Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol: #16

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #16

Monday 02 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

Once again your weekly #histSTM links list is available on computer, tablet and smartphone screens bringing you a comprehensive selection of the histories of science, technology and medicine picked up from the far flung reaches of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Our guiding acronym #histSTM includes both of the disciplines science and technology. These two areas of human endeavour have shared an intricate and complex history over the millennia. Historians and philosophers of both disciplines have often discussed and tried to define the exact relationship between the two throughout their twisted and long history. Did the one lead or drive the other or did they develop totally separately from each other. If so was that development parallel, the one mirroring the other or did each go its own way. The answers to these questions are complex and to some extent still unresolved; the arguments ebbing and flowing from generation to generation.

About a week ago Matt Ridley reopened that debate with an article in The Wall Street Journal, The Myth of Basic Science. In this article he argued that technology was not driven by basic science but developed separately by itself; technologists finding technological solutions for technological problems when required. The conclusion he seemed to draw in his article is that governments should not finance basic scientific research but leave the technological innovation required by society to industry, who will deliver the goods when necessary.

This article provoked a cry of outrage amongst both scientists and STS people. Particularly in view of the fact that both the Conservatives in Britain and the GOP in America are seriously threatening to cut funding for basic scientific research. The first salvo for the defence was fired by Jack Stilgoe in an article in the Guardian, Countering libertarian arguments against science funding. Stilgoe was soon joined on the barricades by historian of technology Anton Howes , who unleashed a double barrelled blast on his blog Capitalism’s Cradle, Innovation vs Science and Is Innovation Autonomous?

Nature got into the fray with an article entitled Does Innovation always come from science?, in which Matt Ridley was seen to backpedal, claiming per email that he had not suggested cutting science research grants.

The final attack to date came from Derek Lowe writing on his blog In The Pipeline, Technology and Funding: Myths and Alternate Worlds. Lines have been drawn, positions have been taken and in all probability the argument will remain as inconclusive as it always has done.

Quotes of the week:

“Creationist commenter: ‘I never saw a monkey turn into a man’. Presumably, however, they were there to see Eve fashioned from Adam’s rib”. – Richard Carter (@friendsofdarwin)

“The scientific literature should exist to communicate ideas and results, not to inflate egos with impact factors and citations”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“A brilliant German word: “verschlimmbessern,” which means ‘to make something worse by trying to improve it’. Happens everyday everywhere”. – Richard Smith (@Richard56)

“Stephen’s 1st law of typographical errors: typos can be neither created or destroyed; autocorrection serves only to move them around”. – Stephen Curry (@Stephen_Curry)

“UK: where fake medicine is legal under health laws, while tea is an exempted substance under drug laws”. – Frank Swain (@SciencePunk)

“Emeritus professors never die. They just lose their faculties”. – Shit Academics Say (@AcademicsSay)

“I bet when cuneiform was invented everyone was like, look at how no one talks anymore and just stares at their tablets”. Ekaterina Sedia (@esedia)

#histSTM Halloween

 95237

The H-Word: Babbage’s brain and Galileo’s finger: six macabre scientific relics

Concocting History: Peter Peter Pumpkin Eater

Ashmolean Halloween:

Early Modern Medicine: Pumpkin Power

CHF: Science and the Supernatural in the 17th Century

The Public Domain Review: The Poet, the Physician and the Birth of the Modern Vampire

Harvard Divinity School: Who are the Dead and What do They Want?

Scientific American: Cemetery Science: The Geology of Mausoleums

Smithsonian.com: The Gruesome History of Eating Corpses as Medicine

Motherboard: From Zombies to Telepathy: When Science Takes on the Supernatural

Strange Remains: The morbid history of Harvard Medical School

1446271417954231

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 26 – Far Side of the Moon

AIP: Henrietta Swope

AHF: Isotope Separation Methods

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Paula and Ludwig Bruggemann’s Interview

JHI Blog: Goodnight Moon: Kepler’s ‘Somnium’

Kepler’s ‘Somnium’ and other writings, published posthumously in 1634

Kepler’s ‘Somnium’ and other writings, published posthumously in 1634

The Somnium Project: Exploring Johannes Kepler’s ‘Somnium’ – the first science fiction story

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 27 – Lise Meitner

Yovisto: The Peltier Effect

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ted Taylor’s Interview

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: “Mortuary Services in Civil Defense” (1956)

OUP Blog: Thinking of Kepler on the Beach

Johannes Kepler, 1610. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Johannes Kepler, 1610. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The Guardian: The astronomer who saved his mother from being burned as a witch

lorentz.leidenuniv.ni: Four centuries of physics dissertations from Leiden University

The Irish Times: Fred Hoyle: The brilliant man who lost the Big Bang debate

AHF: Hydrogen Bomb – 1950

Academia: Priority claims and public disputes in astronomy: E.M. Antoniadi, J. Comas I Solà and the search for authority and social prestige in the early twentieth century Pedro Ruiz-Castell (pdf)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Marshall Rosenbluth’s Interview

Yovisto: The “King of Bombs” and the Craze of Cold War Nuclear Armament

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The improbable William Laurence

Ptak Science Books: Glorious Gearworks, Extended­ – Models of the Solar System, 1817–1821

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

Robinince’s Blog: Psychoastronomy – a morning of awe with Brian Cox

Science Notes: Today in Science History – November 1 – Operation Ivy Mike

AIP: Hermann Bondi

Fusion: Einstein’s life was in turmoil while he developed general relativity

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Untold lives blog: Captain Cook – Endeavour and Resolution

Just Bod: The Isles: Monsters, Mariners and Old Maps of Exploration

Anglesey by John Speed 1610 Public Domain Wikimedia

Anglesey by John Speed 1610 Public Domain Wikimedia

Sarah E. Bond: Mapping the Underworld: Space, Text, and Imaginary Landscapes in Antiquity

The Afternoon Map: The Most Beautiful 19th Century Arabic Map of Syria and Palestine

World Digital Library: World Map, 1566

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Smithsonian.com: How Contact Lenses Were Made in 1948

British Pathé

British Pathé

Thomas Morris: A case for Dr Coffin

Royal College of Physicians: A physician’s cane and the secrets it contained

Remedia: Butchers & Surgeons: Rethinking the 17th-Century English Surgeon

Atlas Obscura: The Tarantula-Possessed Woman Who Could Only be Cured by Dance

Independent: Obituary: Anne Spoerry

Advances in the History of Psychology: BPS’s The Psychologist: Psychology and the Great War, 1914–1918

The Guardian: Can you stomach it? The grim, grisly world of historical surgery – in pictures

Source: The Guardian

Source: The Guardian

Origins of Science as a Visual Pursuit: Networking with the Fabrica

BHL: Eerie Anatomy: Vesalius’ De humani corporis fabrica

Medium: Ancient Medicine and Fetal Personhood

Thomas Morris: Glass half-empty

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 28 – Jonas Salk

Discover: A Mouldy Cantaloupe & The Dawn of Penicillin

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 29 – Baruj Benacerraf

Thomas Morris: Saliva and crow’s vomit

Wales Online: Welsh History Month: Some kind of Recorde…polymath, physician, mathematician and inventor of the equals sign

robert2

Harvard Gazette: Lessons on the brain: The Phineas Gage story

TECHNOLOGY:

The modern world in old Ladybird, pt 54.

The modern world in old Ladybird, pt 54. “The computer is like a gigantic cash register”
(1972)

Conciatore: Solid Water

Plus Magazine: Happy Birthday, George Boole!

Popular Mechanics: 11 Calculators That Show How Far Computing Has Come in the Past 2,000 Years

Quanta Magazine: The Physical Origin of Universal Computing

George Boole 200: Georg Boole: Timeline of Life Events

Wellcome Library Blog: An epoch in the history of typography

Simple City: Obituary Barry Cooper, 1943–2015

O Say Can You See: 6 surprising objects in the history of the Internet

Prisoner ankle bracelet and control box, about 1990

Prisoner ankle bracelet and control box, about 1990

Ptak Science Books: America Attacked, 1937 – and the Unusual Architectural Response to poison Gas and the Homeless

Yovisto: Hans Grade – German Aviation Pioneer

Motherboard: Heroic Junkyard Owner Says He Saved Priceless Moon Rover From Scrap Heap

Conciatore: Witch’s Brew of Glass

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 30 – Joseph Wilson Swan

Joseph Wilson Swan

Joseph Wilson Swan

Alex Wellenstein: RIP Joan Lisa Bromberg, historian who wrote on lasers, fusion, and many things.

Georgian Gent: Hester Bateman – an extraordinary woman: a brilliant silversmith, clever in business

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

AMNH: The Horseshoe Crab

flickr: Biodiversity Heritage Library’s photos: Birds

Fistful of Cinctans: Sea Fables Explained

barnacles-web

Embryo Project: “The Potency of the First Two Cleavage Cells in Echinoderm Development. Experiment Production of Partial and Double Formations” (1891–1892), by Hans Driesch

No Roads Barred: Tracing the footsteps of A. R. Wallace in Singapore

Forbes: In the Alps Myths about dragons may be Rooted in Geology

Yovisto: Othniel Charles Marsh and the Great Bone Wars

TrowelBlazers: Maria Antonina Czaplicka

Portrait of Marie Czaplicka and Henry Usher Hall standing with some of the objects which they collected on the Yenisei Expedition to Siberia (1914-15). Images courtesy of the Pitt-Rivers Photo Collection.

Portrait of Marie Czaplicka and Henry Usher Hall standing with some of the objects which they collected on the Yenisei Expedition to Siberia (1914-15).
Images courtesy of the Pitt-Rivers Photo Collection.

Daily Kos: Daily Bucket: Herbaria Ode and Obituary

Embryo Project: Gavin Rylands de Beer (1899–1972)

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: Neptunism and Transformism: Robert Jameson and other Evolutionary Theorists in Early Nineteenth-Century Scotland

Science League of America: Evolution for John Doe , Part 1

AL.com: Alabama’s hidden role in Darwin’s theory of Evolution

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: Speaking of chemistry

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 30 – Hermann Franz Moritz Kopp

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Academia: The rising of chemical kinds through epistemic iteration Hasok Chang (pdf)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Wikipedia: WikiProject Women Scientists

Barts Health NHS: Archives catalogue

EMROC: The Transcribathon in Numbers… and Names

The Recipes Project: Transcription Communities: Experiencing a Transcribathon in a Class Setting

Medical Museion: Exhibiting Epistemic Objects

BSHS: Ayrton Prize Shortlist

AEON: Paradigms Lost

BBC News: Historical items ‘being destroyed’ by mould in Carmarthen

Book Mould Source: National Library of Wales

Book Mould
Source: National Library of Wales

History Matters: Historical Fiction and Fictional History

Conciatore: Neri and the Inquisition

HSS: October 2015 Newsletter

HSS: Interview—Joan Vandegrift: On the Occasion of Her 30th Anniversary as Manuscript Editor to Isis

HSS: Is Membership an Anachronism?

Cilo@King’s: The Enlightenment bull market and its decolonial future

AHF: October Newsletter

The Getty Iris: A Beginner’s Guide to the Renaissance Book

A 16th-century print shop. A “puller” removes a printed sheet from the press, while a “beater” inks type. - Source Wikimedia Commons

A 16th-century print shop. A “puller” removes a printed sheet from the press, while a “beater” inks type. –
Source Wikimedia Commons

Absolutely Maybe: Curiosity to Scrutiny: the Early Days of Science Journalism

Wellcome Library: A month of pogonography on the blog

CNN: The historical analogs of brilliant women

ESOTERIC:

The Recipes Project: A Remedy for Witchcraft and Demonic Possession in Seventeenth-Century Ireland

An early eighteenth-century depiction of a witch conjuring up demons to do her evil work. From: Richard Boulton, A Compleat History of Magick, Sorcery and Witchcraft … (London, 2 vols, 1715-1722), vol. 1, frontispiece.

An early eighteenth-century depiction of a witch conjuring up demons to do her evil work. From: Richard Boulton, A Compleat History of Magick, Sorcery and Witchcraft … (London, 2 vols, 1715-1722), vol. 1, frontispiece.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science League of America: A New Book to Introduce Evolution to Preschoolers: Grandmother Fish

Nature: Books in Brief

British Library: Maps and views blog: British Town Maps

6a00d8341c464853ef01bb0887ffde970d-800wi

TLS: Truth, beauty, science and art

The Lancet: Soul medicine

Mirror: 13 fascinating and obscure science questions – complete with answers

Popular Science: Light: A Very Short Introduction – Ian Walmsley

LSE: Review of Books: A Historical Atlas of Tibet by Karl E. Ryavec

A-Historical-Atlas-of-Tibet

NEW BOOKS:

Schweizerbart Science Publishers: The Climates of the Geological Past/Die Klimate der geologischen Vorzeit

Palgrave: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England: Ravenous Natures

Ashgate: Spaces of Global Knowledge: Exhibition, Encounter and Exchange in an Age of Empire

9781472444363.PPC.qxd:Withers

The Dispersal of Darwin: Making “Nature”: The History of a Scientific Journal

Ashgate: Geography, Technology and Instruments of Exploration

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Lincoln Cathedral Chapter House: The Life and Legacy of George Boole 14 September–3 November 2015

George Boole Source: Wikimedia Commons

George Boole
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Boston Public Library: Women in Cartography: Five Centuries of Accomplishment 31 October 2015–27 March 2016

Before Newton: Indigenous Knowledge & the Scientific Revolution

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs until 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo) 1772 by George Stubbs. ZBA5754 National Maritime Museum

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo) 1772 by George Stubbs. ZBA5754
National Maritime Museum

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs until 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Saturday

CLOSING SOON: Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope

CLOSING SOON: Maudsley Hospital: The Maudsley at War: the story of the hospital during the Great War

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The Blue Orange Theatre: Frankenstein Runs until 8 November 2015

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA Source: Wikimedia Commons

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Florence Nightingale Museum: How To Die Like a Victorian 2 December 2015

1887 Victorian Mourning

1887 Victorian Mourning

Royal Museum Greenwich: Pepys Show Late: Party like it’s 1669

Motherboard: The ‘Steve Jobs’ Movie Bombed at the Box Office

Preserved Films: Fifty Million Years Ago (1925)

Framing the Face: Programme 28 November 2015

George Boole 200: Happy 200th Birthday George Boole 2 November 2015

Wellcome Collection: Recycling: London’s dirty past 5 November 2015

Wellcome Collection: Home Remedies (British Sign Language Discussion) 6 November 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Painting by Samuel Scott. Comet Halley over the river Thames near London, England in 1759.

Painting by Samuel Scott.
Comet Halley over the river Thames near London, England in 1759.

TELEVISION:

AHF: “Manhattan” Season 2, Episode 2: Mind Games

AHF: “Manhattan” Season 2, Episode 2: The Queen of Los Alamos

A View From the Bridge: Electrifying: Tesla on television

teslaseries_poster_medt

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Museo Galileo: Systems of celestial coordinates

AEON Video: The art of data visualisation

Youtube: The George Boole Song

Aljazeera: Pioneers of Engineering: Al Jazari and the Banu Masa

Youtube: 3.5* ‘til infinity

Vimeo: Lord Rutherford – Goettingen Lecture 14 December 1931

Harvard University Department of Physics: Recollections of Los Alamos and the Nuclear Era

Vimeo:Horrible Histories: Charles Darwin Evolution Song

Youtube: PBS Nova S33E06 Newton’s Dark Secret

RADIO:

BBC Radio 3: Free Thinking – Feature: Health Care in 18th Century Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle Source: Wikimedia Commons

Bamburgh Castle
Source: Wikimedia Commons

PODCASTS:

Mixcloud: The Genealogy Radio Show – Episode 8 Series 3 – George Boole *200 Genealogy project

To the best of our Knowledge: In the Newton Archives

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Calgary, Alberta: CfP: Canadian Society for the history and Philosophy of Science Annual Conference 28–30 May 2016

UCL: CfP: 10th London Ancient Science Conference 15–17 February 2016

École Normale Supérieure: Salle du Centre Cavaillès: Colloque de la Société Française d’Histoire des Sciences Humaines 5 et 6 Novembre 2015

University of Trieste: CfP: International Society for Cultural History Annual Conference 2016 18–22 July

Society for Philosophy and Technology: Call for Nominations for Society for Philosophy and Technology Board and President

University of Lancaster: CfP: Social History Society 40th Anniversary Conference 21-23 March 2016

Origins of Science as a Visual Pursuit: Notes and Records – Essay Prize – deadline 31–01-16

University of Lancaster: Symposium: Literature, Science and Medicine 30–31 March 2016

Maritime at Greenwich: ‘Britain and the Sea’ – Free to attend seminar series at Greenwich

boat

University of Hull: Maritime Trade, Travel, and Cultural Encounter in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century 13–14 November 2015

University of Prague: CfP: 7th International Conference for the European Society for the History of Science 22–24 September 2016

Forum for Inter-American Studies: CfP: Special Issue Bodies in the Americas

The Warburg Institute: Ptolemy’s Science of the Stars in the Middle Ages 5–7 November 2015

4af2ac60d6

National Maritime Museum Greenwich: CfP: From Sea to Sky: the Evolution of Air Navigation from the Ocean and Beyond 9–10 June 2016

Notches: History of Sexuality at the 2016 American Historical Association Conference

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow History of Medicine Group – Autumn Meetings 2015

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Conference: Practical Knowledge and Medical Practice in Ancient Mediterranean Cultures Berlin 2–3 November 2015

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy Conference 3–6 June 2016

Florence Nightingale 2020: Nightingale 2020: General Discussion Meeting on 7th December

USF Tampa Florida: CfP: Philosophy of Science Roundtable 11–13 March 2016

Birkbeck College: CfP: Birkbeck EMS’S 9th Annual Student Conference Sensing the Early Modern 20 February 2016

Birkbeck & Kings Colleges London: CfP: Conference: Life and death in early modern philosophy 14–16 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Amsterdam: Professor of Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage

University of Leeds: Faculty of Arts: New Postdoctoral Position: Cultures of the Book

University of Exeter: Over 100 PhD studentships available for 2016 entry

Council on Library and Information Resources: Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

avhumboldt.de: Stellenausschreibung: Wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in im Akademienvorhaben „Alexander von Humboldt auf Reisen – Wissenschaft aus der Bewegung“

Nazarbayev University: Assistant Professor – History of Medicine, Public Health, and/or Environmental History

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #15

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #15

Monday 26 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

We are back again with Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list, as always bursting at the seams with all the histories of science, technology and medicine that the Internet had to offer over the last seven days.

