambridge: University Lecturer in the Sociology of Science and Technology

University of Exeter: AHRC-funded Collaborative PhD Studentship with the University of Exeter and BT Archives: The Cultures of Radio Research in India, circa. 1890-1947

ODNB: Research Bursaries in the Humanities 2016–17

University of Leeds: AHRC-Funded PhD: “The Working Life of Evolutionary Biologists: Exploring the Culture of Scientific Research Through the Personal Archive of John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)”

University of Minnesota: Call for Applications: Travel Fellowship in the History of the Academic Health Center & Health Sciences at the University of Minnesota, 2016-2017

Queen Mary, University of London: Applications Invited for AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Studentship with RNIB: Blindness, Disability, and Literacy in Britain

University of Minnesota: Assistant Professor, History of Science and Technology

University of California – Berkeley: Lecturer – History of Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment, or Quantitative/Computational History – Department of History

Yale University: The Historical Library of the Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library at Yale University is pleased to announce its ninth annual Research Travel Award for use of the Historical Library.

University of Illinois at Chicago: Junior Fellowship in Philosophy of Quantum Gravity

 

 

 

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Blogging Hiatus

There will be a four-week blogging hiatus both here and at The Renaissance Mathematicus for two different reasons. Firstly I am going into hospital for three weeks, but have no fear this is a positive development not a negative one. I suffer from scoliosis and I’m going to get three weeks of intensive remedial orthopaedic treatment to try and improve my condition. Directly following my last day of treatment, I shall then fly to Britain for a meeting of the Christie Clan in a twelfth-century manor house in the Welsh marches. I shall not be entirely incommunicado, as I will only be a day patient during my treatment. So I will still pop up on Twitter and Facebook, from time to time, but I don’t think I shall be doing any blogging in this period and Whewell’s Gazette is definitely out.

If you are at a loose end and looking for something to do during this period, Afton, the excessively charming three-year-old daughter of my very good #histsci friend and colleague Michael Barton (@darwinsbulldog), suffers from epilepsy and has recently undergone neurosurgery. As they live in America this means big medical bills. Michael and his wife, Catherine, have set up an appeal on gofundme to help pay those bills, so you could do me and Afton a favour and make a small donation to help pass the time until I’m up and blogging again.

Afton

Afton

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #35

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #35

Monday 14 March 2016

EDITORIAL:

Time moves on and it’s time once again for your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette, bringing all of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the depths of cyberspace from the last seven days gathered up and freshly packaged for you delectation.

I wrote the editorial last week on 8 March, International Women’s Day, dedicating last week’s edition of Whewell’s Gazette to the history of women in science. However the collected post went up to Sunday 6 March and the 8 March, of course, brought lots more post dedicated to women in #histSTM, so for a second week we have a special women’s history edition.

A Mighty Girl: Those Who Dared To Discover: 15 Women Scientists You Should Know

Gerty Cori

Gerty Cori

BHL: Women Illustrators in Natural History

Darwin Correspondence Project: Correspondence with women

British Library: Collection items: Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women

Library of Congress: World’s Revealed: Geography & Maps: Putting women back on the map

Anna Beeck. “Plaan van de Dissante of Landing in Spangien voor Cadix…” 1702. Library of Congress, Geography & Map Division.

Anna Beeck. “Plaan van de Dissante of Landing in Spangien voor Cadix…” 1702. Library of Congress, Geography & Map Division.

c-net: The 19th century women who catalogued the cosmos

University of Kent: Thinking Back through our Mothers: The Lady’s Magazine on International Women’s Day

Mashable: 20th Century: The Evolution of Women’s Work Wear

Motherboard: An A-Z of Women Pushing Boundaries in Science and Tech

The American Bookbinding Museum: Bookbinding and the Working Woman

Natural History Museum: Sarah Stone and images from a lost museum

“Mandarin duck, Aix galericulata. Sarah Stone, 1788.” NHM Picture Library Ref 024290

“Mandarin duck, Aix galericulata. Sarah Stone, 1788.” NHM Picture Library Ref 024290

TrowelBlazers: Zonia Baber: The Fearless Firsts of a Scientific Suffragette

Mosaic: In conversation with…Françoise Barré-Sinoussi

Letters from Gondwana: Women in the Golden Age of Geology in Britain

Nature: A tumour through time

Broadly: The History of Erasing Women’s History

CNN: These are the most important women in the history of science

Chien-Shiung Wu Chinese American Physicist (1912–1997)

