Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #28

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #28

Monday 25 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

 

 Another seven days have passed and the Internet has delivered up another bumper crop of post and articles on the histories of science, technology and medicine collected here in your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette.

There is a common misconception, shared on occasions by you friendly sub-editor, that history is something that happens in an undefined ‘distant’ past. However in realty the happenings of yesterday are already history. In the last days we were spectacularly reminded of this fact in a dispute over the history of one of the most recent discoveries/inventions in the history of the life sciences CRISPR.

What started as a dispute amongst specialists in genetic biology quickly attracted the attention of the mainstream media and the history of gene editing had, to quote Andy Warhol, its fifteen minutes of fame.

To prove that Whewell’s Gazette is on the ball and not stuck in the sixteenth century we bring you, hot off the digital presses, the contribution to this debate that our busy elves found on their searches through cyberspace this week.

Genotopia: A Whig History of CRISPR

Engineering Life: CRISPR In the history of science and intellectual property

SciRants: CRISPR Controversy and the Nobel Prize

The Washington Post: A social media war just erupted over the biotech innovation of the century

Genotopia: Criticism of Lander reaches mainstream media

Crispr-Cas9: Bitter row breaks out over ‘official history’ of gene-editing breakthrough

it is NOT junk: The Villain of CRISPR

STAT: In The Lab: Why Eric Lander morphed from science god to punching bag

Emmanuelle Charpentier, August 2015 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Emmanuelle Charpentier, August 2015
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

It would seem the problem started with a paper by Eric Lander on the history of CRISPR in which he tries to minimise the contributions of Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doubna in favour of Feng Zhang and George Church of Lander’s own Broad Institute. Although the motivation seems to be another is this yet another example of women being discriminated against in the history of science?

Jennifer Anne Doudna Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jennifer Anne Doudna
Source: Wikimedia Commons

One website dedicated to correcting the picture of women in #histSTM is Lady Science and Anna Resner and Leila McNeill have revamped their, in our opinion excellent blog, and issued the first Lady Science ebook, which you can download for free. You can read all about it in this Slate article by Bad Astronomer Phil Plait

home+logo

Quotes of the week:

Pooh quote

“When I was a kid, we had bloggers who could actually write and didn’t just post youtube videos”. – Jeet Heer (@HeerJeet)

“I cannot better describe walrus.. meat than by citing..tough Texas beef, marbled with fat and soaked in clam juice.” – Schwatka (1892) h/t @labroides

“Mathematicians stand on each other’s shoulders while computer scientists stand on each other’s toes”. – R. W. Hamming h7t @CompSciFact

“David Bowie dies and then a week later a whole new awesome planet just appears in space… coincidence? I think not”. – Sarcastic Rover (@SarcasticRover)

“The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders of the universe, the less taste we shall have for destruction.” – Rachel Carson h/t @SciHistoryToday

“Did you know that Heraclitus was a pre-Socratic philosopher? He didn’t”. – @historyscientis

“Hey guys I found a really big prime num—”

“WE FOUND A PLANET!”

“Aww.” – Andrew Taylor (@Andrew_Taylor)

“I miss the good old days at Davos when everyone wore flowing robes & the entrail readings were an intimate affair among friends”. – Scott Gosnell (@infinite_me)

MLK Science & Religion

Birthday of the Week:

 André Marie Ampère born 20 January 1775

 

Engraving of André-Marie Ampère (1775 – 1836) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Engraving of André-Marie Ampère (1775 – 1836)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: André-Marie Ampère and Electromagnetism

The British Museum: André Marie Ampère (mathématicien et physicien) / Collection de tous les portraits célèbres

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Medical physics quote

University Library Utrecht: Newton through the eyes of an amateur

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Christy’s Interview

Yovisto: Simon Marius and his Astronomical Discoveries

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Jerome Karle’s Interview

Online Archive of California: Otto Stern Photograph Collection, approximately 1895–1969

Nautilus: These Astronomical Glass Plates Made History

The Atlantic: The Women Who Would Have Been Sally Ride

Jerrie Cobb undergoing physiological testing (NASA).

Jerrie Cobb undergoing physiological testing (NASA).

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ralph Lapp’s Interview

Culture of Knowledge: ‘Skybound was the mind’: Johannes Kepler

Hyperallergenic: Rediscovered Glass Plate Photographs Show the Skies 120 Years Ago

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bill Hudgins’s Interview

NASA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Voyager Mission Celebrates 30 Years Since Uranus

Space.com: Clyde Tombaugh: Astronomer Who Discovered Pluto

Royal Museums Greenwich: Robert Hooke: the man who knew everything

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

National Geographic: Making Maps Under Fire During the Revolutionary War

Atlas Obscura: Found: A Very early and Very Rare Ottoman Atlas

Medievalists.net: Ten Beautiful Medieval Maps

Tabula Rogeriana

Tabula Rogeriana

Yovisto: The World According to Sebastian Münster

AEON: Sky readers

Atlas Obscura: 100 Wonders: The Mapparium

Dawlish Chronicles: A Forgotten Hero of Exploration: Vitus Bering

The Gabriel as drawn by Martin Spangsberg in 1827. Picture: Danish Geografisk Tidsskrift

The Gabriel as drawn by Martin Spangsberg in 1827. Picture: Danish Geografisk Tidsskrift

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Franklin health

Perceptions of Pregnancy: The Phantoms of Pregnancy

Wellcome Library: New database: Popular Medicine in America, 1800–1900

Advances in the History of Psychology: Surgery for Desperados: On Neurosurgical Solutions to Criminality

Thomas Morris: A dismal tail

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: Medicines of the 18th Century

henbanebelladonna

Remedia: Between Photography and Film: Early Uses of Medical Cinematography

Harvard Gazette: Did famine worsen the Black Death?

Science Museum: Thalidomide’s legacy

The Sunday Times: “I heard a baby cry and the doctors talking. I knew something wasn’t right”

The Guardian: Sixth-century wooden foot thought to be Europe’s oldest prosthetic implant

NYAM: The Nightmare of Imminent Baldness

Yovisto: Vladimir Bekhterev and the Bekterev’s Disease

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: H.T. Hamblin: Opthalmologist and Mystic

Thomas Morris: Suffocated by a fish

npr: Was Dr. Asperger A Nazi? The Question Still Haunts Autism

Dr. Hans Asperger with a young boy at the Children's Clinic at the University of Vienna in the 1930s. Courtesy of Maria Asperger Felder

Dr. Hans Asperger with a young boy at the Children’s Clinic at the University of Vienna in the 1930s.
Courtesy of Maria Asperger Felder

Thomas Morris: The man who fought a duel in his sleep

Cleveland Historical: The Cunningham Sanitarium

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: The Cullen Project: digitizing medical history

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Robert Burns and his medical biographer Dr James Currie

Early Modern Medicine: Frances’ Frigidity

emroc: Medicine in the Granville Family Manuscript

Randi Hutter Epstein: Elusive Powers of Estrogen

Anthropology Now: Zika and Microcephaly: Can We Learn from History?

Thomas Morris: Fruit, feathers and hair

Medievalists.net: 23 Medieval Uses for Rosemary

Rosemary illustrated in British Library MS Egerton 747 f. 85v

Rosemary illustrated in British Library MS Egerton 747 f. 85v

Cambridge Journals: Medical History: The Sources of Eucharius Rösslin’s ‘Rosegarden for Pregnant Women and Midwives’ (1513)

Wellcome Library: Linking letters across archives

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Thomas August Watson – Recipient of the Very First Phone Call

Medievalists.net: Printing with gold in the fifteenth century

Conciatore: Reflections on the Mirror

Conciatore: Like Snow From Heaven

JHI Blog: Hippie Bibliography

hippie-bib_image-5

Open Culture: Why Violins Have F-Holes: The Science & History of a Remarkable Renaissance Design

Morbid Anatomy: Midcentury Stereopanorama

Yovisto: Who remembers Apple’s Lisa?

Yovisto: The Steel of Sir Henry Bessemer

Yovisto: Ray Dolby and the Noise Reduction System

The Recipes Project: Searching, Sieving, Sifting, and Straining in the Seventeenth Century

 

Yovisto: Umberto Nobile and his Airships

Yovisto: John Fitch and the Steam Boat

Fact:Danish electronic music legend Else Marie Pade dies at 91

Academia: A natural draught furnace for bronze casting (pdf)

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Women Computers in World War II

Betty Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas (right) operating ENIAC's main control panel.

Betty Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas (right) operating ENIAC’s main control panel.

Atlas Obscura: The First Cross-Country Road Trip Took 2 Men and a Pitbull 63 Days

PM: The Obscure History of the World’s First Synth, Built in 1901

My medieval foundry: Ongoing bell posts – Part 2 – making small bells

Collecting and Connecting: The story that changed my mind

Atlas Obscura: 160-Year-Old Ganges Canal Super-Passages Are An Engineering Marvel

Science Museum: 30 Years On: The Rise of the Macintosh Computer

National Library of Scotland: Scottish glass industry

Science & Society: Picture Library Prints: De Dondi’s ‘Astrarium’, the world’s first astronomical clock, 1364

Tenby Observer: Pembroke Dock maritime museum reflects on first year of operation

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Linneas

Yovisto: Caspar Friedrich Wolff – the Founder of Embryology

 

This Day in Water History: January 14, 1829: First Slow Sand Filter in England

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘The Most ingenious book that ever I read in my life’ Pepys and Micrographia

Notches: The Cologne Sexual Assaults in Historical Perspective

The Public Domain Review: In Search of the Impossible: The Perfect English Rabbit

Genes to Genomes: Calvin Bridges: Bringing genes down to earth

Notches: After Roe: Engaging the Lost History of the Abortion Debate

BHL: Fantastic Worlds: Exploring the Ocean through Science and Fiction

The Public Domain Review: The Bestiarium of Aloys Zötl (1831–1887)

Mèthode: One of the foremost experiments on the 20th century: Stanley Miller and the origins of prebiotic chemistry

TrowelBlazers: Zelia Nutall La Reina de Arqueologiá

Zelia Nuttall Image by kind permission of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley CA.

Zelia Nuttall Image by kind permission of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley CA.

The Public Domain Review: The Embalming Jars of Frederik Ruysch

Understanding Race: Science 168s–1800s: Early Classifications of Nature

TrowelBlazers: Mary Ann Woodhouse Mantell

AMNH: How Hot is Hot? Chile Pepper in Our Global Kitchen

Atomic Surgery: The Life of Louis Agassiz (Real Life Comics, #30)

Joides Resolution: Happy Birthday Andrija Mohorovicic!

Naturally Curious: / Million Wonders: How natural history museums help people and nature flourish in the North West

Slate: The Vault: A Victorian Argument That Snow is Holy, Illustrated by a Beautiful Catalog of Flakes

Letters from Gondwana: The Geological Observations of Robert Hooke

Hooke’s drawing of fossil bivalves, brachiopods, belemnites, shark teeth and possibly a reptilian tooth (Copyright © The Royal Society)

Hooke’s drawing of fossil bivalves, brachiopods, belemnites, shark teeth and possibly a reptilian tooth (Copyright © The Royal Society)

Sinc: La ciencia es notica: The five bird species that Darwin couldn’t discover in Medeira and the Azores

Scripturient: The Flat Earthers Respawn

CHEMISTRY:

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Going to Pieces: A Detective Story

Muslim Heritage: From Alchemy to Chemistry

Front cover of Dix traités d'alchimie de Jâbir ibn Hayyân - Les dix premiers Traités du Livre des Soixante-dix (French translation by Pierre Lory). (Paris, 1983).

Front cover of Dix traités d’alchimie de Jâbir ibn Hayyân – Les dix premiers Traités du Livre des Soixante-dix (French translation by Pierre Lory). (Paris, 1983).

Scroll.in: How the romance between an Aligarh Muslim and a Lithuanian Jew has shaped an Indian pharma major

CHF: George Hitchings and Gertrude Elion

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

vistorica: Mathematics, science, engineering, 1500–1600 European

BBC News: Cash to preserve and digitise historical documents

The Public Domain Review: Japanese Prints of Western Inventors, Artists and Scholars

The Englishman Arkwright wanted to make a spinning-frame. It took him such a long time that he became very poor and so his wife got mad and broke his machine. Angry at her, he sent her away. But even after all this, he succeeded and became extremely rich.

The Englishman Arkwright wanted to make a spinning-frame. It took him such a long time that he became very poor and so his wife got mad and broke his machine. Angry at her, he sent her away. But even after all this, he succeeded and became extremely rich.

Wynken de Worde: what those libraries were in The Toast

Science, Spies, and History: Job Market Stats for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The Hindu: Scientific Histories

Melissa Terras: A Few Words for Professor Lisa Jardine

lisaj

The Arts Newspaper: The Buck Stopped Here: a grand send-off for the polymath powerhouse Prof Lisa Jardine

Avoiding the Bears: Multum in Parvo (said the cupcake toppers)

Cornell College: News Center: Alumna pursuing history career in collections

Londonist: London’s Entire History To Be Mapped By New Project

The H-Word: Flat-Earthers aren’t the only ones getting things wrong

Readex: Early American Newspapers, 1690–1922: By Series

Catholic Herald: Meet five Catholic heroes of science

SocPhilSciPract: January HPS&ST Note

Feministing: New Website Aims to Transform the Philosophy Canon by Highlighting Women

The Guardian: ‘People think curating just means choosing nice things’ – secrets of the museum curators

Darin Hayton: The Use and Abuse of Kuhn’s “Paradigm Shift”

ESOTERIC:

BOOK REVIEWS:

facebook: History Physics: Volume 1 of Tyndall project reviewed

THE: The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains, by Thomas W. Laqueur

Conciatore: CONCIATORE Book Excerpt

CONCIATORE, The Life and Times of 17th Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri, By Paul Engle

CONCIATORE, The Life and Times of 17th
Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri, By Paul Engle

The Guardian: Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs by Lisa Randall – when will anther asteroid wreak havoc on Earth?

Chemistry World: The birth of he pill – how four pioneers reinvented sex and launched a revolution

Science Book a Day: The Composition of Kepler’s Astronomia nova

Rhapsody in Books Weblog: Review of The Invention of Science by David Wootton

Science Book a Day: Empires of Food: Feast, Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilisations

Providence Journal: The genius of astronomer Johannes Kepler

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: The Antivaccine Heresy

519J7776mvL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

 

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Etcetera: Inside the lost library of John Dee, a Tudor wizard

Smithsonian.com: A Painting of John Dee, Astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I, Contains a Hidden Ring of Skulls

The Guardian: John Dee painting originally had circle of human skulls, x-ray imaging reveals

History Extra: In pictures: John Dee, the ‘Elizabethan 007’

streetsofsalem: John Dee, Renaissance Man

Culture 24: New John Dee discovery reveals resemblance to mother and a mysterious ‘dwarf’

The Spectator: John Dee though he could talk to angels using medieval computer technology

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise: Galileo exhibit to feature books, art at OU art museum

OU Lynx: Plan Your Visit

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

151223-ul-600th_0

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Historiens de la santé: Sang sens : observations médicales, interprétations fluides Exposition Bibliothèque Osler d’histoire de la médecine Le vernissage, qui aura lieu le 27 janvier

NewsOK: Galileo magnifico: University of Oklahoma continues yearlong ‘Galileo’s World’ project with exhibit ‘An Artful Observation of the Cosmos’

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The Telegraph: The best art exhibitions of 2016 (some #histSTM connections!)