I’m not actually sure if anybody reads the editorials that I put up here every week. They, together with the Quotes of the Week and Birthday(s) of the Week, are here to give the whole thing more the atmosphere of a real journal rather than just a rather tedious looking list of Internet links. The editorials that I write are always spontaneous, something that has occurred to me whilst putting together those rather formidable looking links lists. Some weeks its difficult thinking of anything to write, other times they write themselves with very little effort on my part.

This weeks editorial has sadly written itself, as on Sunday the #histsci community lost one of its most prominent, colourful and loved members with the death of Lisa Jardine. I’m not even going to attempt to outline all that Lisa did over a ridiculously prolific academic career, you can read all of that in the Wikipedia article I link to below. Instead I’m going to reproduce some, but by no means all, of the heart felt comments that flooded Twitter as the sad news spread throughout our Internet community. Lisa was one of a kind both as an academic and as a human being and she will be sorely missed by many who knew her personally and even more who only knew her through her numerous publications. After the comments are some links to radio broadcasts, videos, interviews etc. where you can experience once again in her own words, as well as the obituaries from the papers and others.

I humbly dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to one of the most vibrant British historians of the last fifty years, Lisa Jardine.

Lisa Jardine (1944–2015) Source: CELL

Lisa Jardine (1944–2015)
Source: CELL

 “Behave Badly”

We’ve lost one of the giants – Thony Christie

 Bugger. Lisa Jardine has died. Bugger. We all die, some sooner, some later. Some too soon. RIP Lisa. You are sadly missed. – Cornelius J. Schilt

 So sad to hear of the death of the wonderful Lisa JardineShe will be greatly missed by all who knew her – Athene Donald

 RIP Lisa Jardine, noted historian and public intellectual. Many happy memories of her lively company – Graham Farmelo

 Hugely shocked and sad to hear of Lisa Jardine’s death. She had such gusto and spirit, it doesn’t seem possible. Great loss for culture. – Philip Ball

Lisa Jardine always sparkling. Took me aside once and said I should speak up more. She did that for so many women…. – Suzanne Moore

Oh….terribly sad news about Lisa Jardine’s death. A fabulous scholar and colleague. Let us remember her well – Joe Cain

Lisa Jardine has been such an inspiration to me over the past few years! What a wonderful person and a terrible loss. – Meg Rosenburg

The death of a great historian is tragic, but they live on through their work – in their reconstruction of the past, we find their thoughts – Greg Jenner

Lisa Jardine dies at 71, leaving us too soon. Memories of our term together at Princeton in 1988. RIP. – Kathryn Olesko

So sad to hear that we’ve lost Lisa Jardine. A giant, a true renaissance woman, the model of what a scholar & public intellectual should be. – John Gallagher

So very sad to hear of the death of Lisa Jardine, such a generous warm-hearted academic whenever I encountered her ­– Katy Barrett

Just saw the news about the loss of Lisa Jardine. It’s hard to believe. She had such energy and presence. – Cathryn Pearce

RIP Lisa Jardine whose publications made a huge impact on my own research and dissertation – Katherine Martinez

Such an amazing response for Lisa Jardine tonight. In the sadness I’m glad for that, the books, broadcasts & the inspiration & generosity. – Rebekah Higgitt

Lisa Jardine an irresistible force finally met her immoveable object. Much missed. – Pete Langman

I am deeply saddened to hear that Lisa Jardine has passed away. I lived for her appearances on In Our Time. – Paraic O’Donnell

Oh my goodness. Sad news. Rest in peace. – Jennifer Park

Saddened to hear of the death of Lisa Jardine. She was very encouraging when I was hesitating over doing a Master’s as a mature student. – Sally Osbourne

Tremendously sad news about the death of Professor Lisa Jardine – Lee Durbin

Just heard that Lisa Jardine has died. Very sad. She was a great scholar & communicator of culture, science, and the cultures of science – Carsten Timmermann

So sorry to hear. “Worldly Goods” helped me discover my love for the Renaissance. – Susan Rojas

Sad to lose our groundbreaking Early Modernist colleague, Lisa – American Science Blog

Lisa Jardine used to give out badges to women saying ‘Behave Badly’ on it. RIP. – Mirander Fay Thomas

Lisa Jardine (1944-2015). A giant of a public intellectual by any measure, a presence the moment you set foot in the vicinity of her fields. In research I encountered Lisa Jardine’s footprints everywhere; today I’m learning something new about her by the hour. Remarkable scholar.– Nicholas Tam

So sad to hear about Lisa Jardine. What a giant. Ingenious Pursuits was a high point in grad school. – Elly Truitt

Sad to hear that Lisa Jardine has died. Was inspired to study early modern history after reading ‘Erasmus, Man of Letters’ as an undergrad. – Robert Harkins

I’ve been very moved by the outpouring of love for Lisa Jardine on Twitter this evening. – Mathew Lyons

Jardine was wildly clever, funny, a great supporter of women in academia, and had excellent taste in music – Sophie Pitman

I never had the honor of meeting Lisa Jardine, but I am so sad to hear of her death. We have lost one of the giants of Renaissance history! – Alisha Rankin

Very sad to hear of the death of Lisa Jardine: great colleague, scholar, progressive, historian, mentor, author & shared admirer of Wedgwood – Tristram Hunt

We’ve lost Lisa Jardine today. I met her only twice, but those meetings had a huge impact on me; Lisa Jardine was one of the sharpest, boldest, wittiest, and most generous scholars I’ve met. But I’ve also met Lisa Jardine through the scholars she collected around herself, at Live & Letters but also in a wider circle. They are the brightest, most generous, most badly behaved, most adventurous group of historical scholars I’ve ever seen. Meeting them has reinvigorated my scholarship, and it has done so with many, I’m sure. Tonight my thoughts are with those scholars around Lisa Jardine, in sadness, and in excited anticipation of everything they’ll create. – Sjoerd Levelt

Lisa Jardine was one of my supervisors at grad school. An immense intellect (and personality), but unfailingly generous and unconceited. – Ross Dandridge

Lisa Jardine was one of the great historians. She understood that to write of humanity you needed to be fully part of it. – Simon Schama

Lisa Jardine kindly praised my article ‘A Physicist’s Lost Love.’ I’ll always feel honored. – Gene Dannen

Sad to hear of the death of Prof. Lisa Jardine. As V&A Trustee for 8 years, her expertise & intellect was invaluable – V&A

Lisa Jardine has died. Warm, provocative, inspiring. She still had too much to tell to us. – Johan Oosterman

Really sad Lisa Jardine has died. Funny, warm and mischievous — when we agreed and disagreed. Especially when we disagreed. – Mark Henderson

Sad to hear of death of Lisa Jardine. As a tribute I hope everyone takes up her call to “behave badly” – Peter Broks

So sad to hear about Lisa Jardine – I will miss her warmth, energy, wit and fantastic support for female colleagues – Felicity Henderson

We’re saddened by news Lisa Jardine has died aged 71 Our thoughts are with her family and friends. – Royal Society

Sad for history to be mourning 2 greats in Jardine & Cesarani; but note w/ pride huge value of their research/expertise beyond academe. – Sara Pennell

We are heartbroken to learn of the death of our beloved and respected President, Lisa Jardine – AHS

Lisa Jardine was an inspiring and exemplary historian. And a wonderful friend. The world is a poorer place without her. Amada Foreman

Lisa Jardine “I only do the things I love and I love the things I do” – Rose Essex

Finally got the courage up to look at twitter. Lisa was the best, and I’m so so glad that she helped and influenced so many of us x I keep returning to the memory of Lisa Jardine at RSA this year, utterly gleeful at the work being presented by ECRs at CELL panels & beyond. She had such a great, infectious love for smart, thoughtful research, and such deep, instinctive care for the people who take part in it. That’s how you do it, right. You love the work, and you support the people who do it in any way you can, and you never elide the hard graft and the effort doing that kind of work takes, and the differing challenges people face. – Kirsty Rolfe

In hope she might laugh:

Lisa your critics compared to thee

Excite contempt & laughter.

No pair of heels I do believe

So many have run after – Faye Getz

Wikipedia: Lisa Anne Jardine, CBE FRS FRHistS (née Bronowski 12 April 1944–25 October 2015)

Lisa Jardine Source: Tribune REporter

Lisa Jardine
Source: Tribune REporter

Lisa in her own words

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Behind the Scenes: The Seven Ages of Science an Interview with Lisa Jardine

BBC Radio 4: Seven Ages of Science

Science Museum Group Journal Review: Seven Ages of Science, BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4: Desert Island Discs: Lisa Jardine

Youtube: Lisa Jardine: Lecture: ‘What is left of Culture and Society’

Soundcloud: Conway Hall: Things I Never Knew about my Father

Youtube: Inaugural Lecture – Professor Lisa Jardine

New Statesman: Lisa Jardine on life and death

New Statesman: Lisa Jardine (1944–2015): How history can be built around fictions, not events

UCL Press: Lisa Jardine: Temptation in the Archives (free download)

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: The Royal Society

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Zero

BBC Radio 4: Point of View: Keeping time

Tributes and Obituaries

BBC Radio 4: A Point of View: A Tribute to Lisa Jardine

The Guardian: Renowned historian Lisa Jardine dies aged 71

THE: Lisa Jardine: academics pay tribute to historian

The Independent: Lisa Jardine dead: ‘Inspirational historian’ and broadcaster dies aged 71

UCL Press: A Tribute to Lisa Jardine (12 April 1944–25 October 2015)

BBC News: Lisa Jardine: Tributes after renowned historian dies

The Guardian: Lisa Jardine ‘She bedazzled her generation’ – (audio)

In The Dark: R.I.P. Lisa Jardine

The Guardian: Lisa Jardine and David Cesarani were just the kind of public intellectuals Britain needs

British Science Association: A tribute to Professor Lisa Jardine

Apollo Magazine: A Tribute to Lisa Jardine

History News Network: Lisa Jardine, historian, humanist, daughter of Jacob Bronowski, dies

Quotes of the week:

“We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.” – Kurt Vonnegut

“If history is boring, it’s the historian’s fault” – Alexis Coe (@AlexisCoe)

“Astronomy is one of the sublimest fields of human investigation. The mind that grasps its facts and principles receives something of enlargement and grandeur belonging to the science itself. It is a quickener of devotion”. – Horace Mann h/t @HistAstro

“Documentation on journals can be really hard to find. Nature threw everything away in the 60s!” – Malinda Baldwin (@Malinda_Baldwin)

“The only truth in Music” – Jack Kerouac

“I immediately loved working with flies. They fascinated me, and followed me around in my dreams.” – Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard h/t @embryoproject

“When everyone is dead, the Great Game is finished. Not before.”– Rudyard Kipling

“”Why isn’t there cool stuff like hoverboards!?” types stupid man on handheld device capable of accessing the sum total of human knowledge”. – Stu Lux Lisbon (@StuLuxLisbon)

“Though God cannot alter the past, historians can; it is perhaps because they are useful to Him in this respect that He tolerates their existence.” – Samuel Butler h/t @jondresner

“What’s this Mummy?” “It’s a pachy… pachyceph… It’s a sort of allosaurus, because Mummy can pronounce that one.” – Sophia Collins (@sophiacol)

“To study the abnormal is the best way of understanding the normal”. – William James

“Every meme ever: I wish humans weren’t so human. I wish we were what we pretend we are”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

Birthdays of the Week:

The Earth was born 23 October 4004 BCE

The Earth as seen from Apollo 17

The Earth as seen from Apollo 17

 October 23, 4004 B.C.: Happy Birthday Earth!

Renaissance Mathematicus: In defence of the indefensible

Irish Philosophy: James Ussher academic modernity

Science League of America: Seven Myths about Ussher

James Chadwick born 20 October 15

 

James Chadwick Source: Wikimedia Commons

James Chadwick
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AIP: James Chadwick

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 20 – James Chadwick

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Nature Physics: A century of physics

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 19 – Ernest Rutherford

Modern Contemporary: The Global Transformation of Time: 1870–1950

Popular Science: General Relativity: 100 Years Old and Still Full of Surprises

The New York Times: George Mueller, Engineer Who Helped Put Man on Moon, Dies at 97

A tense moment during the AS-101 launch. Standing, from left to right are George Mueller, Wernher von Braun, and Eberhard Rees (Director for Research and Development at MSFC). Source: Wikimedia Commons

A tense moment during the AS-101 launch. Standing, from left to right are George Mueller, Wernher von Braun, and Eberhard Rees (Director for Research and Development at MSFC).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: Los Alamos, NM

AHF: The Science Behind the Atom Bomb

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Rose Bethe’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Furman’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Lamphere’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: David P. Rudolph’s Interview

AHF: The Alsos Mission

AHF: Nuclear Fission

The Conversation: The astronomer and the witch – how Kepler saved his mother from the stake

Great Comet of 1577, which Kepler witnessed with his mother as a child.

Great Comet of 1577, which Kepler witnessed with his mother as a child.

Journal of Art in Society: Comets in Art

The Christian Science Monitor: How astronomy solved a Civil War mystery

Wellcome Trust Blog: Image of the Week: Prince Iskandar’s horoscope

AIP: Felix Bloch

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The plot against Leo Szilard

The Atlantic: The First Image of Earth Taken From Space (It’s Not What You Think)

Compasswallah: The Rings on Buddha’s Saturn

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BBC Future: How a Nazi rocket could have put a Briton in space

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 25 – Evangelista Torricelli

IOLbeta: A brief history of relativity

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Mental Floss: 8 Antique Maps That Were the First of Their Kind

Atlas Obscura: The Hole Truth About Why We ‘Dig to China’

Atlas Obscura: The 50-Foot Long Map of Manhattan Only On View for 6 Hours

History Today: Richard Burton dies in Trieste

Slate: The Vault: An Early-20th-Century British Map of the Global Drug Trade

Opium Map

Opium Map

British Library: Revelatory Rivers in Germany – Part 2

Princeton.edu: Hydrography

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Lettuce, a Class A drug

Wellcome Library: Doctors and the invention of the English seaside

V0012256 Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. C Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. Coloured etching by W. Heath after himself. By: William HeathPublished: -

V0012256 Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. C
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
Humorous image of society ladies trying to swim, Brighton. Coloured etching by W. Heath after himself.
By: William HeathPublished: –

The Wall Street Journal: LSD Archive Has Been on a Long, Strange Trip

CHICC Manchester: Early Medical Printed Illustrations

Royal College of Physicians: The ornament of his age

Wellcome Images: Aids Posters

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 22 – Vitamin C

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Littlejohn’s Report of the Sanitary Conditions of Edinburgh

The New York Times: In Ancient DNA, Evidence of Plague Much Earlier Than Previously Known

The Recipes Project: Antimony and Ambergris: ‘New’ Ingredients in the Antidotarium Magnum

Apothecary shop, British Library Ms Sloane 1977 f. 49v. From an early 14th century manuscript of the Circa instans (and other works), France (Amiens). Image Credit: The British Library.

Apothecary shop,
British Library Ms Sloane 1977 f. 49v. From an early 14th century manuscript of the Circa instans (and other works), France (Amiens). Image Credit: The British Library.

Thomas Morris: An ‘unnatural propensity’ and its perils

The Atlantic: There Will Be Blood

Thomas Morris: The electric scalpel

Oxford Today: Cigarettes, bully beef and camel meat: How First World War soldiers survived in the Near East

TECHNOLOGY:

The J.Paul Getty Museum: Thomas Annan Steam Engine

Royal Society of Chemistry: Classic kit: Vernier scale

Gizmodo: The History and Future of Locks and Keys

1485731789406437413

Conciatore: San Giovanni

Time Out London: Back to the past: ideas for London that never took off

Ptak Science Books: A Note on the Future of the Future, 1911

Science Museum: The Clockmakers’ Museum

CEO’s Blog: Alex Benay: Canada’s Spirit of Innovation: Music, Sound and Technology

All Things Georgian: 18th Century Hearing Aids

Atlas Obscura: Why Was It Faster To Build Subways in 1900

Conciatore: Black is Beautiful

We Are Dorothy: Electric Love Blueprint – A History of Electronic Music

Inside the Science Museum: Ruth Belville: The Greenwich Time Lady

Ruth Belville in the Evening News, 1929.

Ruth Belville in the Evening News, 1929.

Pictorial: How the Inventors of the 19th Century Brought People Closer to Talking with the Dead

Noah Veltman: What shape is the internet?

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Reciprocal Science: Structural Biology: a beginners’ guide?

Natural History Apostilles: Those who cavalierly reject the theory of…what?

NCSE Reports: Out of Darwin’s Shadow

the many-headed monster: Can the Sodomite Speak? Voicing Sodomy in Early Modern England

Asia One: Firm friends since double-helix DNA discovery

Atlas Obscura: A 16th Century Pope Buried His Pet Elephant Under The Vatican

 One of Raphael's sketches of Hanno (Image: Raphael/Wikimedia)


One of Raphael’s sketches of Hanno (Image: Raphael/Wikimedia)

Natural History Apostilles: The real decimal-point error that transmogrified into the spinach-iron myth

Science League of America: The Cave of Homo naledi, or A Textbook Example of How to Do Science

Medievalists.net: ‘I know not what it is’: Illustrating Plants in Medieval Manuscripts

Notches: From Cod to Codpieces: Benjamin Franklin’s Guide to Food and Sex

Embryo Project: George Wells Beadle (1903–1989)

University of Leeds: Learning the right lessons from Mendel’s peas

BHL: From the Experts: Recommended Fossil Books

storify: Fossil Stories

RCPE: Basil Besler’s Hortus Eystettensis

Basil Besler

Basil Besler

The Guardian: US film of parachuting beavers found after 65 years (it’s OK, they survived)

BHL: Ancient Myths Inspired by Fossils

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 24 – Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

The New York Times: Robert M. White, Who Revolutionized Weather Forecasts, Dies at 92

HSS: When history Meets Science: A Remembrance of William B. Provine (1942–2015)

Why Evolution is True: Was Darwin lactose-intolerant?