Chien-Shiung Wu Chinese American Physicist (1912–1997)

Royal Society of Chemistry: shaping the history of science

Natural History Museum: Metamorphosis of an artist: Maria Sybilla Merian

Nursing Clio: Women, Animals, and the Poetry of Activism

Lady Science: Wonder Women of STEM

Wiley Online Library: Women in evolution – highlighting the changing face of evolutionary biology

Madelene College Libraries: Women Printers

PL 1077(2): CORTÉS, MARTIN: THE ARTE OF NAUIGATION… [IMPRINTED AT LONDON: BY THE WIDOWE OF RICHARD IUGGE, LATE PRINTER TO THE QUEENES MAIESTIE, 1584].

PL 1077(2): CORTÉS, MARTIN: THE ARTE OF NAUIGATION… [IMPRINTED AT LONDON: BY THE WIDOWE OF RICHARD IUGGE, LATE PRINTER TO THE QUEENES MAIESTIE, 1584].

Smithsonian.com: Ten Historic Female Scientists You Should Know

Conciatore: Sara Vincx

Conciatore: Béguines of Malines

Conciatore: Dianora Parenti

Yakima Herald: Mitchell made the most of her opportunities

Nature: Women at the edge of science

Caterina Sforza defended cities and hoarded alchemical secrets in the fifteenth century.

Caterina Sforza defended cities and hoarded alchemical secrets in the fifteenth century.

The Globe and Mail: The Women on the Moon

CPH Post Online: Low on the Richter scale, but highly respected in the lab

Bletchley Park: Bombe Girls

Royal Museums Greenwich: Three Women in the London Chart Trade, c.1800-1860

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Baumgartner, Leona papers, 1837–1993 (inclusive) 1930–1970 (bulk)

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Dawes, Lydia M. Gibson papers, 1926–1959

The Guardian: Pioneering woman who mapped the ocean floor

Marie Tharp at work on her maps of the Atlantic Ocean floor, in the early 1950s. Photograph: Alamy

Marie Tharp at work on her maps of the Atlantic Ocean floor, in the early 1950s. Photograph: Alamy

Science: Q&A: Author of ‘feminist glaciology’ study reflects on sudden appearance in culture wars

Nicholson’s Journal

I recently got this email forwarded by Sue Bramall concerning the Nicholson’s Journal website, which she runs. This is a wonderful #histSTM resource and it is to be wished that more people follow he lead and produce similar websites for other important by long forgotten scientific periodical from the past.

Dear all,

Especially for those interested in the 18th and the 19th centuries, there is a very useful and impressive new resource. It is a gateway to the whole set of A Journal of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and the Arts, edited by William Nicholson (affectionately known, then and now, as “Nicholson’s Journal”), gathered together in one convenient place:
All of the 3,000 articles have also been indexed, so you can search by author, subject, keyword, and time period from the “Index” tab. You can also find a complete list of authors on the same website, and bibliographies of works by and about Nicholson.
All of this is the work of Sue Bramall, amateur historian and a descendant of William Nicholson. Sue is also in the process of completing a biography of Nicholson, which will fill an important gap in the literature. Information about the forthcoming book can also be found on the website.
Enjoy!
best,
Hasok

…brought to you by HPS-discussion.

The Guardian all brought an excellent article on the H-Word Blog on Ms Bramall’s efforts

The H-Word: Nicholson’s Journal: Britain’s fist commercial science periodical

 Illustration from the 1810 volume of the Journal of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and the Arts. Photograph: Natural History Museum/Wikimedia

Illustration from the 1810 volume of the Journal of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and the Arts. Photograph: Natural History Museum/Wikimedia

Quotes of the week:
“Imagine what would happen if Schroedinger’s cat was asked to “think outside the box”” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“His sort’s nowt a pound, and shit’s tuppence…” – Inspector Thursday h/t @telescoper

“Sensible 17th century medical proverb: ‘You should never touch your eye but with your elbow.’” – Jonathan Healey (@SocialHistoryOx)

“Mr. Watson—Come here—I want to see you” – famous first words over Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone to his assistant Thomas A. Watson @yovisto

Homin Pigeon

“Historical context is no trivial matter”. Michael Egan (@EganHistory)

“Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.” Douglas Adams (1952-2001)

“In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.” Douglas Adams

“I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.” Douglas Adams (1952-2001) h/t @yovisto

“And bleeding Nature with all its bloody laws that we never voted for #brexit” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“Too many cosmologists spoil the primordial soup” – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“Don’t put your trust in revolutions. They always come around again. That’s why they’re called revolutions.” – Terry Pratchett

Roman Algebra

“I never let practical considerations clutter my youthful dreams.” – Roy Chapman Andrews, fossil discoverer and explorer.