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Last Chance: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Henry Walter Bates Until 26 February:

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Daily Motion: Life Story: The race for the Double Helix [1/2]

Daily Motion: Life Story: The race for the Double Helix [2/2]

The Denver Post: “Vera Rubin” performance a collaboration of the BETC and Fiske Planetarium

Vera Rubin measuring spectra, c. 1970

Vera Rubin measuring spectra, c. 1970

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

New Diorama Theatre: Reptember Reloaded 10 January–1 February 2016

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

EVENTS:

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

Descartes event

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Cardiff University: Lecture: Framing the Face: A History of Facial Hair, 1700–1900 20 January 2016

University of York: Lecture: Not Everyone Can Be A Gandhi: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post-WWII Era 3 March 2016

NCSE: Darwin Day Approaches

University of Leeds Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Lecture: Object 1. Horse and Rider 26 January 2016

London PUS Seminar: Celebrity Science – How Does Ancient DNA Research Inform Science Communication? 27 January 2016

University of Kent: Trial by water, or, seafarers’ perspectives on the quest for longitude, 1700–1830 27 January 2016

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Edge of Disaster – Vaccines and Epidemics 21 January 2016

UCL: Lecture: Henry Nicholls: The Galapagos. A Natural History 27 January 2016

The Washington Post: These are the most exciting museum happenings in 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

Shackelton Event

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Dr William Gilbert (1544-1603) showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court, 19th century (oil on canvas)

Dr William Gilbert (1544-1603) showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court, 19th century (oil on canvas)

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Simon Singh on Tudor code breaking and John Dee

Open Culture: Prize-Winning Animation Lets You Fly Through 17th Century London

London Live: John Dee exhibit opens at Royal College of Physicians

Niche: Clearing the Plains and Clearing the Air: Environmental History and National Memory

PBS Newshour: Author explores life on the expanding autism spectrum

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician the lost library of John Dee at the Royal College of Physicians

Youtube: Royal College of Physicians: A constellation for John Dee by Jeremy Millar, 2016

Rune Soup: John Dee: Scholar, Courtier, Magician

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: The Meteorite and the Hidden Hoax

BBC Radio 4: An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin

PODCASTS:

Ben Franklin’s World: Bonus: Why Historians Study History

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Upcoming History of Medicine Events

University of Leeds: Workshop on Interwar Telecommunications History 29 January 2016

UCL: ERC Project Calendars in Antiquity and the Middle Ages Workshop 7: Al-Biruni and his world 15 February 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurs in Berlin. Perspectives on the Berliner Brachiosaurus brancai, 1906˗2015 10–11 March 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: CfP: Working on Things: On the Social, Political, and Economic History of Collected Objects 21–22 November 2016

University of Bristol: CfP: Philosophy of Biology in UK: 8–9 June 2016

Conference Centre Kaap Doorn, near to Utrecht: Philosophy of Science in a Forest 19–21 May 2016

Marsh’s Library: CfP: Newspapers and Periodicals in Britain & Ireland, 1641–1800

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Research in Progress 2016 Queen’s College Oxford 27 February

British Society for the History of Mathematics: History of Mathematics in Education: An Anglo-Danish collaboration Bath Spa University 21–24 August 2016

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Mathematics in the Enlightenment Rewley House Oxford 25 June 2016

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Celebrating the History of Women in Mathematics at Manchester: Manchester University 9 March 2016

University of Cumbria: CfP: The World of Outdoors 24 June 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: Book Prize

Birkbeck University of London: ‘Fluid Physicalities’ speaker programme 2016

European Society for Astronomy in Culture (SEAC): 24th SEAC Conference Bath 12–16 September 2016

The Royal Society: Call for Nominations: Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Prize

University of Nottingham: CfP: Medieval Midlands Postgraduate Conference 13 April 2016

New York University: Conference: Experimental Philosophy Through History 20 February 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2016
Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts 7–10 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin: Postdoctoral Fellowship

University of Westminster: Professor of Modern History of Science and Innovation

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: Collections Scholarships

Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin: Post-Doc Fellow, Archaeology Collection Research

CHoM News: 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

University of London: Alan Pearsall Postdoctoral Fellowship in Naval and Maritime History

Wellcome Library: Wikimedian in Residence at the Wellcome Library

Museum of Health Care: Margaret Angus Research Fellowship

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #27

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #27

Monday 18 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

Despite sub-zero temperatures and Twitter disturbances Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM link list is here once again bring you all of the histories of science, medicine and technology that we could find for your delectation in cyberspace over the last seven days.

Two famous repositories of information, The British Museum and Wikipedia share a birthday although the former is considerably older than the latter. All branches of knowledge require such repositories if they are to function properly and the history of encyclopaedias, libraries and museums is an important part of the histories of science, medicine and technology.

In his concepts of a third world of human knowledge Karl Popper asks his readers to imagine a world devastated by some form of disaster then poses the question, which society would recover fastest one in which all libraries and books had been lost or one in which this repositories of human knowledge had survived and were accessible to the recovering society. The answer should be obvious.

A free online encyclopaedia such as Wikipedia and public libraries and museums are immeasurably valuable resources for everybody that we often take for granted but without them life would be much poorer and often much more difficult.

Whewell’s Gazette a small repository of knowledge says support your local repositories wherever they are, you never know when you might need them.

Wikipedia shares its birthday with British Museum. How apt. – Andy Mabbett (@pigsonthe wing)

The British Museum Opened 15 January 1759

Montague House site of the original British Museum Source: Wikimedia Commons

Montague House site of the original British Museum
Source: Wikimedia Commons

History Today: The British Museum Opened January 15th, 1759

Wikipedia was born 15 January 2000

Wikipedia logo Source: Wikipedia

Wikipedia logo
Source: Wikipedia

The Guardian: Wikipedia’s strength is in collaboration – as we’ve proved over 15 years

ars technica: On Wikipedia’s 15th Birthday, Ars shares the entries that most fascinate us

Yovisto: All the World’s Knowledge – Wikipedia

Wikipedia 15

Quotes of the week:

 “There’s a special place in Hull reserved for the inventor of autocorrect.” h/t @Amanda_Vickery

“In arboretum, trees are domesticated, or at least tame, but in adjacent meadow same trees are feral as escapee seeds from arboretum”. – Dolly Jørgensen (@DollyJørgensen)

“Many bizarre grammar “rules” stem from 18th-19th century grammarians trying to force English to be more like Latin. Ludicrously”. – Justine Larbalestier (@JustineLavaworm)

“Keep reading abt our ancestors “having sex with Neanderthals” = genetic inheritance. Um. Perhaps “our ancestors *included* Neanderthals”?” – Rebekah Higgitt (@beckyfh)

CYZ20GCUwAANJQo

“None of the great discoveries in physics in he 20th C has contributed anything to an understanding of the living world”– Ernst Mayr h/t @philipcball

“Early on, I was taught that coding is the art of introducing bugs into an initially bug-free environment…” – @arclight

“That is, I believe, a fine task for historians: to be a danger to national myths.” – Eric Hobsbawm. h/t @SocialHistoryOx

Tribute to lab research mice-A monument portraying a labmouse knitting a DNAhelix was unveiled in Novosibirsk Russia

Tribute to lab research mice-A monument portraying a labmouse knitting a DNAhelix was unveiled in Novosibirsk Russia

Birthdays of the Week:

Albert Hofmann born 11 January 1906

Albert Hofmann Photo Hofmann.org

Albert Hofmann
Photo Hofmann.org

 

The Vaults of Erowid: Albert Hofmann

Benjamin Franklin born 17 January 1706:

Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky c. 1816 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by Benjamin West

Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky c. 1816 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by Benjamin West

Benjamin Franklin In His Own Words

Discovery of the Week:

11 January 1787 William Herschel discovered Titania and Oberon, moons of Uranus

A montage of Uranus’s moons. Image credit: NASA

A montage of Uranus’s moons. Image credit: NASA

Universe Today: Uranus’ Moon Titania

Universe Today: Uranus’ Moon Oberon

Royal Museums Greenwich: The Herschel Family and the Royal Observatory

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Carl David Anderson and the Positron

AHF: Isidor I. Rabi

The New Yorker: A Hydrogen Bomb by Any Other Name

malinc.se: Heliocentrism and Geocentrism

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Universe Today: What is the Geocentric Model of the Universe?

AHF: In Memoriam: George Mahfouz

Forbes: The Surprisingly Old Physics of Wireless Charging

Yovisto: Igor Vasilyevich Kurchatov ­ Father of the Soviet Atom Bomb

Sky & Telescope: Solar System Featured on New U.S. Stamps

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Newton Stapleton’s Interview

arXiv.org: Lomonosov’s Discovery of Venus Atmosphere in 1761: English Translation of Original Publication with Commentaries (pdf)

AHF: J. Robert Oppenheimer

Yovisto: Joseph Jackson Lister and the Microscope

Joseph Jackson Lister Source: Wikimedia Commons

Joseph Jackson Lister
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

Skulls in the Stars: 1801: Fraunhofer gets research funding in the worst possible way

Yovisto: Edward Teller and Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove

NASA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory: NASA’s Stardust Sample Return was 10 Years Ago Today

Royal Astronomical Society: 100 years and counting: women in the RAS go from strength to strength

Annie Scott Dill Russell (later Annie Maunder), the solar physicist proposed for RAS Fellowship in 1892, who was finally admitted in 1916. Credit: Courtesy of Dorrie Giles.

Annie Scott Dill Russell (later Annie Maunder), the solar physicist proposed for RAS Fellowship in 1892, who was finally admitted in 1916. Credit: Courtesy of Dorrie Giles.

RAS: Women and the RAS: 100 years of Fellowship

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Royal Museums Greenwich: Conserving copper-green degradation on maps

The Guardian: Polar explorer Ernest Shackleton may have had a hole in his heart, doctors say

Atlas Obscura: 19th-Centuy Atlases Included Hundreds of Fake Islands

An 18th century British map with some made-up islands in Lake Superior Source: Wikimedia Commons

An 18th century British map with some made-up islands in Lake Superior
Source: Wikimedia Commons

British Library: Untold Lives blog: Mud Hovels, Mean Houses and Natural Philosophy

Yovisto: Matthew Fountaine Maury and the Oceanography

Hyperallergenic: Before Google earth: A Rare Cartographic Compendium From Renaissance Europe

The Washington Post: How a karma-seeking Redditor uncovered one of the world’s rarest atlases

The National Library of Norway / Nikolaj Blegvad.

The National Library of Norway / Nikolaj Blegvad.

npr: Norway’s National Library Discovers Rare Atlas – With a Little Help From Reddit

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Killed by a cough

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Auroscope invented by John Brunton

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Daniel Carrion’s experiment: the use of self-infection in the advance of medicine

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Bone box with appendicular bones

Thomas Morris: A medical old wives’ tale

JHI Blog: Wilhelm Reich: A Disappointed Utopian

Atlas Obscura: ‘Mind-Blowing’ Archaeological Find: Wooden Prosthetic for a Medieval Foot

An iron ring, likely used to stabilize a wooden prosthesis, was found in situ. (All Photos: Courtesy Österreichisches Archäologisches Institut (Austrian Archaeological Institute))

An iron ring, likely used to stabilize a wooden prosthesis, was found in situ. (All Photos: Courtesy Österreichisches Archäologisches Institut (Austrian Archaeological Institute))

Live Science: Prosthetic Leg with Hoofed Foot Discovered in Ancient Chinese Tomb

Medievalists.net: A History of Tonsillectomy: Two Millenia of Trauma, Hemorrhage and Controversy

Concocting History: Seeing with new eyes

Surgeon’s Hall Museum: Carcinoma

Public Domain Review: Anatomical Illustrations from 15th-century England

Holy Kaw!: 17th Century Medical Pop-Up Book

Phys.org: A medical pop-up book from the 17th century

Columbia librarians preparing the medical pop-up book for digitization. Credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Columbia librarians preparing the medical pop-up book for digitization. Credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Gymnastics and acrobatics as medical therapeutics

Thomas Morris: The woman who turned to soap

The Atlantic: The First Artificial Insemination Was an Ethical Nightmare

hatfield historical society: In-Flew-Enza: The Deadly Pandemic Strikes Hatfield

The Quack Doctor: The Amateur Anatomist and the Amputated Finger

Hyperallergic: Unraveling the Gendered History of Hypnotism

Advances in the History of Psychology: “Scientometric Trend Analysis of Publications on the History of Psychology”

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: The Finger Alphabet

Finger alphabet illustrations from The Invited Alphabet by R.R. published in 1809

Finger alphabet illustrations from The Invited Alphabet by R.R. published in 1809

NYAM: At the Crossroads of Art and Medicine

Thomas Morris: Putting a patient to sleep (without anaesthetic)

Contagions: Human Parasites of the Roman Empire

Thomas Morris: Dear oh dear

Strange Remains: A 13th Century Guide to Forensic Anthropology

Old Book Illustration: Doctor on His Way to Visit His Patient

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: William Hedley and his Puffing Billy

Engineering Timelines: Louis Gustave Mouchel

Conciatore: Alchemical Glassware of 1600

Conciatore: Enamel

Conciatore: Neri’s Aleppo Connection

The Inland Waterways Association: The Father of English Canals – James Brindley

Photo: Packet House, Bridgwater Canal - Christine Smith

Photo: Packet House, Bridgwater Canal – Christine Smith

Innovating in Combat: Signalling at the Battle of Passchendaele, July to November

BBC News: The 19th Century plug that’s still being used

Smithsonian.com: How the Phonograph Changed Music Forever

UW–Milwaukee Special Collections: Typography Tuesday

Smithsonian.com: Radio Activity: The 100th Anniversary of Public Broadcasting

 

Confusions and Connections: Top computing experts join The National Museum of Computing

The British Newspaper Archive: Alexander Graham Bell demonstrates the telephone to Queen Victoria in 1878 – “I’m on the throne!”

Atlas Obscura: The American Textile Industry was Woven from Espionage

A spinning frame at Slater Mill. (Photo: Bestbudbrian/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

A spinning frame at Slater Mill. (Photo: Bestbudbrian/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

The Public Domain Review: Auto Polo (ca. 1911)

Library of Congress: In the Muse: Performing Arts Blog: Unboxing the Buchla Model 100

Open Culture: Rick Wakeman Tells the Story of the Mellotron. The Oddball Proto-Synthesizer Pioneered by the Beatles

The Atlantic: The Travelling Salesmen of the Nuclear-Industrial Complex

Ptak Science Books: Smokestacks and Breweries – Germany, 1930

 

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Yovisto: Nicolas Steno and the Principles of Modern Geology

Atlas Obscura: This 19th-Century Map Shows That Beaver Dams are Built to Last

The Friends of Charles Darwin: 11-Jan-1844: Darwin confesses murder!

Geschichte der Geologie: Carl von Linné und sein schwieriges Verhältnis zu Fossilien

Science Line: A new perspective on old specimens

British Museum: Hans Sloane’s specimen tray

Ptak Science Books: An Odd & Architecturally Symphonic Structure Dedicated to Bats, Malaria, & Guano (1916)

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Todayinsci: Carolus Linnaeus

Five Thirty Eight Science: The Biggest Dinosaur in History May Never Have Existed

The Recipes Project: Hans Sloane: Eighteenth-Century Mixologist

Yovisto: Wilhelm Weinberg and the Genetic Equilibrium

Embryo Project: Ross Granville Harrison (1870–1959)

The Friends of Charles Darwin: 13-Jan-1833: The day HMS Beagle nearly sank

The Guardian: The Danish Girl and the sexologist: a story of sexual pioneers

Notches: Through the Eyes of the Establishment: Student Sexuality and the Dean of Women’s Office at Purdue University

The Recipes Project: Healing Words: Quintus Serenus’ Pharmacological Poem

This View of Life: Social Darwinism, A Case of Designed Ventriloquism

Yovisto: Lewis Terman and the Intelligence Quotient

Smithsonian.com: Life and Rocks May Have Co-Evolved on Earth

European City of Science Manchester 2016: The Peppered Moth Story

© Olei Leillinger

© Olei Leillinger

The New India Express: Wallace: Darwin’s Rival and Admirer

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: The Impact of Lamarck’s Theory of Evolution Before Darwin’s Theory

Forbes: How the Dissection of a Shark’s Head Revealed the True Nature of Fossils

Wild Reekie: Become a Local Environmental Historian

Ptak Science Books: The Display of Quantitative Data – a Pretty but Wanting Example, British Weather

CHEMISTRY:

homunculus: The place of the periodic table

Yovisto: Jan Baptiste Helmont and the Gases

Jan Baptiste Helmont

Jan Baptiste Helmont

Chemical Heritage Magazine: A Strange and Formidable Weapon

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

homunculus: The myth of the Enlightenment (again)

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Communiqué No. 92 Winter 2016 (see interview with Jai Virdi-Dhesi pp. 9–12)

DW Made for Minds: Bavaria returns stolen books worth millions to Naples

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Bowdoin College Library

Collectors Weekly: Physica Sacra

Public Domain Review: NYPL Release 187k Public Domain Images in Hi-Res

storify: BSHS Postgraduate Conference 2016

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Voltaire: Experimental Philosopher

François-Marie Arouet (1694–1778), known as Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (1694–1778), known as Voltaire

Registrar Trek: The Next Generation: How NOT to number objects

BHL: Download How To

Society for the History of Natural History: Professor Jim Secord – awarded SHNH Founders’ Medal

The #EnvHist Weekly

Brill Online: Early Science and Medicine: Volume 20, Early Modern Colour Worlds, 2015 Contents

homunculus: More on the beauty question

Lady Science: No. 16: Gender and Forensic Science on Television

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Founders of Science?