CHEMISTRY:

Yahoo News: What can we learn about the discovery of Thomas Jefferson’s chemistry lab at the University of Virginia

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 21 – William A. Mitchell

Chemistry World: Pregl’s analysis tubes

Pregl's apparatus allowed michrochemical determination of many elements © Image source: DOI: 10.1039/AP9933000272

Pregl’s apparatus allowed michrochemical determination of many elements © Image source: DOI: 10.1039/AP9933000272

Distillations Blog: Jane Marcet Conversations on Chemistry

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 23 – Gilbert Lewis

Education in Chemistry Blog: The early teaching of chemistry

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Phlogiston Theory – Wonderfully wrong but fantastically fruitful

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Nylon: A Revolution in Textiles

Richard Carter: Darwin on earthworms: small change writ large

Open Culture: Charles Darwin’s Kids Drew on Surviving Manuscript Pages of On the Origin of Species

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Now Appearing: The evils of science exaggerations

The Guardian: Humanities research is groundbreaking, life-changing…and ignored

Wellcome Trust: Research Spotlight: Dr Angela Cassidy

Dr Angela Cassidy

Dr Angela Cassidy

Royal Society: All journal content free access until 30 November 2015

Conciatore: Pirates

Irish Examiner: Cork City wined and dined during Famine, Boole letters show

The New York Times: Museum Specimens Find New Life Online

storify: Ad Stijnman on early modern engraving techniques

History Matters: Historic Fiction and Alternative Truths

The Recipes Project: The (Near) Magic of Digital Access to Manuscript Cookbooks

Page from “Gemel Book of Recipes : manuscript, circa 1660-1700,” New York Academy of Medicine. Curse on bottom of page: Jean Gembel [Gemel] her book / I wish she may be drouned yt steals it from her.

Page from “Gemel Book of Recipes : manuscript, circa 1660-1700,” New York Academy of Medicine. Curse on bottom of page: Jean Gembel [Gemel] her book / I wish she may be drouned yt steals it from her.

The Guardian: Royal Institution to sell science treasures to rescue finances

Cradle in Caricature: Programming Historian Live

Girl in the Moon: Rare books gifs – John Dee, volvelles, apples and things

The #EnvHist Weekly

University of Kent: Notes on periodical genres, inspired by a trip to Trondheim

Heterodoxology: Why fear the history of science? A brief response to Don Wiebe

storify: Scientific Books and their makers

India Today: Bad miss, Nobel!: 7 discoveries that should have got the Nobel Prize

Daily Camera: Boulder’s climb from ‘scientific Siberia’ to scientific peak

ESOTERIC:

The Toast: Scientists Announce Ultimate Success of Alchemy

The Somnium Project: Hekla, Witchcraft and Katherina Kepler

Detail of Abraham Ortelius' 1585 map of Iceland showing Hekla in eruption. The Latin text translates as

Detail of Abraham Ortelius’ 1585 map of Iceland showing Hekla in eruption. The Latin text translates as “The Hekla, perpetually condemned to storms and snow, vomits stones under terrible noise”.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: Maps: charting and changing the world

NCSE: Reports: Wallace, Darwin, and the Origin of Species

Science Book a Day: The Red Canary: The Story of the First Genetically Engineered Animal

red-canary

Wall Street Journal: Man’s Other Best Friend (Goggle title and click on first link to avoid paywall!)

Brain Pickings: Ten Days at the Mad-House: How Nellie Bly Posed as Insane in 1887 in Her Brave Exposé of Asylum Abuse

Forbes: When Scientific Amateurs Have Eureka Moments

The Economist: Understanding the universe

NEW BOOKS:

University of Toronto Press: The Secrets of Generation: Reproduction in the Long Eighteenth Century

Editions Hermann: Écrits de phénoménologie et de philosophie des sciences

Palgrave Macmillan: Navigational Enterprises in Europe and its Empires, 1730–1850

9781137520630

AIP: Selection of 2014–2015 titles researched at NBL&A

Advances in the History of Psychology: Rethinking Interdisciplinarity across the Social Sciences and Neurosciences

ART & EXHIBITIONS

U.S. National Library of Medicine: Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature

photo-home-digitalgallery

Natural History of Museum: Images of Nature

Culture 24: A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee

Chadds Ford Live: Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life

Hyperallergic: Remembering Forgotten Female Printmakers from the 16th to 19th Centuries

Maria Sibylla Merian, “Der Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung” (“The Wonderful Transformation of Caterpillars”) (1679-83) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

Maria Sibylla Merian, “Der Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung” (“The Wonderful Transformation of Caterpillars”) (1679-83) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

CLOSING SOON: Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscopy

Museum of the History of Science: Extended to 31 January 2016: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs till 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs till 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs till 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Tuesdays & Wednesdays

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The Blue Orange Theatre: Frankenstein Runs till 8 November 2015

Coach House Theatre: Nothing to Hyde Closes 31 October 2015

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Runs till 21 November 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Runs till 18 June 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

CHoM News: Celebrating Ten Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine 3 November 2015

University of Yale: 2015 Terry Lecture: Becoming Darwin: History, Memory, and Biography 5 November

London Museums of Health & Medicine: Lecture: Finding Voices in the Medical Collection 28 October 2015

Webinar: Medical technology and disability in the First World War 12 November 2015

Science Museum: Computer says Lates 28 October 2015

The Guardian: The dangers of Disney’s film about Charles Darwin

‘Whether Darwin will seem so swashbuckling if the film is honest about his chronic sea-sickness is another matter.’ Photograph: Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images

‘Whether Darwin will seem so swashbuckling if the film is honest about his chronic sea-sickness is another matter.’ Photograph: Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images

Royal College of Physicians: Walking Tour: “London’s Plagues”

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Unknown artist: Chemist or Pharmacist in His Laboratory, with Assistants and Apparatus (c) Museum of the History of Science; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Unknown artist: Chemist or Pharmacist in His Laboratory, with Assistants and Apparatus
(c) Museum of the History of Science; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Laughing Squid: A Fascinating Look Into What Goes Into Building Miniture Replicas for the Museum of Scotland

Scientific American: The Pigeon, the Antenna, and Me: Robert Wilson

Youtube: Alfred Russel Wallace Top #10 Facts

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

BookLab 009: Sapiens and the Upright Thinker

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

ICHST2017: CfP: 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology Rio de Janeiro 23–29 July 2017

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Drew University: CfP: Transatlantic Connections 3 Conference: How Medical Humanities is Building Bridges to the Future of Medicine 13–16 January 2016

Binghampton University: CfP: The Pre-Modern Book in a Global Materiality and Visuality 21–22 October 2016

University of Hull: Maritime Trade, Travel and Cultural Encounter in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries 13–14 November 2015

The Hakluyt Society Essay Prize: This year’s results and Next year’s CfP

University of Kent: Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Context 710 July 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: CfP: Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference University of Sheffield 5–8 July 2016

Victoria University in the University of Toronto: Workshop: Jesuit Science in the Early Modern World

Wrocław, Poland: CfP: Ludwik Fleck’s theory of thought styles and thought collectives – translations and receptions 10–11 March 2016

Hôpital Adultes Timone, Marseille: Colloque: Classification et catégories en psychiatrie : enjeux éthiques 29 Janvier 2016

BPS/UCL Hist Psych Disciplines Talk: “Getting on in Gotham: Preventing Mental Illness in New York City, 1945-1980” 29 October 2015

Institute of Historical Research: Maritime History and Culture Seminars 2015–16

Karl Jaspers Centre Heidelberg: Conference: Psychiatry in Europe after World War II 30-31 October 2015

UCL: CfP: Science/Technology/Security: Challenges to global governance? 20-21 June 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Nazarbeyev University, Astana, Kazakhstan: Assistant Professor History of Medicine, Public Health, and/or Environmental History

Royal Museums Greenwich: Fellowships 2016

Trinity College Dublin: Assistant Professor in Environmental History

University of Cambridge: Graduate funding opportunities in History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge 2016–17

British Library: Curator of Ancient and Medieval Manuscripts

National Maritime Museum: seeks proposals from university partners for collaborative doctoral scholarships to start in October 2016

Academic Job Wiki: History 2015–16

UCL: Research Associate Inner Lives

University of Leeds Library: Medical Collections Project Assistant

UEA: Self-Funded PhD Project: History of Logic

British Library: Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Hans Sloane’s Books: Evaluating an Enlightenment Library

University of Hertfordshire: PhD Studentship in Early Modern History

Sorbonne Universités Paris: Postdoctoral Fellowship – History of nuclear energy and society

South, West, and Wales: Doctoral Training Partnerships 2016/17

University of Leiden: 3 PhD Positions on Rethinking Disability: the Global Impact of the International Year of Disabled Persons (1981) in Historical Perspective

The Antique Boat Museum: Executive Director

Antique Boat Museum Ian Coristine Photo

Antique Boat Museum
Ian Coristine Photo

University of Göttingen: 4 Early Career Fellowships

American Geographical Society Library: Fellowships

Carnegie Mellon University: One-Year Visiting Assistant Professor in History of Science and Technology and/or Science and Technology Studies

| 3 Comments

Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #14

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #14

Monday 19 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

It’s that time again, time for the next edition of your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that could be scooped up from the depths of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Last Tuesday was Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of women in STEM, so naturally this week’s Whewell’s Gazette has the same theme. The first section of links deals with women in STEM in general.

FIVE: An interview with… Athene Donald on Women in Science

The Guardian: Why Ada Lovelace Day Matters

Churchill College Cambridge: Professor Dame Carol Robinson

BuzzFeed: 100 Inspiring Women Who Made History

New Statesman: This Ada Lovelace Day, Let’s celebrate women in tech while confronting its sexist culture

The next section is a collection of links about Ada Lovelace that mostly concentrate on the real history and less on the hagiography.

“If Ada Lovelace did not exist, it would be necessary to invent her”. –Christopher Burd (@christopherburd)

“Ada Lovelace exhibition at the Science Museum seemed to me like a nice, balanced, modest display, and well worth a visit”. – Philip Ball (@philipcball)

Royal Museums Greenwich: Ada Lovelace and female computers

Inside the Science Museum: Ada Lovelace: A visionary of the computer age

Gallery View of “Ada Lovelace Enchantress of numbers. An exhibition about the remarkable story of Ada Lovelace, a Victorian pioneer of the computer age, celebrating the bicentenary of her birth.

Gallery View of “Ada Lovelace Enchantress of numbers. An exhibition about the remarkable story of Ada Lovelace, a Victorian pioneer of the computer age, celebrating the bicentenary of her birth.

ODNB: Ada Lovelace

BBC Four: Calculating Ada: Not your typical role model: Ada Lovelace the 19th century programmer

BBC Radio 4: The Letters of Ada Lovelace

BBC News: Ada Lovelace’s letters and work on display at Oxford Library

CHF: the French Connection

An 1839 woven silk portrait of French textile merchant and inventor Joseph-Marie Jacquard, recently added to CHF’s collections. The portrait, made on a Jacquard loom, required more than 24,000 cards to create the pattern. (CHF Collections/Jesse Olanday)

An 1839 woven silk portrait of French textile merchant and inventor Joseph-Marie Jacquard, recently added to CHF’s collections. The portrait, made on a Jacquard loom, required more than 24,000 cards to create the pattern. (CHF Collections/Jesse Olanday)

We then have a section of links on the stories of individual or groups of women in #histSTM.

Atlas Obscura: The Daredevil Girl Pals Who Conquered the Sky

A signed photograph of Harriet Quimby and Matilde Moisant. (Photo: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives/flickr)

A signed photograph of Harriet Quimby and Matilde Moisant. (Photo: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives/flickr)

Google Cultural Institute: 1944: Women in Computing: A British Perspective

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A bewitching lady astronomer

Aglaonice Source: unknown

Aglaonice
Source: unknown

ODNB: Squire, Jane (bap. 1686, d. 1743)

Scientific American: 15 Works of Art Depicting Women in Science

“Portrait of Gabrielle-Émilie le Tonnelier de Breteuil, Marquise du Châtelet” – Nicolas de Largillière
(oil on canvas)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Guardian: On Ada Lovelace Day, here are seven other pioneering women in tech

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Isabella Karle’s Interview

Open Culture: Hear Seven Hours of Women Making Electronic Music (1938–2014)

Delia Derbyshire

Delia Derbyshire

Government Equalities Office: Women in Engineering

Wellcome Library: Women pharmacists demand the vote

Wired: Her Code Got Humans on the Moon – And Invented Software Itself

Margaret Hamilton at the MIT Museum in Cambridge, MA. Photo: HARRY GOULD HARVEY IV FOR WIRED

Margaret Hamilton at the MIT Museum in Cambridge, MA.
Photo: HARRY GOULD HARVEY IV FOR WIRED

Musings of a Clumsy Palaeontologist: In Honour of Ada Lovelace – Female Palaeontologists

Letters From Gondwana: Marie Stopes and Her Legacy as Plaeobotanist

Marie Stopes (1880-1958) photographed by George Bernard Shaw. (LSE Archives Image Record, 1921).

Marie Stopes (1880-1958) photographed by George Bernard Shaw. (LSE Archives Image Record, 1921).

Embryo Project: Marie Stopes International

TrowelBlazers: Veronica Seton-Williams

Veronica Seton-WIlliams, image courtesy of the EES.

Veronica Seton-WIlliams, image courtesy of the EES.

Brain Pickings: Trailblazing Astronomer Vera Rubin on Obsessiveness, Minimizing Obstacles, and How the Trill of Accidental Discovery Redeems the Terror of Uncertainty

Mental Floss: 8 Stellar Facts About the Most accomplished Female Astronomer You’ve Never Heard Of

Caroline Herschel IMAGE CREDIT: MRS. JOHN HERSCHEL, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Caroline Herschel
IMAGE CREDIT:
MRS. JOHN HERSCHEL, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

A lot of the articles in the Internet on the #histSTM of women are unfortunately historically not very accurate and mythologizing. A great exception is Lady Science, which celebrated its first anniversary last Friday. Lady science is well researched, well written and historically accurate and if you don’t already subscribe to their monthly newsletter you should.

Lady Science 1 Year Anniversary

Lady Science

We close our women in #histSTM on a sombre note. 12 October was the one hundredth anniversary of the English nurse Edith Cavell in Belgium in WW I.

Edith Cavell executed 12 October 1915

 CRGXCp-W8AAyqvD

The Conversation: Edith Cavell: the British nurse who taught women the way of the stiff upper lip

The H-Word: Edith Cavell: nurse, martyr, and spy?

image-20151009-9124-1xz2zt2

British Pathé: Service at Westminster Abbey – Nurse Cavell 1915

ODNB: Cavell, Edith Louisa (1865–1915)

CRGZ_klWoAEMZ-8.jpg-large

Quotes of the week:

Calvin

“People laugh about children who ask “why?” all the time but not about the adults who never do”. – Andy Matuschak (@andy_matuschak)

‘Science in itself’ is nothing, for it exists only in the human beings who are its bearers. –Virchow h/t @embryoprojct

“Men don’t make passes at girls who wear glasses.”

“Why do you think I wear them?” – Jennifer Wallis (@harbottlestores)

“Hard work is for people who have nothing better to do”–

“The truth is rarely pure and never simple”. – Oscar Wilde

“My take on scientists saying that we might have MAYBE! detected an alien civilization? Crying in my beer over the stupidization of astronomy” – Mike Brown (@plutokiller)

“When Adam delved, and Eve span, who was then the gentleman? From the beginning all men by nature were created alike” – John Ball 1338-1381

“I think I cracked the Gödel Code. It’s like God but this heavy metal version with the Nazi dots”. – Casmilus (@Casmilus)

 Wren quote

 PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

New Scientist: Explore 100 years of general relativity

moonandback.com: Ninth Planet Named For God of Dark, Dank, Distant Underworld

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Henry Frisch and Andrew Hanson’s Interview

Physics Central: Buzz Blog: Christopher Columbus Steals the Moon

The Space Review: Declassified documents offer a new perspective on Yuri Gagarin’s flight

Gagarin being led to his spaceship at the top of the gantry by Oleg Ivanovsky who was the “lead” (production) designer of the Vostok spaceship.

Gagarin being led to his spaceship at the top of the gantry by Oleg Ivanovsky who was the “lead” (production) designer of the Vostok spaceship.

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 14 – Friedrich Kohlrausch

AHF: Norman Ramsey:

The H–Word: Frank Malina and an overlooked Space Age milestone

AIP: Jesse Greenstein I

AIP: Jesse Greenstein II

Martin J. Clemens: The Mysterious Celestial Spheres of the Ancient Mughal Empire

The famous celestial globe of Muhammad Salih Tahtawi is inscribed with Arabic and Persian inscriptions, completed in the year 1631.

The famous celestial globe of Muhammad Salih Tahtawi is inscribed with Arabic and Persian inscriptions, completed in the year 1631.

