Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #35

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

6a00e54fcdd9e188340115719d3b2c970b-320wi

Volume #35

Monday 16 February 2015

EDITORIAL:

It seems like only yesterday that we posted the thirty fourth edition of Whewell’s Gazette the preeminent weekly #histSTM links list and here we are back again with Volume #35.

Last weeks editorial touched upon the theme of the lone genius myth in the history of science and it has raised its head again in the last seven days with the celebration of Darwin Day on 12 February, the anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin. The international devoting of a day to one nineteenth century natural historian does rather smack of a lone genius cult, which thought provoke Rebekah “Becky” Higgitt (@beckyfh) to suggest that there should be a #histSTM #NOLONEGENIUSESDAY.

Now I do understand that this day was created as part of the promotion of the scientific theory of evolution against the encroachment of creationism and intelligent design, particularly in the US. However by placing it on Darwin’s birthday and naming the day after him does rather make it look as if he created the theory all on his ownsome.

There was already a rather sweet comment from the Alfred Russel Wallace Twitter account (@ARWallace):

Wallace Day

International Business Times: Darwin Day 2015: Alfred Russel Wallace, the forgotten evolutionist overshadowed by Charles Darwin

There are however many others who deserve more than a mention if talking about the evolution of the theory of evolution starting with James Burnett, Lord Monboddo, Pierre-Louis Moreau de Maupertuis, and Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon moving forward over Jean-Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet, Chevalier de Lamarck and Darwin’s own grandfather Erasmus, the geologists Adam Sedgwick and Charles Lyell and the evolutionists Robert Chambers and Patrick Matthew and other less prominent figures. To this list we could add Captain Robert Fitzroy and other members of the crew of the Beagle.

Beagle Crew

Darwin was anything but a lone genius.

My suggestion, which will undoubtedly be totally ignored, is that we replace Darwin Day with an Evolution Day on the anniversary of the reading of the joint Darwin-Wallace paper at the Linnean Society in London, 1 July 1858, and on that day celebrate all of those who contributed to the evolution of this great theory.

As you can see our masthead owl is still on his skating holiday and this week has sent us a colour photo of himself and his partner.

Birthdays of the week:

Charles Darwin born 12 February 1809

Charles Darwin, six years old — February 12 1815

Charles Darwin, six years old — February 12 1815

“The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life and has determined my whole career”. Charles Darwin

“Scarcely anything in my life made so deep an impression on me. I sometimes think general & popular treatises are almost as important for the progress of science as original work” Darwin on reading John Herschel’s book on scientific method.

“What Lyell did for the inorganic world, Darwin did for the organic.” — Emil du Bois-Reymond “Exposition of the Darwinian Theory,” 1877

“I cannot understand why you scientific people make such a fuss about Darwin. Why, it’s all in Lucretius!” — Matthew Arnold, 1871

The Royal Society: Notes and Records: The many lives of Charles Darwin: early biographies and the definitive evolutionist

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Darwin Day celebration focuses on islands, isolation

Peddling and Scaling God and Darwin: Charles Darwin through Christian spectacles

Darwin Correspondence Project: Darwin and Religion: an introduction

Darwin Correspondence Project: Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa

 

Darwin Correspondence Project: Earthworm activity

Irish Philosophy: The Evolution of Evolution: Darwin’s philosophical forebears

Yovisto: Charles Darwin and the Natural Selection

Letters from Gondwana: Darwin and the Strangest Animal Ever Discovered

Twilight Beast: The bizarre elongated llama

University of Reading: Happy Birthday, Charles Darwin

 

Until Darwin: Darwin, Slavery, the HMS Black Joke, and Seaman Morgan

History of Geology: Charles Darwin – the Monster Slayer

Science Friday: A Year of Darwin

Life Traces of the Georgia Coast: Of Darwin, Earthworms, and Backyard Science

Origins a history of beginnings: When Darwin Met a Neandertal

Brain Pickings: A Graphic Biography of Darwin

darwingraphicbiography1The Mountain Mystery: Charles Darwin, the Geologist

The Public Domain Review: The Naturalist and the Neurologist: On Charles Darwin and James Crichton-Brown

Letters from Gondwana: Darwin, Owen and the ‘London Specimen’.

Krulwich Wonders: Charles Darwin and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Ocean Portal: Charles Darwin’s Ocean Upwelling

 

Emil du Bois_reymond, “Darwin and Copernicus”

American Museum of Natural History: Darwin’s Kids Doodled All Over His “Origins of Species” Manuscript

x7wee7mo5ykzjuosh5sk

Geological Society of London Blog: Happy Darwin Day!

The Irish Times: Unthinkable: Why Charles Darwin is a threat to religion

Herald media: Science and Society: Darwin’s sacred cause – and Lincoln’s also.

The Friends of Charles Darwin: The Darwin bicentennial oak, 6 years on

Join the Friends of Charles Darwin

The twelfth of February is also the birthday of other prominent figures in the history of biology, Jan Swammerdam for example. Whereas my Twitter stream was flooded with tweets about Darwin, my own were the solitary tweets celebrating Swammerdam.

Jan Swammerdam born 12 February

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A Biological Birthday

Jan Swammerdam (1637–1680)

Quotes of the week:

“There’s a story told about a distinguished cardiac surgeon who, about to retire, decided he’d like to take up the history of medicine. He sought out a historian friend and asked her if she had any tips for him. The historian said she’d be happy to help but first asked the surgeon a reciprocal favor: “As it happens, I’m about to retire too, and I’m thinking of taking up heart surgery. Do you have any tips for me?”” – Steven Shapin in his WSJ review of Steven Weinberg’s “To Explain the World”

“Mr. Weinberg identifies his account as a personal view, and there’s no reason why people shouldn’t want to know how an eminent modern scientist (and public intellectual) thinks about all sorts of things. What is interesting is that these different stories about the historical development of science persist, with no prospect that professional historians of science will ever own their subject as, say, art historians own the history of art. Science remains almost unique in that respect. It’s modernity’s reality-defining enterprise, a pattern of proper knowledge and of right thinking, in the same way that—though Mr. Weinberg will hate the allusion—Christian religion once defined what the world was like and what proper knowledge should be. The same circumstance that gives science its immense modern cultural prestige also ensures that there will be an audience for its idealization and celebration. “To Explain the World” is for that audience.“ – Steven Shapin in his WSJ review of Steven Weinberg’s “To Explain the World”

Valentine’s Day

STM historians are not heatless and delivered up some Valentine’s day contributions

The Heart, plate from 'Anatomy of the Visceras,' by Arnaud Eloi Gautier D'Agoty, 1745

The Heart, plate from ‘Anatomy of the Visceras,’ by Arnaud Eloi Gautier D’Agoty, 1745

1746 years ago today, St Valentine was beaten with clubs and beheaded outside the Flaminian Gate in Rome. Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! @BarnabyEdwards

Dr Jennifer Evans: Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine

 

The Recipes Project: Lizards and lettuces: Greek and Roman recipes for Valentines Day

Darwin Correspondence Project: Darwin’s notes on marriage

Valentine's Day

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Donald & Martha Ross

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: The Chimps & The Surgeon: A history of Heart Transplants

Lapham’s Quarterly: Mutual Interest: The courting of Marie Curie

The H-Word: Marriage and the making of scientific careers

O Say Can You See: How do you mend a broken heart?

A double cordiform (heart-shaped) world map made by Mercator in 1550

A double cordiform (heart-shaped) world map made by Mercator in 1550

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

The Washington Post: Val Logsdon Fitch, physics pioneer and Nobel laureate, dies at 91

Val Logsdson Fitch, who won the Nobel Prize for physics, at Princeton University in 1980. (Kanthal/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Val Logsdson Fitch, who won the Nobel Prize for physics, at Princeton University in 1980. (Kanthal/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

 

The New York Times: Val Fitch, Who Discovered Universe to Be Out of Balance, Is Dead at 91

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Val Fitch’s Interview

Scientific American: How a Wire Was Used to Measure a Tiny Force of Gravity

The Nature of Reality: The Big Bang’s Identity Crisis

Philly:com: Year of Light marks a turning point

Starts with a Bang: The Tragic Fate of Physicist Paul Ehrenfest

APS Physics: J Willard Gibbs

 

Uncertain Principles: Science Story: Not a Bath House

Emmy Noether on a boat in 1930.

Emmy Noether on a boat in 1930.