Jonathan Saha: The Health of the History of Medicine in Southeast Asia

The Guardian: We need to talk about TED

ESOTERIC:

Atlas Obscura: The History and Uses of Magical Mandrake, According to Modern Witches

A woodcut of two mandrake plants. (Photo: Wellcome Images, London/CC BY 4.0)

A woodcut of two mandrake plants. (Photo: Wellcome Images, London/CC BY 4.0)

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

Inside Higher Ed: Physics Envy

Notches: “Arresting Dress”: A Student Interview with Clare Sears

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Vial and Error

Science Museum: What to think about machines that think

University of Hartford: Associate Professor Michael Robinson’s New Book Explores Cultural Bias Among Explorers

51-DsC+IJEL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_

Geographical: The Mountain

Science League of America: Bitten by the Insect Bug

The Guardian: Menagerie by Caroline Grigson – a lively history of strange animals and stranger people

Watershed Moments: Thoughts from the Hydrosphere: The Invention of Nature: Serendipity, Early Scientists, and Modern Ideas

Nature: Entomology: A life of insects and ire

History News Network: Women Who Advanced Science and Changed History: An interview with Rachel Swaby

Prospect: Where medieval magicians experimental scientists?

Ricochet: Saturday Night Science: The Hunt for Vulcan

Star Tribune: The Stargazer’s Sister by Carrie Brown

Worlds Revealed: Geography and Maps at the Library of Congress: American Geography and Geographers: Towards Geographic Science

NEW BOOKS:

Manchester University Press: The Senses in Early Modern England, 1558–1660

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Last Volcano: A Man, a Romance, and the Quest to Understand Nature’s Most Magnificent Fury

9781605989211

The Dispersal of Darwin: A Brief History of Creation: Science and the Search for the Origin of Life

Brill: Virtuoso by Nature: The Scientific Worlds of Francis Willughby FRS (1635–1672)

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

The Telegraph: The best art exhibitions of 2016 (some #histSTM connections!)

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Dulwich Picture Gallery: The Amazing World of M.C. Escher

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

The Spectator: John Dee though he could talk to angels using medieval computer technology

History Extra: In pictures: John Dee, the ‘Elizabethan 007’

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The Guardian: John Dee painting originally had circle of human skulls, x-ray imaging reveals

John Dee performing an experiment before Elizabeth I, by Henry Gillard Glindoni. Photograph: Wellcome Library

John Dee performing an experiment before Elizabeth I, by Henry Gillard Glindoni. Photograph: Wellcome Library

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The Art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Closing Soon: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Denver Post: “Vera Rubin” performance a collaboration of the BETC and Fiske Planetarium

Benjamin, Director of Education, runs the visuals during a rehearsal for Vera Rubin: Bringing the Dark to Light at Fiske Planetarium in Boulder, Colorado January 13, 2015. Boulder Daily Camera/ Mark Leffingwell

Benjamin, Director of Education, runs the visuals during a rehearsal for Vera Rubin: Bringing the Dark to Light at Fiske Planetarium in Boulder, Colorado January 13, 2015. Boulder Daily Camera/ Mark Leffingwell

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

New Diorama Theatre: Reptember Reloaded 10 January–1 February 2016

EVENTS:

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Cardiff University: Lecture: Framing the Face: A History of Facial Hair, 1700–1900 20 January 2016

University of York: Lecture: Not Everyone Can Be A Gandhi: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post-WWII Era 3 March 2016

NCSE: Darwin Day Approaches

University of Leeds Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Lecture: Object 1. Horse and Rider 26 January 2016

London PUS Seminar: Celebrity Science – How Does Ancient DNA Research Inform Science Communication? 27 January 2016

Descartes event

University of Kent: Trial by water, or, seafarers’ perspectives on the quest for longitude, 1700–1830 27 January 2016

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Edge of Disaster – Vaccines and Epidemics 21 January 2016

UCL: Lecture: Henry Nicholls: The Galapagos. A Natural History 27 January 2016

The Washington Post: These are the most exciting museum happenings in 2016

Gresham College: Lecture: Babbage and Lovelace 19 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

Shackelton Event

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Leeuwenhoek with His Microscope by Ernest Board (c) Wellcome Library; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Leeuwenhoek with His Microscope by Ernest Board
(c) Wellcome Library; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Vimeo: Seeing the Invisible

Youtube: Houghton Library: Starry Messengers

Youtube: Project Diana 70th Anniversary Special Event | Moonbounce | EME

Two Nerdy History Girls: Horse-Drawn Carriages in Motion

Ri Channel: How to survive in space

Youtube: Mathematics vs astronomy in early medieval Ireland

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Soundcloud: Sci Fri: These Outmoded Scientific Instruments Are Also Things of Beauty

Science for the People: Science in Wonderland

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Hagley Museum & Library, Wilmington, Deleware: 2016 Annual Conference – Oral History and Technology 14–15 April 2016

Pulse: CfP: Graduate Journal in History, Philosophy, Sociology of Science

University of Cambridge: Workshop: Defining Effective Digital History Mentorship 15 March 2016

Graz, Austria: STS Conference: CfP: The Role of Webvideos in Science and Research Communication

Bodleian Library: Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Library: Science, Medicine, and Culture Seminar Programme, Hilary

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series, Spring 2016

Science Museum: Research Seminar Series

University of Exeter: CfP: Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference 28–29 July 2016

Amsterdam: CfP: Anton Pannekoek (1873–1960): Ways of Viewing Science and Society 9–10 June 2016

SIGCIS: Computer History Museum Prize: Call for Submissions 2016

University of Chicago: CfP: American Association for the History of Nursing 33rd Annual Conference

Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama: CfP: 2016 Meeting of the Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History (SFAFE) 15-16 April 2016

Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce, Poland: CfP: Borders and Crossings: International and Multidisciplinary Conferences on Travel Writing

Royal Geographical Society: CfP: Annual International Conference 30 August–2 September 2016

Vrije University Brussel, Belgium: CfP: Feeding on the nectar of the gods: Appropriations of Isaac Newton’s thought ca. 1700–1750

University of Barcelona: CfP: Joint ESHHS & Cheiron Meeting 27 June–1 July 2016

Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine” (STEEM): CfP: “Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine” (Russia’s Great War & Revolution, 1914-1922)

University of Amsterdam and Utrecht University: CfP: XVII UNIVERSEUM NETWORK MEETING Connecting Collections 9-11 June 2016

University of Leeds: HPS Seminar Series 2016

University of Bristol: Literature & Medicine Seminars

Notches: CfP: The History of Venereal Disease

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Call for submissions for Computer History Museum Prize

LOOKING FOR WORK:

MHS Oxford: Part-Time Exhibition Curator – ‘Back From the Dead’

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: Collections Scholarships

MHS Oxford: Project Assistant (2 posts) – Move Project

The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Department II (Lorraine Daston): Postdoctoral Fellowship

ChoM News: 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

University of Kent: Research Associate: The Abortion Act: a Biography

UCL: CELL: Research Assistant

University of Groningen: Tenure track position in the philosophy, sociology and history of science applied to psychology Deadline 27 January 2016

BSHS: Outreach and Education Committee Grants: Undergraduate Dissertation Archive Grants 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #26

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #26

Monday 11 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

 Moving on into 2016 it’s time once again for Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could find in the infinite depths of cyberspace.

Science Show

This is the twenty-sixth edition of the second year of Whewell’s Gazette meaning the year is half full or half empty depending on your point of view. We view ourselves as part of the on going infinite science show.

Science Show 2

Quotes of the week:

“I would like 2016 to be the year in which people stop asserting that there is “a method” of science”. – Oliver Usher (@ojusher)

“Science is indeed merely a method of investigation. But it is the best one for answering many important questions”. – Christopher Chabris (@cfchabris)

“Repeat after me: pharma being shit does not mean magic beans cure cancer.” – Ben Goldacre (@bengoldacre)

“Man is a genius when he is dreaming”. — Akira Kurosawa h/t @berfois

“It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop”. – Confucius

“Plato is my friend—Aristotle is my friend—but my greatest friend is truth.” – Isaac Newton h/t @wordnik

“Someone who wants to learn logic from language is like an adult who wants to learn how to think from a child.”— Frege h/t @GuyLongworth

“On this day in 1961, Erwin Schrödinger may or may not have died. We’ll only know if we open his coffin and collapse the wave function”. – John J. McKay (@archymck)

“History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce.” – Karl Marx h/t @ferwen

“…it really pisses me off when people say “medieval” = synonym for crude, uncivilised, primitive. Use your eyes, people”. – Caroline Shenton (@dustshoveller)

“As Twitter awoke one morning from uneasy dreams, it found itself transformed into a gigantic Facebook”. – Elena Epaneshnik (@ElenaEpaneshnik)

“Alexander Pope thought that bad writing was a ‘morbid secretion from the brain’ … he might be right – at least on some writing days”. Andrea Wulf (@Andrea_Wulf)

“Historians don’t have the luxury to decide certain people out of existence.” – Paul Halliday h/t @jotis

“I don’t believe in the Malaria theory and doubt very much if there is any such thing a Malaria” – Henderson 1872 h/t @KewDC

“Hear hear. Philosophy of science has traditionally been too dominated by physicists”. – Philip Ball (@philipcball)

“Though better known for his work on philosophy, Karl Popper also pioneered the recreational use of Amyl Nitrate TrueFacts – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“Synonym has no synonym. Anagram has no anagram. Onomatopoeia doesn’t sound like what it means. But portmanteau is a portmanteau. Phew”. – @WardQNormal

“The most important thing a University has to teach you is that no matter how much you know, it’s never enough”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

Ne’r marry one with a wey Beard,

He is of the fumbling Crew;

Of such I’ve oft times heard,

they little or nothing can do – 1685 h/t @DrAlun

Birthday of the Week:

Alfred Russel Wallace born 8 January 1823

Alfred Russel Wallace ca. 1895 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alfred Russel Wallace ca. 1895
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 Yovisto: Alfred Russel Wallace and the Naturel Selection

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Biography of Wallace

BHL: Wallace, Darwin, and Evolution: The Real Story

Death of the Week:

Ernest Shackleton died 5 January 1922

 Enduring-Eye-RGS-5

UFunk: Enduring Eye – Exploring Antarctica in 1914 through fascinating photos

Royal Museums Greenwich: Sir Ernest Shackleton

The Public Domain Review: Ernest Shackleton on his south polar expedition (1910)

Enduring-Eye-RGS-6

Demonstration of the Week:

 Leon Foucault first demonstrated the turning earth 6 January 1851

Foucault's Pendulum in the Panthéon, Paris Source: Wikimedia Commons

Foucault’s Pendulum in the Panthéon, Paris
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 David Ellyard Discoveries: Leon Foucault and The Turning Earth

Space Watchtower: 165th Anniversary: Foucault Pendulum

Discovery of the Week:

The four largest moons of Jupiter were discovered 7 January (Galileo) 8 January (Simon Marius)

 

Jupiter and the Galilean Moons Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jupiter and the Galilean Moons
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Jupiter and the Galilean Moons

esa: space science: 7 January

Library University of Michigan: The Galileo Manuscript

The Renaissance Mathematicus: One day later

Simon Marius

Simon Marius

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Encyclopædia Britannica: Wilhelm Beer

Science Museum: Sputnik – engineering a world first

Sputnik Source: Science Museum

Sputnik
Source: Science Museum

Voices of the Manhattan Project: James C. Hobb’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lee DuBridge’s Interview

CNN Style: Astronomical watches: The whole of the night sky, strapped to your wrist

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Roger Rasmussen’s Interview

Society for the History of Astronomy: SHA e-News: Volume 8, no.1, January 2016

AHF: Manhattan Project Spotlight: The Chrysler Corporation

aavso.org: Women in the History of Variable Star Astronomy (pdf)

Early photo of ‘Pickering's Harem’, as the group of women computers assembled by Harvard astronomer Edward Charles Pickering was dubbed. The group included Leavitt, Annie Jump Cannon, Williamina Fleming and Antonia Maury Source: Wikimedia Commons

Early photo of ‘Pickering’s Harem’, as the group of women computers assembled by Harvard astronomer Edward Charles Pickering was dubbed. The group included Leavitt, Annie Jump Cannon, Williamina Fleming and Antonia Maury
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Siegfried Hecker’s Interview

Astronotes: Ancient Astronomy (part 1)

AIP: Bryce DeWitt and Cecile DeWitt-Morette

AHF: Computing and the Manhattan Project

Cooper Hewitt: Book, Atlas of the Celestial Heavens, 19th Century

Project Diana: The Men Who Shot The Moon

Postcard commemorating Project Diana. Image: US Army

Postcard commemorating Project Diana. Image: US Army

Motherboard: Seventy Years Ago, We Bounced Signals Off the Moon for the First Time

The New York Review of Books: Einstein: Right or Wrong

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

dsl.richmond.edu: American Panorama: An Atlas of United States History

Yovisto: William of Rubruck and his Adventurous Journey to Karakorum

Voyage of William of Rubruck in 1253 – 1255

Voyage of William of Rubruck in 1253 – 1255

The New York Times: Harvard’s Find of a Colonial Map of New Jersey Is a Reminder of Border Wars

Atlas Obscura: Captain Cook Monument

Center for Islamic Studies: Maps and Diagram

publicdomain.nypl.org: Navigating The Green Book

Bryars & Bryars: Kerry Lee Revisited: cartographer, commercial artist, socialist

Attractions of London, for Carr’s of Carlisle

Attractions of London, for Carr’s of Carlisle

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Dr Alun Withey: Detoxing in History: the morning after the night before

History Today: Shameful Secrets: Male Sexual Health

Thomas Morris: Don’t mess with an electric eel

Atlas Obscura: Need a Chill Pill? Here’s a Recipe from the 19th Century

Vesalius Census: Warren, Vesalius and the Fine Arts

Vesalius Census: New Fabricas Found

NYAM: Counterfeiting Bodies:Examining the Work of Walther Ryff

Plate 1 of Ryff’s Des aller furtrefflichsten, hoechsten und adelichsten Gschoepffs aller Creaturen (1541).

Plate 1 of Ryff’s Des aller furtrefflichsten, hoechsten und adelichsten Gschoepffs aller Creaturen (1541).

Yovisto: Louis Braille and the Braille System

UW-Milwaukee Special Collections: The Braille World Book Encyclopedia

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Scots abroad: medical influences in the 18th century

Thomas Morris: Unfortunate injury of the decade

The H-Word: The junior doctor’s strike – what really new about it?

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Gruesome Tale of Self-Surgery

General Claude Martin by Renaldi, 1794

General Claude Martin by Renaldi, 1794

Smithsonian Libraries: Unbound: Dr G.Zander’s Medico-Mechanical Gymnastics

Yovisto: Sir Percivall Pott and his Cancer Research

Zócalo Public Square: When California Sterilized 20,000 of Its Citizens

Darin Hayton: Death in the Archive

The Last Word on Nothing: The Wonderful World of Period Patents

US5158535-1-768x523

Joihn Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: History of Midwifery

Thomas Morris: The seven-foot tumour

Thomas Morris: Wine, the great healer

Smithsonian.com: Dr. Gustav Sander’s Victorian-Era Exercise Machines Makes the Bowflex Look Like Child’s Play

Thomas Morris: Dead or alive at will

binet.hypothesis.org: James McKeen Cattell

Gizmodo: Columbia Just Digitalized a Bestselling Anatomy Flipbook From the 1610s

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Thomas Hobbes on Glass

Conciatore: Torricelli and Glass

The Conversation: Mathematical Winters: Ada Lovelace 200 years on

George Boole 200: Timeline of Life Events

The New York Times: Untangling an Accounting Tool and an Ancient Incan Mystery

Patricia Landa, an archaeological conservator, painstakingly cleans and untangles the khipus at her house in Lima. Credit William Neuman/The New York Times

Patricia Landa, an archaeological conservator, painstakingly cleans and untangles the khipus at her house in Lima. Credit William Neuman/The New York Times

CHF: Up, Up and Away: The day a lead balloon flew

BBC: How Germany’s love of silence led to the first earplug

Yovisto: James Watt and the Steam Age Revolution

Academia: Hertha Marks Ayrton: An electric woman (pdf)

The Public Domain Review: Arabic Machine Manuscript

Yovisto: Ulman Stromer and the First Paper Mill North of the Alps

The Renaissance Mathematicus: How papermaking crossed the Alps

Ulman Stromer’s Paper-mill. (From Schedel’s Buch der Chroniken of 1493.)