AHF: The Alsos Mission

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 16 – China Goes Nuclear

Louvre: Roofed spherical sundial

Slate: The Vault: An Early-20th-Century Globe Promoting the Fantasy of a Socialist Culture on Mars

The Royal Society: The Repository: Newton’s dog-ears

NASA: Remembering George Mueller, Leader of Early Human Spaceflight

Yovisto: Réaumur and the Réaumur Temperature Scale

BBC News: The First Spacewalk

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Mariners Today Still Use a Math Genius’ 1802 Navigation Guide

Atlas Obscura: China’s Classroom Maps Put The Middle Kingdom at the Center of the World

Ptak Science Books: A Glorious if Not Accurate Map of Ocean Currents 1675

Intelligent Life: Deleted Islands

Atlas Obscura: How Marshall Islanders Navigated the Sea Using Only Sticks and Shells

Cambridge University Library: Collections: Marshal Islands Sailing Charts

Sailing chart of Marshall Islands archipelago. Black & White photograph, taken in May 1928, from the Science Museum Photo Archive. Object on loan to the Science Museum from the Royal Empire Society

Sailing chart of Marshall Islands archipelago. Black & White photograph, taken in May 1928, from the Science Museum Photo Archive. Object on loan to the Science Museum from the Royal Empire Society

Atlas Obscura: Places You Can No Longer Go: The Navigation Trees

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Business Insider: A relic of medieval history explains why glasses make people look smart

Thomas Morris: Stay of execution

The Atlantic: A Short History of Empathy

Mimi Matthews: Aphrodisiacs, Elixirs, and Dr, Brodum’s Restorative Nervous Cordial

V0016204 Two unorthodox medical practitioners, J. Graham and G. Kater Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

V0016204 Two unorthodox medical practitioners, J. Graham and G. Kater
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org

Royal College of Physicians: Mark Edwin Silverman

The Cut: The First Legal Abortion Providers Tell Their Stories

Embryo Project: Rudolf Carl Virchow (1821–1902)

Museum of Health Care: Diphtheria

The History of Modern Biomedicine: History of Cervical Cancer and the Role of Human Papillomavirus, 1960–2000

Remedia: Crafting a (Written) Science of Surgery: The First European Surgical Texts

Atlas Obscura: The True Story of Dr. Voronoff’s Plan to Use Monkey Testicles to Make Us Immortal

L0003517 Caricature of Serge Samuel Voronoff (1866 - ) Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

L0003517 Caricature of Serge Samuel Voronoff (1866 – )
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org

Fugitive Leaves: Tracing Monsters Across Medicine

Thomas Morris: Brained by a bull

Conciatore: A Gift for the Innocent

Thomas Morris: A case of hiccups

NYAM: Cook Like a Roman: The New York Academy of Medicine’s Apicius Manuscript

The Recipes Project: Removing Arrowheads in Antiquity and the Middle Ages

History of Medicine in Ireland: AIDS and history

Conciatore: Alessandro Neri

Thomas Morris: Aleing all day, and oiling all night

Medium: Ralph M. Rosen: The Best Doctor is Also a Philosopher: Galen on Science and the Humanities

Thomas Morris: Hemlock and millipedes

One to be taken three times a day

One to be taken three times a day

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: The Origins of Anesthesia

Smells Like Science: Ether and the Discovery of Anesthesia

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: The Purse of Envy

A Thoroughly Anglophile Journal: Uncovering a History of Secrets

The Atlantic: The Sexism of American Kitchen Design

Mrs. H.M. Richardson, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) housewife is shown as she prepares a meal in her all-electric kitchen in Morris, Tenn., on January 15, 1936. (AP Photo)

Mrs. H.M. Richardson, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) housewife is shown as she prepares a meal in her all-electric kitchen in Morris, Tenn., on January 15, 1936. (AP Photo)

Christie’s The Art People: The evolution of the modern PC in Eight objects

NPR: Turnspit Dogs: The Rise and Fall of the Vernepator Cur

AEON: The hand-held’s tale

Academia: Seeing the Invisible: The Introduction and Development of Electron Microscopy in Britain, 1935–1945

Leaping Robot Blog: Remembering Lines of Light

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Washington Post: A scientist found a bird that hadn’t been seen in half a century, then killed it. Here’s why

Embryo Project: Theodor Heinrich Boveri (1862–1915)

Royal Society: The Repository: Drawing under the Microscope

BHL: Fossils Under the Microscope: Hooke and Micrographia

Robert Hooke's microscope. Micrographia, 1665. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/786364. Digitized by: Missouri Botanical Garden.

Robert Hooke’s microscope. Micrographia, 1665. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/786364. Digitized by: Missouri Botanical Garden.

BHL: Proving Extinction: Cuvier and the Elephantimorpha

BHL: Early Innovations in Paleontology: Gessner and Fossils

BHL: The Roots of Paleontology: Brongniart and Fossil Plants

BHL: A Sinner Killed During the Great Flood or a Fossil Reptile? Discovering a Plesiosaur

World of Phylogenetic Networks: Buffon and the origin of the tree and network metaphors

Brain Pickings: Gorgeous 19th-Century Illustrations of Owls and Ospreys

Royal Natural History Lydekker 6

Royal Natural History Lydekker 6

BHL: Fact or Fiction? Discovering the Mosasaur

Hyperaallergic: The 16th–Century Fossil Book that First Depicted the Pencil

BHL: The First Described and Validly Named Dinosaur

BHL: Uncovering the “Fish Lizard”: Ichthyosaurs and Home

BHL: Naming the Second Dinosaur: Mantell and Iguanodon

BioInteractive: Reading Primary Sources: Darwin and Wallace

Public Domain Review: Richard Spruce and the Trials of Victorian Bryology

Map showing Spruce’s route through the Andes from Notes of a Botanist on the Amazon and Andes (1908), edited by Alfred Russel Wallace – Source.

Map showing Spruce’s route through the Andes from Notes of a Botanist on the Amazon and Andes (1908), edited by Alfred Russel Wallace – Source.

American Museum of Natural History: Invertebrate Zoology: Amber

Mammoth Tales: The First Trilobite

Embryo Project: The Meckel-Serres Conception of Recapitulation

CHEMISTRY:

io9: How Pee Led to One of the 17th Century’s Most Important Chemistry Breakthroughs

The Alchemist in Search of the Philosopher's Stone, by Joseph Wright, 1771 Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Alchemist in Search of the Philosopher’s Stone, by Joseph Wright, 1771
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gizmodo: How One Man’s Love of Urine Led to the Discovery of Phosphorus

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 12 – Ascanio Sobrero

Science at Play: Periodic Round Table

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 13 – Margaret Thatcher

Chemistry World: Chemistry Nobel laureate Richard Heck dies

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Factually: The patron saint of the internet is Isidore of Seville, who tried to record everything ever known

Culture 24: The Crime Museum Uncovered: Museum of London’s show merges morbid curiosity and real stories

The Recipes Project: Categories in a Database of Eighteenth-Century Medical Recipes

The Chronicle of Higher Education: The Future of History

The Guardian: History v historical fiction

Willing to suspend disbelief … Jane Smiley. Photograph: Rex

Willing to suspend disbelief … Jane Smiley. Photograph: Rex

#EnvHist Weekly

In Useful: Nathaniel Comfort Begins as Third NASA/Library of Congress Chair of Astrobiology

CHF: Merger Announced

CHF: CHF and LSF Announce Merger

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Change, history, and a talk before Parliament

EurekaAlert!: Six Degrees of Francis Bacon launches

Smithsonian.com: Six Degrees of Francis Bacon Is Your New Favourite Trivia Game

Corpus Newtonicum: Isaac Newton Library Online

The Newton Project: Books in Newton’s Library

Londonist: Pie Charts of the Life of the Londoner Who Invented Pie Charts

William Payfair's pie chart. Much better and less frivolous than our own examples.

William Payfair’s pie chart. Much better and less frivolous than our own examples.

Priceonomics: Should You Ever Use a Pie Chart?

The Bookseller: Knowledge Unlatched moves into second phase

the many-headed monster: Sources, Empathy and Politics in History from Below

ESOTERIC:

Open Culture: In 1704, Isaac Newton Predicts the World Will End in 2060

Modern Mechanix: Machine Reads Your Head Bumps (Jul, 1931)

med_machine_reads_head_bumps

BOOK REVIEWS:

The New York Review of Books: The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt

Forbes Tech: Pre-Digital Cartography is Still Key to “Mapping” Human History

MAP-flat-cover-1705x1940

Notches: “The Gay Revolution”: An Interview with Lillian Faderman

Science Book a Day: Imagination and a Pile of Junk: A Droll History of Inventors and Inventions

Thinking Like a Mountain: Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914

NEW BOOKS:

Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine: A History of Bovine TB c.1965–c.2000 Free download

W.W. Norton: Lady Byron and Her Daughters

9780393082685_198

University of Toronto Press: The Secrets of Generation: Reproduction in the Long Eighteenth Century

Bloomsbury Publishing: Medical Negligence in Victorian Britain

Jim Baggott: Origins: The Scientific Story of Creation

Science Book a Day: Epidemics (eyewitness Guides)

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace

BBC News: Ada Lovelace: Opium, maths and the Victorian programmer

Wellington.scoop: History of maps of charts – new exhibition opening at National Library

Academia: #ColeEx – Twitter Exhibition of Twentieth-Century Natural History and Zoology at the Cole Museum of Zoology, UK

Journal of Art in Society: Science Becomes Art

Joseph Wright of Derby, A Philosopher giving that Lecture on the Orrery (1766) Derby Museums (detail)

Joseph Wright of Derby, A Philosopher giving that Lecture on the Orrery (1766) Derby Museums (detail)

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything 10 October–28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs till 21 February 2016

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Closes 25 October 2015

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs till 13 March 2016

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Extended to 31 January 2016

CLOSING SOON: Florence Nightingale Museum: The Kiss of Light 23 October 2015!

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscopy Runs till 23 November 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Early Modern Medicine: Review: Jane Wenham the Witch of Walkern

The Conversation: Good year for science on stage as Nicole Kidman discovers the double helix in Photograph 51

Photograph 51, , Credit Johan Persson

Photograph 51, , Credit Johan Persson

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Bookings until 21 November 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Science Museum: Evening Exchange: Ada Lovelace

University of York: Ada Lovelace Day Wikipedia 2015 Editathon at YorkU 29 October

Youtube: Experimenter – Official Trailer 1 (2015)

Barts Pathology Museum: Contraception & Consent: a 19thC Sex Education 25 November 2015

Youtube: The Forgotten Voyage: Alfred Russel Wallace and his discovery of evolution by natural selection

Museum of Fine Arts Boston: Sorting Out a World of Wonders: Science in the Dutch Golden Age 4 November 2015

Johns Hopkins University: History of Medicine Department: Colloquium with Harold Cook: Descartes’ Early Medical Interests: Some Conjectures 22 October 2015

University of Strathclyde: James Watt’s heat engine: energy transitions past, present, and future 21 October 2015

Royal College of Physicians: Walking Tour: Fit to rule?

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology

The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities: Inaugural Annual Ada Lovelace Lecture 27 October 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek by Jan Verkolje, c.1680

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek by Jan Verkolje, c.1680

TELEVISION:

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Manhattan noir

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Damon Albarn’s Dr Dee live session

Youtube: Alpen-Adria-University Klagenfurt: POPSCI 2015

Youtube: Continental Drift Alfred Wegener Song by The Amoeba People

Nature Documentaries.org: The Making of a Theory: Darwin, Wallace, and Natural Selection

BSHS: BSHS Annual Conference in Swansea

Vimeo: Jim Endersby: Darwin, Hooker, and Empire

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Perpetual Motion

PODCASTS:

New Books in Medicine: EUGENE RAIKHEL, EDITOR; TODD MEYERS, ASSOCIATE EDITOR; EMILY YATES-DOERR, MEMBER Somatosphere.net

Soundcloud: Poem: On the Publishing of Robert Boyle’s The Sceptical Chymist, 1661

The_Sceptical_Chymist

abc.net: RN Drive: Twitterati: @brennawalks

The Royal Society: Hooke’s microscopic world

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Leeds: Call for Participants: Workshops: Pasts, Presents and Futures of Medical Regeneration January, April and June 2016

University of Oxford: Bodleian Libraries: Gough Map Symposium 2015: 2 November

St Anne’s College Oxford: CfP. Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

UCL: CfP: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain during April 2016

H–SCi–Med–Tech: CfP: Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 25 January 2016

The Linnaean Society of New York: Programs 2015–2016 Seasons

University of Lancaster: CfP: Panel on Photographic History at SHS Conference 21–23 March 2016

UCL: Conference: Europe From The Outside in? Imagining Civilization through Collecting the Exotic

The Wagner Free Institute of Science: Chemistry Series: The Periodic Table of Elements: How We Got It and How We Can Use It Mondays Begins 19 October 2015

University of Alberta: Three Societies Meeting: BSHS–CSHPS–HSS 22-25 June 2016

ICHST 2017: 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology Rio de Janeiro Brazil 23-29 July 2017

banner_1434035935_5_4_layer1

University of Minneapolis: CfP: The International Society for History and Philosophy of Science 11th International Congress 22–25 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Harvard: Tenure-Track Assistant Professor in the History of Modern or Contemporary Physics

The Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences: Professor for Science Communications

University of Ghent: Three Fully Funded PhD Scholarships in European Periodical Studies

University of Basel: Postdoc: The Effects of Glass Making in Venetian Self-Perception and Identity

APS: Long-Term Pre-Doctoral Fellowships

UC Irvine: Assistant, Associate or Full Professor: History and Philosophy of Science preference

| 5 Comments

Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #13

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #13

Monday 12 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

 If you’ve been holding your breath, you can breathe out now, as the thirteenth edition of the second year of the weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette, is finally here. Putting aside their triskaidekaphobia our editorial team has collected together all that they could find on the histories of science, technology and medicine in the vast reaches of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Whenever I write a blog post or research a lecture, sooner or later I will almost always make a pilgrimage to consult the volumes of the Dictionary of Scientific Biography, a cornucopia of history of science information presented at the highest levels of scholarship. This invaluable tool of historical research was put together under the editorship of Charles Coulston Gillispie one of the giants of post Second World War history of science. Beyond the DSB Gillispie was a important historian of science writing mostly about eighteenth-century French science, whilst teaching and establishing the history of science department at Princeton University.

Charles Gillispie died on 6 October at the age of 97. In the DSB he left behind a monument in the history of science that others will struggle to equal and with this thought I would like to humbly dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to him.

Charles Coulston Gillispie 6 August 1918­ – 6 October 2015 Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Charles Coulston Gillispie
6 August 1918­ – 6 October 2015
Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

News at Princeton: Charles Gillispie, trailblazer in the history of science, dies at 97

NCSE: Charles Coulston Gillispie dies

facebook: Marco Berratta: Charles Gillispie Obituary

Quotes of the week:

The *Great Man of Science* is a myth. They all had collaborators that disappeared from history. – Andrew David Thaler (@SFriedScientist)

“Sir Humphrey Davy was asked to name the greatest discovery he’d ever made. He answered “Michael Faraday””. – Verity Burke (@VerityBurke)

“‘thank God! there is no drinking of coffee [in the next world], and consequently no waiting for it.’”—De Quincey, quoting Kant h/t @GuyLongworth

“I’m a scientist. I don’t want to people to accept that what I say is accurate. I want to give them the tools to find out for themselves”. – John Hawks (@johnhawks)

“We must labour to find out what things are in themselves by our owne experience … not what another sayes of them” – John Wilkins 1640 h/t @felicityhen

“Science doesn’t suffer fools, but it can make fools suffer.” – Richard Hammond

h/t @Pillownaut

“Nothing more ruins the world than a conceit that a little knowledge is sufficient.” – Thomas Traherne. h/t @telescoper

“50 yrs from now, people will see the discovery of exoplanets as a major development in #HistSTM” – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

“The only reason that christianity imagined hell as a pit of fire is because Christ was born too early to experience a bus full of teens”. – Marc Girard Alleyn (@StevenAlleyn)

“Is it too much to ask for conference coffee that isn’t brown pisswater? Where is my Black Ichor of Awakeness?” Ed Yong (@edyong209)

“I rather like “defy the facts”. Ignorance is strength”. – Guy Longworth (@GuyLongworth)

“Shit doesn’t just happen. Shits make it happen”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

Wren quote

6 October was National Badger Day

A badger, as illustrated in Histoire Naturelle des Mammiféres, 1824-57. (1257.l.1-4)

A badger, as illustrated in Histoire Naturelle des Mammiféres, 1824-57.
(1257.l.1-4)

Birthdays of the Week:

Robert Goddard born 5 October 1882

Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1882. The phyicist determinedly pursued his spaceflight obsession.

Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1882. The phyicist determinedly pursued his spaceflight obsession.

Barron Hilton Pioneers of Flight Gallery: Robert Hutchins Goddard

NASA: Goddard Space Flight Center: Dr. Robert H. Goddard, American Rocketry Pioneer

Niels Bohr born 7 October 1885

 Niels Bohr on G. Gamow's motorcycle, with his wife Margrethe sitting behind. Photo credit Emilio Segrè Visual Archives h/t Alex Wellerstein

Niels Bohr on G. Gamow’s motorcycle, with his wife Margrethe sitting behind.
Photo credit Emilio Segrè Visual Archives
h/t Alex Wellerstein

“An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made, in a narrow field”. – Niels Bohr h/t @ChemHeritage

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 7 – Niels Bohr

AIP: Niels Bohr – Session I

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Cambridge University Library Special Collections Blog: ‘It’s all in a day’s work’: the Royal Greenwich Observatory Audio-Visual Collection, Stories of Observatory Life

Cosmos: Émilie du Châtelet: the woman science forgot

Particle Decelerator: New Zealand recognised as major contributor to radio astronomy history

Physics Today: Seeing dark matter in the Andromeda galaxy

Vera Rubin Source: Physics Today

Vera Rubin
Source: Physics Today

Conciatore: A Fast Calendar

Collect Space: Astronaut Sally Ride’s personal items and papers acquired by Smithsonian

ahram online: Mars, the invincible planet

ethw.org: George Westinghouse AIEE membership application

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 6 – Ernest Walton

Atlas Obscura: These Atomic Tourists Have Visited 160 Forgotten Nuclear Sites Across the U.S.