 

Yovisto: Leo Szilard and the Atomic Bomb

 

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Louis Turner’s Interview

http://manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories/louis-turners-interview

Scientific American: How 2 Pro-Nazi Nobelists Attacked Einstein’s “Jewish Science” [Excerpt]

Yovisto: Fritz Zwicky and the Dark Matter

Math Buffalo: Physicists of the African Diaspora

Atomic Heritage Foundation: The Science Behind the Atom Bomb

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Medievalists.net: The Universal Atlas of Fernão Vaz Dourado

Medievalists.net: Medieval Maps of Britain

British Library: American studies blog: Forgotten histories of the Passage: the whalers

Above: frontispiece from vol. 2 of Scoresby's, 'An Account of the Arctic Regions' [copy on display in Lines in the Ice, G.2602 & G.2603]. Image from Archive.org - See more at: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/americas/2015/02/forgotten-histories-of-the-passage-the-whalers.html#sthash.BQkLShUI.dpuf

Above: frontispiece from vol. 2 of Scoresby’s, ‘An Account of the Arctic Regions’ [copy on display in Lines in the Ice, G.2602 & G.2603]. Image from Archive.org – See more at: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/americas/2015/02/forgotten-histories-of-the-passage-the-whalers.html#sthash.BQkLShUI.dpuf

 Medievalists.net: Top 10 Medieval Places That Don’t exist

MEDICINE:

The Sloane Letters Blog: On Tooth Worms

George Campbell Gosling: Perceptions of Pregnancy

Royal College of Physicians: A physicians cane and the secrets it contained

Consultation of physicians or the arms of the undertaker, engraving by William Hogarth, 1736.

Consultation of physicians or the arms of the undertaker, engraving by William Hogarth, 1736.

Huffpost Science: Shifting the Old Debate over Vaccines

Renaissance Utterances: ‘Poky pigges and stynkynge makerels’: Food standards and urban health in medieval England

NYAM: Tattoo Removal: Method or Madness?

University of Minnesota: HSTM: Eating through the Archives: Milk Pancakes (1820)

Ancient Origins: Ancient skull was drilled and harvested for medicine in the 18th century

The Recipes Project: The Torture of Therapeutics in Rome: Galen on Pigeon Dung

 

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Conciatore: Botanical Gardens Reprise

iiTVidya: Henry Walter Bates

Notches: Sexual Politics in the Era of Reagan and Thatcher: Marc Stein in Conversation with Jeffrey Weeks

Niche: One Flew Over The City: Sensorial Experiences of Urban Space

Wonders & Marvels: Humanness in the Age of Discovery: Dog-Headed Men

cynocephali

The Public Domain Review: Neandethals in 3D: L’Homme de La Chapelle

Nautilus: Safecracking the Brain: What neuroscience is learning from code-breakers and thieves

American Museum of Natural History: Barnum Brown: The Man Who Discovered Tyrannosaurus rex

Yovisto: Barnum Brown and the Tyrannosaurus Rex

Palaeo-Wanderer: A blog about the past, living in the present: Introduction

CHEMISTRY

The Royal Society: Philosophical Transactions A: The periodic table: icon and inspiration

The periodic table of ‘endangered elements’. Adapted from the original version created by Mike Pitts of the UK’s Chemistry Innovation Knowledge Transfer Network [6]; apart from uranium, the abundances of all radioactive elements have been ignored. (Online version in colour.)

The periodic table of ‘endangered elements’. Adapted from the original version created by Mike Pitts of the UK’s Chemistry Innovation Knowledge Transfer Network [6]; apart from uranium, the abundances of all radioactive elements have been ignored. (Online version in colour.)

TECHNOLOGY:

Gizmodo: A Secret Stash of Moon Artefacts Has Been Found in Neil Armstrong’s Wardrobe

NYAM: Recipes for Cooking by Electricity (Item of the Month)

IEEE Global History Network: Walter H Brattain

 

AIP: Oral History Transcript – Dr Walter Brattain

Inside the Science Museum: Winston Churchill: Up In The Air

Winston Churchill after his arrival by air at Portsmouth, from Upavon, Wiltshire, 1914. Image credit: Science Museum / SSPL

Winston Churchill after his arrival by air at Portsmouth, from Upavon, Wiltshire, 1914. Image credit: Science Museum / SSPL

Science Museum: Online Science: Wall telephone with Blake transmitter, 1880–1900

Grantland: The Difference Machine: Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper, and Women in Tech

Grist: Meet Lewis Latimer, the African American who enlightened Thomas Edison

Nautilus: The Future of the Web Is 100 Years Old

Endgadget: Annie Easley helped make modern spaceflight possible

To celebrate Black History Month, Engadget is running a series of profiles honoring African-American pioneers in the world of science and technology. Today we take a look at the life and work of Annie Easley.

To celebrate Black History Month, Engadget is running a series of profiles honoring African-American pioneers in the world of science and technology. Today we take a look at the life and work of Annie Easley.

Yovisto: Henry Steinway and the Grand Pianos

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Niche: Landscapes of Science: the first in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and the histories of science, technology, and medicine.

Tincture of Museum: 1. Natural History Museum Library and Archives – Tinc in Museum Library Land

MBS Birmingham: “How are we meant to educate ourselves?” What Libraries did for us

 

Early English Books Online:

Darin Hayton: Explaining A Good Question

King’s College London: Current Maughan Library exhibition: The great leveller: humanity’s struggle against infectious disease

Histscifi.com: Seeing From Afar

BSHS: BSHS Travel Guide

Storify: The research culture is not ready for signed peer review.

THE: World’s oldest scientific journal is focus of new exhibition

scientific-journal-011214-ful_450

The Scientist: Scientific Publishing, 1665

The Guardian: 350 years of publishing from the world’s oldest science journal – in pictures

Early Modern Letters Online: The Correspondence of Athanasius Kircher

American Science: A Very Recent History of Histories of the Future

iai news: Beauty is Truth?

Gothamist: Two-Faced Kitten & Cigar-Smoking Squirrels On View At Morbid Anatomy Museum

Two-headed kitten in a Belljar, photo courtesy of Chris Bradley

Two-headed kitten in a Belljar, photo courtesy of Chris Bradley

The Atlantic: A Failed Metaphor for Intelligent Design

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Career Development Service

Brill History of Modern Science Series: Call for Book Proposals

Making Science Public: Science, politics and science communication

Science & Religion @ Edinburgh: Science, Religion and the Changing Conceptions of Nature – John Hedley Brooke lectures

ESOTERIC:

Bottle Rocket Science: Giordano Bruno on Prudence

Conciatore: Caterina Sforza

Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi (now in the Museum of Forlì.)

Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi
(now in the Museum of Forlì.)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Do you believe in magic?

Conciatore: Iron into Copper

BOOK REVIEWS

JHI Blog: Annotations and Generations John Winthrop’s interactions with the marginalia of John Dee

PopMatters: God’s Planet: In Conversational Orbit of ‘God’s Planet’ With Owen Gingerich

Gonit Sora: Seduced by Logic: Emilie du Chatelet, Mary Somerville and the Newtonian Revolution

Seduced-by-Logic-Emilie-du-Chatelet-Mary-Somerville-and-the-Newtonian-Revolution

Science Book a Day: Severed: A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found

Marx and Philosophy: Review of Books: Ted Benton, Alfred Russel Wallace: Explorer Evolutionist, Public Intellectual – a thinker for Our Own Times?

What’s in John’s Feezer?: Owning Owen

Ether Wave Propaganda: Patrick McCray’s The Visioneers

Brain Pickings: A Radical Journey of Art, Science, and Entrepreneurship: A Self-Taught Victorian Woman’s Visionary Ornithological Illustrations

PLATE XXVIII. Progne Purpurea – Purple Martin

PLATE XXVIII.
Progne Purpurea – Purple Martin

 

The Independent: To Explain the World by Steven Weinberg, book review: A bracing and necessary guide to the discoveries of the 17th century

The Wall Street Journal: Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History

(If you run into a pay wall google the title, Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History, and click on the first link!)