Ulman Stromer’s Paper-mill. (From Schedel’s Buch der Chroniken of 1493.)

Distillations Blog: Schematic Wiring Diagram of the Basic Integrating Circuit

Open Culture: Meet the “Telharmonium,” the First Synthesizer (and Predecessor to Muzak), Invented in 1897

Hyperallergenic: An Arrow-Shooting Goddess from a Time When Clocks Were Entertainment

quiteirregular: “the use of the post-office is in her own hands” –Anthony Trollope, Pillar Boxes, and Love Letters

Royal Museums Greenwich: A colourful history of the Queen’s House

 

Two Nerdy History Girls: Hackney Cab vs. Hackney Coach

Sotherby’s: A Medieval Revolving Bookmark, manuscript on vellum

Ptak Science Books: Dialing Remote Live Music – a Trip into the Future, 1892

History ASM: Why is the Flying Scotsman so Famous?

Yovisto: Jean-Pierre Blanchard crossed the English Channel in a Balloon

Smithsonian Air & Space: Across the Channel by Balloon

Crossing of the English Channel  by Blanchard and Jeffries

Crossing of the English Channel
by Blanchard and Jeffries

Open Culture: The Fascinating Story of How Delia Derbyshire Created the Original Doctor Who Theme

My medieval foundry: Making medieval bells – part 1 (A never ending series)

Yovisto: Joseph Weizenbaum and his famous Eliza

Icons of Progress: The Punched Card Tabulator

Computer History Museum: Making Sense of the Census: Hollerith’s Punched Card Solution

Two Nerdy History Girls: An 18thc Automaton Watch

The New Yorker: Through the Looking Glass

Medievalists.net: The Early Medieval Cutting Edge of Technology

Heroes of History: Margaret Hamilton – One Giant Leap for Womankind

The Atlantic: The Gift of the Daguerreotype

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

National Geographic: The Time 19th Century Paleontologists Punched it Out

Science: Solving the mystery of dog domestication

Niche: The Otter-La Loutre: Top Five Articles of 2015

Notches: Truly Ugandan: Martyrs, Pope Francis, and the Question of Sexuality

RCPI Heritage Centre Blog: Meteorology, Medicine and Moore

John William Moore in 1887 (VM/1/2/M/19)

John William Moore in 1887 (VM/1/2/M/19)

AMNH: Trilobites and Horseshoe Crabs

Yovisto: Alfred Wegener and the Continental Drift

flickr: BHL: British beetles

Medievalists.net: The Kraken: when myth encounters science

Science League of America: Whence Hopeful Monsters?

Yovisto: Johan Christian Fabricius and his Classification System for Insects

npr: In ‘Heirloom Harvest,’ Old-School Portraits of Vegetable Treasures

Chemistry World: How the leopard got its spots

Data is nature: Thomas Sopwith’s Stratigraphic Models

04 Sopwith Model VII The surface denudation of mineral veins 1841

04 Sopwith Model VII The surface denudation of mineral veins 1841

Tripping from the Fall Line: On the origin of natural history: Steno’s modern, but forgotten philosophy of science

PhilSci Archive: The parallactic recognition of an evolutionary paradox (pdf)

Distillations Blog: Carl Akeley’s Striped Hyenas

Library of Congress: Charting the Gulf Stream

Atlas Obscura: The Exquisite 19th-Century Infographics That Explained the History of the Natural World

TrowelBlazers: Gertrude Caton Thompson

CHEMISTRY:

CHF: The Catalyst Series: Women in Chemistry: Stephanie Kwolek

Photograph of Stephanie Kwolek, taken at Spinning Elements, Chemical Heritage Foundation

Photograph of Stephanie Kwolek, taken at Spinning Elements, Chemical Heritage Foundation

Distillations Blog: The Chemistry of One Coat

Chemistry World: D’Alelio’s resins

The Conversation: The search for new elements on the periodic table started with a blast

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Daily Nous: Philosophers, Physicists, Others Win €2.5m to Study the Large Hadron Collider

The New York Society Library: New York Needs a History of Reading

The Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 13: recipes in Time and Space Part 2 – Between 2

The Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 13: recipes in Time and Space Part 8 – Between 3

Cambridge Journals Online: Medical History: Volume 60 Issue 1 Table of Contents

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: Everything Has a History

Flat Hill: Other Humanities Subjects Lost Majors Too, but History Lost More

Faculty of Life Sciences UoM: Tuesday Feature episode 32: Liz Toon

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Potential Historical Speakers

AEON: Epic Fails: Great theories can spend decades waiting for verification. Failed theories do too. Is there any way to tell them apart?

The Guardian: The problem with science journalism: we’ve forgotten that reality matters most

Conciatore: Michel Montaigne

Science Museum Group Journal: The Cosmonauts challenge

Cover of the associated publication Cosmonauts: birth of space age exhibition, Scala, 2014

Cover of the associated publication Cosmonauts: birth of space age exhibition, Scala, 2014

The New York Times: New York Public Library Invites a Deep Digital Dive

William White Papers: Journal of Inebriety

The Atlantic: A Brief History of Noise: From the big bang to cellphones

John Stewart: Converting Student’s History Essays into Wikipedia Articles

PLOS: one: Text Mining the History of Medicine

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Working Group: Working with Paper: Gender Practices in the History of Knowledge

BHL: BHL Receives 2015 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Award for Field Notes Project

Darin Hayton: Isaac Newton Scientific Revolution Essay

The #EnvHist Weekly

The British Museum: Faith after the pharaohs: Egyptian papyri conservation

William Corbett’s Bookshop: browse the shelves of a seventeenth-century bookshop

University of Exeter: Hidden Florence revealed through new history tour App

ESOTERIC:

Alchemy Website: A modern alchemy hoax exposed

Ptak Science Books: Can You Find the Ancient Death Ray of Death? Symbolism in the Garden of Mathematical Sciences (ca. 1670)

Image: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Image: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Slate: A Short History of Martians

Atlas Obscura: Ritualistic Cat Torture Was Once a Form of Town Fun

distillatio: Sometimes I think people don’t know what Alchemy is, or else they don’t explain why they think there is alchemy in what they see

BOOK REVIEWS:

Andrea Wolf: The Invention of Nature: Winner of Costa Biography Award 2015

Some Beans: A History of the 20th Century in 100 Maps by Tim Bryars and Tom Harper

Notches: Out of the Union: An Interview with Miriam Frank

New Statesman: Magical thinking: the history of science, sorcery and the spiritual

41LhpjSf6JL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_

Science Book a Day: Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons: Medical Photography and Symbolism

Science Book a Day: Untamed: The Wild Life of Jane Goodall

NEW BOOKS:

Liverpool University Press: Manchester: Making a Modern City (incl. James B Sumner on #histSTM)

Boydell & Brewer: Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England

Bloomsbury Publishing: British Nuclear Culture

9781441141330

NCSE: Evolution vs. Creationism: An Introduction, 2nd Edition

UCLA Newsroom: Philosopher Brian Copenhaver publishes two scholarly books on magic

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

History Extra: In pictures: John Dee, the ‘Elizabethan 007’

Dulwich Picture Gallery: The Amazing World of M.C. Escher

Wellcome Trust: Wellcome Trust windows – featuring ‘Tools of the Trade’

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

CT scans of a mummified crocodile with mummified infant crocodiles on its back. From Kom Ombo, Egypt, 650–550 BC.

CT scans of a mummified crocodile with mummified infant crocodiles on its back. From Kom Ombo, Egypt, 650–550 BC.

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

Enduring-Eye-RGS-14

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Closing Soon: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

Group-Edit-Small

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

New Diorama Theatre: Reptember Reloaded 10 January–1 February 2016

EVENTS:

King’s College London: Kass Lecture on the History of Medicine: On the Efficacy of Placebos: An Historian’s Perspective 18 January 2016

Warburg Institute: Maps and Society Lectures: Experiencing Early Lunar Maps through an Eighteenth-Century Collection 14 January 2016

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Edge of Disaster – Vaccines and Epidemics 21 January 2016

UCL: Lecture: Henry Nicholls: The Galapagos. A Natural History 27 January 2016

The Washington Post: These are the most exciting museum happenings in 2016

Gresham College: Lecture: Babbage and Lovelace 19 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

11th Cambridge Wellcome Lecture in the History of Medicine: Michael Stolberg: Curing Diseases and Exchanging Knowledge: Sixteenth-Century Physicians and Their Female Patients 14 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Jan Brueghel the Elder repeatedly depicted telescopes: The Five Senses, 1617 – 1618, by two Flemish masters Jan Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rubens.

Jan Brueghel the Elder repeatedly depicted telescopes:
The Five Senses, 1617 – 1618, by two Flemish masters Jan Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rubens.

TELEVISION:

Notches: The Rejected: Homophile Activists in the Spotlight

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Sci Fri: Things of Beauty: Scientific Instruments of Yore

Youtube: Big Old Lenses – Objectivity #51

Youtube: Numberphile: The iPhone of Slide Rules

Youtube: Natural History of Dinosaurs

Museo Galileo: Celestial Globe

Youtube: Bob Newhart – Herman Hollerith.wmv

Youtube: Fighting Firedamp – The Lamp that Saved 1,000 Lives

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: Submarine for a Stuart King

BBC Radio 4: Front Row: Includes Andrea Wulf talking about her Alexander von Humboldt biography

PODCASTS:

The Telegraph: The best history podcasts

Advances in the History of Psychology: New Books in STS Podcast: Erik Linstrum on Ruling Minds

The Linnean Society: The Video Podcasts: James Sowerby: The Enlightenment’s natural historian

New Books in East Asian Studies: Tea in China: A Religious and Cultural History

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: Objects in Motion

CHF: Distillations: Episode 206: Is Space the Place? Trying to Save Humanity by Mining Asteroids

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Notches: CfP: The History of Venereal Disease Deadline 15 January 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: CfP: Writing Reformation Lives Wolfson College Oxford 27–28 June 2016

Canadian Society for the History of Medicine: CfP: A Palpable Thrill: An Introduction to Medical Humanities McMaster University 6–7 May 2016 Deadline 15 January 2016

Bryn Mawr College: CfP: Re:Humanities ’16: Bleeding Edge to Cutting Edge national digital humanities conference of, for, and by undergraduates 31 April–1 April 2016

Bruges: CfP: SCSC Conference: Jesuit Studies 18–20 August 2016

Queen Mary University, London: CfP: The Life of Testimony/Testimony of Lives – a life writing conference 5–6 May 2016

Cornell University: Inviting Historians of Science/Med/Tech to attend a “Boot Camp” for the History of Capitalism, July 10-23 2016 Deadline 15 January 2016

Medical History Society of New Jersey: Symposium: The Eugenics Movement in New Jersey: A Cautionary Tale 2 February 2016

University of Arizona, Tucson: CfP: Magic and Magicians in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Age 28 April–1 May 2016

University of St Andrews: CfP: Re//Generate Conference Materiality and the Afterlife of Things in the Middle Ages, 500–1500

MIHOS: CfP: Torricelli’s Opera Geometrica (1644)

University of Tartu: CfP: Nordic Network for Philosophy of Science: Fourth Annual Meeting

Dana Centre, Science Museum: CfP: Women Engineers in the Great War and after 23 April 2016

Annapolis: AIP Center for the History of Physics: CfP: The Third Biennial Early-Career Conference for Historians of the Physical Sciences 6–10 April 2016

ICOHTEC Congress Porto: CfP: Nuclear Fun? Banalization of Nuclear Technologies Through Displays 26–30 July 2016

University of Bucharest: An Interdisciplinary Master Class on the Nature of Principles in Western Thought 15–18 March 2016

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series, Spring 2016

University of Groningen: Conference: Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Religion and Science 21-23 March 2016

University of Strasbourg: Training Workshop: Revealing University Objects: From the Attic to the Public 23–27 May 2016

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: CfP: From Knowledge to Profit? Scientific Institutions and the Commercialisation of Science 10–12 October 2016

Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy: Call for Submissions: Method, Science and Mathematics: Neo-Kantianism and Early Analytical Philosophy

University of Flensburg: The International History Philosophy and Science Teaching [IHPST]: 1st European Regional Conference 22-25 August 2016

University of Cardiff: BSPS Annual Conference 7–8 July 2016

University of Brussels: CfP: Appropriation of Isaac Newton’s thought ca. 1700–1750

Center for Philosophy of Science at Pittsburgh: Events

University of Birmingham: CfP: Teaching and Learning in the Middle Ages

New York University: Experimental Philosophy Through History 20 February 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

King’s College London: Georgian Papers Programme Fellowships

Wellcome Trust: Medical Humanities Advisor

UCL: CELL: Research Assistant

Queen Mary University London: Three Funded PhD Studentships: ‘Living With Feeling: Emotional Health in History, Philosophy, and Experience’. Deadline 31 January 2016

Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel: Research Fellowships 2017

CHF: Fellowship Applications 2016–2017 Deadline 15 January 2016

University of Liverpool: ESRC CASE Doctoral Award: Liverpool’s medical community since 1930: shaping knowledge and business networks

The Royal Society: Newton Mobility Grants

New England Regional Fellowship Consortium: Deadline 1 February 2016

New York Public Library: Head of Special Collections Cataloging

University of Strasbourg: Training Workshop: Revealing University Objects: From the Attics to the Public 23–27 May 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Neuro History Grants @ Osler Library

University of Leeds: Postgrad Leeds

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #25

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #25

Monday 04 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

Assuming you survived the artillery barrage and the alcohol excesses of the New year’s celebrations you now have before you the first 2016 edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list, which continues to bring you are that we could find of the histories of science, technology and medicine over the last seven days throughout cyberspace.

Happy NY I

Strictly the New Year’s celebration welcoming the beginning of the year 2016 CE only apply to those whose lives are regulated by the arbitrary prescriptions of the Gregorian calendar, which like all calendars is merely a social convention.

Those who live according to the Jewish calendar are still in the middle of the year AM 5776 which will end at sunset on 2 October 2016 according to the Gregorian calendar. The year will also end around 2 October for those living according to the Islamic calendar but in their case it will be the end of the year 1437 AH. Persians and Afghanis who live according to the Solar Hijri calendar will celebrate the end of their year 1394 on 19 march 2016. The tradition Chinese New Year celebrating the beginning of year 33 in their 60-year cycle will be on 8 February 2016 according to the Gregorian calendar.

For those who prefer to mark the passing of time according to the four principal points of the solar year, vernal or spring equinox falls on 20 March 2016 and the autumnal equinox on 22 September. The summer solstice is on 20 June and the winter solstice is on 21 December.

Whichever calendar you follow and whenever your year begins and ends we hope you will continue to follow Whewell’s Gazette the whole year round.

Happy NY II

Quotes of the week:

 “The problem with the future is that is keeps turning into the present.” – Bill Watterson “Calvin & Hobbes”

Math with Bad Drawings: A Mathematician’s New Year’s Resolutions

mathematician-new-years-5

“I just read this on @‪TheAtlantic “There is just no acceptable level of any chemical to ingest, ever” and then my brain fell out of my ear”. – @Schrokit

“If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.”― Rudyard Kipling h/t @ESA_History

Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift

“Consider in last 10 seconds of 2015 – If earth´s age would be 1 year, written history of humankind would start at 23:59:46” – David Bressan (@David_Bressan)

“Smoking is a leading cause of statistics.” – Fletcher Knebel h/t @intmath

Death Quote

“Statistics means never having to say you’re certain”. – Murray Bourne (@intmath)

“I have not time nor Paper to describe this horrid spot of Hills, the like of which I never yet saw” – Halley unimpressed by Snowdonia. h/t @KateMorant

“Often history will work when nothing else will.” – J.H. Robinson (1863-1936) h/t @tabosaur

“…the pursuit of evidence is probably the most pressing moral imperative of our time.” – Alice Dreger (@AliceDreger)

“Anyone who finds “Lord of the Flies” incredible has not spent enough time in a British Isles’ secondary school”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“Man produces evil as a bee produces honey…” William Golding (1965) h/t @DublinSoil

“What distinguishes humans from the rest of the animal kingdom is our capacity for hypocrisy”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“I would like 2016 to be the year when people remembered that science is a method of investigation and NOT a belief system”. – John Cleese (@JohnCleese)

mistake quote

Birthday of the Week:

Ceres the asteroid discovered 1 January 1801

A view of Ceres in natural colour, pictured by the Dawn spacecraft in May 2015.