“All this fuss about artificial intelligence, I’d settle for a bit more human intelligence” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“Science is a tribute to what we can know ‘although’ we are fallible.” – Jacob Bronowski

“How do you titillate an ocelot? Oscillate its tit a lot”. – Jon Sutton (@jonmsutton)

Birthdays of the Week:

William Herschel discovered Uranus 13 March 1781

Herschel  Neptune

NASA Space Place: Why did it take so long to discover Uranus?

JHA: Uranus and the Establishment of Herschel’s Astronomy (pdf)

iscovery of Neptune

EarthSky: This date in science: Uranus discovered, completely by accident

Yovisto: Sir William Herschel and the Discovery of Uranus

John Herschel born 7 March 1792

John Herschel 1846

John Herschel 1846

Encyclopædia Britannica: Sir John Herschel, 1st Baronet

Yovisto: John Herschell – A Pioneer in Celestial Photography

Urbain Le Verrier born 11 March 1811

Urbain Le Verrier

Urbain Le Verrier

Yovisto: Urbain Le Verrier and the hypothetical Planet Vulcan

Georg Buckland born 12 March 1784

BUckland

History of Geology: Geology history in caricatures: A Coprolitic Vision

Strang Science: William Buckland

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Henry Draper and his Passion for Astronomy

Ptak Science books: Kingdom of Dust: Dancing Dust and Vibrating Membranes

6a00d83542d51e69e201bb078a6864970d-500wi

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Johann Bayer

AHF: Enrico Fermi

Yovisto: Johannes van der Waals – A Pioneer in the Molecular Sciences

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Hans Bethe

Fornax Chimiæ: Prismatic Analysis

Sky and Telescope: Flood Threatens Photographic Plates

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Leon Overstreet’s Interview

Motherboard: When Astronomers Chased a Total Eclipse in a Concorde

Concorde 001 taking off on its eclipse mission. Photo: Jim Lesurf

Concorde 001 taking off on its eclipse mission. Photo: Jim Lesurf

Forbes: Astronomy and the Cold War

Royal Astronomical Society: A brief history of the RAS

Voices of the Manhattan Project: James C. Hobbs’ Interview

The Renaissance Mathematicus: We’re British not European – Really?

In The Dark: “British Physics” – A Lesson from History

APS: John van Vleck: Quantum Theory and Magnetism

Macau Daily Times: This Day in History: 1960 Radio Telescope Makes Space History

The British radio telescope at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire

The British radio telescope at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Brilliant Maps: 1853 Japanese Map of the World by Suido Nakajima

1853 Japanese Map Of The World By Suido Nakajima

1853 Japanese Map Of The World By Suido Nakajima

The National Archives: The Text Message Blog: Fur Warden Sketches Map of Fortymile River Basin in Alaska

NEH 50th Anniversary: History of Cartography

Smithsonian.com: Was America Named for a Pickle Dealer

Yovisto: Richard E. Byrd, Jr. – Aviator and Polar Explorer

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Cured by a lightning bolt

ART UK: Barber-surgeons and the history of the dentist

Nezzo, Luciano; A Toothdrawer Concealing the Key from the Patient; Wellcome Library;

Nezzo, Luciano; A Toothdrawer Concealing the Key from the Patient; Wellcome Library;

The History of Modern Biomedicine: Pyjamas on Everest and in the lab – tales from the National Institute of Medical Research

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Maister Peter Lowes Gloves

dcist.com: St. Elizabeths Stories: How the World’s Most Notorious Lobotomist Got His Start in D.C.

IEEEXplore: Ask your doctor…About Computers

Yovisto: John Fothergill – Physician and Gardener

Thomas Morris: Wrapped in a dead sheep

cha-fr.net: Le club de l’Histoire de l’Anesthésie et de la Réanimation

Cambridge Journals Medical Histoy: Professional Heresy: Edmund Gurney (1847–88) and the Study of Hallucinations and Hypnotism

Thomas Morris: Jaundice and night blindness

SSHM: The Evolving Functions and Roles of the Bristol and Dudley Dispensaries, 1888–1914

NYAM: Solving Woman’s Oldest Hygienic Problem in a New Way. A History of Period Products

“Farr’s Patent Ladies’ Menstrual Receptacle,” advertised in American Druggist, January 1884.