NASA History: James E. Webb

Pasadena Star-News: Astronomy: These women were ‘human computers’ before they were allowed to be astronomers

AHF: Operation Plumbbob – 1957

AEON: Light dawns

Scientific American: 20 Years Later – a O&A with the first Astronomer to Detect a Planet Orbiting Another Sun

Independent: Prague Astronomical Clock: Three things you probably didn’t know about today’s Google Doodle

Prague astronomical clock Source: Wikimedia Commons

Prague astronomical clock
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Heavy: Prague Astronomical Clock: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Gizmodo: Prague Astronomical Clock Celebrated by Google Doodle on its 605th Birthday

The Guardian: A Fife church minister first imagined space flight – beating Jules Verne

AHF: Britain’s Early Input – 1940–41

IET Blog: The Great Melbourne Telescope

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Neglected Niigata

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 11 – James Prescott Joule

AHF: The Einstein Letter – 1939

Dannen.com: Einstein to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939

BLink: Mystery of the starry sphere

Too big for the palm: Emperor Jahangir is shown holding a globe in this Mughal-era painting. The globe is believed to have been made by metallurgist Muhammad Salih Tahtawi. Photo: Wikipedia

Too big for the palm: Emperor Jahangir is shown holding a globe in this Mughal-era painting. The globe is believed to have been made by metallurgist Muhammad Salih Tahtawi. Photo: Wikipedia

AIP: Robert Marshak

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Ptak Science Books: Blank and Missing Things: a Map of Missing people of Europe and Russia, 1881

University of Cambridge: Digital Library: Oppidium Cantebrigiae

British Library: Maps and views blog: Drawing Lines across Africa – from the War Office Archive

World Digital Library: Map of Louisiana, View of New Orleans

The French royal engineer, de Beauvilliers, drew this 1720 map of the entire hydrographic network of the Mississippi River Source: World Digital Library

The French royal engineer, de Beauvilliers, drew this 1720 map of the entire hydrographic network of the Mississippi River
Source: World Digital Library

A Thoroughly Anglophile Journal: The Center of Space and Time, and History

Geographicus Rare Antique Maps: 1650 Jansoon Wind Rose, Anemographic Chart, or Map of the Winds

Factum Arte: Terra Forming: Engineering the Sublime

Atlas Obscura: Found: 39 Maps from the Mid-1800s That ‘Show Chicago Being Born’

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Yovisto: James Lind and a Cure for Scurvy

Vice: How One Man Ran the World’s Only Menstruation Museum from his Basement

The first-ever Kotex advertisement, from January 1921

The first-ever Kotex advertisement, from January 1921

Thomas Morris: The case of the luminous patients

Remedia: Roaring Horses, Lame Dogs and the Re-framing of British Veterinary Surgery

Medievalists.net: Medieval Viagara [sic]

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: “Secta Empírica y Domáticos Racionales”: medicine and the ESD in early modern Spain II

BBC Future: It’s time we dispelled these myths about autism

Conciatore: The Duke’s Mouthwash

The Conversation: Could ancient textbooks be the source of the next medical breakthrough

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR). 1967-68

Circulating Now: Radam’s Microbe Killer: Advertising Cures for Tuberculosis

Advertisement in Roanoke Times, March 28, 1894

Advertisement in Roanoke Times, March 28, 1894

ph.ucla.edu: On The Inhalation of the Vapour of Ether in Surgical Operations (pdf)

Philly.com: Remember what ‘Aunt Sammy’ said … about babies and drafts?

The Recipes Project: From Bloodstone to Fish Soup: Iron Recipes

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: John Atanasoff and the first Electronic Computer

Yovisto: Christiaan Huygens and the Pocket Watch

Atlas Obscura: The Simple, Elegant History of the Swiss Army Knife

Modell 1890, the first Swiss Soldier Knife produced by Wester & Co. Solingen. (Photo: Cutrofiano/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

Modell 1890, the first Swiss Soldier Knife produced by Wester & Co. Solingen. (Photo: Cutrofiano/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

Engineering & Technology History Wiki: Reginald A. Fessenden Biography

BBC News: Forth Bridge ‘is Scotland’s favourite engineering work’

Atlas Obscura: Kansas Barbed Wire Museum

Conciatore: Antonio Who?

Yale Books Blog: Dirty Old London: 30 Days of Filth: Day 29: The Great Exhibition Toilet Myth

Pioneers of Flight: Amelia Earhart and Eleanor Roosevelt flying from Washington, D.C. to Baltimore

Amelia Earhart and Eleanor Roosevelt flying from Washington, DC to Baltimore in 1933

Amelia Earhart and Eleanor Roosevelt flying from Washington, DC to Baltimore in 1933

Ptak Science Books: A Massively Geared “Tricycle” of 1879

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Dispersal of Darwin: Article: Exploration and Exploitation of Victorian Science in Darwin’s Reading Notebooks

Dispersal of Darwin: Article: Flattening the World: Natural Theology and the Ecology of Darwin’s Orchids

Gizmodo: Here’s the Drawing That Proved the Earth has a Solid Core

1460648158338612877

Engineering Life: Putting synthetic biology in historical context: Becoming a Tralfamadorian

The Scientist: The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

Notches: The Hunger of the Finnish Bachelor: Married Men, Desire and Domesticity in 20th Century Finland

geoitaliani: Tacchi a spillo, capigliature corte alla garconne, continenti alla deriva: Federico Sacco contro tutti

Atlas Obscura: The Scrappy Female Paleontologist Whose Life Inspired a Tongue Twister

Ancient Origins: The Ancestral Myth of the Hollow Earth and Underground Civilizations

MBL History Project: Zoology in Color: Rudolf Leuckart

“It is not possible for man, as a thinking being, to close his mind to the knowledge that he is ruled by the same power as is the animal world.” –Rudolf Leuckart

“It is not possible for man, as a thinking being, to close his mind to the knowledge that he is ruled by the same power as is the animal world.” –Rudolf Leuckart

Physics Buzz Blog: Meteorite Markings Offer Clues to Their Past

Science Magazine: Beyond the “Mendel-Fisher Controversy”

Notches: “This is Your Pasty”: The Performance of Queer Domesticity in Small-Town Wisconsin

Embryo Project: Study of Fossilized Massospondylus Dinosaur Embryos from South Africa (1978–2012)

Audubon: John J. Audubon’s Birds of America: The life’s work of both a lover and observer of birds and nature

Plate 1 of Birds of America by John James Audubon depicting a wild turkey. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Plate 1 of Birds of America by John James Audubon depicting a wild turkey.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

U.S: Immigration and Customs Enforcement: ICE returns stolen Charles Darwin book

Road to Paris: A very short history of climate change research

Fistful of Cinctans: The Well Worn Paths of Natural History

Macroevolution: Orangutan-human hybrids?

MBL History Project: People of the Lab: Calvin Bridges

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 8 – Henry-Louis Le Chatelier

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 9 – Max von Laue

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 10 – Henry Cavendish

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The H-Word: The Greenwich longitude exhibition on tour

Adam Matthew: To Publish 500 Years of Unique Materials on the History of Printing, Publishing and Bookselling (Stationers’ Company Archives)

Smithsonian.com: How Not to Win a Nobel Prize

3 Quarks Daily: How did the Nobel Prize become the biggest award on earth?

Washington Post: What people in 1900 thought the year 2000 would look like

Air Canada enRoute: The World’s 14 Coolest New Museums

Shanghai Natural History Museum

Shanghai Natural History Museum

Independent: Paintings reveal what people in 19oo thought the year 2000 would look like

AHA Today: The Past for the Present: the New Mock Briefings Program and Reasons to Study History

Wynken de Worde: questions to ask when you learn of digitization projects

INKUNABULA: New Blog (German)

The Recipes Project: Exploring Six Degrees of Francis Bacon in Beta

Portrait of Francis Bacon, by Frans Pourbus (1617), Palace on the Water in Warsaw. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Francis Bacon, by Frans Pourbus (1617), Palace on the Water in Warsaw.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

#EnvHist Weekly

Science Museum: Clockmaker’s Museum

Scroll.in: The history of science has been West-centric for too long – it’s time to think global

University of Cambridge: Research: A world of science

151007historyofindianscience

Richard Carter: Bacon and X

Tincture of Museum: The Crime Museum Uncovered, Museum of London, October 2015

Somatosphere: Summer Roundup: Forums – Books & Films

Academia: Science in the Everyday World: Why Perspectives from the History of Science Matter

h-madness: How I Became a Historian of Psychiatry: Andrew Scull

Engaging Science, Technology, and Society: First Issue: Table of Contents

The Atlantic: 12 Historical Gems From One of the Best Time Capsules Online

ESOTERIC:

University of Cambridge: Digital Library: Chinese Oracle Bones

distillatio: Alchemy and Magic, are they related

Royal 6.E.vi, f. 396v. detail

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Science contra Copernicus

Graney001

sehepunkte: Audra J. Wolfe: Competing with the Soviets (German!)

Nature: Geology: The continental conundrum

NEW BOOKS:

Routledge: Ancient Botany

9780415311205

URSUS: World of Innovation: cartography in the time of Gerhard Mercator

Historiens de la santé: On Hysteria: The Invention of a Medical Category between 1670 & 1820

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Bletchley Park: Last Chance to see the Imitation Game, The Exhibition: Closes 1 November 2015

Alan Turing memorial statue in Sackville Park, Manchester. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alan Turing memorial statue in Sackville Park, Manchester.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Right Relevance: Gender and Representations of the Female Subject in Early Modern England

Musée d’Orsay: Splendours and Misery, Pictures of Prostitution, 1850–1910

Museum of the History of Science: ‘DEAR HARRY…’ – HENRY MOSELEY: A SCIENTIST LOST TO WAR Extended to 31 January 2016

Hunterian Glasgow: The Kangaroo and the Moose 2 October 2015–21 February 2016

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Closes 25 October 2015

Science Museum: Cosmos & Culture

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Etcetera Theatre: LHF: The Devil Without 13–18 October 2015

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph 51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Nicole Kidman as Rosalind Franklin Photograph: Johan Persson/Johan Persson Source: The Guardian

Nicole Kidman as Rosalind Franklin Photograph: Johan Persson/Johan Persson
Source: The Guardian

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Bodies Wanted – Anatomy and the Dissection Debate 4 November 2015

CHoM News: Celebrating 10 Years of the Archive for Women in Medicine 3 November 2015

Dittrick Museum: Lecture: Eye of the Artist 14 October 2015

Engraving of the eye in A Complete Physico-Medical and Churugical on the Human Eye and the Demonstration of Natural Vision (Degraver, 1780).

Engraving of the eye in A Complete Physico-Medical and Churugical on the Human Eye and the Demonstration of Natural Vision (Degraver, 1780).

CHoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine “Remorse Without Regret: Experimentalism, Consent, Apology, and the Affective Economies of Biomedicine” 15 October 2015

The Royal Society: The Big Draw – Seeing Closer 17 October 2015

Dr John Dee Mortlake Society: Events: AGM 13 October 2015

Open Culture: Watch Breaking the Code, About the Life & Times of Alan Turing (1996)

Wellcome Library: Talk: A history of health? Integrating food and drink into the history of medieval medicine 13 October 2015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Women and Medicine

Wellcome Library: Joseph Banks: Lincolnshire botanist 12 October 2015

Sir Joseph Banks, as painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1773 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sir Joseph Banks, as painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1773
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal Society: A new visible world: Robert Hooke’s Micrographia 17 October 2015

Museum of the History of Science Oxford: Too Valuable to Die? 13 October 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Don Shank: Laboratory Still Life 1

Don Shank: Laboratory Still Life 1

TELEVISION:

Indiewire: Can WGN America’s Stellar ‘Manhattan’ Finally Break Through?

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Turkey

Youtube: Invention of Radio – Reginald A. Fessenden Part 1

The Excavator: Bill Bailey on Alfred Russel Wallace

Youtube: Gresham College: Was the Great Plague of 1665 London’s Problem? – Professor Vanessa Harding

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Great Lives: Andrew Adonis on Joseph Bazalgette

BBC Radio 4: Natural History Heroes

BBC Radio 4: Natural Histories: Anemone

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy 3–6 June 2016

Anita Guerrini: Notes and Records – Essay Prize – deadline 31-01-16

University of Flensburg: 1st European IHPST Regional Conference: Science as Culture in the European Context: Historical, Philosophical, and Educational Perspectives 22–25 August 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality and Religion

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Christmas Meeting Birmingham 5 December 2015

St Anne’s College Oxford: CfP: Knowing Demons, Knowing Spirits – Scientiae 2016 5–7 July

University of Exeter: Online Store: One day workshop: Framing the Face: New perspectives on the history of facial hair Friends Meeting House London 28 November 2015

H–Material–Culture: CfP: American Material and Visual Culture in the “Long” Nineteenth Century

Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Oxford: Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology Michaelmas Term 2015

Cleveland.com: Dittrick Medical Museum to host series of ‘Conversations’ on hot-button medical topics

HSTM Network Ireland: Inaugural Conference Maynooth University 13-14 November 2015

University of Groningen: CfP: Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Religion and Science 21–23 March 2016

The Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe – Institute of the Leibniz Association Marburg: Entangled Science? Relocating German-Polish Scientific Relations 28–30 October 2015

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Lancaster: Culture, Society and Medicine Seminars

eä: Journal of Medical Humanities & Social Studies of Science & Technology CfP: Information for Authors

University of Lyon: Séminaire de l’Institut d’histoire de la médecine de Lyon Cycle 2015-2016

Rowan University, NJ: CfP: Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice Sixth Biennial Conference 17–19 June 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Stirling: Chair in Environmental History and Heritage

University of Harvard: History of Pre-Modern or Early Modern Science or Medicine Tenure Track

University of Hull: PhD Studentships in Visual Culture

British Library: AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships

Academic Jobs Wiki: History of Science, Technology, and Medicine 2015–2016

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: Wellcome Trust History of Medicine PhD Studentship: Health Systems in History: the case of Nigeria 1946–c. 2000

Telegraph Museum Porthcurno: Director

n the 19th century Porthcurno was connected to the rest of the world by submarine cables Source: Wikimedia Commons

n the 19th century Porthcurno was connected to the rest of the world by submarine cables
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Hertfordshire: PhD Studentship in Early Modern History

California Institute of Technology: Postdoctoral Instructor Position in Philosophy of Science

Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy: Postdoc

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #12

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #12

Monday 05 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

 Another week, another edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list, bringing you all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that could be scooped up from the distant reaches of cyberspace during the last seven days.

The week saw NASA announce that they had discovered mineral deposits on the surface of Mars that might have been made by flowing water. This announcement kicked off the expected hysteria of where there is water there will be life, as we know it. These reports set off alarm bells in my brain about Giovanni Schiaparelli, Percy Lowell and the canals of Mars.

1877 map of Mars by Giovanni Schiaparelli. Source: Wikimedia Commons

1877 map of Mars by Giovanni Schiaparelli.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Humanity has been obsessed with Mars and the possibility of there being Martians for a long time now and the NASA announcement didn’t just trigger memories in my brain and a number of people throughout the Internet wrote about the history of that obsession. So this edition of Whewell’s Gazette is dedicated to David Bowie’s famous musical question “Is there life on Mars?”

Martian channels depicted by Percival Lowell Source: Wikimedia Commons

Martian channels depicted by Percival Lowell
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 “This week in science: scientists broke the secret pact & talked about water on Mars, making the moon turn red. Now the great doom befalls us” – Ed Yong (@edyong209)

Mars

History Today: Roger Hennessy tells of a hundred years of investigation, imagination and speculation about live on Mars

Ptak Science Books: The Positively Enormous Skyscraper Plant Eyeballs of Mars, 1912

Source: via Chronicles of America series at the Library of Congress, here, and first seen via the interesting Pinterest collection of Trevor Owens, here. Ptak Science Books

Source: via Chronicles of America series at the Library of Congress, here, and first seen via the interesting Pinterest collection of Trevor Owens, here.
Ptak Science Books

The Conversation: NASA: streaks of salt on Mars mean flowing water, and raises new hopes of finding life

Popular Mechanics: A Short History of Martian Canals and Mars Fever

BibliOdyssey: Channelling Martian Maps

Source: BilbliOdyssey

Source: BilbliOdyssey

Scientific American: How Our View of Mars Has Changed from Lush Oasis to Arid Desert

News.com.au: My favourite Martian: behind the science is the story of why we love Mars

Not just little green men ... a scene from the Mars film John Carter.

Not just little green men … a scene from the Mars film John Carter.

“Water, water everywhere

Nor any drop to drink

‘Cause it was all saturated with perchlorate salts” – Rime of the Ancient Rover – Matthew R. Francis (@DrMRFrancis)

Quotes of the week:

“People say history is written by the winners, but actually history is written by historians, and most of them are losers”. – @The TweetOfGod

“’The ohm is where the art is’ is a brilliant title for an article” – Steven Gray (@Sjgray86)

“Everything’s connected, but some things are more connected than others”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“We need to figure out if Jonas Salk was on the spectrum. Only then can we definitely say whether autism cause vaccines” – @WardQNormal h/t @stevesilberman

“If you don’t feel guilty about using maps and satnavs, don’t feel guilty about using introductory philosophy books and study guides” – Nigel Warburton (@philosophybites)

“Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas.” – Albert Einstein

“Almost all really new ideas have a certain aspect of foolishness when they are first produced”. – A. N. Whitehead h/t @PeterSjostedtH

BEAUTY TIP: Read a book

EMPATHY TIP: Read a book

EDUCATION TIP: Read a book

LOVE TIP: Read a book

HEALTH TIP: Read a book – Matt Haig (@matthaig1)

Birth of the Week:

The Space Race Began 4 October 1957

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Leaping Robot: Apprehending the Artifact

Yovisto: The Sputnik Shock

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Princeton University Press: Keep Watching the Skies!: The Story of Operation Moonwatch and the Dawn of the Space Age

NASA: NASA’s First 5o Years Historical Perspectives

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Youtube: Omnicron & the Sputnik

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Agenda.ge: Ancient astronomy manuscripts published in Georgia

Physics Today: Information: From Maxwell’s demon to Landauer’s eraser

Fermi.lib.uchicago.edu: Letter from Fermi to Szilard re: use of carbon to slow chain reaction

NASA: Alouette 1

The Alouette 1 satellite Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Alouette 1 satellite
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Outside Prague: The Astronomical Clock

AIP: Nobels of the Past

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 1 – NASA

Science News: The amateur who helped Einstein see the light

With some help from Science News Letter (the precursor to Science News), a restaurant dishwasher named Rudi Mandl persuaded Einstein to explore the phenomenon of gravitational lensing.