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Healthcare in Ireland and Britain from 1850: Voluntary, regional and comparative perspectives

Enfilade: Commercial Vision in the Dutch Golden Age

9780226117744

THEATRE:

Wellcome Collections Blog: Tammy Wants You

FILM:

Nature: And the winner is: not science

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Vimeo: Ruth Bourne Turing and Bletchley Park

Youtube: BBC – My Father the Bomb and Me

Youtube: Thomas Edison interviewed at the age of 84

VOX: The origins of the anti-vaccine movement, in 3 Minutes

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

H-Net: CfP: Perspectives for the history of the life sciences: New themes, new sources, new approaches Munich 30 October–1 November 2015

AAHM: CfP: Working Across Species: Comparative Practice in Modern Medical, Biological and Behavioural Sciences

University of Cambridge: Science Festival: Longitude Found 21 March 2015

University of Cambridge: Science Festival: Infectious knowledge: science in popular culture 22 March 2015

Warwick: Humanities Research Centre: Ruling Climate: The theory and practice of environmental governmentality, 1500–1800 16 May 2015

York University Toronto Canada: Science Technology, and the Modern Canada 24-25 April 2015

NI Science Festival: Lecture: How To Make a Dwarf Mammoth 20 February 2015

Perspectives of Science: Special Issue: CfP: The Second Metaphysical Club and its Impact on the Development of American Science and Philosophy

 

University of Oulu Finland: Testing Philosophical Theories Against the History of Science Workshop 21 September 2015

University of Lisbon: CfP: 2nd Portuguese-Brazilian Meeting on the History of Tropical Medicine 14-16 October 2015

CHF: Alien Abduction and Psychic Spies: Lecture: On the Edges of Cold War Science 26 February 2015

Making Waves: Workshop 4: Scientific Lives: Oliver Lodge and the History of Science in the Digital Age

 

Senate House Library: CFP: Marginal presences: unorthodox belief and practice, 1837–2014 23 April 2015

Denver: Victorian Self-Fashioning 22-24 October 2015 Gabriel Finkelstein (@gabridli) is looking for partners for a #histsci session

UCL: Professor Sheila Jsanoff: The Constitutional Place of Science – the 2015 UCL STS Haldane Lecture 12 March 2015

Institute of Historical Research: Lecture: History and Biography – Professor Lawrence Goldman 19 March 2015

Penn State University: Polar Day 2015 27 March

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Royal Holloway: University of London: Eighteenth Century British History and Gender History Teaching Fellow

Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and Apothecaries Hall of Ireland launch PhD Fellowship in the history of medicine in Ireland

Royal Museums Greenwich: Intern Programme: History of Science & Technology

Birkbeck: University of London: History of Science and Medicine (MA)

CHF: Director, Center for Applied History

British School at Rome: Giles Worsley Rome Fellowship

University of Swansea: Lecturer in Medical History

Metropolitan New York Library Council: Reference Archivist, Manuscript Department – The Patricia D. Klingenstein Library

Science Museum: Library and Research Administrator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| Leave a comment

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #34

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

A Pair of Skating Owls, first half of 17th century, Adriaen Pietersz van de Venne

Volume #34

Monday 09 February 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days have passed both in the real world and in cyberspace and Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list has returned for the thirty-fourth time to bring all of the latest in the histories of science, medicine and technology out of the Internet.

The last week saw the appearance of an interesting paper analysing a brief comment made by Newton in one of his early notebooks on how the water in plants is transferred from the roots to the leaves. (Nature Plants, Newton and the ascent of water in plants, David J. Beerling)  Unfortunately he proceeds to ruin an interesting article by invoking the myth of the lone genius in his closing sentence.

“Reclusive and secretive, it’s doubtful he gained botanical inspiration from conversations with others at Cambridge University interested in plants.”

ABC Science: Newton’s journal reveals seeds of plant biology

Science: Scienceshot: Gravity-defying trees explained by Newton

Business Insider: Newly unearthed writings show that Isaac Newton figured out how trees work 200 years before botanists

I also got to see The Imitation Game last week and was deeply upset by the lousy quality of the history of science in the film as I tweeted on my return home the film is an insult to the memory of both Alan Turing and all those who worked in Bletchley Park during the war. Here the concept of the lone genius is taken to the extreme. Turing single-handedly breaking the Enigma code and thus winning the war whilst his colleagues stand on the side-lines initially jeering and then later cheering him on. In reality Bletchley Park was a collaborative effort with Turing part of a large and very dedicated team.

Perhaps the most stupid version of the lone genius myth was delivered up this week by Neil deGasse Tyson:

Not enough of us reflect on how modern civilization pivots on the discoveries of just a few intellectually restless people.

To which Anna Goldstein (@apgolst) delivered the perfect comment:

Thank goodness for all those brave lone geniuses.

On this topic read the excellent blog post by Evelyn Lamb on her Roots of Unity blog:

The Media and the Genius Myth

This one by Julia R. Bursten:

Genius and Imitation

And this one from Darin Hayton:

Moving beyond Heroic Geniuses

The lone genius myth is a piece of romantic rubbish that has nothing to do with the history of science and should be stamped on every time it raises its ugly little head.

As you might have noticed, it being winter our masthead owl has gone skating this week with a friend

Quotes of the week:

The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves and wiser people so full of doubt – Bertrand Russell

Repeat after me: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. – @alisonatkin

But when one accepts one theory and rejects another which is equally consistent with the phenomenon in question, it is clear that one has thereby blundered out of any sort of proper physics and fallen into mythology – Epicurus, Letter to Pythocles

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Uncertain Principles: Science Stories: Commercial Instincts

Artist's conception of Heinrich Hertz's experiment demonstrating electromagnetic waves in 1887. Image from Wikimedia.

Artist’s conception of Heinrich Hertz’s experiment demonstrating electromagnetic waves in 1887. Image from Wikimedia.

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Arthur Squires’ Interview – Part I

Leaping Robot: Physics at the Frozen Fringe

Live Science: Taj Mahal Gardens Found to align with the Solstice Sun

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Eleanor Irvine Davisson

The Guardian: The H-Word: The Great Moon Hoax and the Christian Philosopher

Holy lunarians, bat-men! An illustration produced for a later edition of the New York Sun’s “Great Astronomical Discoveries”. Illustration: Wikimedia

Holy lunarians, bat-men! An illustration produced for a later edition of the New York Sun’s “Great Astronomical Discoveries”. Illustration: Wikimedia

AIP: From the Physics Today Archive – February 2015

Inside MHS Oxford: Regiomontanus: The Man in the Moon

Uncertain Principles: Science Stories: Impossible Conditions

University of Chicago: Microcosmos

Board of Longitude Project: 250 years ago today: Nevil Maskelyne becomes Astronomer Royal

Atomic Heritage Foundation: The Soviet Atomic Program – 1946

Ptak Science Book: Dr Strangelove’s Computer

The Hindu: The man behind the laser saga, and more

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

ABC News: Unearthed grave sheds light on Batavia shipwreck mass murder

PHOTO: A skeleton found on Beacon Island is believed to be from the Batavia shipwreck massacre. (ABC News: Sarah Taillier)

PHOTO: A skeleton found on Beacon Island is believed to be from the Batavia shipwreck massacre. (ABC News: Sarah Taillier)

Linguistic Geographies: The Gough Map of Great Britain and its Making

MEDICINE:

Darin Hayton: “Nothing New” is “Really Bad”

The Recipes Project: Making Drinkable Gold for the King of Siam

King Narai receiving the French Embassy, 1685. Wikimedia Commons

King Narai receiving the French Embassy, 1685. Wikimedia Commons

NYAM: Cholera Comes to New York City

Greg Jenner: Coincidental

University of Minnesota HSTM: Visualising the Body

Early Modern Medicine: Beauty Spots and French Pox

The Recipes Project: Recipes in the Inquisition Records

UMJ: Dr William Drennan – His Life in Georgian Ireland

Yovisto: Alfred Adler and the Individual Psychology

J Walker words 2: The effects of infant mortality in the nineteenth century as seen in the non-gendering of babies in literature

Science 2.0: Honoring Carl Djerassi: The Pill Was A Revolution For Women And Men

Nature: A View From the Bridge: Carl Djerassi 1923–2015

The Star.com: Tech News: 2,700-year-old marijuana found in Chinese tomb

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Environment & Society Portal: Anthropocene Milestones No. 28: Mass spectrometry and geological eras – Nika Korniyenko

History of Geology: Mount Etna: Significance in the history of volcanology

Topographic map of Mount Etna in 1823 (reprinted in 1844 by Leonhard "Vulkan Atlas") by Mario Gemmellaro, displaying lava flows, cones and villages in the surroundings of the volcano.

Topographic map of Mount Etna in 1823 (reprinted in 1844 by Leonhard “Vulkan Atlas”) by Mario Gemmellaro, displaying lava flows, cones and villages in the surroundings of the volcano.

Embryo Project: Charles Manning Child (1869–1954)

Notches: Sex and the Single Man in Late Medieval England

Laelaps: Sciencespeak: Lazarus taxon

Fossil History: Fossils, Museums, & History: Dippy the Diplodocus

Du Pont: History of Biotechnology

Macroevolution: Raymond Arthur Dart (1893–1988)

Paleeoblog: Died This Day: Ernst Mayr

Medievalist.net: Blood beliefs in early modern Europe

Trowelblazers: Winifred Brunton

New World Encyclopedia: Arthur Keith

Yovisto: John Lindley and his Love for Plants

Nautilus: The Man Who Tried to Redeem the World with Logic

Trowelblazers: Mary Leakey

Doing History in Public: Homosexuality in the ‘Enlightenment’?