“Farr’s Patent Ladies’ Menstrual Receptacle,” advertised in American Druggist, January 1884.

The Recipes Project: A Medicine for the Archduchess of Innsbruck

Thomas Morris: The stomach eel

Yovisto: Alexander Fleming and the Penicillin

Atlas Obscura: Museum of Medical History Hamburg

Atlas Obscura: Bile Beans, The Incognito Laxative That Claimed to be a Cure-All

Smithsonian.com: These Erie Civil War Photos Changed How the U.S. Saw Veterans

John Bowers was 19 when he was injured in the Battle of Fredericksburgh. (U.S. National Library of Medicine)

John Bowers was 19 when he was injured in the Battle of Fredericksburgh. (U.S. National Library of Medicine)

Listverse: 10 Horrifying Medical Cases That Make You Glad You Didn’t Live in the Past

TECHNOLOGY:

The Guardian: Ray Tomlinson, email inventor and selector of the @ symbol, dies at 74

Smithsonian.com: The Accidental History of the @ Symbol

Yovisto: Nicéphore Niépce and the World’s First Photograph

Ptak Science books: Two Dimensions to Three and Back Again (1588) – a Bit of an Optical Illusion

Ptak Science Books: Universal Spelling Board, 1889

Smithsonian.com: The Laptops That Powered the American Revolution

Atlas Obscura: Text-to-Speech in 1846 Involved a Talking Robotic Head With Ringlets

Newsworks: Sound it out: the (sometimes creepy) history of the talking machine

Yovisto: Thomas Augustus Watson – Recipient of the Very First Phone Call

Bell telephone

Ptak Science Books: The Big Stuff – Heavy Numbers, 1939

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Electromechanical Telephone Switching

Yovisto: Vannevar Bush and the Memex

Yovisto: J.C.R. Licklider and Interactive Computing

Primitive Method: Clay & Ceramics in “On Divers Arts” – Medieval Crucibles Part 1

Open Culture: Meet the Telharmonium the First Synthesizer

Telharmonium console by Thaddeus Cahill 1897. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Telharmonium console by Thaddeus Cahill 1897.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Notches: Presidential Penis Politics: A Micro-History

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Library & Archives: College Botanical Books

otto_brunfels_1

Atlas Obscura: Thomas Jefferson’s Dream to Rid the Oceans of Salt

BHL: Following Early Naturalists of the American West

Yovisto: Georg Wilhelm Steller and the Great Nordic Expedition

Yovisto: Rembert Dodoens and the Love for Botanical Science

Origins: Washed Ashore: Marine Mammals from Medieval Times to Today

AIP: The Discovery of Global Warming

BHL: Is it Hoppy Hour yet?

H. lupulus from American Medical Botany vol. 3 (1820)

H. lupulus from American Medical Botany vol. 3 (1820)

University of Birmingham: Professor Charles Lapworth LL D FRS

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Harry Coover and the Super Glue

rsc.org: Dmitri Mendeleev

Chemistry World: Sodium hypochlorite

Yovisto: Jeremias Richter and the Law of Definite Proportions

Jeremias Benjamin Richter Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jeremias Benjamin Richter
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Sir William Henry Bragg and his Work with X-Rays

Yovisto: Johann Rudolf Glauber – the first Chemical Engineer

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Sybiartic: Magic Beans

Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Brotherton Library at the University of Leeds

The Bigger Picture: Knowledge Begins in Wonder: The Design Behind the Smithsonian Children’s Room

An illustration of the Children’s Room in the Smithsonian Castle. Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1901. Smithsonian Libraries.

An illustration of the Children’s Room in the Smithsonian Castle. Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1901. Smithsonian Libraries.