With some help from Science News Letter (the precursor to Science News), a restaurant dishwasher named Rudi Mandl persuaded Einstein to explore the phenomenon of gravitational lensing.

Radio Ne Zealand News: Rare telescope’s crucial lens survives quake

AIP: Otto Frisch

NASA: Dr. Robert H. Goddard, American Rocketry Pioneer

NASA: NASA “Hacks”: The Real Stories

El País: Un cura dio la “más bella explicación de la Creación”, según Einstein

The Atlantic: Standing the Test of Time (and Space)

WGBH News: Meet America’s First Woman Astronomer: Maria Mitchell

Maria Mitchell's telescope, at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. Credit Dpbsmith / WGBH News

Maria Mitchell’s telescope, at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.
Credit Dpbsmith / WGBH News

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Mary Rockwell’s Interview

flickr: Project Apollo Archive

Sky & Telescope: Beyond the Printed Page: Soviet Stamps and Astronomy

Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings: Niels Henrik David Bohr

Museum Victoria Collections: Astrographic Catalogue

AIP: Happy Birthday Enrico Fermi

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: The Maps That Helped The Citizens of a ‘Locked Country’ See The World

Half of “Screens of the Four Continents and People in 48 Countries in the World,” by an unknown Edo-era Japanese painter. (All images: Kobe City Museum/Google Cultural Institute)

Half of “Screens of the Four Continents and People in 48 Countries in the World,” by an unknown Edo-era Japanese painter. (All images: Kobe City Museum/Google Cultural Institute)

D News: 1500-Year-Old Mosaic Map Found

Slate: A Bizarrely Complicated Late-19th-Century Flat-Earth Map

The Hakluyt Society Blog: Australia Circumnavigated: The Story of the HMS Investigator

The Shakespeare Blog: Mapping Shakespeare’s world

The Sheldon tapestry map of Worcestershire

The Sheldon tapestry map of Worcestershire

Halley’s Log: Back in the Thames

Halley’s Log: Halley’s third logbook

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

History Today: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson passed her medical exams on September 18th 1865

Thomas Morris: Speaking in tongues

From the Hands of Quacks: Can Vitamin B Cure Deafness

Smithsonian.com: The Nose Job Dates Back to the 6th Century B.C.

Wellcome Trust: A Brief History of Childbirth: Exploring the National Childbirth Trust Archives

Remedia: The Window Operation: Hope through Surgery

Cross-section of the inner ear, showing the ossicles–mallelus, incus, and stapes. Illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter for Henry Gray, “Anatomy of the Human Body ” (Philadelphia & New York: Lea & Febiger, 1918), plate 919.

Cross-section of the inner ear, showing the ossicles–mallelus, incus, and stapes. Illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter for Henry Gray, “Anatomy of the Human Body ” (Philadelphia & New York: Lea & Febiger, 1918), plate 919.

Medium: Scurvy Dogs

Embryo Project: The Pasteur Institute (1887– )

Public Domain Review: Kaishi Hen, an 18th Century Japanese anatomical atlas

Early Modern Medicine: Dog Danger

Thomas Morris: The child with Bonaparte in his eyes

Wellcome Collection: Hysteria

Gross Science: The Horrors of Ancient Cataract Surgery

tumblr_nv59naD4s61sxczrdo1_1280

Countway Library of Medicine: The Archives for Women in Medicine

Concocting History: Strong as a mountain

Forbes: Ancient Pompeiians Had Good Dental Health But Were Not Necessarily Vegetarians

This Intrepid Band: More Misdeeds of Military Nurses

Embryo Project: The Effects of Thalidomide on Embryonic Development

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: History of Midwifery

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 2 – Baruj Benacerraf

Science Museum: Brought to Life: Seishu Hanaoka (1760–1835)

Perspectives: The art of medicine: Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Body Snatcher

MBL History Project: “By living we learn.” Happy Birthday Sir Patrick Geddes!

Embryo Project: Marie Charlotte Stopes (1880–1958)

Marie Stopes in her laboratory, 1904 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Marie Stopes in her laboratory, 1904
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Thomas Morris: Electrical anaesthesia

Bustle: The Average Age Women Got Their First Period, Throughout History

Mosaic: How to mend a broken heart

Thomas Morris: The petrol cocktail: a cure for cholera

TECHNOLOGY:

Medievalists.net: Rapid Invention, Slow Industrialization, and the Absent Entrepreneur in Medieval China

Open Culture: The World’s Oldest Surviving Pair of Glasses (circa 1475)

Yale Books: Dirty Old London: 30 Days of Filth: Day 13 Deodorising and Flushing

Thomas Morris: Top Gear (steam edition)

Atlas Obscura: The Rise and Fall of the Cash Railway

Inside the Lamson ball, from a 1912 Lamson catalogue. (Image: Tony Wolf)

Inside the Lamson ball, from a 1912 Lamson catalogue. (Image: Tony Wolf)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 29 – Rudolf Diesel Mystery

Airminded: The oscillation of R33

Conciatore: The Art of Metals

Conciatore: The Blue Tower

Medium: Backchannel: How Steve Jobs Fleeced Carly Fiorina

Quartz: Not Enough for Goodenough: The man who brought us the lithium-ion battery at the age of 57 has an idea for a new one at 92

Yovisto: Tōkaidō Shinkansen – the Bullet Train

Tōkaidō Shinkansen passing tea fields between Shizuoka and Kakegawa

Tōkaidō Shinkansen passing tea fields between Shizuoka and Kakegawa

Yovisto: The Unfortunate Inventions of Charles Cros

IEEE Spectrum: When Engineers Had the Stars in Their Eyes

News Works: Sound it out: the (sometimes creepy) history of the talking machine

Slate: What Could Go Wrong?

Collectors Weekly: Rise of the Synthesizer: How an Electronics Whiz Kid Gave the 1980s Its Signature Sound

Paleofuture: Drunk Driving and The Pre-History of Breathalysers

BBC News: Drawings reveal Germans’ World War Two boobytrap bombs

One of Fish's drawings shows an Army mess tin adapted for nefarious purposes Picture: Anthony Thompson TWN

One of Fish’s drawings shows an Army mess tin adapted for nefarious purposes
Picture: Anthony Thompson TWN

BBC News: Dorman Long: The Teesside firm that bridged the world

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 31 – Joseph Wilson Swan

United States Patent and Trademark Office: A. C. Reid Handset Telephone

BBC News: The lost rivers that lie beneath London

Ian Visits: Unbuilt London: Straightening the River Thames

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Making Science Public: The pause

Ptak Science Books: Charting the Winds: a Superb Anemographic Chart from 1598

ChoM News: New Acquisitions: Rose E. Frisch Papers

Slate: The Great September Gale of 1815

TrowelBlazers: Lucy Allen: Curator and Librarian

Lucy Allen Smart, 1955. This photo is reproduced here under the Central Library Consortium's fair use policy; may not be used for commercial purposes without contacting copyright holder.

Lucy Allen Smart, 1955. This photo is reproduced here under the Central Library Consortium’s fair use policy; may not be used for commercial purposes without contacting copyright holder.

NYAM: Censoring Leonhart Fuchs: Examples from the New York Academy of Medicine

Notches: “A promiscuous class of females. All huddled together in a mass”: Sex and Food in the Nineteenth-Century American Metropolis

University of Cambridge Museums: The Next Big Leap at the Whipple

io9: Which Animals Did Nuclear Scientists Pick to Represent the Entire World?

Science League of America: Did Darwin Know “Acres of Diamonds”?

Circulating Now: A German Botanical Renaissance

Perspectives on History: An Environmental History of the Real Thing

The Guardian: Calling all palaeo bloggers! Do you ant to write for the Guardian science blog network

Forbes: How Geologists Determined The Way That Mountains Formed

The mountains around the Urnersee, from Scheuchzer´s “Helvetiae Stoicheiographia” published in 1716 (image in public domain).

The mountains around the Urnersee, from Scheuchzer´s “Helvetiae Stoicheiographia” published in 1716 (image in public domain).

Mommoth Tales: Mammoth in the News: Michigan Edition

Scientific American: Tetrapod Zoology: Piltdown Man and the Dualist Contention

Wired: The Battle Over Genome Editing Gets Science All Wrong

The Leakey Foundation: Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey

Science Insider: Q&A: Francis Crick’s granddaughter on her genomic sculpture

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 28 – Henri Moissan

News Work: A Nobel Prize for noble gasses

William Ramsay in 1904 (Munn & Co./Appleton's Magazine)

William Ramsay in 1904 (Munn & Co./Appleton’s Magazine)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 4 – Mole

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

History Matters: Voices from 1915: Public Engagement with the First World War

New HSS: Sleep Laboratories, Psychiatry in Penguin Books, & More

Mersenne: Heroic Journeys? Networks of women scientists in the late nineteenth and twentieth century: Conference Report

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Penny Universities

Coffeehouse in London, 17th century Source: Wikimedia Commons

Coffeehouse in London, 17th century
Source: Wikimedia Commons

ChoM News: Archivist attends “Women in Biotech” symposium at Radcliffe Institute

Chronologia Universalis: A Moment of Wonder: Overlapping Networks

Chronologia Universalis: Pervolvi totum librum…

JCOM: Ships, Clocks and Stars: The Quest for Impact

Deathplanation: Publishing with Integrity (Whilst Still Having Career Options)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Political correctness and the history of science

The Conversation: Jesuits as science missionaries for the Catholic Church

BBC Culture: The places the world forgot (includes several #histSTM sites)

Flanders and Brabant power station, Belgium Source: BBC

Flanders and Brabant power station, Belgium
Source: BBC

The Recipes Project: The Digital Humanities Turn

THE: What it’s like to work with the academic greats

MHS Oxford: Newsletter – October 2015

The Harvard Crimson: Gathering the Galleries

Medieval Books: The Incredible Expandable Book

Wired: The Nobel Committee Hasn’t Always Picked the Right Winners

THE: Progressive Science Institute challenges researcher ‘bias’

Nautilus: Why Science Needs Metaphysics

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Alchemy of Plants

Compasswallah: Annie Besant: The Occult Freedom Fighter

Annie Besant Source: Wikimedia Commons

Annie Besant
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Academia: Physics in the Twelfth Century: The Porta Elementorum of Pseudo-Avicenna’s Alchemical De Anima and Marius’ De Elementis

Sociatas Magia: A Medieval Charm with Music

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Space Review: A Sky Wonderful with Stars: 50 Years of Modern Astronomy on Maunakea

Thinking Like a Mountain: Food, Inc: Mendel to Monsanto – The Promises and Perils of the Biotech Harvest

Public Domain Review: Bad Air: Pollution, Sin, and Science Fiction in William Delisle Hay’s The Doom of the Great City (1880)

Front cover of Hay’s The Doom of the Great City Source: The British Library

Front cover of Hay’s The Doom of the Great City
Source: The British Library

The New York Times: Sunday Book Review: ‘The Invention of Nature,’ by Andrea Wulf

Dissertation Reviews: Chemistry in Imperial and Weimar Germany

Geographical: Alfred Russel Wallace; Letters from the Malay Archipelago OUP

The Dispersal of Darwin: Darwin on Evolution: Words of Wisdom from the Father of Evolution  

Popular Science: 13.8: the quest to find the true age of the universe and the theory of everything John Gribbin

Los Angeles Review of Books: Paula Findlen on Galileo’s Telescope: A European Story

Archives of Natural History: Benton, Ted: Alfred Russel Wallace: explorer, evolutionist, public intellectual – a thinker for our own times?

Science News: Centennial books illuminate Einstein’s greatest triumph

NEW BOOKS:

Vrin: Psychologie et psychologisme

Enfilade: Scenes of Projection: Recasting the Enlightenment Subject

image-3

Historiens de la santé: Bretonneau: Correspondance d’un médicine

NCSE: The Story of Life in 25 Fossils

Emotions Blog: History in British Tears

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Nature: Space Travel: When Soviets ruled the great beyond

MHS Oxford: ‘Dear harry…’ – Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Extended till 31 January 2016

CHF: Science at Play On view through September 2 2016

Skil-Craft No. 430 Microscope Chemistry Lab, ca. 1955. CHF Collections. Photo by Gregory Tobias.

Skil-Craft No. 430 Microscope Chemistry Lab, ca. 1955. CHF Collections. Photo by Gregory Tobias.

Massachusetts Historical Society: Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Closes 25 October 2015

Hunterian Glasgow: The Kangaroo and the Moose 2 October 2015–21 February 2016

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph 51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Etcetera Theatre: LHF: The Devil Without 13–18 October 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Wellcome Collection: ‘The Thing is …Beards!’ 15th October 2015

World Health Organization Global Health Histories: Webinar: Ebolar: exploring the cultural contexts of an epidemic 8 October 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Plague takeover 21 November 2015

Royal Society: Cells: from Robert Hooke to Cell Therapy – a 350 year journey 5_6 October 2015

Royal Astronomical Society: Fred Hoyle Birth Centennial – his remarkable career and the impact of his science 9 October 2015

A statue of Fred Hoyle at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge Source: Wikimedia Commons

A statue of Fred Hoyle at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Providence Public Library: Exploring the Eye of History: NEA Symposium on 19th Century Photography 7 November 2015

Dittrick Museum: Lecture: The Eye as Art: Anatomy and Vision in the 18th Century 14 October 2015

CHoM News: Celebrating 10 Years of the Archive for Women in Medicine 7 November 2015

Musée Claude Bernard: Colloque: Claude Bernard et le diabète 10 Octobre 015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour One for the Road!

Museum of the History of Science: Sacrifice of a Genius Tonight!

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Joaquin Sorolla 1863- 1923 Doctors Laboratory, an investigation, Oil on canvas

Joaquin Sorolla 1863- 1923 Doctors Laboratory, an investigation, Oil on canvas

TELEVISION:

BBC 2: Bletchley Park: Code-breaking’s Forgotten Genius

Gordon Welchman Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gordon Welchman
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: “Manhattan” Season One Recaps

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Museo Galileo: Eudoxus’s system

Youtube: Royal Society: Science stories – Small

Youtube: Interview with J. Robert Oppenheimer

Youtube: The Royal Institution: Quantum Physics and Universal Beauty – with Frank Wilczek

Youtube: Polio Hero Frank Shimada

Youtube: Gilbert White: The Nature Man (2006) May Vision International

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Natural History Heroes

PODCASTS:

The Diane Rehm Show: Andrea Wulf: “The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies: Symposium: Early Modern Journeys: Practice and Everyday Experiences of Travel, 1450–1800 15-16 October 2015

University of Leeds: Centre for HPS: HPS Seminars, Semester 1, 2015-2016

Harnack House Berlin: The 100th anniversary of Einstein’s field equations 30 November–2 December 2015

ChoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine: Madness and Mayhem in Maine: The Parkman-Portland Parley and a Mass Murder 12 November 2015

ChoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine: War and Human Nature in Modern America 17 December 2015

ChoM News: Studying Traumatic Wounds and Infectious Diseases in the Civil War Hospitals: The Medical Photography of the American Civil War 19 November 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: ISCHE 38 Education and the Body

University of Kent: CfP: Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts 7-10 July 2016

IHPST: 1st Regional IHPST Conference: Science as Culture in the European Context: Historical, Philosophical, and Educational Perspectives Flensburg Germany 22–25 August 2015

Oxford Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine, and technology: Michaelmas Term 2015

HSS: THATCamp: The History of Science Society hosts its second annual THATCamp on November 19 2015 San Francisco

The Haluyt Society: Conference: Maritime Trade, Travel and Cultural Encounter in the 18th and 19th Centuries 13–14 November 2015

University of Birmingham: History of Medicine and Health Seminars

UCL STS: Seminar Series

University of Vienna: CfP: Claiming authority, producing standards: The IAEA and the history of radiation protection 3–4 June 2016

Maynooth University: HSTM Network Ireland Inaugral Conference 13–14 November 2015

Birkbeck College University of London: CfP: After the End of Disease 26–27 May 2016

University of Edinburgh: CfP: Eighteenth–Century Research Seminars Series 2016

University of London: School of Advance Study EMPHASIS Seminar: Amateurs and Authorship: Oronce Fine’s Projection of a Republic of Mathematics 17 October 2015

Oronce Fine Source: Wikimedia Commons

Oronce Fine
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Res Philosophica: CfP: Res Philosophica Essay Prize: Philosophy of Disability

The Warburg Institute: Colloquia 2015–2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Huddersfield: Research Assistant in History of Health or Medicine

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Awards in the Science Museums and Archives Consortium (SMAC) from October 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Fully Funded PhD Studentship – Science and Religion in Society

Ohio State University Department of History: Assistant or Associate Professor in Environmental History and Sustainability

University of Harvard: Tenure–track Assistant Professor History of Pre-Modern or Early Modern Science or Medicine

University of Groningen: Netherlands Research School for Medieval Studies: 4 PhD Positions: Communication and Exploitation of Knowledge in the Middle Ages

Oxford Brookes University: PhD Studentships

University of Copenhagen: Professor of History and Philosophy of Science

Think Oxford: Over 1000 Scholarships

University of London: Research fellowships in cultural and intellectual history

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year, 2 Vol: #11

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #11

Monday 28 September 2015

EDITORIAL:

The world didn’t end on Sunday night so we are back again with your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette, bringing you all that could be culled from cyberspace on the histories of science technology and medicine during the last seven days.