A view of Ceres in natural colour, pictured by the Dawn spacecraft in May 2015.

Motherboard: The 19th Century Space Controversy That Sparked a Planet Truther Movement

astropa.unipa.it: Bode’s Law and the Discovery of Ceres

The first element transmutation 3 January 1919 by Ernest Rutherford

Rutherford

AHF: Ernest Rutherford

 

Isaac Asimov celebrated his birth on 2 January 1920

Isaac Asimov celebrated his birth on 2 January 1920

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Royal Museums Greenwich: Conserving Galileo

AIP: Maarten Schmidt

MSFC history Office: “The Disney-Von Braun Collaboration and Its Influence on Space Exploration”

erittenhouse: The Art of Making Leyden Jars and Batteries According to Benjamin Franklin

AHF: Klaus Fuchs

Darin Hayton: Maria Wants Her Sextant Back

The first building completed at Vassar College was the observatory, long called the Maria Mitchell Observatory.

The first building completed at Vassar College was the observatory, long called the Maria Mitchell Observatory.

Cooper Hewitt: The Great Moon Hoax of 1835

Atlas Obscura: In 1844, the Philippines Skipped a Day, and it Took Decades for the Rest of the World to Notice

Perimeter Institute: Pioneering Women of Physics

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Just another day

APS: Historic Sites Initiative

BBC Future: How the most expensive structure in the world was built

The ISS may lack the drama of missions like Apollo 13, but that’s how mission control would prefer it (Credit: Nasa)

The ISS may lack the drama of missions like Apollo 13, but that’s how mission control would prefer it (Credit: Nasa)

New Historian: Demon Star Influenced Egyptian Calendars

Huff Post: The Blog: Peake and the Women that Science Forgot

AHF: John von Neumann

AHF: Jumbo

Atlas Obscura: Jantar Mantar

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Cornell University Library: Division of Rare & Manuscript Collections: Persuasive Cartography

Barron Maps Blog: The persuasive power of maps – the Danzig Crisis & Nazi Propaganda map postcards, 1933–1939

Der-Korridor-als-Verwaltungszerstörer-German-Propaganda-postcard-c1933-5-01

Big Think: Is This Map Australia’s Clumsy Attempt at Fabricating a Japanese Invasion During WWII?

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Flemming #histmed quote

Thomas Morris: Sober up the nineteenth-century way

National Journal: That is the Brain that Shot President James Garfield: But why? A 135-year-old mystery

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Mummies and the Usefulness of Death

Atlas Obscura: The Toothbrush that Grows on Trees

Embryo Project: Test-Tube Baby

ODNB: Scarburgh, Sir Charles

The Victorianist: The ‘lady Doctor’ and the ‘helpless Native’: Constructing the Female Doctor/Patient Relationship in Nineteenth-Century India

Florence Dissent (From Indian Medical Record). Source: Library, Royal College of Surgeons of England

Florence Dissent (From Indian Medical Record). Source: Library, Royal College of Surgeons of England

Ptak Science Books: The Leech Explorers of 1833

Thomas Morris: The child that cried in the womb

Advances in the History of Psychology: Special Issue on Cinema and Neuroscience

Greg Jenner: How did women deal with their periods? The history of Menstruation

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Pasteur Institute and the Study of the Animal Mind

Vesalius Census: New Blog

Vesalius Census: Bibliography as Search Engine

Thomas Morris: Death from too much pie

Wellcome Library: The ‘disease woman’ of the Wellcome Apocalypse

Source: Wellcome Library

Source: Wellcome Library

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases: The 1899 United States Kissing Bug Epidemic

Thomas Morris: Impaled on a stake

British Library: Vesalius’s Anatomy

The Guardian: Opium-soaked tampons, voodoo elixirs and leeches: welcome to New Orleans’ Pharmacy Museum

CHF: Tryals and Tribulations: In 17th-century England, doctors battled illness and each other

TECHNOLOGY:

Ptak Science Books: Illustrating the Effect of Destructive Capacity: August, 1914

erittenhouse: The David H.H. Felix Collection and the Beginnings of the Smithsonian’s Museum of History of Technology

Corning Museum of Glass: Souvenirs and Mold-Blown Glass for the Marketplace

Techné: Reading Feynman Into Nanotechnology: A Text for a New Science (pdf)

Conciatore: Ultramarine Blue

Conciatore: Containing Hooke’s Tears

Glass drops or tears coated in glue, after detonation, (cross section is left) from Robert Hooke's Micrographia 1664, between p. 10, 11.

Glass drops or tears coated in glue,
after detonation, (cross section is left)
from Robert Hooke’s
Micrographia 1664, between p. 10, 11.

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Rocket Engine, Liquid Fuel, R. Goddard

The Vault of the Atomic Space Age: The GE Performance Television

Newsworks: First flight or historic hop?

Mental Floss: The Theatrophone: The 19th-Century Version of Livestreaming

Ptak Science Books: Troncet’s Arithmograpphe, the “Instant Calculator” (1892)

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Demonstrations in Europe

A refinement of the 1905 Flyer, the Wright Model A was flown on demonstration flights in Europe in 1908 and 1909. Source: Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

A refinement of the 1905 Flyer, the Wright Model A was flown on demonstration flights in Europe in 1908 and 1909.
Source: Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Smithsonian.com: From Edison’s Light Bulb to the Ball in Time Square

The Telegraph: Robert Boyle’s prophetic scientific predictions from the 17th century go on display at the Royal Society

Canadian Science and Technology Museums: Collection Online: Cycle, stationary

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

American Scientist: Rereading Darwin

Medium: We’ve been talking about climate change for a long time

The Royal Society: Notes and Records: A Yankee at Oxford: John William Draper at the British Association for the Advancement of Science at Oxford, 30 June 1860

Portrait of John Draper engraved by John Sartain Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of John Draper engraved by John Sartain
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Geschichte der Geologie: Vom Bergbau, Waldrodung und Umweltzerstörung

es.ucsc.edu: The Age of the Earth Debate (pdf)

The Public Domain Review: Sex and Science in Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora

Georgian Gentleman: Saartjie Baartman – a reminder of a tragic life – and death – two hundred years ago

The Three Graces – A midget, the Hottentot Venus and an albino woman, shown courtesy of the British Museum

The Three Graces – A midget, the Hottentot Venus and an albino woman, shown courtesy of the British Museum

Science League of America: Absurdly Inadequate

Ptak Science Books: Antiquarian Comparative Analysis: Lakes, Islands, Mountains

Once Upon a Time…: A Dino-Lover’s Dream – 1853’s New Year’s Eve Dinner in Crystal Palace Park

Forbes: How to Celebrate the New Year Like a Victorian Paleontologist

Dinner in the Iguanodon Model, at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham, London Illustrated News, 7 January 1854 (image in public domain).

Dinner in the Iguanodon Model, at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham, London Illustrated News, 7 January 1854 (image in public domain).

Blink: Death of the floating world

Process: Has Environmental History Lost Its Way?

TrowellBlazers: TrowelBlazers 2015 Review

Geschichte der Geologie: Gottes Werk und Teufels Beitrag: Der Vulkan als Gott und Höllentor

CHEMISTRY:

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Cabinets for the Curious

Len Fisher: How Robert Boyle and I Became Chemists

Beautiful Chemistry.net: Beautiful Chemistry Instrument

Boyle's Vacuum Pump (1660) Reproduced based on Robert Boyle's book, New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring of the Air, and Its Effects (1660).

Boyle’s Vacuum Pump (1660)
Reproduced based on Robert Boyle’s book, New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring of the Air, and Its Effects (1660).

CHF: Robert Boyle

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Environmental History: Volume 21 Issue 1 January 2016 Table of Contents

eRittenhouse: Vol. 26 2015 Issue 74 Table of Contents

Brooklyn Magazine: From Bumper Cars to Torah Taxidermy: A Guide to 25 of Brooklyn’s Most Unusual Museums

The Morbid Anatomy Museum

The Morbid Anatomy Museum

American Panorama: An Atlas of United States History

Lady Science: Lady Science Reading List

Literacy of the Present: Living in the past: advice to a time traveller

Scientific American: Gone in 2015: Commemorating 10 Outstanding Women in Science

Aída Fernández Ríos GALICIAN ROYAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Aída Fernández Ríos
GALICIAN ROYAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Ether Wave Propaganda: The Empiricist Potential: EWP at 8

The #EnvHist Weekly

MHS Oxford: New on Instagram

New York Times: How to Cultivate the Art of Serendipity

ESOTERIC:

h/t Anna Resner (@AnnaNResner)

h/t Anna Resner (@AnnaNResner)

Conciatore: The Kabbalah

Mysterious Universe: Was John Dee’s Fascination With the Occult Driven by Espionage?

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science League of America: The Rocky Road to Acceptance, Part 1

Science League of America: The Rocky Road to Acceptance, Part 2

powell_cover

Science League of America: The Rocky Road to Acceptance, Part 3

Science League of America: The Rocky Road to Acceptance, Part 4

PLOS: Genetics: Women Don’t Give a Crap

Gizmodo: The Discovery of the Solar System Included Some Dead Ends In The Hunt for Vulcan

Granta: Best Book of 2003: The Curious Life of Robert Hooke

NEW BOOKS:

Routledge: Women and Gender in the Early Modern World

Penguin Random House: Magic in Islam

9780399176708

Springer: A History of Women Philosophers A.D. 500–1600

torriherridge.com: The World’s Smallest Mammoth

Palgrave: Conjuring Science: A History of Scientific Entertainment and Stage Magic in Modern France

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Inside MHS Oxford: What happens to loan objects?

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Two women wiring the right side of the ENIAC with a new program, ca. 1946. Courtesy US Army. Standing: Marlyn Wescoff, Crouching: Ruth Lichterman.

Two women wiring the right side of the ENIAC with a new program, ca. 1946. Courtesy US Army. Standing: Marlyn Wescoff, Crouching: Ruth Lichterman.

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Last Chance: Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

The Hull of the Mary Rose in her drying out period

The Hull of the Mary Rose in her drying out period

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Closing Soon: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

Royal Astronomical Society: “The Way to the Stars” – a dramatized celebration of the history of women astronomers leading up their admission as Fellows of the RAS in 1916 8 January 2016

EVENTS:

Gresham College: Lecture: Babbage and Lovelace 19 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

11th Cambridge Wellcome Lecture in the History of Medicine: Michael Stolberg: Curing Diseases and Exchanging Knowledge: Sixteenth-Century Physicians and Their Female Patients 14 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Royal Astronomical Society: RAS Public Lecture: 100th Anniversary of the election of Women to the RAS Fellowship 12 January 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

CHF: Science on Tap: Gas on Tap: Loony Gas and the History and Science of Gasoline 11 January 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Michael Faraday at work in his laboratory in the basement of the Royal Institution in London. Painting by Harriet Moore Source: Wikimedia Commons

Michael Faraday at work in his laboratory in the basement of the Royal Institution in London. Painting by Harriet Moore
Source: Wikimedia Commons

TELEVISION:

Royal Institution: Christmas Lecture 2015

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Electric Love

Vimeo: The Mystery of Matter: Other Discoverers of the Periodic Table

Science Friday: Diary of Snakebite Death

RADIO:

BBC World Service: Royal Institute Lectures 2015

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: Submarine for a Stuart King

PODCASTS:

University of Oxford: Enchantress of Numbers or a mere debugger?: a brief history of cultural and academic understanding of Ada Lovelace

New Books in East Asia Studies: Rice: Global Networks and New Histories

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Deutsches Bergbau-Museum Bochum: VDI Ausschuss Technikgeschichte: Objektgeschichte(n) Jahrestagung Bochum, 11.‐12. Februar 2016

Stevens Institute of Technology: The Maintainers: A Conference, April 8, 2016

Calgary, Alberta: 2nd Call for Abstracts: CSHPS Annual Conference Calgary 28-30 May 2016

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens: CfP: Music and the animal world in Hellenic and Roman antiquity 15 March 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

ChoM News: 2016-2017 Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

Trinity College Dublin: Ussher Assistant Professor in Environmental History Since 1800

Amsterdam School for Heritage and Memory Studies: PhD Candidate

MHS Oxford: Team Leader, Move Project ­– MHS Project Assistant (2 posts) – Move Project

The Centre for the History of the Emotions at Queen Mary University of London: Three funded PhD studentships on ‘Living With Feeling’ project

University of Groningen: New MA Programme in Theory/history of Psychology

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazete: Year2, Vol. #24

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #24

Monday 28 December 2015

EDITORIAL:

Christmas has come and gone but here comes the next edition of the weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette, to chase away those post Christmas blues by bringing you the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine that found its way into the Internet over the last seven days.

25 December, Christmas Day saw the anniversary of Isaac Newton’s birth, or did it? Many people, including myself, posted various things on the Internet in celebration of the day but a small minority of spoilsports posted on Twitter and Facebook that it wasn’t Newton’s birthday because of the calendar reform. In reality in our times Newton’s ‘real’ birthday falls on 4 January. If you’re confused you can read the grisly details in an old blog post of mine, Calendrical confusion or just when did Newton die? Despite the title it also deals with the date of Newton’s birth.

Now as I’ve written more than once in the past, Newton was born on Christmas Day in his own time and celebrated his birthday eighty-four years long on Christmas day and so I think, although it is calendrically wrong, it is somehow more apposite to celebrate his birthday on Christmas Day than on 4 January. So despite the spoilsports I for one shall continue to do so.

Interestingly 27 December saw the anniversary of Johannes Kepler’s birth with an equally large number of people throughout the Internet celebrating the fact. However nobody pointed out the fact that his birthdate is old style i.e. according to the Julian Calendar and therefore we should wait until 6 January before celebrating! One rule for Isaac and another for Johannes it would appear.

MHS Oxford Advent Calendar

Day 21: ‘Tower’ Table Clock, by ‘HP’ or ‘HR’, German, 17th Century

Day 22: Microscope Slides in Small Cardboard Box

Day 23: Dissecting Microscope, by E. Leitz, Wetzlar, c.1900-25imu-media.php

Day 24: Globe Clock and Sundial, Dial by Ulrich Schniep, French and Germany, 16th Century

Culham Research Group: Advent Calendar

Day 21: Winter Mint

Day 22: Healing Christmas: Cinnamon

Day 23: Night of the Radishes

Rabanos2014_027ab

Day 24: King Protea

After the twenty-four days of Advent we of course have the twelve days of Christmas

12 Days of Royal Museums Christmas

christmas 1

 

Royal College of Physicians Twelve days of Christmas

1513197_10151798152302721_657761975_n

The Recipes Project: Happy Holidays

 The book of household management by Mrs Beeton Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

The book of household management by Mrs Beeton
Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Quotes of the week:

Hypothesis: many people confuse their hypotheses with the truth. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

Wright brothers quote

“A small error at the beginning of something is a great one at the end” – Thomas Aquinas h/t @JohnAllenPaulos

A little nonsense now and then, is cherished by the wisest men. — Roald Dahl h/t @berfois

“There is no such thing as an empty space or an empty time… In fact, try as we may to make a silence, we cannot.” – John Cage h/t @t3dy

pythag quote

“Discretion, like the hole in a doughnut, does not exist except as an area left open by a surrounding belt of restriction.”—R. Dworkin h/t @GuyLongworth

“Asked what Walter Benjamin means when he says that capitalism is a religion, a student answered with one word: Christmas”. – Jan Mieszkowski (@janmpdx)

“A gingerbread man sits inside a gingerbread house. Is the house made of flesh? Or is he made of house? He screams, for he does not know”. – Kris Wilson (@TheKrisWilson)

Kepler quote

“Science knows no country because knowledge belongs to humanity, and is the torch which illuminates the world.” – Louis Pasteur h/t @embryoproject

Birthday of the Week:

The Transistor was born 23 December 1947

Transistor

Wired: Dec. 23, 1947: Transistor Opens Door to Digital Future

Youtube: AT&T Archives: Genesis of the Transistor

Yovisto: The Birth of the Transistor

Canada Science and Technology Museums: Transistor

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

AIP: Bryce DeWitt and Cecile DeWitt-Morette

AIP: Ira Sprague Bowen

Cosmos: Celebrating James Maxwell the father of light

Mathematician and poet James Clerk Maxwell. CREDIT: SPL/ GETTY IMAGES/ (BACKGROUND) SOLA

Mathematician and poet James Clerk Maxwell.
CREDIT: SPL/ GETTY IMAGES/ (BACKGROUND) SOLA

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Roger Fulling’s Interview

NASA: Apollo 8

Fourier’s Heat Conduction Equation: History, Influence, and Connections

The Conversation: What can science tell us about the Star of Bethlehem?