JHI Blog: The Methodology of Genealogy: How to Trace the History of an Idea
Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Experimental Philosophy and Early Modern Ethics: Turnbull and Fordyce

Medium: Decolonising Science Reading List

storify: Social History of Medicine Why Does it Matter?

storify: ISISCB feedback

Computer History Museum: Reading Artifacts, Finding Culture

University of Leeds: Museum of the History of Science Technology and Medicine: History and Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects

Object 2: Two-Headed Fish

Object 2: Two-Headed Fish

BSHS: New Lecture Series: History and Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects

Town Topics: The Local Angle Enters Into the Picture in Library’s History of Science Series

The #EnvHist Weekly

Der Donerstagphilosoph: The Future of the History of Medicine

OUP: Galileo’s legacy: Catholicism, Copernicanism, and conflict resolution

ESOTERIC:

Computer History Museum: Digicomp DR-70 Astrology Minicomputer

Yovisto: Franz Josef Gall – the Founder of Phrenology

Wellcome Library: The origins of the English almanac

Zodiac man in EPB/61971/A: Goldsmith, 1679. An almanack for the year of our Lord God, 1679 (London: Printed by Mary Clark, for the Company of Stationers, 1679), leaf B2 recto. Image credit: Elma Brenner.

Zodiac man in EPB/61971/A: Goldsmith, 1679. An almanack for the year of our Lord God, 1679 (London: Printed by Mary Clark, for the Company of Stationers, 1679), leaf B2 recto. Image credit: Elma Brenner.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Niche: Bouchier and Cruikshank, The People and the Bay

Notches: The Calendar of Loss: Dagmawi Woubshet on Race, Sexuality, and Mourning in the Early Era of Aids

The Guardian: Imaginative science of Einstein celebrated in short story anthology

The Guardian: Battling the Gods: Atheism in the Ancient World – disbelief has been around for 2,500 years

A 19th century Greek vase illustration of Zeus abducting Leda in the form of a swan. Photograph: Stapleton Collection/Corbis

A 19th century Greek vase illustration of Zeus abducting Leda in the form of a swan. Photograph: Stapleton Collection/Corbis

H-Histsex: Jennings on Lanser: The Sexuality of History: Modernity and the Sappic, 1565–1830

TLS: Calendars and capitalism, from the Middle Ages to the present

TLS: Localization and its Discontents: A Genealogy of Psychoanalysis and the Neuro Disciplines, by Katja Guenther

NEW BOOKS:

Enfilade: The Global Live of Things

Historiens de la santé: Heightened Expectations: The Rise of the Human Growth Hormone Industry in America

Hachette Book Group: Rise of the Rocket Girls

Early Modern Medicine: Children of Wrath: Possession, Prophecy and the Young in Early Modern England – Anne French

9781472443670-201x300

Historiens de la santé: Jean Fernel, premier physiologiste de la Renaissance

OUPO: Essays in the Philosophy of Chemistry

Heterodoxology: Replacing the Dictionary: Brill launches new Esotericism Reference Library

Historiens de la santé: Le rose et le bleu : La fabrique du féminin et du masculin

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée, Marsella: “Made in Algeria, généalogie d’un territoire” runs till 2 May 2016

The Guardian: Cambridge University Library dusts off Darwin and Newton for display

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Bay Area Reporter: Wonderful worlds of 17th-century China: Asian Art Museum Runs till 8 May 2016 

A Complete Map of the World (1674) (detail) by Ferdinand Verbiest (Flemish, 1623-88). Beijing, China. Ink on paper. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Photo: Courtesy Asian Art Museum

A Complete Map of the World (1674) (detail) by Ferdinand Verbiest (Flemish, 1623-88). Beijing, China. Ink on paper. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Photo: Courtesy Asian Art Museum

Greenwich Historical Society: Upcoming Exhibitions: Close to the Wind: Our Maritime History

Royal Society of Chemistry: Our 175 faces of chemistry exhibition

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

University of Delaware: UDaily: Alchemy and Mineralogy 26 February–31 March 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Colonial Williamsburg: We are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence Opening 5 March 2016

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Queens’ College Cambridge: ‘The Rabbi & The English Scholar’ exhibition in the library 22 February–24 March 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

HBO Movies: Einstein & Eddington

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Macrobert Arts Centre: The Trials of Galileo

Perth Concert Hall: The Trials of Galileo

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

Salle du Conseil de l’ancienne Faculté, Paris: Prochaine séance de la Société Française d’Histoire de la Médecine 19 Mars 2016

The Early Modern Intelligencer: John Dee, the Magus of Mortlake Birkbeck 18 March 2016

FitzPatrick lecture – Churchill’s medical men, Dr David Eedy 21 March 2016

Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne: Leonardo And Anatomical Drawing: A Brief History Of Anatomy Illustration In Medical Education 17 March 2016 