The reference to the end of the world is of course to Sundays so-called Super-Blood-Moon or to put it somewhat less sensationally and more scientifically the simultaneous occurrence of the moon at perigee in its elliptical orbit around the earth and a lunar eclipse caused by the earth passing between the moon and the sun.

Super Blood Moon

Super Blood Moon

This double astronomical phenomenon illustrates two important developments in the long history of astronomy. The astronomers of Babylon were the first to realise that lunar eclipses follow a predictable arithmetical pattern and were thus able, using an algebraic algorithm, to predict the occurrence of this particular astronomical phenomenon. It would appear that the ancient Greeks were the first to realise that eclipses are the result of the earth casting its shadow onto the moon when both of them and the sun were in the right alignment.

The world would have to wait almost another couple of thousand years before the young English astronomer Jeremiah Horrocks demonstrated in the seventeenth century that the moon also obeyed Kepler’s laws of planetary motion in its orbit around the earth, that is an elliptical orbit with the earth at one focus of the ellipse, thus processing a furthest point, apogee, and a nearest point, perigee, in its orbit.

Put these historical astronomical discoveries together and you have the correct scientific explanation of Sunday’s Super-Blood-Moon. The next one is in 2033 so don’t forget to set the alarm clock.

Quotes of the week:

“It’s time to say it again: I am an atheist but Richard Dawkins does not speak for me”. – Karen James (@kejames)

“Autocorrect just changed Winton Prize into Wino Prize! In vino veritas?” – Thony Christie (@rmathematicus)

“Ultimately the one goal appointed to science may be not to comprehend the nature of things, but to comprehend that it is incomprehensible.” – Emil du Bois-Reymond

“Young men should prove theorems, old men should write books.” – G. H. Hardy h/t @AnalysisFact

“There’s a guy in this coffee shop sitting at a table, not on his phone, not on a laptop, just drinking coffee, like a psychopath”. – Jason Gay (@jasongay)

“There is no branch of mathematics, however abstract, which may not someday be applied to the phenomena of the real world.” – Lobachevsky

“the natural scientist is the man [sic] to decide about wombats and unicorns.”—W. V. O. Quine h/t @GuyLongworth

The Old English word for ‘equinox’ is ’emniht’ (from efen + niht ‘even nights’); so today is the ‘hærfestlice emniht’, autumnal equinox.

After the equinox, as Byrhtferth of Ramsey says, ‘langað seo niht and wanað se dæg’ (the night lengthens and the day wanes). – Eleanor Parker (@ClerkofOxford)

“Occupy yourselves with the study of mathematics. It is the best remedy against the lusts of the flesh.” – Thomas Mann h/t @intmath

“Note to self- if you dig up graves you’re a criminal and creep but if you wait long enough you’re an archaeologist”. – Trver Noah (@Trevornoah)

“And when you read other people’s diaries and mail, you’re a historian”. – Adam Shapiro (@TryingBiology)

How, great,

to, be, a, comma,

and, separate,

one, word, fromma,

nother. – Brian Bilston (@brian_bilston)

“History just burps, and we taste again the raw-onion sandwich it swallowed centuries ago.” – Julian Barnes h/t (@jondresner)

Talk

Birthday of the Week:

Michael Faraday born 22 September 1791

 

Michael Faraday delivering a Christmas Lecture at the Royal Institution in 1856. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Michael Faraday delivering a Christmas Lecture at the Royal Institution in 1856.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: A Life of Discoveries – the Great Michael Faraday

Brain Pickings: Michael Faraday on Mental Discipline and How to Cure Our Propensity for Self-Deception

Mental Floss: 10 Electrifying Facts for Michael Faraday’s Birthday

Portrait of Faraday in his late thirties Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Faraday in his late thirties
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Skulls in the Stars: A Cornucopia of Faraday Posts!

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 21 – Donald Arthur

KAUST Museum: Explore the Museum > Astronomy and Navigation

Palamar Observatory: Searching the Sky for Dangerous Neighbors: Eleanor Helin and the 18-inch Telescope

Dr. Helin holding the discovery image for asteroid Ra-Shalom, circa 1979. (Helin Family Estate)

Dr. Helin holding the discovery image for asteroid Ra-Shalom, circa 1979. (Helin Family Estate)

The Guardian: Building the Bomb (Multimedia)

Listverse: 10 Incredible Astronomical Instruments That Existed Before Galileo

Yovisto: Hippolyte Fizeau and the Speed of Light

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 23 – Neptune

The Asian Age: Relativity & comedy of errors

JSTOR Daily: Los Alamos had a Secret Library

Academia: Origins of the “Western” Constellations

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: From Augsburg to the Moon: Johann Matthias Hase

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Reaching for the stars

Dürer's Star Map: Northern Hemisphere Source: Ian Ridpath’s Star Tales

Dürer’s Star Map: Northern Hemisphere
Source: Ian Ridpath’s Star Tales

Nature: Archimedes’ legendary sphere brought to life

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Jane Yantis’s Interview

The Local: The German astronomer who found Neptune

Waffles at Noon: Classic Urban Legend: NASA Space Pen

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Crain’s. How the New York Public Library digitizes its vast map collection

PC Mag: 5 Digital Mapping Projects That Visualize History

The Public Domain Review: Amundsen’s South Pole expedition

6504419625_c5a71cd002_o

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Remedia: Surgical Devices and Placebo Testing – A Rehearsal

Thomas Morris: Roger ‘two urinals’ Clerk

Center for the History of Medicine: Dawes, Lydia M. Gibson papers, 1926–1959

Yovisto: David Vetter, the Bubble Boy

The Atlantic: The ‘Noble Savage’ Diet

The Sloane Letters Blog: A Friend in Need is a Friend Indeed

Embryo Project: Diethylstilbestrol (DES) in the USA

Ptak Science Books: A Mechanical Night Nurse, 1869

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

Nursing Clio: Placentophagy Isn’t New, But It Has Changed

Autistica: The Lessons of Autism Research

The Public Domain Review: Gynecological Gymnastics from Outer Space (1895)

Vox: 7 Terrifying medical “treatments” that never caught on

Thomas Morris: A fatal nose job

Yovisto: Typhoid Mary

Typhoid Mary in a 1909 newspaper illustration

Typhoid Mary in a 1909 newspaper illustration

The Public Domain Review: A Treatise on Adulteration of Food and Culinary Poisons (1820)

Advances in the History of Psychology: Hall’s developmental theory and Haeckel’s recapitulationism

Atlas Obscura: How a Fake Typhus Epidemic Saved a Polish City from the Nazis

Chom News: Priscilla A. Schaffer Papers Now Open

PBS Newshour: Celebrating the life of Alice Hamilton, founding mother of occupational medicine

Thomas Morris: Heal thyself

Conciatore: Top Physician

Center for the History of Medicine: Oral history interview with Margaret Brenman-Gibson

Thomas Morris: The perils of toast

From the hands of quacks: Dieting Deafness Away

ph.ucla.edu: On the Inhalation of the Vapour of Ether in Surgical Operations, 1847 (pdf)

Branch: Matthew Rowlinson, “On the First Medical Blood Transfusion Between Human Subjects 1818”

TECHNOLOGY:

The Verge: Museum of telephones burned to ground in California wildfire

The Guardian: A long history of toilets in Ukraine museum

Yovisto: What a Brick! – The World’s First Cell Phone

Ptak Science Books: The Straight Line Series: Looking Straight Through a Vickers Gun Sight, 1916

Medievalists.net: How to Make Ink in the Middle Ages

Pocket Change: The World’s Oldest Surviving Paper Money

The National Museum of American History: American Watch Company Prototype

Pocket watch. ME*334625.

Pocket watch. ME*334625.

Smithsonian.com: The History of the Bar Code

Yovisto: William F. Friedman and the Art of Cryptology

Atlas Obscura: Vacuum Cleaner Museum and Factory Outlet

Open Culture: How French Artists in 1899 Envisioned Life in the Year 2000: Drawing the Future

Conciatore: Stonework

Medievalists.net: Renaissance Robotics: Leonardo da Vinci’s Lost Knight and Enlivened Materiality

Model of Leonardo’s robot with inner workings, as displayed in Berlin. Photo by Erik Möller

Model of Leonardo’s robot with inner workings, as displayed in Berlin. Photo by Erik Möller

Medievalists.net: Friction and Lubrication in Medieval Europe: The Emergence of Olive Oil as a Superior Agent

Smithsonian.com: Can You Guess the Invention Based on These Patent Illustrations?

distillatio: Making blue and green ink

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

BBC: The man who bought Stonehenge – and then gave it away

Embryo Project: Dizhou Tong (1902–1979)

Notches: Tempests and Teapots: Sexual Politics and Tea-Drinking in the Early Modern World

Yovisto: Peter Simon Pallas – A Pioneer in Zoography

Embryo Project: Paul Kammerer (1880–1926)

Embryo Project: The Inheritence of Acquired Characteristics (1924) by Paul Kammerer

Scientific American: Rosetta Stones: Darwin’s Encounter with a Chilean Earthquake

TrowelBlazers: Patty Jo Watson

Patty Jo Watson Image used with permission from the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA).

Patty Jo Watson
Image used with permission from the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA).

Leaping Robot: DNA…From Blueprint to Brick

Science League of America: Dixon, Not Darwin

arXiv: Exploration and Exploitation of Victorian Science in Darwin’s Reading Notebooks

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 25 – Thomas Hunt Morgan

Embryo Project: Thomas Hunt Morgan’s Definition of Regeneration: Morphallaxis and Epimorphosis

BuzzFeed: Inside the Natural History Museum’s Wonderfully Creepy Room of Things in Jars

Hayley Campbell / BuzzFeed

Hayley Campbell / BuzzFeed

The Molecular Ecologist: Measuring dispersal rate in Neotropical fishes in units of ‘wallace’

MBL History Project: People of the Lab: Happy Birthday Ivan Pavlov!

Ivan Pavlov (Image MBL History Project)

Ivan Pavlov
(Image MBL History Project)

Open Democracy: Bacteriology as conspiracy

Open Democracy: It’s the failure to admit failure that fuels conspiracy theories

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: James Dewar and the Liquefaction of Gases

Sir James Dewar (1842-1923)

Sir James Dewar (1842-1923)

Conciatore: Lixivitation

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 22 – Frederick Soddy

Academia: The Death of the Sensuous Chemist: The ‘New’ Chemistry and the Transformation of Sensuous Technology (pdf)

The Chymistry of Isaac Newton: Experiments in Mineral Acids

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 27 – Adolph Wilhelm Hermann Kolbe

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Alun Salt: I clearly don’t understand what an academic review is for

The History Woman’s Blog: Redefining the independent scholar

Thomas Morris: The bird and the bees

teleskopos: What are science museums for?

Social History: New Blog Site

Theos: So, what is science and what is religion and why do you think they clash?

Conciatore: Art and Science

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518, fanciful glass vessels, ink and watercolor on paper.

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518, fanciful glass vessels,
ink and watercolor on paper.

American Science: Announcing the Thomas Kuhn’s “Structure of Scientific Revolutions” Comparison Watch!

Forbes: From Steve Jobs to Oliver Sacks : 12 Scientists and Techies Who Tinkered as Kids

Taming the American Idol: Taylor’s World Pt. 1: Training in Frederick Winslow Taylor’s Social Networks

The Recipes Project: What Recipes Can Teach Us About Reading

Scientific American: Symbiartic: A Science Illustrator’s Legacy

Illustration of Pliciloricus enigmatus by Carolyn Gast, National Museum of Natural History. From a condensed Smithsonian report, New Loricifera from Southeastern United States Coastal Waters

Illustration of Pliciloricus enigmatus by Carolyn Gast, National Museum of Natural History. From a condensed Smithsonian report, New Loricifera from Southeastern United States Coastal Waters

The #EnvHist Weekly

Open Culture: The History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps Podcast, Now at 239 Episodes, Expands into Eastern Philosophy

Nautilus: Five Veteran Scientists Tell Us What Most Surprised Them

ESOTERIC:                      

BOOK REVIEWS:

History Today: Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War

planck

Some Beans: The Value of Precision edited by M. Norton Wise

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on the History of Medicine

Literary Hub: The Invention of Nature

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: The Last Children’s Plague: Poliomyelitis, Disability, and Twentieth-Century American Culture

51VsFfox-IL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_

Historiens de la santé: Femme Médecin en Algérie – Journal de Dorothée Chellier (1895–1899)

NCSE: The Story of Life in 25 Fossils

ART & EXHIBITIONS

National Museum Cardiff: Reading the Rocks: the Remarkable Maps of William Smith

William Smith

William Smith

Museum Boerhaave: Einstein & Friends 19 September 2015–3 January 2016

Slice: The Stars Align at OU for Galileo’s World

ars technica: Science Museum’s Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age reviewed

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Till 25 October 2015

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh: Surgeons Hall Museum: Casualties

The Hunterian: The Kangaroo and the Moose 1 October 2015–21 February 2016

George Stubbs, The Kongouro from New Holland, 1772 © National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London

George Stubbs, The Kongouro from New Holland, 1772 © National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London

 THEATRE AND OPERA:

Berkeley City Club: Ada and the Memory Machine 17 October–22 November 2015

Noël Coward Theatre: Photograph 51 Till 21 November 2015

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA Source: Wikimedia Commons

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal Opera House: Raven Girl/Connectome

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Bodleian: Ada Lovelace: Celebrating 200 years of a computer visionary 9–10 December 2015

Center for the History of Medicine: Celebrating 10 Years of the Archive for Women in Medicine 3 November 2015

Wellcome Collection: Fred Sanger Lecture: Angely Creager “EAT.DIE.” The Domestication of Carcinogens in the 1980s 4 November 2015

CHF: Brown Bag Lecture: “Making Money Circulate: Chemistry and ‘Governance’ in the Career of Coins in the Early 19th-century Dutch Empire”

Knight Science Journalism at MIT: Book Night Talk with Victor McElheny: Watson and DNA: Making a Scientific Revolution 1 October 2015

Victor McElheny Founding director of the Knight Science Journalism Fellowships at MIT

Victor McElheny
Founding director of the Knight Science Journalism Fellowships at MIT

Wellcome Library: A celebration of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and 150 years of medicine 29 September 2015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: The Making of Thoroughly Modern Medicine

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: Brain Fag

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Newton Investigating Light from The Illustrated London News, June 4, 1870

Newton Investigating Light from The Illustrated London News, June 4, 1870

TELEVISION:

Radio Times: Cosmonauts: How Russia Won the Space Race

BBC Four: Cosmonauts: How Russia Won the Space Race

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

The Public Domain Review: Gertie The Dinosaur (1914)

Center for the History of Medicine: Oral history interview with Pricilla Schaffer

Youtube: Alfred Wegener: Science, Exploration, and the Theory of Continental Drift: Book Trailer

Youtube: Albert Einstein (Stock footage/archival footage)

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Natural History Heroes: Alfred Russel Wallace

BBC Radio 4: Book of the Week: The White Road

BBC Radio 4: Inside Science: Hiroshima radiation, Anthropocene, Bonobo noises, Physicist Henry Moseley

BBC Radio 4: Computing Britain

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Perpetual Motion

BBC Radio 3: Pohl Omniskop X-Ray Machine

PODCASTS:

The Guardian: Why is the scientific revolution still controversial?

Jefferson Public Radio: DNA Decoded: “Life’s Greatest Secret”

Little Atoms: Matthew Cobb & Alex Bellos

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

The Warburg Institute: Rethinking Allegory 30 October 2015

University of Paderborn: International Workshop: Emilie du Châtelet – Laws of Nature/Laws of Morals 23-24 October 2015

Émilie du Châtelet Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour Source: Wikimedia Commons

Émilie du Châtelet Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour
Source: Wikimedia Commons

IUHMSP: Lausanne: Thérapies dissonantes 30 October 2015

CHoM News: 2015 Fall Event Calendar

Royal Historical Society: Maritime History and Cultural Seminar Series 2015–16

University of Munich: Perspectives for the History of Life Sciences 30 October–1 November 2015

CHoSTM: Working Groups: Physical Sciences: Upcoming Meetings

HSTM Network Ireland: Inaugural Conference Maynooth University 13-14 November 2015

All Souls College, Oxford: Conference: Charles Hutton (1737–1823): being mathematical in the Georgian Period 17–18 December 2015

Charles Hutton Source: Wikimedia Commons

Charles Hutton
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of London: Institute of Historical Research: History of Libraries Research Seminars

University of Leeds: CfP: Communication, Correspondence and Transmission in the Early Modern World 12–13 May 2016

University of Edinburgh: CfP: Sixth Integrated History and Philosophy of Science conference (&HPS6) 35 June 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

The Beckman Center for the History of Chemistry at the Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF), an independent research library in Philadelphia, PA: Beckman Fellowships in #histSTM

UCL STS: Part Time Teaching Fellow in STS

Michigan State University: Assistant Professor Philosophy of Science

The German Historical Institute Washington DC: 5 Doctoral Fellowships in the History of Knowledge, Race & Ethnicity, Religion & Religiosity, Family & Kinship, and Migrant Knowledge.

University of Alicante: DOCTORADO EN ESTUDIOS HISTÓRICOS Y SOCIALES SOBRE CIENCIA, MEDICINA Y COMUN

University Miguel Hernández: Programa de Doctorado en Estudios Históricos y Sociales sobre Ciencia, Medicina y Comunicación Cient

University of Valencia: Programa de Doctorado en Estudios Históricos y Sociales sobre Ciencia, Medicina y Comunicación Científica

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #10

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #10

Monday 21 September 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days have slipped by and once again it’s time for Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list bringing its eager readers the best from the last seven days of the histories of science, technology and medicine swept up from the distance corners of cyberspace for their perusal and delectation.