Penelope: Da Costa and the Venus dione: The Obscenity of Shell Description

dacosta

The Guardian: Inflame her to venery with wanton kisses: the joy of sex, 1684-style

Horniman Museums and Gardens: Get Involved: Uncovering our Fossil Collection

Daarjeeling: The soldier who preferred flowers to guns

American Museum of Natural History: Shelf Life: Episode Three: Six Ways to Prepare a Coelacanth

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Dmitri Mendeleev and the Periodic Table of Elements

Yovisto: Joseph Priestly and the Discovery of Oxygen

Equipment used by Joseph Priestley in his experiments on gases

Equipment used by Joseph Priestley in his experiments on gases

TECHNOLOGY:

120 Years of Electronic Music

BBC: Lost chunk of pioneering Edsac computer found

Greg Jenner: Wakey, Wakey!

Conciatore: Like Snow From Heaven

Popular Science: The Disappearance of the Instruction Manual

Yovisto: Henri Giffard and the Giffard Dirigible

Yovisto: Charles Lindbergh and his Spirit of St. Louis

Conciatore: 16-17th Century Glass Furnace

From "De re metallica"  Agricola (Georg Bauer) 1556.

From “De re metallica”
Agricola (Georg Bauer) 1556.

BBC: Rediscovered plans aid Edsac reconstruction

M Library Blog: An Early Example of a Portable Calculator? Indeed, the Arithmographe just Arrived!

Louis Troncet. Arithmographe Troncet. Pour les quatre opérations. Calculateur mécanique instantané. Librairie Larousee. Paris, 19 rue Montparnasse, 19, ca. 1900

Louis Troncet. Arithmographe Troncet. Pour les quatre opérations. Calculateur mécanique instantané. Librairie Larousee. Paris, 19 rue Montparnasse, 19, ca. 1900

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Niche: Landscapes of Science: the first in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and the histories of science, technology, and medicine.

Aberystwyth University: £750,000 to study how science fiction writers and readers anticipate the future

ChoM News: Countway and University of Alberta team up to bring hidden medical data to light

Ptak Science Books: Inventory of the Apocalypse (1964)

Ether Wave Propaganda: Sutton vs. Jacob: Was John Desagulier a Prophet of Industrialization?

Diagram from a lecture concerning friction in mechanical engines, from Desaguliers, A Course of Experimental Philosophy. Click through for an online exhibit on Desaguliers at the Cambridge Whipple Library website.

Diagram from a lecture concerning friction in mechanical engines, from Desaguliers, A Course of Experimental Philosophy. Click through for an online exhibit on Desaguliers at the Cambridge Whipple Library website.

Ambix: Volume 62 Number 1

The New York Times: General Relativity’s Big Year?

Tecnoscienza: Our Common Future: Joining Forces for Histories of Sustainable Design

BSHS: Postgraduate Conferences New Hosts Required!

Nautilus: Art’s Biggest Wheel Turns Toward Science

AEON: Absolute English: Science once communicated in a polyglot of tongues, but now English rules alone. How did this happen – and at what cost?

The Art of Science App: Butterfly and Moth Paintings by the Scott Sisters

Science Book a Day: Interviews Sharon Bertsch McGrayne

Science Comma: Science criticism, or, what is this thing about science called?

RCS: War, Art and Surgery: Exhibition, Conference, Book

Historiens de la santé: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences Vol. 70 Issue 1

The New York Times: Is Book Reviewing a Public Service or an Art?

ESOTERIC:

Academia.edu: CONSTRUCTING ESOTERICISMS SOCIOLOGICAL, HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL APPROACHES TO THE INVENTION OF TRADITION

Conciatore: The Golden Sun Reprise

QDL: Sahl Ibn Bishr and the Rise of Astrology in Abbasid Times

Horoscope with planetary positions corresponding to about 3am, 4 July 824 in Baghdad (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Arabic MSS 523, f. 50a)

Horoscope with planetary positions corresponding to about 3am, 4 July 824 in Baghdad (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Arabic MSS 523, f. 50a)

HNN: Prehistoric High Times: Early Humans Used Magic Mushrooms, Opium

Vox: These 5 men were scientific geniuses. They also thought magic was real.

Cambridge Historians: The Society for Psychical Research’s Cambridge Roots

BOOK REVIEWS:

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: MedHum Mondays Presents: Rhetoric in the Flesh

BMJ Blogs: The Reading Room: Performance, Madness and Psychiatry

41omiL3biRL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX324_SY324_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA346_SH20_OU03_

LRB: Anti-Condescensionism: Bodily Matters: The Anti-Vaccination Movement in England, 1853–1907

NEW BOOKS:

Springer.com: Foot Steps of the Ancient Great Glacier of North America

9783319131993

Historiens de la santé: Encyclopedia of Asylum Therapeutics, 1750–1950s

THEATRE:

Broadway World.com: San Francisco: Theatre Rhino to Present Hugh Whitemore’s Breaking the Code 4-21 March 2015

FILM:

Ursula Writes: The Imitation Game, or, the Inventing Things That Didn’t Happen Game

The Guardian: Berlin 2015: Queen of the Dessert review – a towering Nicole Kidman goes there and back again

d6c51602-5a34-4bbb-8bce-b56f316b7745-620x372

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Skepchick: A trio of badass scientists you should know

Youtube: Harry Potter and the History of Alchemy

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Producing Plutonium

Amphibol: Das Innere der Erde

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Royal Society: R. Science podcast: January 2015: Scientific anniversaries

Boxcar Aldous Huxley: The Great Moon Hoax of 1835

Science Friday: Remembering ‘The Father of the Pill’

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Werkgroep Zeventiende Eeuw: CfP: Uit de Europese mal. Europese hypes in de Nederlanden 29 August 2015

Chronologia Universalis: Early Modern Chronologies in Berlin – updated schedule

Historiens de la santé: Université d’Angers: Call for Abstracts: 34th Annual Meeting of the European Society for the History of the Human Sciences (ESHHS) 7-10 June 2015

The Sixteenth-Century Studies Conference, CfP: Panel: Apocalyptic knowledge (To what extent was “science,” as it emerged in the early-modern period, end-times knowledge?) Vancouver B.C., October 22-25, 2015

CRASSH: CfP: Mater and Materiality in the Early Modern World

School of Advanced Studies University of London: Institute of English Studies: Biennial London Chaucer Conference: Science, Magic and Technology 10-11 July 2015

Call For Artists: Komunitas Salihara, Jakarta, invites artists to propose projects for the upcoming exhibition 125,660 Specimens of Natural History, premiering at the Gallery in mid-August 2015.

Info Clio.ch: The Technology of Information, Communication and Administration – An Entwined History 26-27 March 2015 Swiss Federal Archives

CRASSH: CfP: The Making of Measurement 23-24 July 2015 Cambridge

CRASSH: Drinking Things 11 February 2015

Historiens de la santé: Workshop: Psychopathological fringes. Historical and social science perspectives on category work in psychiatry 13-14 February 2015 Berlin

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Fellowships at the Edward Worth Library, Dublin: Early modern medicine, early modern science

University of Rochester: Master’s in Medical Humanities Program

Support for Research at the Bakken Library and Museum: Research Travel Grant and Visiting Research Fellowship

CHF: Career Opportunities at CHF

Manchester University: CHSTM: Open days: March 2015 taught Master’s introduction and taster session

University of Illinois at Chicago: Postdoc position in philosophy of quantum gravity

| Leave a comment

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #33

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #33

Monday 02 February 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days have past and it’s time again for the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette the unique #histSTM weekly links list brought to you by the Whewell’s Ghost editorial team. I’m going to go a bit C.P. Snow on you in this week’s editorial.

Most educated people in Europe or America on hearing the theme music to the film Chariots of Fire would know that it was composed and recorded by the Greek keyboard wizard Vangelis. Likewise they would associate the terms Hobbit or Hogwarts with J.R.R. Tolkien and J.K. Rowling respectively. However when it comes to modern science or technology their response would be more hesitant if they responded at all.

The laser is an iconic symbol of post World War Two technology. Whether it be slicing a table in two and threatening to do the same to 007’s genitalia in the lair of the baddy in a James Bond movie or providing the weapons of choice in the form of light sabres in the Star Wars epics, the laser in a favourite of Hollywood film makers. It is also a favourite of gigantomaniac rock bands in the form of laser light shows. No lecture, these days, is complete without a laser pointer and astronomers measure the distance between the earth and the moon to an unbelievably accurate level by bouncing laser beams off a mirror left on the moon by American astronauts. The laser is an all-present piece of high-tech in our world but who invented it? On the tip of your tongue? No idea!