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

Workshop RS

Royal College of Surgeons of England: Skeletons in the Closet: The Grant Museum

Wellcome Trust: Pharmacy history: sources and resources 18 April 2016

UCL: STS: Haldane Lecture: Helen Longino ‘Underdetermination in science:  a dirty little secret?’! 16 March 2016

Science Museum: Women Engineers in the Great War and after 23 April 2016

British Society for the History of Pharmacy: Pharmacy History: sources and resources 18 April 2016

Boole-Shannon

Wren Library Lincoln Cathedral: Lecture: Anna Agnarsdóttir – Sir Joseph Banks and Iceland 28 April 2016

Atlas Obscura: OBSCURA SOCIETY NY: AFTER-HOURS AT THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE “EAST MEETS WEST” 10 March 2016

The Royal Society: Workshop: The Politics of Academic Publishing 1950–2016 22 April 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Mental Maps of the World in Great Britain and France, 1870–1914

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

Glasgow histmed events

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Map Event

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Henry Stacy Marks: Science is Measurement, 1879

Henry Stacy Marks: Science is Measurement, 1879

TELEVISION:

M Télévision & Radio: « T4 », prologue de la « solution finale »

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Albert Einstein – Draw My Life

Gresham College: Darwin, Evolution and God: The Present Debates

Youtube: Cosmos – Experiment

RADIO & PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Conf. People Places

Institute of Physics: A history of Units from 1791 to 2018 17 March 2016

Notches: History of Sexuality at the 2016 European Social Science History Conference

Notches: CfP: Histories of Magic and Sexuality

University of Göttingen: Göttingen Spirit Summer School: Academic Collecting and the Knowledge of Objects, 1700-1900 5-10 September 2016

Atelier du Centre d’Études Médiévales et Post-médiévales de l’Université de Lausanne: Alimentation et santé au Moyen-Âge Le 18 mars 2016

Institute of Historical Research, London: Conference: Best-Laid Plans 8 April 2016

Manipulatingflora: CFP: Publications on JEMS: Gardens of Laboratories. The History of Botany through the History of Gardens Deadline 1 October 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Heterodoxology: CfP: Trans-States: the art of crossing over Deadline 20 March

University of Cambridge: The African Studies Association of the UK (ASAUK) biennial conference: CfP: Medical knowledge and practice in print 7-9 September 2016

McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada: CFP: Early Modern Works by and about Women: Genre and Method 4-6 November 2016

AIP: Center for History of Physics: Early Career Conference Annapolis Maryland 6-10 April 2016

Museum of the History of Psychiatry S. Lazzaro, Reggio Emilia, Italy: CfP: The conflict, the trauma. Psychiatry and First World War September 2016

Nice: Appel à communication: Quatrième rencontre du groupe RES-HIST (Réseaux & Histoire) 22-24 septembre 2016

Science Museum: CFP: Artefacts Meeting 2–6 October 2016

Vatican Library Conference

Butser Ancient Farm (UK): Experimental Archaeometallurgy Course 13–16 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: One-Day Symposium: People-Powered Medicine 7 May 2016

Eidyn Research Centre: Workshop: Relativism in Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science, 16 March 2016

Institut d’Anatomie Pathologique, Hôpital Civil – Strasbourg: Mardis de l’Histoire Médicale Programme 2015-2016

(HSTM) Network Ireland: CfP: Annual conference of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (HSTM) Network Ireland in association with Celsius 11–12 November 2016

American Printing History Association: CfP: The Black Art & Printer’s Devils: The Magic, Mysticism, and Wonders of Printing History Huntingdon Library 7–8 October 2016

CHPHM Blog: Crossing Boundaries: The Histories of First Aid in Britain and France, 1909–1989

University of Leeds: CfP: Telecommunications in the Aftermath of WW1: Civilian and Military Perspectives (Deadline 30 March) 10 August 2016

The Renaissance Society of America: CfP: Early Modern Works by and about Women: Genre and Method McGill University Montreal 4–6 November 2016

NEASEC Amherst MA: CfP: The Globe, the World, and Worldliness: Planetary Formations of the Long Eighteenth Century

EHESS; Paris: Appel à communications: Santé au travail, santé environnementale : quelles inclusions, quelles exclusions ? 29 juin 2016

University of Oxford: Call for Registration: Oxford Scientiae 5–7 July 2016

AAAS: History and Philosophy of Science at AAAS call for symposia proposals for 2017 AAAS Meeting

La mort en Europe du XVIIe au XXIe siècle. Représentations, rites et usages: Appel à contribution