The history of science theatre event of the year is without any doubt Nicole Kidman making a rare appearance on the London stage as Rosalind Franklin in “Photograph 51”. Unfortunately the play, which is not new, perpetuates a major history of science myth in its very title. The myth says that Maurice Wilkins showed Franklin’s x-ray crystallography photograph 51 of DNA to James Watson without her permission and he was able to solve the structure of DNA upon seeing it.

As Matthew Cobb has clearly shown in his new book Life’s Great Secret nearly everything in this story is false. Photograph 51 was not made by Franklin but by Raymond Gosling who had been Wilkins’ doctoral student, was then transferred to Franklin and then back to Wilkins’ as Franklin decided to leave the King’s College laboratory. At the time Wilkins showed the photo to Watson he was Gosling’s doctoral supervisor and so was perfectly entitled to do so, although whether he was wise to do so is another question. More important despite the claims he made in his book, The Double Helix, Watson would not have been able to determine the structure of DNA from this photo.

More interestingly it was Crick who actually derived the structure of DNA using, amongst other things, data from Franklin’s work that she herself had made public in a lecture that Crick attended.

It is interesting to see how the critics reacted to this new historical information. In her review in the Telegraph Kate Mulcahy claims that “The debate rages on” whilst at the same time linking to Cobb’s earlier Guardian article laying out the true facts; in my opinion more than somewhat disingenuous. In his excellent review in the Guardian, Stephen Curry points out that “the real story is…more complex” (with reference to the use of Photograph 51) whilst linking in a footnote to the Cobb article with the comment. Matthew Cobb’s recent article gives an efficient summary of the facts of the matter”.

Whatever it would appear from the review that the piece is well worth going to see.

Noël Coward Theatre: Photograph 51 Till 21 November 2015

Nicole Kidman as Rosalind Franklin Photograph: Johan Persson/Johan Persson Source: The Guardian

Nicole Kidman as Rosalind Franklin Photograph: Johan Persson/Johan Persson
Source: The Guardian

The New York Times: In ‘Photograph 51’, Nicole Kidman Is a Steely DNA Scientist

The Telegraph: Rosalind Franklin should be a feminist icon – we women in science need her more than ever

The Guardian: Photograph 51: how do you bring science to the stage?

New Scientist: Photograph 51: Inside the race to understand DNA

Quotes of the week:

“Genius and science have burst the limits of space, and few observations, explained by just reasoning, have unveiled the mechanism of the universe. Would it not also be glorious for men to burst the limits of time, and, by a few observations, to ascertain the history of this world, and the series of events which preceded the birth of the human race?” – Georges Cuvier h/t @hist_astro

“Every book is the wreck of a perfect idea.” – Iris Murdoch h/t @askpang

“In the UK we call them lifts but in the US they call them elevators, because we’re raised differently”. – Moose Allain (@MooseAllain)

“Does anyone know what the smallest number is that can’t be described in a single tweet?” – Guy Longworth (@GuyLongworth)

Ding dong dell

Pussy’s in the well

Who put her in?

Schrödinger, Erwin

What is her state?

Indeterminate – Matthew Hankins (@mc_hankins)

He was very careful during bondage sessions. He always used a safe word that contained upper and lower case letters and at least one number. – @50Nerds of Grey

[History] does not use induction or deduction, it does not demonstrate, it narrates. —Collingwood discussing Croce. h/t @gabridli

Birthday of the Week:

John Goodricke born 17 September 1764

 goodricke_john1

Yovisto: John Goodricke and the Variable Star Persei

teleskopos: Sights and sounds: darkness and silence

Alexander von Humboldt born 14 September 1769

Portrait of Alexander von Humboldt by Friedrich Georg Weitsch, 1806 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Alexander von Humboldt by Friedrich Georg Weitsch, 1806
Source: Wikimedia Commons

New Scientist: The Invention of Nature finds science’s lost hero

National Geographic: Why Is the Man Who Predicted Climate Change Forgotten?

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Inside the Science Museum: Russia’s 19th century cosmic pioneers

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 14 – Charles François de Cisternay du Fay

Charles François de Cisternay du Fay Source: Wikimedia Commons

Charles François de Cisternay du Fay
Source: Wikimedia Commons

arXiv: 100 Years of General Relativity (pdf)

Scientific American: Guest Blog: Paris: City of lights and cosmic rays

AIP: Murray Gell-Mann

New Science Theory: William Gilbert On The Magnet (Full text English New Translation)

Forbes: New Evidence The Nazis Didn’t Come close to the Bomb

Starts with a Bang: Maxwell’s Unification Revolution

World Digital Library: Explanation of the Telescope

journals.cambridge.org: Connecting Heaven and Man: The role of astronomy in ancient Chinese society and culture

The Timaru Herald: Big telescope with an even bigger history to be restored in Fairlie

The historic Brashear telescope will be the centrepiece of the new Astronomy Centre built by Earth and Sky near the shore of Lake Tekapo. Source: The Timaru Herald

The historic Brashear telescope will be the centrepiece of the new Astronomy Centre built by Earth and Sky near the shore of Lake Tekapo.
Source: The Timaru Herald

In the Dark: A Botanic Garden of Planets

guff: Einstein’s Amazing Scientific Contemporaries That Changed the World

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

BuzzFeed News: The Wreck of HMS Erebus: How a Landmark Discovery Triggered a Fight for Canada’s History

Scientific Data: Roads and cities of 18th century France

PBA Galleries: The Warren Heckrotte Collection of Rare Cartography

Miguel Costansó’s Carta Reducida Del Oceano Asiatico, Ó Mar Del Sur - See more at: http://www.pbagalleries.com/content/2015/09/14/the-warren-heckrotte-collection-of-rare-cartography/#sthash.KgAcxIEl.dpuf

Miguel Costansó’s Carta Reducida Del Oceano Asiatico, Ó Mar Del Sur – See more at: http://www.pbagalleries.com/content/2015/09/14/the-warren-heckrotte-collection-of-rare-cartography/#sthash.KgAcxIEl.dpuf

globes.consciencebibliotek.be: Erfgoed Antwerpen, Blaeu Globes

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Dr Alun Withey: Medicine in a Vacuum – Practitioners in Early Modern Wales

Yovisto: William Budd and the Infectious Diseases

storify: Things I’m going to miss teaching my medical students

Embryo Project: Margaret Higgins Sanger (1879–1966)

Margaret Sanger in 1922 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Margaret Sanger in 1922
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Center for the History of Medicine: Barbara Barlow

Morbid Anatomy Museum: Anatomical Atlases Digitized

19th Century-Disability Cultures and Contexts: Talking Gloves

Thomas Morris: The supernumerary leg

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 17 – Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne du Boulogne

Thomas Morris: Give that man a medal

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow Surgical Instrument Makers

Newman’s cytoscope for examination of the bladder by John Trotter Ltd.

Newman’s cytoscope for examination of the bladder by John Trotter Ltd.

Thomas Morris: Nutmeg is the best spice for students

The Harvard Crimson: Harvard Field Hospital Unit Active in England

Academia: Typhoid Fever and Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, 1891

Remedia: Gossip, News and Manners: the Barber-Surgeon in 16th Century Italy

Thomas Morris: The mystery of the poisonous cheese

The Medicine Chest: Mapping histories of medicine

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: The Discovery of Glass

English Heritage: 5 Clocks Which Tell the Story of Time

The Grandfather Clock at Mount Grace Priory Source: English Heritage

The Grandfather Clock at Mount Grace Priory
Source: English Heritage

Capitalism’s Cradle: How many industrial Revolutions?

Teyler’s Museum: Dompelbatterij

99% Invisible: Episode 180: Reefer Madness

Yovisto: Happy Birthday Linux

Tux the penguin, mascot of Linux Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tux the penguin, mascot of Linux
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Contributor: Decoding Alan’s apple

Leaping Robot: Frank Malina’s Cosmos

Still image of Malina’s Vortex and 3 Molecules (1965) Source: Leaping Robot

Still image of Malina’s Vortex and 3 Molecules (1965)
Source: Leaping Robot

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Why Evolution is True: The duck-faced lacewing, its baby and an ancient Egyptian inscription

York Daily Record: Dover Intelligent Design trial: 10 years later

3 Quarks Daily: The Scopes “Monkey Trial”, Part 1: Issues, Fact, and Fiction

Scopes in 1925 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Scopes in 1925
Source: Wikimedia Commons

3 Quarks Daily: The Scopes “Monkey Trial”, Part 2: Evidence, Confrontation, Resolution, Consequences

AMNH: Digitizing Darwin’s Work

Hakai Magazine: The Great Quake and the Great Drowning

Embryo Project: Wilhelm Roux (1850–1924)

Google Cultural Institute: Historic Moments: Beauty from Nature: Art of the Scott Sisters

Notches: Revisiting Loves Golden Age

Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience: Mechanical Neuroscience: Emil du Bois-Reymond’s Innovations in Theory and Practice

The Guardian: Revealed: how Indigenous Australian storytelling accurately records sea level rises 7,000 years ago

Indigenous rock art in Kakadu national park in the Northern Territory. Researchers say stories about sea level rises in Australia date back though more than 7,000 years of continuous oral tradition. Photograph: Helen Davidson for the Guardian

Indigenous rock art in Kakadu national park in the Northern Territory. Researchers say stories about sea level rises in Australia date back though more than 7,000 years of continuous oral tradition. Photograph: Helen Davidson for the Guardian

Jacob Darwin Hamblin: The Atom does not wait for favors from nature

The Raw Story: The ‘missing link’ in evolution is a myth that comes from medieval theology not modern science

Public Domain Review: Dr Mitchill and the Mathematical Tetrodon

PNAS.org: Strong upslope shifts in Chimborazo’s vegetation over two centuries since Humboldt (pdf)

Notches: Out in the Open: Rural Life, Respectability, and the Nudist Park

NCSE: Huxley’s Paley, Part 3

News Works: How Old Faithful earned its name

Until Darwin: The “American School”: A brief timeline of the Monogenist/polygenist Debate

Until Darwin: Digital Biography for the Works Cited in Darwin’s “A Historical Sketch of the Recent Progress of Opinion on the Origin of Species” (Updated)

Geschichte der Geologie: Von den Untiefen der Meere zu den Gipfeln der Welt

University of Cambridge: Research: The Magna Carta of scientific maps

Sigmund & Jocelyn: Fine Art: Birdman 1: George Edwards

Artist George Edwards Source: Sigmund & Jocelyn

Artist George Edwards
Source: Sigmund & Jocelyn

Embryo Project: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (1890– )

Why Evolution is True: Another DNA anniversary, which ells a different story from the textbooks

Current Biology: Oswald Avery, DNA, and the transformation of biology

New Historian: Navy Drove Fishing Globalisation in 16th Century England

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 15 – Aleksandr Mikhaylovich Butlerov

Conciatore: Deadly Fumes

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A breath of fresh air

Stephen Hales Source: Wikimedia Commons

Stephen Hales
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 18 – Edwin Mattison McMillan

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Creator unknown

Creator unknown

Lady Science: Issue 12: The Pill in America: Subscribe!

oral contraceptives, 1970s Source: Wikimedia Commons

oral contraceptives, 1970s
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Glasgow Library: Themes from Smith and Rousseau: the best and the worst aspects of archival research

Now Appearing: On a Bacon Hunt

Double Refraction: Is it post-modern to be present-centred? Thoughts prompted by Nick Tosh

American Science: We’re Back, or, Monday on the Blog with George

Bookplate of George Sarton Source: Wikimedia Commons

Bookplate of George Sarton
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Recipes Project: Teaching High School American History With Cookbooks

the many-headed monster: What is to be done? Mending academic history

NHM: Digital Museum: Mobilising the world’s natural history collections for the benefit of human well-being

The Renaissance Mathematicus: When Living in the Past Distorts the Past; Or, Why I Study the Victorian Era

Forbes: History as Big Data: 500 Years of Book Images and Mapping Million of Books

The Recipes Project: Spicing up the Victorians: Teaching Mrs. Beeton’s Recipe for Mango Chutney

Niche: New Scholars New Links

History in Photographs: Vintage Harvard

Observatory group, ca. 1910

Observatory group, ca. 1910

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Revolution contra Gradualism: Let the debate begin

International Commission on the History of Meteorology: History of Meteorology – Volume 7 (2015) Contents Page

Macro-Typography: Glory of Asia

Chronologia Universalis: On the Road: In Royal Prussia

The Washington Post: How publishing a 35,000-word manifesto led to the Unabomber

A view from the bridge: The undisciplinarian

Making Science Public: Naturel/artificial

ESOTERIC:

Forbidden Histories: Two Years of ‘Forbidden Histories’

Academia: Scientific rationalism, occult empiricism? Representations of the microphysical world, c. 1900

Hermetic.com: The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz (full text English)

Conciatore: A Network of Alchemists

“The Alchemist” 1558, Pieter Brugle the Elder.

British Library: Digitised Manuscripts: Alchemical Rolls (The Ripley Scrolls)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: House Guests, House Pests: A Natural History of Animals in the Home

house-guests-house-pests

University of Glasgow Library: Glasgow Incunabula Project Update: The Nuremberg Chronicle

Academia: Women at the Edge of Science

Public Books: Speaking in Science

Popular Science: Eureka: How Invention Happens – Gavin Weightman

Elle Thinks: Cryptonomicon, by Neal Stephenson

The Independent: The Royal Society Winton Prize: Top scientists and shortlisted authors share that have excited them

Science Book a Day: The Value of Believing in Yourself: The Story of Louis Pasteur

NEW BOOKS:

VRIN: Alzheimer La vie, la mort, la reconnaissance

Renaissance Mathematicus: The growing pile – too many good books not enough time

Historiens de la santé: Soigner le cancer au XVIIIe siècle. Triomphe et déclin de la thérapie par la ciguë dans le Journal de Médecine

Palgrave Macmillan: Psychiatry in Communist Europe

9781137490919

Academia: Dis/unity of Knowledge: Models for the Study of Modern Esotericism and Science

David Wootton: The Invention of Science Web Site

Museum Boerhaave: Stripboek: Ehrenfest!

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Opens 18 September 2015

Galileo’s World: e-newsletter September

BBC: Tenby man who invented the equals sign remembered in exhibit

The first known equation, equivalent to 14x+15=71 in modern syntax. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The first known equation, equivalent to 14x+15=71 in modern syntax.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Museum Boerhaave: Einstein & Friends 19 September 2015–3 January 2016

Science Museum: Julia Margaret Cameron: Influence and Intimacy 24 September 2015–28 March 2016

Painting of Julia Margaret Cameron by George Frederic Watts, c. 1850-1852 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Painting of Julia Margaret Cameron by George Frederic Watts, c. 1850-1852
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Till 25 October 2015

Science Museum: Cosmos and Culture Till 31 December 2015

The Old Operating Theatre, Museum & Herb Garret: The Operating Theatre

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Till 18 June 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Florence Nightingale Museum: Please, Matron! Dramatic reconstruction of a 1900 lecture to nursing students 22 October 2015

Florence Nightingale Museum: Meet the Florence Nightingale Museum Curator 28 September 2015

Victoria University in the University of Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies: Early Modern Interdisciplinary Graduate Forum I: Adam Richter Biblical History in the Natural Philosophy of John Wallis (plus other talks) 6 October

Bodleian Library: Women in Science: Wikipedia improve-a thon 14 October

Wellcome Library: A celebration of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and 150 years of medicine 29 September 2015

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

RGU Sport, Aberdeen: Journey to the Centre of the Earth 29 September 2015

Surgeon’s Hall Museum Edinburgh: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Man Lecture 28 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

The student of chemistry and pharmacy by Karl Joseph Litschaur Source: Wikigallery.org

The student of chemistry and pharmacy by Karl Joseph Litschaur
Source: Wikigallery.org

TELEVISION:

PBS America: 1,000 Days of Fear: The Deadly Race at Los Alamos

SLIDE SHOW:

Fadesingh: The Age of Games: Black Magic, Mathematics, Automata & Games

VIDEOS:

Youtube: The Einstein Theory of Relativity (Max Fleischer, 1923)

Youtube: Tidal predicting machine Part II

Youtube: How the Moon Affects the Ocean Tides – Tides and the Moon – CharlieDeanArchive / Archival Footage

Youtube: Visita do físico Albet Einstein ao Brasil completa 90 anos

RADIO:

BBC: Ada Lovelace: Letters shed light on tech visionary

BBC: Computing Britain

PODCASTS:

Nevada Public Radio: Even Einstein Made Mistakes

Physics Buzz Blog: A Time Capsule of the Universe

Science for the People: Eye of the Beholder

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

HaPoC 2015: 3rd International Conference on the History and Philosophy of Computing Pisa Italy 8–11 October 2015

Advances in the History of Psychology: Workshop: Photography, Representation, and Therapy Villa Di Breme Oven, Via Martinelli 23 in Cinisello Balsamo 24 September

MPIWG: Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe” Colloquia 2015/16

BSECS: CfP: BSECS 45th Annual Conference St Hugh’s College Oxford 6-8 January 2016

Athens: Workshop: Science Fiction. Jules Verne and 19th Century Science 17–18 December 2015

Almagest: CfP: Special issues Science fiction in the framework of science and literature studies Deadline 15 December 2015

University of Cambridge: History of Medicine Seminars

University of Paderborn: International Workshop: Emilie du Châtelet – Laws of Nature/Laws of Morals 23–24 October 2015

Advances in the History of Psychology: Round up: Calls for Papers in Allied Fields

LOOKING FOR WORK:

H–Physical Sciences: American Physical Society StudTravel Grants

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering: Dibner Chair in History or Philosophy of Technology

Bern Dibner Source: Wikimedia Commons

Bern Dibner
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Queensland: 3 Research Fellows Harnessing Intellectual Property to Build Food Safety

University of Vienna: 1 Fully paid student position + 6 associate positions

University of Pittsburgh: Assistant Professor History and Philosophy of Science

University of Pittsburgh: Associate Professor History and Philosophy of Science

MIT: Program in Science, Technology, and Society Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor

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