Based on a theoretical concept published by Albert Einstein, he gets in on the act all over the place, the maser, the microwave predecessor of the laser, was developed by Charles Hard Townes and others in 1953. In 1957 Townes and Arthur Leonard Schawlow went on to develop the laser or ‘optical maser’ as they first called it. Townes who went on to have a very distinguished career in physics received the Physics Nobel Prize for the maser in 1964. Schawlow received it for the laser in 1981. Townes died on 27 January 2015 at the venerable age of 99. The edition of Whewell’s Gazette is dedicated to the memory of Charles Hard Townes.

Townes in 2007

Townes in 2007

UC Berkeley: News Center: Nobel laurate and laser inventor Charles Townes dies at 99

Nature.com: From the maser to the laser

The Washington Post: Charles H. Townes, Nobel laureate and laser pioneer, dies at 99

LA Times: Charles Townes, physicist who invented the laser, dies at 99

The Guardian: Laser inventor Charles Townes dies

The New York Times: Charles H. Townes, Who Paved Way for the Laser in Daily Life, Dies at 99

IEEE Spectrum: Maser Man Charles Townes Dead at 99

Believed to be the 1st photograph of a laser beam. Photo appeared on cover of Electronics, McGraw-Hill Weekly 1963.

Believed to be the 1st photograph of a laser beam. Photo appeared on cover of Electronics, McGraw-Hill Weekly 1963.

 

Since I wrote the editorial above another giant of twentieth century science has passed away, the chemist. Carl Djerassi who contributed substantially to the development of the oral contraceptive pill. Just how much this invention has influenced the world is shown by the fact that when we refer to it we just say ‘the pill’ and nobody asks which pill?

As one of those whose sex life (in the pre-aids era) benefited from the freedom granted by this wonderful invention I wish to also dedicate this edition to Carl Djerassi.

 

Carl Djerassi, recipient of the AIC Gold Medal, 2004  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Carl Djerassi,
recipient of the AIC Gold Medal, 2004
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Die Welt: The co-inventor of the “pill” is dead

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Carl Djerassi, UW grad who helped create “the pill”, dies at 91

The New York Times: Carl Djerassi, at 91, a Creator of the Birth Control Pill, Dies

Stanford News: Carl Djerassi, Stanford professor and world-renowned chemist, dead at 91

CHF: CHF Remembers Carl Djerassi

ChemBark: RIP Carl Djerassi…and the Importance of the Nobel Prize

The Guardian: Casrl Djrassi, chemist who developed the birth control pill, dies at age 91

 

The Guardian: Father of the pill

The Curious Wavefunction: Carl Djerassi (1923-2015): Chemist, writer, polymath, cultural icon

Quotes of the week:

“As for everything else, so for a mathematical theory: beauty can be perceived but not explained” Arthur Cayley

You know you’re a scientist when you attempt to explain what a thesaurus is and find yourself saying “It’s full of, you know, word isotopes” @marekkukula

Birthdays of the week:

Roy Chapman Andrews born 26 January 1884

Roy Chapman Andrews Source: Embryo Project

Roy Chapman Andrews Source: Embryo Project

The Embryo Project: Roy Chapman Andrews (1884– 1960)

History of Geology: Roy Chapman Andrews and the Kingdom of the Cretaceous Skulls

Fossil History: Meet the Naturalist: Roy Chapman Andrews

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Dannen:com: A Physicist’s Lost Love: Leo Szilard and Gerda Philipsborn

Jacob Philipsborn family, Wildbad 1910. Front row, left to right: unidentified woman, Gerda. Back row: unidentified man, Claire, Ida, unidentified woman, Jacob. Photo courtesy Gerry Brent.

Jacob Philipsborn family, Wildbad 1910. Front row, left to right: unidentified woman, Gerda. Back row: unidentified man, Claire, Ida, unidentified woman, Jacob. Photo courtesy Gerry Brent.

Yovisto: Henry Biggs and the Popularization of Logarithms

Gallica tourne rond

Lunar and Planetary Institute: To a Rocky Moon: A Geologist’s History of Lunar Exploration

Yovisto: Johannes Hevelius and his Selenographia

The Royal Society: The Repository: Julian to Gregorian

Wired: The Challenge of the Planets, Part Three: Gravity

Uncertain Principles: Surprise!

I.I. Rabi at a blackboard; somewhat ironically, as he was famously a terrible lecturer.

I.I. Rabi at a blackboard; somewhat ironically, as he was famously a terrible lecturer.

Motherboard: When Einstein Proposed a Limit to the Universe

Gizmodo: The Theft and Half-Century Journey of Einstein’s Brain

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Grace Grove’s Interview

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Untold lives blog: Colonial Knowledge: Lorimer’s Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf, Oman and Central Arabia

Oxford Dictionaries: Exploring the language of longitude

Georgian Gent: 1st February 1709 reprised – a red letter day for Alexander Selkirk!

 

selkirk1

MEDICINE:

The Royal Society: The Repository: Rabies, the Royal Society and the renown of Louis Pasteur

19th Century-Disability: The Palmer Patent Leg

Wallifaction: Happy birthday to Thomas Willis

Frontispiece to Thomas Willis' 1663 book "Diatribae duae medico-philosophicae – quarum prior agit de fermentatione", engraved and published by Gerbrandus Schagen in Amsterdam Source: Wikimedia Commons

Frontispiece to Thomas Willis’ 1663 book “Diatribae duae medico-philosophicae – quarum prior agit de fermentatione”, engraved and published by Gerbrandus Schagen in Amsterdam
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Gibson Girl’s Guide to Glamour: Mystery Solved – Cold Cream is from Galen!

The Recipes Project: Syphilis and seiseinyū: manufacturing a mercurial drug in early modern Japan

Smithsonian.com: The First Woman in America to Receive an M.D. Was Admitted to Med School as a Joke

Elizabeth Blackwell was a pioneer of women in medicine. (Bettmann/CORBIS)

Elizabeth Blackwell was a pioneer of women in medicine. (Bettmann/CORBIS)

Boingboing: Stiffs, Skulls and Skeletons – Over 400 medical portraits taken in the 1800s and early 1900s

 

Yovisto: Thomas Willis and the Royal Society

Medical History: The Impact of Tuberculosis on History, Literature and Art

The Public Domain Review: When Chocolate was Medicine: Colmenero, Wadsworth and Dufour

Seat 6A: Mondays in Maryland: The Medical Museum

Gizmodo: Terrifying Medical Instruments Found on Blackbeard’s Sunken Ship

D News: Blackbeard’s Pirate Ship Yields Medical Supplies

Smithsonian.com: How Halitosis Became a Medical Condition With a “Cure”

The H-Word: Medical Training: How long does it take to make a doctor?

 

The Sloane Letters Blog: Measles in History

Discover: Body Horrors: Abracadabra

Scientific American: Medical Technology, 1915 [Slideshow]

CHEMISTRY:

distillatio: Purification of Saltpetre, part one

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Embryo Project: Nikolai Ivanovic Vavilov (1887–1943)

Notches: Radical Relations: An Interview with Daniel W. Rivers

Concocting History: Beauty spot

A More Human Nature: How the Invention of the Telegraph Led to our Modern Conception of “Weather”

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Adam Sedgwick

Haaretz: The Nazi commandments for a pure Aryan society

Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs: ‘Sophie’

Sophie

Sophie

Embryo Project: Carol Widney Greider (1961-)

Notches: Beyond the Binary: Trans* History in Early America

BBC: Museum’s ‘Dippy’ dinosaur makes way for blue whale

Atlas Obscura: Anthropomorphic Taxidermy: How Dead Rodents Became The Darlings of the Victorian Elite

Niche: William McKay’s Character Book: Tracing Environmental Change in Archival Fragments

Rapid Uplift: Darwin: An Encounter With Beetles

 

Yovisto: The Phantastic Travels of Adelbert von Chamisso

American Museum of Natural History: Loch Ness Outdone

 

Embryo Project: Wilhelm Friedrich Phillip Pfeffer (1845–1920)

 

Trowelblazers: Gertrude Caton Thompson

TECHNOLOGY:

Picture: Slide rule on the rim of a snuff box, described in 1816 by Jomard as being invented & made by the ‘mécanicien’ Hoyau

Picture: Slide rule on the rim of a snuff box, described in 1816 by Jomard as being invented & made by the ‘mécanicien’ Hoyau

Ptak Science Books: “The World’s First Game Developer” and the First Computer Chess Machine, 1915