Science Alert: Can astronomy explain the Biblical Star of Bethlehem?

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Christmas Trilogy Part 1: The famous witty Mrs Barton

Catherine Barton, Isaac Newton's half-niece Source: Wikimedia Commons

Catherine Barton, Isaac Newton’s half-niece
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Leicester Mercury: Barwell meteorite: 50th anniversary of the day it fell to earth

NASA: Johannes Kepler

Brown: Ladd Observatory Blog: The Boston Time-Ball

AHF: Emilio Segrè

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Northeasterners Were Always Snobs – And These Maps Prove It

Geographical: On This Day: 1915, Shackleton marches on Christmas Day

Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

World Digital Library: Mappamundi

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Spitalfields Life: Phil Maxwell at the London Hospital

Shakespeare & Beyond: The Four Humors: Eating in the Renaissance

Humors-graphic-654x1024

Royal College of Physicians: Robert Willan and the history of dermatology

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: Sir Percivall Pott: A Doctor from Threadneedle Street

The Chirugeon’s Apprentice: Not Just For Kissing: Medicinal Uses of Mistletoe (Past & Present)

Wellcome Library: Edward Jenner: pamphleteer

RCS Bulletin: The compassionate surgeon: Lessons from the past

Thomas Morris: The perils of Christmas pudding

Ingoldsby-Xmas-pudding

The Recipes Project: Gluttony and “Surfeit” in Early Modern Europe

Slate: The Death of Jacqueline Smith

Thomas Morris: The hidden dangers of a Victorian Christmas

Quartz: Thank Columbus! The true story of how syphilis spread to Europe

Thomas Morris: A Victorian hospital Christmas

Medical Daily: Mad Scientists: 6 Scientists Who Were Dismissed as Crazy, Only to be Proven Right Years Later

Ptak Science Books: A Plate Full of Eyes (1851)6a00d83542d51e69e201b7c7c4f859970b-500wi

 

The Daily Beast: The Nixon-Masked Man Who Helped End Homosexuality as a Disease

Embryo Project: The Pasteur Institute (1887– )

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatotre: The Rise and Fall

Conciatore: Fake Pearls

Johannes Vermeer "Girl with a pearl earring" (1665-6)

Johannes Vermeer
“Girl with a pearl earring” (1665-6)

History Matters: The End of Coal: An Industry Out of Time

Motherboard: The Primitive Streetlights That Predicted Electronic Music in 1899

 

The National Museum of American History: Aaron Cane Torsion Pendulum Clock

Wired: Dec. 22, 1882: Looking at Christmas in a New Light

Today in Science: The First Electric Christmas Tree Lights

Photo taken on 25 Dec 1882 showing Edward H. Johnson's Christmas tree with strings of electric lamps.

Photo taken on 25 Dec 1882 showing Edward H. Johnson’s Christmas tree with strings of electric lamps.

Yovisto: The World’s Fastest Aircraft – Lockheed SR-71

Yovisto: James Rumsey’s Steam Boat

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Celluloid: The Eternal Substitute

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Christmas Trilogy Part 2: Understanding the Analytical Engine

Trial model of a part of the Analytical Engine, built by Babbage, as displayed at the Science Museum (London) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Trial model of a part of the Analytical Engine, built by Babbage, as displayed at the Science Museum (London)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Christmas Trilogy Part 3: Roll out the barrel

ASME: Radio City Music Hall Hydraulically Actuated Stage 1932

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Embryo Project: Petr Alekseevich Kropotkin (1842–1921)

The Public Domain Review: Robin Redbreast (1907)

Colorized_Robin_Drawing

Yovisto: Jean-Henri Fabre – The Virgil of Insects

Science League of America: “Not Proved and Not Provable”

The East End: Charles Jamrach

The Atlantic: The Forgotten Father of Environmentalism

BHL: Tired of Poinsettias? Bah, Humbug! Then into the Smithsonian Library

Smithsonian.com: How Joel Poinsett, the Namesake for the Poinsettia, Played a Role in Creating the Smithsonian

John Roberts Poinsett (1779-1851) (Library of Congress) Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/a-smithsonian-holiday-story-joel-poinsett-and-the-poinsettia-3081111/#kwHjAGbYLCyYWvVv.99 Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

John Roberts Poinsett (1779-1851) (Library of Congress)

 

jamescungureanu: Newcomb and the Christian Evolutionists

Motherboard: The Eight Best Extinct Species Discovered in 2015

Medievalists.net: Medieval Beekeeping

The New York Times: The Subway Garnet

Atlas Obscura: 9 Beautiful Portraits of Rescued Owls

The cover of Leila Jeffreys new book Bird Love, published by Abrams.

The cover of Leila Jeffreys new book Bird Love, published by Abrams.

Science at Play: Sciencecraft Mineralogy Outfit No. 510, c. 1940

Medievalists.net: 10 Natural Disasters that Struck the Medieval World

CHEMISTRY:

AHF: Otto Hahn

Tyler’s Museum: Curie, Marie (Dutch)

Curie Chem

AHF: Marie Curie

CHF: Scientific Instrument Makes Leap from Lab to Historical Significance

Conciatore: Sal Ammoniac

CHF: Louis Pasteur

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

EME Calendar: A Calendar of Calls and Events about Early Modern Experimentation

Yovisto: Leopold von Ranke and the Science of History

Leopold von Ranke (1795 – 1886)

Leopold von Ranke
(1795 – 1886)

TPM Online: Biology vs Physics: Two Ways of Doing Science?

Academia: Scientific Celebrity: The Paradoxical Case of Emil du Bois-Reymond

The Guardian: Science and Christmas: a forgotten Victorian romance

Ancient Greek Philosopher: Against Empiricism: Galen’s Arguments

The Ordered Universe Project: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Materialism and the Value of Conscious Life

the scholarly kitchen: Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Our Story: Hamiltunes and the Burden of Founding Histories

digital.deutsches-museum.de: Gründungssammlung des Deutsches Museum

Pachs.net: News and Notes: Coastal Identities: Science Technology, Commerce and the State in American Seaports 1790–1850

Why Evolution is True: Kevin J Connolly (1936–2015)

209224a0

University of Oxford: 15cBookTrade

facebook: John Wesley Honors College: 2015 Aldergate Prize Awarded to Australian Laureate Fellow

Epistemocritique: Belles lettres, science et littérature

The New York Times: Robert Spitzer, Psychiatrist Who Set Rigorous Standards for Diagnosis, Dies at 83

Dr. Robert L. Spitzer was a major architect of the modern classification of mental illnesses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Credit Alex di Suvero for The New York Times

Dr. Robert L. Spitzer was a major architect of the modern classification of mental illnesses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Credit Alex di Suvero for The New York Times

History of Science: Carla Nappi: “Hey, historians of sci/med/tech: submit things to the History of Science journal! We’re looking for innovative, risk-taking work. Help push the field in new directions and send us your grooviness”

 

ESOTERIC:

Heterodoxology: Review symposium on “The Problem of Disenchantment”

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: Science and Nature: Observer Books of the Year 2015

Mad Art Lab: The Women in Science Reading List: The Twenty Best (and Four Not Best) Books to Read and Own

G19-DeBakcsy-300x300

New York Review of Books: Lead Poisoning: The Ignored Scandal

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on Climate Change Fiction

Science Book a Day: Why Things Break: Understanding the World by the Way It Comes Apart

The Boston Globe: ‘The Invention of Science by David Wooton (sic)

The Scientist: Capsule Reviews

Cosmos: Light from the East

NEW BOOKS:

Brill: Virtuoso by Nature: The Scientific Worlds of Francis Willughby FRS (1635–1672)

Francis Willughby 1635 – 1672 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Francis Willughby 1635 – 1672
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Margot Lee Shetterly: Hidden Figures: The African American Women Mathematicians Who Helped NASA and the United States Win the Space Race: An Untold Story

University of Pennsylvania Press: Thinking in Public: Strauss, Levinas, Arendt

The University of Chicago Press: Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

Dogs watching Endurance in the final stages of its drift, shortly before it sank to the bottom of the Weddell Sea Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dogs watching Endurance in the final stages of its drift, shortly before it sank to the bottom of the Weddell Sea
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

LAST CHANCE: Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Replica of the Small-Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM) at the Museum of Science and Industry in Castlefield, Manchester Source: Wikimedia Commons

Replica of the Small-Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM) at the Museum of Science and Industry in Castlefield, Manchester
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

 

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

EVENTS:

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Cliva A. Burden 1 Thornton South Carolina

Cliva A. Burden 1 Thornton South Carolina

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

11th Cambridge Wellcome Lecture in the History of Medicine: Michael Stolberg: Curing Diseases and Exchanging Knowledge: Sixteenth-Century Physicians and Their Female Patients 14 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Royal Astronomical Society: RAS Public Lecture: 100th Anniversary of the election of Women to the RAS Fellowship 12 January 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Members of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, painted by Peder Severin Krøyer Source: Wikimedia Commons

Members of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, painted by Peder Severin Krøyer
Source: Wikimedia Commons

TELEVISION:

Royal Institution: Christmas Lecture 2015

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

FiveThirtyEightLife: The Queen of Code

Youtube: UCC Ireland: An Investigation of the Laws of Thought – George Boole

Youtube: NASA: Hidden Figures: The Female Mathematicians of NACA and NASA

CHF: Science at Play Shorts

Youtube: Space Debris: 1957–2015

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Michael Faraday

Michael Faraday by Thomas Phillips oil on canvas, 1841-1842  NPG Source: Wikimedia Commons

Michael Faraday by Thomas Phillips oil on canvas, 1841-1842 NPG
Source: Wikimedia Commons

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Groningen: CfP: The Politics of Paper in the Early Modern World 9–10 June 2016

University of Groningen: Conference: Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Religion and Science 21–23 March 2016

141118-header-thomas-750

Western University in London Ontario: CfP: 16th Annual Philosophy of Logic, Math and Physics Graduate Student Conference 910 June 2016

Durham University: Conference: Self-Commentary in Early Modern European Literature 26–27 February 2016

Barts Pathology Museum and the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, London: CfP: Corpses, Cadavers and Catalogues: The Mobilities of Dead Bodies and Body Parts, Past and Present, 17–18 May 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Kent: School of History: Postgraduate Funding

UCL: CELL: Research Assistant

University of Cambridge: UL in Science, Technology and Medicine before 1800

CHF: Fellowships 2016-17 Applications due by 15 January 2016

St. Cross College, Oxford: History and Philosophy of Physics Visiting Fellow

Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Post-Doctoral position “Juan de la Cierva”: History of Nuclear Energy and Society in Europe.

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: year 2, Vol. #23

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #23

Monday 21 December 2015

EDITORIAL:

Christmas is coming and the goose is getting fat and here is a fat edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you all the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the Internet over the last seven days, to give you something to read whilst you’re trying to digest all of that food you’ve stuffed in over Christmas.

Most of the celebrations at this time of year are actually not connected with the birth of Christ but with the Winter Solstice, which this year is on the 22 December. On this day the sun reaches the southern most point on its yearly journey over the Tropic of Capricorn, turns (the word tropic derives from the Greek topikos meaning ‘of or pertaining to a turn’) and starts its long trek back up to the north bringing first spring and then summer to the northern climes and leaving those in the south their winter.

wintersolstice

Solstice is a more better day to celebrate than 25 December or 1 January being a natural end and beginning to the annual solar cycle, so all of the owls here at Whewell’s Gazette wish all of our readers all the best for the holiday season and look forward to greeting you again after this years Christmas weekend.

Owl

MHS Oxford Advent Calendar

Day 14: Marble Copy of John Dee’s 1582 Holy Table, English, Mid C.17th

Day 15: Gelatine Print of Henry Moseley, Balliol-Trinity Labs, Oxford,1910

Day 16: Exploding Horizontal Cannon Dial, English?, c.1900

Day 17: Astrolabe, by Muhammad Muqim, Lahore, 1641/2

imu-media.php

Day 18: Instruction Booklet For Aircraft Wireless Telephone Transmitter

Day 19: Armillary Orrery, by Richard Glynne, London, c. 1710-30

Day 20: “Chemical Magic” Chemistry Set, by F. Kingsley, London, c. 1920

Culham Research Group: Advent Calendar

Day 14: the Olive

Day 15: Mahleb

Day 16: Straw or Hay, which will make Dr M’s day?

Loose stacked hay built around a central pole, Romania

Loose stacked hay built around a central pole, Romania

Day 17: Sgan t’sek

Day 18: The Tangerine – Just Like a Virgin

Day 19: Popcorn tree decorations

Day 20: Sugar

Quotes of the week:

Merry X-mas

“We all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible player”. – Albert Einstein h/t @phalpern

“To fathom hell or soar angelic

Just take a pinch of psychedelic.” – Adam Lagerqvist (@adamlagerqvist)

Banker

This is my favorite Hindi curse: “Why are boring me with all this useless narrative?” – Gabriel Finkelstein (@gabridli)

“We become what we pay attention to, so we must be careful what we pay attention to.” – Kurt Vonngut

Kim Robinson

Joseph Stalin and Keith Richards

were born on Dec. 18th.

Can you guess which one

was born 137yrs ago? – @Marcywords2

Planck quote

Men: Not ALL men.

Men to their daughters: Yes, all men. Every single one of them. – @ChiefElk

Birthday of the Week:

 Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, Marquise du Châtelet born 17 December 1706

Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, marquise du Châtelet  Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, marquise du Châtelet
Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A feminist Newtonian

Yovisto: A great man whose only fault was being a woman – Émilie du Châtelet

Tycho Brahe Born 14 December 1546

Tycho Brahe (1596) Artist unknown Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tycho Brahe (1596) Artist unknown
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 The Renaissance Mathematicus: Financing Tycho’s little piece of heaven

Yovisto: Tycho Brahe – The Man with the Golden Nose

Bildgeist: Tycho Brahe, Astronomical Instruments (1598)

The Royal Library: Astronomiæ instauratæ mechanica

esa: space for europe: 14 December

British Museum: Effigies Tychonis Brahe

Star Child: Tycho Brahe

BibliOdyssey: Tycho Mechanica

Humphy Davy born 17 December 1778

Sir Humphry Davy, Bt by Thomas Phillips Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sir Humphry Davy, Bt
by Thomas Phillips
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Science and Celebrity: Humphry Davy’s Rising

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: The Invention of the Davy Lamp

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

JJ Tho

Yovisto: Max Planck and the Quantum Theory

History Extra: Life of the Week: Albert Einstein

Muslim Heritage: The Armillary Sphere: A Concentration of Knowledge in Islamic Astronomy

AIP: N. G. Basov

Yovisto: Nikolay Basov and the Development of the Maser and Laser

Museum Victoria Collections: Great Melbourne Telescope

Erection of Great Melbourne Telescope, 1869 Source: Museum Victoria This image is: Public Domain

Erection of Great Melbourne Telescope, 1869
Source: Museum Victoria
This image is: Public Domain

3 Quarks Daily: Maxwell and the Mathematics of Metaphor

Atlas Obscura: Leiden Observatory

Leaping Robot: Astronomers and the Art of Reconciliation

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Carl Higby’s Interview

Somnuium Project: Project the First Interactive Rudolphine (Under Construction)

The Saturday Evening Post: “Imagination Is More Important than Knowledge”

AHF: Nuclear Reactors

Living in the Chinese Cosmos: The Chinese Cosmos: Basic Concepts

The Yinyang Symbol Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate, from the Compendium of Diagrams (detail), 1623 Zhang Huang (1527-1608)

The Yinyang Symbol
Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate, from the Compendium of Diagrams (detail), 1623
Zhang Huang (1527-1608)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Franklin Mattias’s Interview

collections.ucolick.org: The Lick Observatory: Historical Collections

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Mensis or menstruation?