University of St Andrews: Mathematical Biography: A Celebration of MacTutor 16–17 September 2016

Budapest: CEU Summer University: Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe 18–27 July 2016

Amsterdam: Conference by Women in Philosophy #3 1 July 2016

University of Oklahoma: Midwest Junto for the History of Science: 1–3 April 2016

University of Plymouth: CfP: One-Day Symposium: Pilgrimage, Shrines and Healing in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe 24 June 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Bridging the Divide: Literature and Science 3 June 2016

23 Things for Research: Book now for a Women in Wikipedia edit-a-thon, 23 March 2016

NYAM: Scientific Illustration: A Workshop Using the Collections of the Academy 7 April 2016

University of Kassel: CfP: Workshop: Representing Scientific Results 18–19 November 2016

Victoria University of Wellington: CfP: The New Zealand Polymath – Colenso and his contemporaries 17–19 November 2016

Rio de Janeiro: 25th International Congress for the History of Science and Technology: CfP: Global Mathematics 23–29 July 2017

Berlin: Call for Participants: Convening for three workshops in Berlin, 2016-2017 Accounting for Health: Economic Practices and Medical Knowledge, 1500–1970

Public Communication of Science and Technology: Conference program (Draft: PCST Conference Istanbul 26–28 April 2016

AAR: Western Esotericism Group: CfP: AAR Annual Meeting San Antonio 19–22 November 2016

University of Warsaw: CfP: Interim Conference of ISA Research Committee on the History of Sociology 6–8 July 2016

BSHS: Call for Papers and Panels: Science in Public 2016

Science in Public

University of Sussex: CfP: SPRU 50th anniversary conference on ‘Transforming Innovation’

Mexico City: CfP: The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T²M) 14thAnnual Conference 27–30 October 2016

NACBS, Washington DC: CfP: Early Modern History Workshop on “Networks of Knowledge” November 2016

UCL: STS: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2016

Rutgers University: Workshop for the History of Environment, Agriculture, Technology, & Science (WHEATS) 30 October–2 October 2016

University of Zürich: Conrad Gessner Congress Program 6–9 June 2016

University of Kent: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference Programme (DRAFT as at Feb 15, 2016) 7–10 July 2016

London Metropolitan University: CfP: ‘Made in London’: Makers, designers and innovators in musical instrument making in London, from the 18th to 21st centuries

Summer School: Rethinking Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 23–25 July 2016 Part I Lisbon 26–30 July 2016 Part II Porto

Istanbul: XXXV Scientific Instrument Symposium: CfP: Instruments between East and West 26–30 September 2016

University of York: Conference: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences 7-8 April 2016

Harvard University: 51st Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 2 April 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP Teaching and Learning in Early Modern England: Skills and Knowledge in Practice

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: The 131st Annual Meeting Call for Proposals and Theme Denver CO 5–7 January 2017

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Call for Submissions: Book: Historical Epistemology of Science/Philosophy of Science, Torricelli

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

University of Western Ontario: CfP: Philosophy of Logic, Mathematics, and Physics Graduate Conference

Institut d’Études Scientifiques de Cargèse, Corsica: CNRS School “BioPerspectives” Philosophy of Biology 29 March–1 April 2016

Klosterneuburg: CfP: European Advanced School in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) 59 September 2016

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester: Lunchtime Seminar Series Feb–June 2016

AIP: Lyne Starling Trimble Science Heritage Public Lectures Feb–Sept 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: ICOHTEC Symposium in Rio de Janeiro on 23-29 July 2017

Asian Society for the History of Medicine: Call for Submissions: Taniguchi Medal 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Essay

International Committee for the History of Technology: CfP: 43rd Annual Meeting in Porto, Portugal Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

University of York 7–8 April 2016

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: CfP: Maculinity, health and medicine, c.1750–present 28–29 April 2016

Effaced Blog: CfP: History of Facial Hair

Sidney Sussex College: University of Cambridge: Programme and Registration Treasuries of Knowledge: 8 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

AIP: Research Assistant: two full-time temporary Research Assistants to join the Center for History of Physics for Summer 2016.

Bath Spa University: PhD Fee Waiver Studentships

Queens University Belfast: Research Fellow: War and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe

University of York: AHRC-funded PhD Studentship at the University of York (History dept.) in collaboration with the Science Museum “Instruments and their makers: A study of experiment, collaboration and identity in seventeenth-century London”

 

 

 

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