The Conversation: The female enigmas of Bletchley Park in the 1940s should encourage those of tomorrow

Jean Valentine, a bombe operator at Bletchley in the 1940s. Rui Vieira/PA

Jean Valentine, a bombe operator at Bletchley in the 1940s. Rui Vieira/PA

Stories from the Stores: Alexander Parkes: Living in a material world

Conciatore: Scientific Glassware

Culture 24: National Museum of Computing enlists sound artist Matt Parker to create sound archive of computing

DPLA: Unexpected: Snow Removal

National Geographic: Human Ancestors May Have Used Tools Half-Million Years Earlier than Thought

99% Invisible: Episode 150: Under the Moonlight

Atlas Obscura: Schwäbisches Turmuhrenmuseum

Conciatore: Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall

Blink: Telegraphic tales from the Raj

Ptak Science Books: The History of the Future of Skyscrapers: Thomas Nast, 1881

Mashable: c.1957–1970 The Soviet Union’s Dog That Conquered Space

Spitalfields Life: Frost Bros, Rope Makers & Yarn Spinners

IEEE Spectrum: Innovation Magazine and the Birth of a Buzzword

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ether Wave Propaganda: Wakefield’s Nightmare, Pt. 2: Divided Opinion on the Political Economic Importance of Enlightenment Intellectual Culture

Andre Wakefield

Andre Wakefield

The Finch & Pea: On Beauty in Technical Science Writing

ChoM News: Southard in the Spotlight

 

The National Museum of American History: Exhibition: “Hear My Voice”: Alexander Graham Bell and the Origins of Recorded Sound 26 Jan–25 Oct 2015

The Washington Post: Milton Rosen, rocket engineer and NASA executive dies at 99

Mosaic: Science for the people!

British Library: The Newsroom blog: Into the void

The Science and Entertainment Laboratory: Evangelizing the Cosmos: Science Documentaries and the Dangers of Wonder Overload

BSHS: BJHS Themes inaugural issue “Intersections: Science and Technology in Twentieth Century China and India”

 

Communications of the ACM: The Tears of Donald Knuth

Bodleian Libraries: Thousands of early English books released online to public by Bodleian Libraries and partners

Atlas Obscura: Secret Libraries in Rome

 

Storify: The dinosaur in the “iconic Victorian Hintze Hall”

Early Modern Medical Humanities Research Network New Blog

History Applied: Domains of Literature – Geographies of Science

Until Darwin: Science & the Origins of Race: Eight classic works from Archive.org

The Nation: Latin Lives

Unique at Penn: An Occult and Alchemical Library

Forbes: How Chronologists Moved From Ancient Text to Ancient Earth

Arts Journal: An Ambitious Plan To Bring Out-Of-Print Academic Books Back to Life

 

Making Science Public: Science communication and ‘vulgarisation scientifique’: Do words matter?

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: The Desert Knows Me Well

Sotheby’s: Alchemical Manuscript

Fine Books& Collections: Penn Library Acquires Collection of 18th-Century Occult and Alchemical Manuscripts

Forbidden Histories: The Mathematician and the World Beyond: The Visions of Girolamo Cardano

Gerolamo Cardano Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gerolamo Cardano
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Darin Hayton: Astrologer Ralph Kraum’s Copy of the Tuckerman Tables

BOOK REVIEWS:

Roots of Unity: Learning to count like an Egyptian

Count Like an Egyptian by David Reimer. Image: Princeton University Press.

Count Like an Egyptian by David Reimer. Image: Princeton University Press.

Kestrels and Cerevisiae: Book Thoughts: Leviathan and the Air-Pump

Science Book a Day: Earth’s Deep History: How It Was Discovered and Why it Matters

strategy+business: The Hard Work of Invention

Scientific American: The Powerhouse: Inside the Invention of a Battery to Save the World

NEW BOOKS:

CUP: The Cambridge Companion to the History of the Book

New Books in Astronomy: Observing by Hand: Sketching the Nebulae in the Nineteenth Century

Chicago Journals: Osiris Volume 29: Chemical Knowledge in the Early Modern World51+9TpA1aeL._AA160_THEATRE:

The Guardian: After Turing and Hawking, now it’s the stage story of Robert Oppenheimer, the man behind the bomb

Robert Oppenheimer, right, with Albert Einstein in 1947. Photograph: Alfred Eisenstaedt/Life Picture Collection/Getty

Robert Oppenheimer, right, with Albert Einstein in 1947. Photograph: Alfred Eisenstaedt/Life Picture Collection/Getty

FILM:

Inside the Science Museum: How Eddie Redmayne Mastered Stephen Hawking’s Voice

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: What is the History of Emotions?

 

ESPN Video: Signals: The Queen of Code (Grace Hopper)

Grace Hopper on Letterman

 

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Student Society for Science: Scientists Say: Coprolite

Cabinet: Conversation: “Lives in the Margins”, with Anthony Grafton and William Sherman

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Charles University in Prague: CfP: Material Perspectives on Culture: Making Archaeology Relevant 12 May 2015

University of Wisconsin-Madison: CfP: 2015 Midwest Junto for the History of Science

The Royal Society: CfP: Archival Afterlives: Life, Death and Knowledge-Making in Early Modern British Scientific and Medical Archives 2 June 2015

University of Kent: School of History: Victorian magic lantern show 24 February

Spencer Museum of Art: Hybrid Practices in the arts, sciences, & technology from the 1960s today 10-13 March 2015

The Royal Society: Michael Faraday Prize and Lecture: Andrea Stella – Is chemistry really so difficult? 9 February 2015

H-Environment: CfP: Workshop for the History of Environment, Agriculture, Technology, and Science (WHEATS) 2015 CU Boulder 2-4 October 2015

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow History of Medicine Group – Spring Meetings 2015

St John’s University: CfP: World History Theory and Practice: Gender, Technology, Culture

Saint Louis University & Washington University in St. Louis: Vesalius and the Invention of the Modern Body 26-28 February 2015

 

Royal Geographical Society: International Conference of Historical Geographers 2015 5-10 July

The Royal Institution: Talks: John Tyndall: In the sky, not under it 4 March 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main: Three PhD positions in the field of History of Science

BSHS: Undergraduate Dissertation Archive Grants 2015

CHF Center for Oral History Fellowship Announcement

BSHS Strategic Conference Grants

University of Western Australia: Research Associate Emotions in Early Modern Colonial Encounters 1600–1800

Yale University: Two Postdoctoral Positions in Biological Anthropology

University of London: Huguenot Scholarship (Hint: There were Huguenot scientists!)

Newcastle University: Research Assistant/Associate (Historical and Cultural Landscapes)

MPIHS Berlin: Two month postdoctoral fellowships deadline 16 March

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| Leave a comment

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #32

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #32

Monday 26 January 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome dear readers to the thirty second edition of the Internet’s finest #histSTM weekly links list Whewell’s Gazette. The year 2015 is the two hundredth anniversary of the publication of the first ever geological map of an entire country by the surveyor and amateur geologist William Smith (1769–1839). Smith work for various mining companies and he realised that different geological strata were characterised by the fossils to be found in them, an important discovery in the history of geological dating. Given the importance of his work and the bicentenary of his map this edition of Whewell’s gazette id dedicated to William ‘Strata’ Smith.

 

Smith's famous 1815 geological map of part of Great Britain Source: Wikimedia Commons

Smith’s famous 1815 geological map of part of Great Britain
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Combe Down Heritage Society: William Smith Project

The Geological Society: The William Smith Map Bicentenary (1815–2015)

D News: 200-Year-Old Map Changed How We See the World

Ars Technica: Scientific Method/Science & Exploration: The first major geological map turns 200

The Washington Post: This beautiful map traces North America’s geological history

Quotes of the week:

“It’s never too late to procrastinate” @DublinSoil

“If there is one history of science show or book you must get acquainted with; it is “The Ascent of Man” by Jacob Bronowski. Please do it.” @fadesingh

Birthdays of the week:

Simon Marius born 20 January (ns) (10 January os) 1573

Simon Marius portrait from Mundus Iovialis 1614 Source:Wikimedia Commons

Simon Marius portrait from Mundus Iovialis 1614
Source:Wikimedia Commons

Simon Marius Portal

Yovisto: Simon Marius and his Astronomical Discoveries

Robert Boyle born 25 January 1627

Johann Kerseboom - Chemical Heritage Foundation, Photograph by Will Brown.

Johann Kerseboom – Chemical Heritage Foundation, Photograph by Will Brown.

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: The formation of Boyle’s experimental philosophy

Chemical Heritage Foundation: Robert Boyle

Wallifaction: Happy Birthday to Robert Boyle!