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Communications Satellite, SCORE

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The greatest villain in the history of science?

Andreas Ostinater by Georg Pencz Source: Wikimedia Commons

Andreas Ostinater by Georg Pencz
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alex Wellerstein: The Secrets Patents for the Atomic Bomb

AIP: David Bohm

AHF: Espionage

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Yovisto: Amundsen’s South Pole Expedition

Library of Congress: Putting Boston on the Map: Land Reclamation and the Growth of a City

Atlas Obscura: Maps of the World’s Most Cursed Destinations

Nuuk Marluk: Inuit Cartography

In English, the caption reads: "Kuniit's three wooden (tree) maps show the journey from Sermiligaaq to Kangertittivatsiaq. Map to the right shows the islands along the coast, while the map in the middle shows the mainland and is read from one side of the block around to the other. Map to the left shows the peninsula between the fjords Sermiligaaq and Kangertivartikajik." From "Topografisk Atlas Grønland", published by Det Kongeglige Danske Geografiske Selskab, 2000 (pg 171).

In English, the caption reads: “Kuniit’s three wooden (tree) maps show the journey from Sermiligaaq to Kangertittivatsiaq. Map to the right shows the islands along the coast, while the map in the middle shows the mainland and is read from one side of the block around to the other. Map to the left shows the peninsula between the fjords Sermiligaaq and Kangertivartikajik.” From “Topografisk Atlas Grønland”, published by Det Kongeglige Danske Geografiske Selskab, 2000 (pg 171).

Atlas Obscura: The Hidden Bolts That Drive Manhattan’s Infrastructure Nerds Nuts

Atlas Obscura: How the World Looked When Jesus was Born According to Roman Geographers

The Tablet: The Priest who Mapped the World

Haaretz: Old Maps of Jerusalem Combine the Sacred With the Realistic

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: There was an old woman who swallowed a fork…

The Kansas City Star: Kansas City’s nuclear legacy trails weapon makers and their families

Fugitive Leaves: Letting Fall Grains of Sand or Pins into a Glass: Finding the Poetry of René Laennec at the Historical Medical Library

The Champlain Society: Performing Blindness: A Postcard of the Taylor Concert Company, c1910, and the Canadian History of Disability

Taylor-Concert-Co-postcard-scan

Med. Hist: Digitisation, Big Data, and the Future of the Medical Humanities

Yovisto: Niels Ryberg Finsen and the Phototherapy

The Recipes Project: Van Helmont on the Plague Again!

Thomas Morris: A beetle in the bladder

Wellcome Library Blog: A gift for Disability History Month

Thomas Morris: Death by Christmas dinner

History of Medicine in Ireland: Medical Practitioners in Early Modern Irish Wills

Res Obscura: The Alchemy of Madness: Understanding a Seventeenth-Century “Brain Scan”

"Le Médecin guérissant Phantasie," Mattheus Greuter, 1620 (Bibliothèque nationale de France).

“Le Médecin guérissant Phantasie,” Mattheus Greuter, 1620 (Bibliothèque nationale de France).

Irish Philosophy: Frozen in Time the Edward Worth Library

The Guardian: Britain’s teeth aren’t that bad – but what do you know of their rotten history?

Atlas Obscura: Peek Inside the Grisly, Salacious Case Files of NYC’S Head Coroner in the Early 1900s

Emory News Center: Vaccines in U.S. have complex history, says Emory expert

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Hans von Ohain and the Jet Engine

Los Angeles Times: Weekend: Looking at aerospace’s place in history

Conciatore: Glass Beads

Six-layer glass chevron trade beads (photo attr. unknown)

Six-layer glass chevron trade beads
(photo attr. unknown)

Conciatore: Roasting the Frit

Conciatore: Neri the Scholar

Historic England: Navel and Maritime Military Heritage

Medievalists.net: Food and technology – Cooking utensils and food processing in medieval Norway

Wired: The Secret History of World War II-Era Drones

Yovisto: The Wright Brothers Invented the Aviation Age

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: 1903 Wright Flyer

http___airandspace.si.edu_webimages_collections_full_A19610048000CP15.jpg

Ptak Science Books: The Horizontal Section of the Deep Dark (1887)

Smithsonian.com: Did John Deere’s Best Invention Spark a Revolution or an Environmental Disaster?

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Edwin H. Armstrong

columbia.edu: History of Science, Mathematics, Technology, #171

264

Attack: The World’s Most Desirable (and Valuable) Electronic Music Gear

Ptak Science Books: Blowing Up Hell(gate), 1876

distillatio: Using Oak Galls to dye wool

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Geologists

Yovisto: Sir William Hamilton and the Volcanoes

rs21: A homosexual Christmas in 1905 Berlin

Slate Vault: Poe’s Only Bestseller as a Living Author Was This Schoolbook About Seashells

conchologistsfir00poeed_0007

A Lance Eye View: Alfred Russel Wallace

Yovisto: Margaret Mead and Modern Anthropology

Yovisto: Alexander Ross Clarke and the true Shape of the Earth

The New York Times: Evelyn Witkin and the Road to DNA Enlightenment

Imperial Weather: New Paper: meteorology as an imperial science

Forbes: How Creationism Has Evolved Since The Dover Trial

Public Domain Review: The Snowflake Man of Vermont

Bentley Snowflake

Bentley Snowflake

The New Yorker: Humboldt’s Gift

Heavenfield: The Bavarians from the Ground Up

umich.edu: Obituary: Jack McIntosh

Biodiversity Library: BHL Isn’t Just for Biologists

ars technica: Scientific Method/Science & Exploration: An evolutionary analysis of anti-evolution legislation

BioLogos: The First Major Evolution Controversy in America

CHEMISTRY:

Yorkshire Evening Post: Leeds scientists who discovered the atomic world to be honoured 100years after 1915 discovery

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Harold Urey’s Interview

CHF: Harold C. Urey: Science, Religion, and Cold War Chemistry

After helping create the atom bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, Harold Urey focused on uncovering the age and origins of Earth and the solar system. In this 1951 photo Urey inspects a 'fossilized thermometer' of belemnite (a prehistoric squid-shaped creature). Urey used information from these fossils to estimate the temperature of oceans from as far back as 100 million years. (USC Digital Library)

After helping create the atom bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, Harold Urey focused on uncovering the age and origins of Earth and the solar system. In this 1951 photo Urey inspects a ‘fossilized thermometer’ of belemnite (a prehistoric squid-shaped creature). Urey used information from these fossils to estimate the temperature of oceans from as far back as 100 million years. (USC Digital Library)

Research Gate: The discovery of the periodic table as a case of simultaneous discovery

newser: A Sophomoric Prank Lurks on the Periodic Table

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Not-So-Great Moments in Chemical Safety

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ether Wave Propaganda: Against Methodology by Cryptic Aphorism

Nautilus: Living in the Long: Art & Engineering Peers Into Our Future

University of Zurich: Corpus Corporum

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys and the Royal Society

Lady Science: Issue 15: Gender in the Mid-Century Kitchen

JHI Blog: Thinking About Knowledge in Motion and Social Engagement at HSS

Sandwalk: Did Michael Behe say that astrology was scientific in Kitzmiller v. Dover?

Ptak Science Books: Table of the Compass of Voices and Instruments (1814)

HuffPost Science: Blog: What Science Is – and How and Why It Works

Histoire, médicine et santé n° 7: New Issue

Commission for the History and Philosophy of Computing: Special Issue HPL on History and Philosophy of Computing Contents

Museums Association: Report finds lack of diversity in curators at Major Partner Museums

h-madness: Obituary: Gerald N. Grob (1931–2015)

635858802429544084-grobcr

Recipes Project: Searching for Recipes: A Glimpse of Early Modern Upper Class Life

Warburg Institute News: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize 2016 awarded to Professor Dr Dag Nikolaus Hasse, an Alumnus of the Warburg Institute

The Ordered Universe Project: Generating sounds: help us write our next paper!

OUP Blog: Eric Scerri: A new philosophy of science

The #EnvHist Weekly

Inside MHS Oxford: Christmas has come early for MHS!

homunculus: Talking about talking about history

December HPS&ST Note: is on the web

Capitalism’s Cradle: AI and the Problem of Ideology

The Ordered Universe Project: Unity in Diversity

Medievalists.net: The Medieval Magazine: The Top 50 Medieval Books of 2015 (Issue 46)

The Public Domain Review: Japanese Prints of Western Inventors, Artists and Scholars

The Englishman Watt wanted to make a steam engine. He spent so much time on it that he upset his aunt. Finally, however, he was successful.

The Englishman Watt wanted to make a steam engine. He spent so much time on it that he upset his aunt. Finally, however, he was successful.

ESOTERIC:

Correspondence: Volume 3 (2015) Contents

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The Secrets of Alchemy

Detail from The Alchemist. Francois-Marius Granet, 19th century. (Gift of Roy Eddleman, CHF Collections/Will Brown)

Detail from The Alchemist. Francois-Marius Granet, 19th century. (Gift of Roy Eddleman, CHF Collections/Will Brown)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Remaking the John: The Invention and Reinvention of the Toilet

idées.fr: Cette médicine qu’on dit « parallèle »

Nature: the view from the bridge: The top 20: a year of reading immersively

Science Book a Day: Life on a Young Planet: The First Three Billion Years of Evolution on Earth

Some Beans: The Invention of Nature by Andrea Wolf

Symmetry: Physics books of 2015

Science Book a Day: The Triumph of Seeds: How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses, and Pips Conquered the Plant Kingdom and Shaped Human History

triumph-of-seeds

Cambridge News: Cambridge historian Ruth Scurr on her Costa Awards-shortlisted book, John Aubrey: My Own Life

Brain Pickings: Buckminster Fuller’s Manifesto for the Genius of Generalities

idées.fr: Le corps de la science

Diebedra.de Prof Alan Turing decoded

Science Book a Day: Inventions That Could Have Changed the World… But Didn’t!

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Contagious Communities: Medicine, Migration, and the NHS in Post War Britain

OUP: The History of Chemistry: A Very Short Introduction

OUP: Essays in the Philosophy of Chemistry

Amazon: Science and Empire: Knowledge and Networks of Science across the British Empire, 1800–1970

MIT Press: Anachronic Renaissance

Historiens de la santé: Révélations: Iconographie de la Salpêtrière. Paris, 1875–1918

Amberley Publishing: Historical Falconry

516RvKSmyRL._SX346_BO1,204,203,200_

Palgrave: Why We Need the Humanities

University of Chicago Press: Life Atomic: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Oxford Thinking: ‘Dear Harry…’ An exhibition of a scientist lost to war

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

ICE: ICE Christmas Exhibition Past, Present and Future 4–18 December 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

ImageHandler.ashx

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

bauer-exhibition-birds

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

EVENTS:

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

11th Cambridge Wellcome Lecture in the History of Medicine: Michael Stolberg: Curing Diseases and Exchanging Knowledge: Sixteenth-Century Physicians and Their Female Patients 14 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Event ad

Royal Astronomical Society: RAS Public Lecture: 100th Anniversary of the election of Women to the RAS Fellowship 12 January 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

Royal Institution: Christmas Lecture 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Louis Pasteur (1885), by A. Edelfeldt

Louis Pasteur (1885), by A. Edelfeldt

TELEVISION:

io9: The Inside Story of Manhattan, the Best TY Show You Haven’t Been Watching

inpiwlyvtcjaq2yolvf2

National Trust for Historical Preservation: Trinity Test, Gadget, Spies: What’s True in Season 2 of Manhattan?

Je Suis, Ergo Sum: Gone fission: WGN’s Manhattan brings something new into the world

SLIDE SHOW:

Scientific American: Aviation in 1913: Images from Scientific American’s Archives [Slide Show]

VIDEOS:

Youtube: God, Science and Atheism

Youtube: Globus Weigla

Youtube: Steps to Flourishing Sessions 3: Anton Howes present his thesis

Youtube: Fighting Firedamp – The Lamp that Saved 1,000 Lives

 

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

npr: ‘Map’ Is An Exquisite Record of the Miles – And The Millennia

9780714869445_custom-31db5d6691d3420fa55b89a2bc27bf63b4f0de8d-s400-c85

Virginia Campbell MD: Matthew Cobb on “Life’s Great Secret”

Science Friday: Do Scientists Have the Duty to Speak Out?

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Durham: Workshop: The Graphic Evidence of Childhood, 1760–1914 15 April 2016 (N.B several #histsci papers)

German Historical Institute Paris: CfP: Masculinity(/ies) – Femininity(/ies) in the Middle Ages 2–3 March 2016

Notches Blog: Call for Submissions: The History of Venereal Disease Deadline 15 January 2016

University of Vienna: CfP: Claiming authority, producing standards: The IAEA and the history of radiation protection

Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ: CfP: Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice (SPSP) Sixth Conference 17–19 June 2016

Joint conference of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) and European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST). CfP: What is a Problem? Problematic Ecologies, Methodologies and Ontologies in Techno-science and Beyond Barcelona 31 August–3 September 2016

Institute of Historical Research: University of London: CfP: International Postgraduate Port and Maritime History Conference 14–15 April 2016

University of Shanghai: CfP: International Health Organizations (IHOs): People, politics and practices in historical perspective 21–24 April 2016

University of Bucharest: Institute of Research in the Humanities: An Interdisciplinary Master class on the Nature and Status of Principles in Western Thought 15–18 March 2016

Barts Pathology Museum and the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, London: Call for participation: Corpses, Cadavers and Catalogues: The Mobilities of Dead Bodies and Body Parts, Past and Present 17–18 May 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Summer Research Fellowships: History of Women in Medicine

University of Twente: Two Assistant Professors Philosophy of Science

Pembroke College Cambridge: Abdullah Al-Mubarak Research Fellowship in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

QMUL: Three new Wellcome funded PhD Studentships in History of Emotions

University of Cambridge: UL in Philosophy of Life Sciences

University of Cambridge: UL in Science, Technology, and Medicine before 1800

University of Southern California: One Year Mellon Sawyer Postdoctoral Fellowship Visual History: The Past in Images

University of Notre Dame: Two Postdoctoral Fellowships in History and/or Philosophy of Science

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarships

Brunel University London: The Leverhulme Trust – Early Careers Fellowships

UCL: CELL: Research Assistant

BSHS: Part-time BSHS Intern

CHF: Fellowships

ChoM News: 2016–17 Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

LMU Munich: 10 Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #22

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #22

Monday 14 December 2015

EDITORIAL:

Running awfully late here is the latest edition of the weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all the fascinating posts, articles and other offerings in the histories of science, technology and medicine that our legions of Internet elves could find in the second week of advent.

In any given week the balance of the number of posts in the various rubrics in our humble Gazette varies, with sometimes Physics, Astronomy and Space Science dominating, as this week, or on other occasions the Earth Sciences or Technology having the most entries. However over time I have noticed that there are always relatively few posts on the history of chemistry. I don’t know whether this is due to a paucity of history of chemistry material on the web or whether I am just not catching enough of what is out there.

If you post on the history of chemistry or know somebody who does and the posts are failing to appear here on Whewell’s Gazette then please draw attention to this deficit in some way. Join Twitter and tip me off so that I follow you or send me an email with a list of your posts and links. I would like to see more history of chemistry here at the Gazette so make it your #histSTM charitable act for Christmas to draw my attention to all those post that I sure I’m missing.