The Royal Society: The Repository: What Scientists Want: Robert Boyle’s to-do list

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Experimental philosophy and Religion

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Chronologia Universalis: In the year 252525…, or: How to bore your opponent to death

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The specialist in causing pain

Ptak Science Books: The Dots Between the Sun and the Stars

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Innovation Through Teamwork

Astrolabes and Stuff: Precision and accuracy in medieval astronomy

Slate Vault: Beguiling 19th-Century Space Art, Made by a Self-Taught Astronomical Observer

"Aurora Borealis. As observed March 1, 1872, at 9 h 25m P.M.” E.L. Trouvelot, 1881–82.

“Aurora Borealis. As observed March 1, 1872, at 9 h 25m P.M.” E.L. Trouvelot, 1881–82.

Yovisto: Pierre Gassendi and his Trials to reconcile Epicurean atomism with Christianity

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Harold Fidler’s Interview

Space Watchtower: Part of Historic Westinghouse Van de Graaff ‘Atom Smasher’ Preserved

National Post: Incredible discovery of the oldest depiction of the universe almost lost to the black market

Atlas Obscura: Essential Guide: Ruins of Space Exploration

Scientific American; Cross-Check: Did Edgar Allen Poe Foresee Modern Physics and Cosmology?

Atomic Heritage Foundation: University of California, Berkeley

The Conversation: Let there be light! Celebrating the theory of electromagnetism

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: Fruits of Espionage in the K.Top

The Soft, Warm, Wet Technology of Native Oceania (pdf)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Raemer Schreiber’s Interview

Medievalist.net: A 16th century view of North America in the Vallard Atlas

vallard-atlas-north-America

MEDICINE:

NYAM: A Letter from Benjamin Franklin

BetaBoston: Leech bleedings and weather reports: Inside the first issue of the New England Journal of Medicine

Diseases of Modern Life: ‘Pearls before swine’ or heavenly messengers? The work of the Victorian Flower Missions

Robert Gavin, The Flower Mission

Robert Gavin, The Flower Mission

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh: Surgeons’ Hall Museum: Object of the Week: Knuckle Duster

Medievalist.net: Toxicology and Treatment: Medical Authorities and Snake-bite in the Middle Ages

Morbid Anatomy: The Curiously Anatomized Bodies of John Ardene

History Today: The Dreaded Sweat: the Other Medieval Epidemic

Royal College of Physicians: The new light

The Guardian: Death in the city: the grisly secrets of dealing with Victorian London’s dead

The Quack Doctor: ‘Eat! Eat! Eat!’ Those notorious tapeworm diet pills

Taenia saginata Internal-medicine a work for the practicing physician on diagnosis and treatment 1920

Taenia saginata Internal-medicine a work for the practicing physician on diagnosis and treatment 1920

CHEMISTRY:

Mirror: Six ridiculously dangerous science experiments from kid’s old chemistry sets

Chemistry Blog: 23 Million Times Slower than Molasses

Pitch Drop

Pitch Drop

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Synapse: 125,660 Specimens of Natural History

Embryo Project: “A Plant Genetically Modified that Accumulates Pb Is Especially Promising for Phytoremediation” (2003)

Horniman Museum: Bookblitz: Early Entomology

The monochrome images in 'Johannes Godartius of Insects' (published 1682) were printed from careful copper etchings made by a 'Mr F Pl'.

The monochrome images in ‘Johannes Godartius of Insects’ (published 1682) were printed from careful copper etchings made by a ‘Mr F Pl’.

Embryo Project: Edwin Stephen Goodrich (1868–1946)

Letters from Gondwana: The Great Acceleration

Audra J. Wolfe: Bentley Glass Project

Wired: Fantastically Wrong: The Silly Theory That Almost Kept Darwin From Going on His Famous Voyage (Read comment by @friendsofdarwin!)

National Geographic: Phenomena: Laelaps: How Paleontologists Uncovered the World’s Biggest Rhino

TrowelBlazers: Audrey Williams: Trowelblazing the Temple of Mithras

TwilightBeasts: Joseph Leidy’s atrocious baby

American lion reconstruction by Sergiodlarosa via Wikimedia Commons

American lion reconstruction by Sergiodlarosa via Wikimedia Commons

Embryo Project: Paul Kammerer’s Experiments on Salamanders (1903-1912)

Slate Vault: The Documents That Trapped Poor Southern Farmers in a Dangerous Form of Debt

Embryo Project: Theodora (Theo) Emily Colborn (1927-2014)

BBC Earth: The 25 Biggest Turning Points in Earth’s History

Notches: Heterosexuality and Americanisation: “Social Education” for Immigrant Youth in the 1920s

Yovisto: Andrija Mohorovičić and the Mohorovičić Discontinuity

The Guardian: The secret history of same-sex marriage

The Friends of Charles Darwin: Charles Darwin on the family tree of languages

The Guardian: A language family tree – in pictures

Minna Sundberg

Minna Sundberg

Big History Project: Chapter 3 LIFE

Renaissance Utterances: Dresden Conference: Chimeric Blobs, biological art or where I go off script

TECHNOLOGY:

Atlas Obscura: Objects of Intrigue: The Infernal Machine

Collectors Weekly: Flipping Out Over Handheld Movies, a Century Before Smartphones

Yovisto: John Fitch and the Steam Boat

Motherboard: Happy Birthday to the Cold War’s Most Eerie Technology: The ‘Atom Sub’

My Medieval Foundry: Bronze casting at the Experimental Archaeology Conference

Wired: These Priests’ Invention Could Help Us Drill Into Icy Alien Worlds Someday

Northwest Public Radio: Beware of Japanese Balloon Bombs

BBC: Goldsworthy Gurney: Inventor took hot air out of parliament

People on board Sir Goldsworthy's steam carriage on its journey from London to Bath in 1827

People on board Sir Goldsworthy’s steam carriage on its journey from London to Bath in 1827

Smithsonian.com: Exploring the Titanic of the Ancient World

Amazing Women in History: Sarah Guppy, Eclectic English Inventor

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

SuperScholar: Paul Halpern Interview

Renaissance Utterances: Dresden Conference: Part One Cabinets of Curiosity/Wunderkammern/Kunstkammern

British Library: Help For Researchers: Concise History of the British Newspaper in the Seventeenth Century

Ships, Clocks and Stars Visitors Survey

Washington Post: Crowdfunding propels scientific research

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: MedHum Monday Presents: The Power of Story

Atlas Obscura: Collegium Maius

Collegium Maius Photo by Andreas Welch on Flickr | Copyright: Creative Commons

Collegium Maius
Photo by Andreas Welch on Flickr | Copyright: Creative Commons

The Guardian: How Britain’s world war spirit benefited science

The apparatus used by Robert Watson-Watt in 1935 to demonstrate radar technology. Photograph: Jennie Hills/Science Museum

The apparatus used by Robert Watson-Watt in 1935 to demonstrate radar technology. Photograph: Jennie Hills/Science Museum

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists

Wired: Exhibition reveals Churchill’s secret love of science

Inside the Science Museum: Celebrating Churchill’s Scientists with Sir Winston’s great-grandson

CBC News: Winston Churchill’s love of science helped Britain in WWII

The Alan Turing Internet Scrapbook

News.com.au: Code-breaker Alan Turing’s notes will be auctioned

AEON: Trick of the Eye: Optical illusion such as magic lanterns taught the Victorians what o trust. What can they teach us today?

Two Temple Place: Exhibition: Cotton to Gold: Extraordinary Collections of the Industrial North West 31 January-19 April 2015

JHI Blog: The Gay Past and the Intellectual Historian

Curie: In the business of looking to the past

The Sloane Letters Blog: A Most Dangerous Rivalry

BSHS Travel Guide

Communiqué No. 88, Summer 2014: Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science

Boston Review; The Virtue of Scientific Thinking by Steven Shapin

Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 7: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 1

Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 7: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 2 – WITH

Renaissance Utterances: Dresden Conference: Wildgoose Memorial Library

HUB: Johns Hopkins adds new interdisciplinary major: Medicine, science, and humanities

THE: The rise of the medical humanities

Design Week: Revelations: an exhibition of scientific discovery

Ether Wave Propaganda: Wakefield’s Nightmare, Pt. 1: The Enlightenment and Industrial Revolution Chain

Wikimedia Blog: Wellcome Library donates 100, 00 medical images to Wikimedia Commons

Dr Alun Withey: Fart Catchers and Duck F***ers! The World of 18th-century slang

The Royal Institution: A fond farewell

The #EnvHist Weekly

Crux: Priest-scientists are at the crossroads of faith and reason

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: The Kabbalah Reprise

Kabbalistic Sephiroth Tree, from Portae Lucis, Paulus Ricius (Trans.) Augsburg, 1516.