MHS Oxford Advent Calendar

Day 7: Paper Astrolabe, by Johann Krabbe, German, 1583

Day 8: Diptych Dial, by Thomas Tucher, Nuremberg, c. 1620

Day 9: Mural Quadrant, by John Bird, London, 1773

Day 10: Parts of Difference Engine, by Charles Babbage, c. 1822-30

Day 11: Crescent Moon Amulet, Southern Italian

imu-media.php

Day 12: Astrolabe Quadrant, by Giovanni Antonio Magini, Italy, Late 16th Century

Day 13: Radio Valve R5V, by Marconi Osram Valve Co., London, c. 1923

Culham Research Group: Advent Calendar

Day 7: Saffron: A light in the darkness

Day 8: Wassailing

Day 9: Reindeer Moss

Looking festive and tasty! Cladonia rangiferina has been collected and vouchered in California only twice, in 1999 by Ronald and Judith Robertson, and in 1975 in Del Norte Co., in the Smith River canyon. The Robertsons collected Cladonia rangiferina once in Humboldt County in the remnant forest of Lanphere Dunes, a US Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Looking festive and tasty! Cladonia rangiferina has been collected and vouchered in California only twice, in 1999 by Ronald and Judith Robertson, and in 1975 in Del Norte Co., in the Smith River canyon. The Robertsons collected Cladonia rangiferina once in Humboldt County in the remnant forest of Lanphere Dunes, a US Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Day 10: Rice Pudding

Day 11: Sweet Chestnuts

Day 12: Anyone can grow paperwhites but their taxonomy is a different story

Day 13: Putting Christmas on the Map

Quotes of the week:

mathematician quote

“Digital information lasts forever or five years. Whichever comes first”. – RAND researcher Jeff Rothenberg h/t @johannaberg

“Anthropologists stand in the position of molecules of paint on a picture’s surface, striving to catch the artist’s design”—Pitt-Rivers h/t @ProfDanHicks

“For people writing about the topic—”interment” means burial. “Internment” means detaining a group of people”. – Laura (@ophiliacat)

Absent minded prof

“Parts of London are so radicalised that most of the atoms and molecules there have unpaired valency electrons”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“The “Asian Values” trope as Orientalism appropriated by the Orientals”. – @struthious

“If I’m descended from my parents, why do I still have cousins?” Owain Griffiths (@OwainGriffiths)

Hoyle quote

“The essence of genius is to know what to overlook”. – William James

Study shows a result you like: “see, I base my views on science!”

 

Study shows a result you dislike: “I’ve got issues with their methodology” – Existential Comics (@existentialcomics)

Alice Quote

Birthdays of the Week:

 Grace Hopper born 10 December 1908

 Grace Murray Hopper at the UNIVAC keyboard, c. 1960. Credit: Unknown (Smithsonian Institution)


Grace Murray Hopper at the UNIVAC keyboard, c. 1960.
Credit: Unknown (Smithsonian Institution)

Yovisto: Grace Hopper and the Programming Languages

Annie Jump Cannon born 11 December 1863

tumblr_nz5gyjSngl1ry3nado1_500

Yovisto: Annie Jump Cannon and the Catalogue of Stars

sdsc.edu: Annie Jump Cannon Theorist of Star Spectra

Smithsonian Institute Archives: Annie Jump Cannon (1863–1941)

Linda Hall Library: Annie Jump Cannon

Gemma Frisius was born 9 December 1508

Gemma Frisius, Holzschnitt (17. Jh.) von Esme de Boulonois Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gemma Frisius, Holzschnitt (17. Jh.) von Esme de Boulonois
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: The Most Accurate Instruments of Gemma Frisius

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Mapping the history of triangulation

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

 

Renowned quantum physicist Niels Bohr with acclaimed jazz trumpeter, composer and singer Louis Armstrong h/t Paul Halpern Source: Unknown

Renowned quantum physicist Niels Bohr with acclaimed jazz trumpeter, composer and singer Louis Armstrong h/t Paul Halpern
Source: Unknown

Yovisto: Arnold Sommerfeld and the Quantum Theory

Yovisto: Omar Khayyam – Mathematics and Poetry

Popular Science: A Brief History of Space Stations Before the ISS

arXiv.org: Early Telescopes and Ancient Scientific Instruments in the Paintings of Jan Brueghel the Elder (pdf)

Ptak Science Books: Found Poetry in the Sciences (1610 and 1698)

Sue Kientz: Spacecraft Galileo at Jupiter

Ipi.usra.edu: Probe Mission Successful

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Walter Goodman’s Interview

arXiv.org: A brief history of the multiverse (pdf)

BBC: Future: Eight objects that define the Soviet space race

Titov's movie camera

Titov’s movie camera

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The story behind the IAEA’s atomic logo

March to the Moon: Gemini VII

Berliner Zeitung: Albert Einstein war in Berlin nur relative glücklich

World Socialist Web Site: 100 years of General Relativity – Part One

World Socialist Web Site: 100 years of General Relativity – Part Two

World Socialist Web Site: 100 years of General Relativity – Part Three

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Philip Abelson’s Interview (2002)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Aristotle Killer of Science!

Atlas Obscura: Vintage Images of Canine Cosmonauts from the USSR

A matchbox label from 1959, showing a space dog flying to the Moon. (Photo: © FUEL Publishing/Marianne Van den Lemmer)

A matchbox label from 1959, showing a space dog flying to the Moon. (Photo: © FUEL Publishing/Marianne Van den Lemmer)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Leona Marshall Libby’s Interview

AHF: Leo James Rainwater

The Conversation: The life-changing love of one of the 20th century’s greatest physicists

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Theodore Rockwell’s Interview

Yovisto: The Last Men on the Moon…so far

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Gabriel Bohnee’s Interview

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The curious death of Oppenheimer’s mistress

Astronomy Now: Astronomers recall discovery of Phaethon – source of the Geminid meteors

AHF: Rotblat Account

CHF: Laws of Attraction

Open Mind: Kepler, the Father of Science Fiction

Tech Times: Black History Month: & Ways Albert Einstein Supported the Civil Rights Movement

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: Digitisation of the Klencke Atlas

Swann Auction Galleries: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books, Featuring the Mapping of America

The American Military Pocket Atlas

The American Military Pocket Atlas

Peter S. Clarke: A Christmas Santa Map

Slate Vault: An Early-20th-Century British Map of the Global Drug Trade

Ptak Science Books: Bombing Britain, 1940 – a View of the Battle of Britain from Germany

The Bodleian’s Map Room Blog: Ships

IMG_0214-300x225

Giornalè Nuovo: A Map of Schlaraffenland

Stanford University Library: Adventures in oversized imaging: digitizing the Ōmi Kuni-ezu 近江國絵圖 Japanese Tax Map from 1837

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: The man with the rubber jaw

The Conversation: Remind me again, what is thalidomide and how did it cause so much harm?

O Can You See?: Combating infectious disease and slaying the rubella dragon, 1969–1972

Atlas Obscura: Maps of 19th-Century New York’s Worst Nuisances

A "Sanitary and Social Chart" of New York's 4th Ward. (Photo: Courtesy the New York Academy of Medicine)

A “Sanitary and Social Chart” of New York’s 4th Ward. (Photo: Courtesy the New York Academy of Medicine)

BBC News: Cookbook features recipes to cure the plague

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘In a most handsome and thriving condition’: Samuel Pepys’s Health

Thomas Morris: A bad use for good wine

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: A Doctor’s View of Industrial Manchester

Nursing Clio: Baby Parts for Sale – Old Tropes Revisited

Circulating Now: A Portrait of the Medical World of 1911

Silas Weir Mitchell

Silas Weir Mitchell

Thomas Morris: All hail the strawberry

Yovisto: Robert Koch and Tuberculosis

Thomas Morris: Somewhat silly in his manner

TECHNOLOGY:

Brown: Steward Delaney’s New Clock

Verso: Look>>A Historiscope

Forbes: This Week in Tech History: The Mother of All Demos

BBC News: Volunteers aid pioneering Edsac computer rebuild

Each of the 140 chassis that form Edsac takes upwards of 20 hours to build and test

Each of the 140 chassis that form Edsac takes upwards of 20 hours to build and test

The National Museum of Computing: Edshack: a workshop time capsule

Atlas Obscura: Soviet Scenesters Used X-Rays to Record Their Rock and Roll

Yovisto: Maria Telkes and the Power of the Sun

Yovisto: Guglielmo Marconi and his Magic Machine

Yovisto: My Hovercraft is full of Eels

MAA100: Mathematical Treasures: Early Calculating Machines

Leibnitzrechenmaschine

Leibnitzrechenmaschine

Ptak Science Books: A World Map of Heavy (1922)

A Wireless World: The origins of radio

Ptak Science Books: Balloons I Know But Do Not Love – Death From Above, Ads and Bombs

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Sometimes I'm asked what is the difference between a raven and a crow, well here it is. h/t @ravenstonetales

Sometimes I’m asked what is the difference between a raven and a crow, well here it is. h/t @ravenstonetales

Letters from Gondwana: The Bernissart Dinosaurs

Notches: Coming Oot! A Fabulous Gay History of Scotland

Hyperallergic: How Audubon Pranked a Fellow Naturalist with a Bulletproof Fish

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: The London Baedeker for the Darwin enthusiast

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: An Ottoman response to Darwinism: Ísmail Fennî on Islam and evolution

Atlas Obscura: The Ghost Forest of Christmas Past: How a Fungus Stole Roasted Chestnuts

Naturalis Historia: The Earth on Show: Encountering Lost Worlds Through Fossil Displays

A “Young Mammouth” unearthed by Charles Willson Peale on display at the Philadelphia museum in 1821.

A “Young Mammouth” unearthed by Charles Willson Peale on display at the Philadelphia museum in 1821.

National Geographic: Meet Grandfather Flash, the Pioneer of Wildlife Photography

Gizmodo: These Dogs are Honorary Geologists for their Early Exploration of Alaska

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac and his Work on Gases

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

CHF: True Blue: DuPont and the Color Revolution

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Birkbeck: Early Modern History Website

Public Disability History: New blog

NYAM Library: Discover the Past Inform the Future

PISO_005

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: The ESD in early modern Spain: taking stock

CIA: The Directorate of Science and Technology Historical Series: The Office of Scientific Intelligence, 1949–68

Conciatore: Francesco’s Studiolo

Conciatore: Neri’s Travels

Conciatore: Fall from Grace

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Library of the Royal College of Surgeons

PSA Women: Female-Authors-Only Philosophy of Science

OUP: The Monist: The History of Women’s Ideas Contents

University of Oxford: Research: Ursula Martin

Irish Philosophy: Frozen in Time: the Edward Worth Library

The Edward Worth Library (c) Irish Philosophy (CC BY)

The Edward Worth Library
(c) Irish Philosophy (CC BY)

AEON: What if?

PhilSci Archive: An Archive for Preprints in Philosophy of Science

The New York Times: Amir Aczel, Author of Scientific Cliffhanger, Dies at 65

The Economist: In search of serendipity

Yovisto: Melvil Dewey and the Dewey Decimal System

Scistarter: Purposeful Gaming: Help improve access to historic biodiversity texts!

Age of Revolutions: A HistorioBLOG

Lisa Tenzin-Dolma: Interview with Paul Halpern

Corpus Newtonicum: Isaac Newton moves to Oxford

#EnvHist Weekly

AEON: Why physics needs art to help picture the universe

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CUP: Medical History Vol. 60 Issue 01: Contents

Motherboard: Ada Lovelace and the Impossible Expectations We Have of Women in STEM

Chicago Journals: Osiris Vol. 30, No. 1 Scientific Masculinities Contents

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: How widespread were alchemical books in Britain in Medieval times and who owned them?

The Recipes Project: Temporality in John Dauntesey’s Recipe Book (1652–1683)

The Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Manuscript MSS 2/0070-01 (Signature Page), Photo included with permission.

The Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Manuscript MSS 2/0070-01 (Signature Page), Photo included with permission.

Spacewatchtower: 50th Anniversary: Kecksburg, Pa. “UFO” Incident

The Public Domain Review: Worlds Without End

Detail from a depiction of thought-transference, the man behind dictating the movement of the other, from Magnetismus und Hypnotismus (1895) by Gustav Wilhelm Gessmann

Detail from a depiction of thought-transference, the man behind dictating the movement of the other, from Magnetismus und Hypnotismus (1895) by Gustav Wilhelm Gessmann

BOOK REVIEWS:

Brain Pickings: Alexander von Humboldt and the Invention of Nature: How One of the Last True Polymaths Pioneered the Cosmos of Connections

MedHum Monday Book Review: Riotous Flesh

Popular Science: Kepler and the Universe

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Brain Pickings: The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate That Changed Our Understanding of Time

Sun News Miami: Celestial Cartography

New Statesman: A true scientific revolution: the triumph of mathematicians over philosophers

Reviews in History: To Explain the World: the discovery of Modern Science

Nature: Books in Brief: Tunnel Vision: The Rise and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider, The Hunt for Vulcan…

NEW BOOKS:

Plagrave: Technology, Self-Fashioning and Politeness in Eighteenth-Century Britain

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Paradox of Evolution: The Strange Relationship Between Natural Selection and Reproduction

Amazon: More Passion for Science: Journeys into the Unknown

Wiley: A Companion to Intellectual History

The Dispersal of Darwin: Darwin’s Sciences

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The University of Chicago Press: Foucault and Beyond

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Story of Life in 25 Fossils

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

ICE: ICE Christmas Exhibition Past, Present and Future 4–18 December 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Muslim Heritage: Allah’s Automata – A Review of the Exhibition

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Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

Upcoming: The Old Operating Theatre: Surgeon to the Dead 10-12 & 15-17 December 2015

SpArC Theatre: Opéra National De Paris: La Damnation De Faust 17 December 2015

EVENTS:

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Royal Astronomical Society: RAS Public Lecture: 100th Anniversary of the election of Women to the RAS Fellowship 12 January 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

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British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

Royal Institution: Christmas Lecture 2015

A Forgotten Hero – Now Remembered: Dr John Rae (LRCSEd): Arctic Explorer 

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Dr William Gilberd 1540-1603 showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court by Arthur Ackland Hunt

Dr William Gilberd 1540-1603 showing his Experiment on Electricity to Queen Elizabeth I and her Court by Arthur Ackland Hunt

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Atlas Obscura: 100 Wonders: The Desertron

Centre for Global Health Histories: Youtube Channel

The New York Times: Animated Life: Mary Leakey

RADIO:

BBC World Service: Discovery: Humboldt – the Inventor of Nature

The Guardian: Occam’s Corner: Will Self’s forceful search for the genius behind a scientific giant

BBC Radio 4: Self Drives: Maxwell’s Equations

PODCASTS:

Mosaic: The ingenuity of Gordon Vaughan

Soundcloud: John Aubrey, My Own Life by Ruth Scurr – audio extracts

John Aubrey. Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Aubrey.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

British Museum: CfP: Objectively Speaking 4 April 2016

Graz, Austria; CfP: STS Conference: The Role of Webvideos in Science and Research Communication 9–19 May 2016

UCL: CfP: Science/Technology/Security: Challenges to global governance? 20–21 June 2016

University of Edinburgh: Science, Technology and Innovation Studies Seminar Series, Semester Two 2015-16

Sam Houston State University: CfP: The 8th Annual Medicine and the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference 17–18 March 2016

H/SOZ/KULT: Playing with Materials and Technology. 7th Symposium on Playing with Technology – Part of the 43rd Symposium of the Internationl Committeee for the History of Technology 2016 Porto 26 July–30 July 2016

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin: Workshop: From Knowledge to Profit? Scientific Institutions and the Commercialization of Science 10–12 October 2016

Dresden Summer – International Academy for the Arts: Collecting: 27 August – 03rd September 2016

University of Durham: Workshop: The Graphic Evidence of Childhood, 1760–1914 15 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

British Library: Curator of Medieval Historical Manuscripts 1100–1500

University of Freiburg: Chair for Science and Technology Studies: Wissenschaftliche(r) Mitarbeiterin/Mitarbeiter (Assistant Professor Equivalent)

University of Kent: Centre for the History of Science: Postgrad funding

University of Swansea: Fees Only PhD Studentship: Mapping the Historic Landscape Character of the South Wales Region

Mississippi State University: History of Modern Europe and Science/Technology/and/or Medicine

University of Oxford: Faculty of Theology and Religion: Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship 2016

University of Notre Dame: History and Philosophy of Science Program Two Postdoctoral Positions

MIT: Calling all Science Journalists: Applications for 1016-17 KSJ Fellowships Open January 11

Durham University: Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies: Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships

Trinity College Dublin: Ussher Assistant Professor in Environmental History

Drexel University College of Medicine: Summer Research Fellowship: History of Women in Medicine

 

 

 

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