Kabbalistic Sephiroth Tree,
from Portae Lucis, Paulus Ricius (Trans.)
Augsburg, 1516.

History of Alchemy: Archimastry – Giovanni Panteo

BOOK REVIEWS:

George Campbell Gosling: Healthcare: Private and Public from the Early Modern Period to 2000

Science Book a Day: In The Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette

SomeBeans: Sextant by David Barrie

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Lost at Home: Istan Hargittai: Buried Glory: Portraits of Soviet Scientists

Portrait of Soviet scientists Petr Kapitza (left) and Nikolai Semenov by Russian painter Boris Kustodiev (1921). Both scientists were later awarded Nobel Prizes, Semenov for chemistry in 1956 and Kapitza for physics in 1978

Portrait of Soviet scientists Petr Kapitza (left) and Nikolai Semenov by Russian painter Boris Kustodiev (1921). Both scientists were later awarded Nobel Prizes, Semenov for chemistry in 1956 and Kapitza for physics in 1978

Science Book a Day: 10 Great History of (European) Science Books and more

Somatosphere: Daniel P. Todes’ Ivan Pavlov: A Russian Life in Science

Publishers Weekly: The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer

NEW BOOKS:

The MIT Press: H.G. Bronn, Ernst Haeckel, and the Origins of German Darwinism

Conciatore: Conciatore: The Life and Times of 17th Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri: An Excerpt

Conciatore 200x300

The University of Chicago Press: Haeckel’s Embryos: Images, Evolution, and Fraud

THEATRE:

The Guardian: Oppenheimer five-star review – father of atomic bomb becomes tragic hero at RSC

Intoxicating excitement' … John Heffernan as Robert Oppenheimer and Ben Allen as Edward Teller in Oppenheimer at Stratford. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

Intoxicating excitement’ … John Heffernan as Robert Oppenheimer and Ben Allen as Edward Teller in Oppenheimer at Stratford. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

The Telegraph: Oppenheimer, RSC Swan, Stratford-upon-Avon, review: ‘a dazzling spectacle’

The Independent: Oppenheimer, RSC Swan, Stratford-upon-Avon, review: Immaculately acted

homunculus: Are you ready? Then I’ll begin…

FILM:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

How To Make A Scientific Revolution: Lessons From 3000 Years of History @fadesingh

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Scientists You Must Know: Robert Gore Discovers ePTFE

Laughing Squid: Tom Scott Describes the British Rail Flying Saucer, A Scientifically Improbable Spacecraft Design

Youtube: Under The Knife: Episode 5 – Human Skin Books

RADIO:

Free Thinking: BBC Radiophonic Workshop

Dick Mills, BBC Radiophonic Workshop reunion live at the Roundhouse in 2009. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dick Mills, BBC Radiophonic Workshop reunion live at the Roundhouse in 2009.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BBC: A History of Ideas: Simon Schaffer on Humans, Apes and Carl Linnaeus

BBC Radio 3: The Essay: Sir Paul Nurse on Conjectures and Refutations

PODCASTS:

CIGI: Webcast: Discovering the Erebus: Mysteries of the Franklin Voyage Revealed 3 February 2015

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Department of History and Philosophy of Science University of Cambridge: History of Medicine Seminars Lent Term 2015

MPIHS Berlin: Technical Art History: 26 January Erma Hermens: Technical Art History and Materials as Markers, a 16th-Century Material Travel Log

London Medieval Society: Magic & Miracles 28 February 2015

CENTRE FOR HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (HPS) School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science, University of Leeds HPS SEMINAR PROGRAMME, 2014–15, Semester 2 Wednesdays, 3.15–5.00pm, Baines Wing G.36

University of Marburg: CfP: Shared Practices, Entangled Spaces, Circulating Objects, Translated Theories: Relocating German-Polish Scientific Relations 28-30 Oct 2015

University of Cambridge; Department of History and Philosophy of Science: Seminars

University of Cambridge: History of Medicine Seminars

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: Southern History of Science and Technology (SoHoST) Meeting 10-11 April 2015 Richmond VA

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: Empty Spaces A one day conference Institute of Historical Research London 10 April 2015

Royal Society: The experience of scientific publishing: A public oral history event: 19 March 2015

Royal Society: The future of scientific publishing: Roundtable discussion 20 March 2015

The Royal Institution: John Tyndall resurrected: Talks: 4 March 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Working with Nineteenth-Century Medical and Health Periodicals St Anne’s College Oxford 30 May 2015

h-madness: CfP: Does the History of Psychology Have a Future? History of Psychology Special Issue Deadline 15 July 2015

Hektoen International: A journal of Medical Humanities: Third Hektoen Grand Prix Essay Competition

The Huntington: Exhibition: Samuel F. B. Morse’s “Gallery of the Louvre” and the Art of Invention 24 Jan-4 May 2015

Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, (1831–1833

Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, (1831–1833

Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Library: TORCH Humanities and Science: In Conversation

Natural History Museum: Talk: Letters of Note: Alfred Russel Wallace 27 January 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

BSPS Doctoral Scholarship Competition 2015

Yale Medical History Library: Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Travel Grants

CHoM News: 2015-2016 Countway Fellowships: Application Period Open

University of Leeds: Faculty of Arts: 110 Anniversary Research Scholarships

The Museum of the History of Science, University of Oxford: Co-curator/researcher

National Museum of Natural History: Peter Buck Deep Time Postdoctoral Fellowship

The Royal Institution: BBSRC Professional Internship for PhD Students, Spring 2015

The University of Edinburgh: Full time Post Doc Research Fellows Science, Technology and Innovation Studies

University of Wuppertal: Doctoral studentships (PhD) in STS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| 2 Comments

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #31

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #31

Monday 19 January 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome to Volume #31 of the world’s numero uno #histSTM weekly links list, Whewell’s Gazette. Yesterday, 18 January, was the 107 anniversary of the birth of Polish-British polymath Jacob Bronowski. As I said on more than one occasion I became interested in the history of mathematics when I read a copy of Eric Temple Bell’s Men of Mathematics, at the age of sixteen. Two books did more than anything else to cause me to widen my horizons to a more general history of science, one was Arthur Koestler’s The Sleepwalkers and the other was Jacob Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man.

Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man was originally a much praised television series but in my case it was the book to the series that had a major impact. Later I would go on to read two books by Bronowski on the philosophy/sociology of science, The Common Sense of Science and Science and Human Values, both of which influenced my interest in science studies. When I discovered that Bronowski had also written books on William Blake, then and now my favourite poet, my fate was sealed, I was definitely a fan. I don’t do heroes but if I did Bronowski would be a serious candidate.

In many discussions over the years both on blog comment columns and on Twitter I have become aware that The Ascent of Man played an important role in the career decision of quite a few historians of science and so I have decide to dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to the memory of Jacob Bronowski (18 January 1907 – 22 August 1974)

Jacob Bronowski Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jacob Bronowski
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

The Sloane Letters Blog: Storms, Sounds and Authorship

Ptak Science Blog: Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, 1961

National Geographic: A Half Century of Martian Invasions

Corpus Newtonicium: All was light – but was it?

Uncertain Principles: Science Stories: Letters to Famous Physicists

Medium.com: When Einstein met H.G. Wells

Conciatore: Torricelli and Glass

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Hugh Taylor’s Interview

Making Waves: Oliver Lodge and the Cultures of Science, 1875-1940: The Alternative Path: Lodge, Lightning, and Electromagnetic Waves

Irish Philosophy: Small and Far Away: Thomas Kingsmill Abbott

New York Review of Books: Los Alamos Declassified

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Hanford, WA

Medieval Books: Medieval Apps

British Library, Egerton MS 848 (15th century)  Source: British Library

British Library, Egerton MS 848 (15th century)
Source: British Library

Greenwich.co.uk:blogs: The Grave of John Flamsteed

The Institute: A History of the Magnetic Compass

O Say Can You See?: What emerging science got the public excited in the 1860s? Spectroscopy!

The Indian Express: In the word “sine”, we see interconnection of three mathematical traditions – Indian, Arabic and European

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

B7rJXHjCEAAO0-d

Richard Who?: Editing Hakluyt’s The Principal Navigations: A 8nearly) 10-year Progress Report

SvD Kultur: Se de okända bilderna från Andrées polarfärd

Livescience: Treasured 16th-Century ‘Lenox Globe’ Gets a Digital Makeover

Slate Vault: Pitching a Potential Donor, Shackleton Sketched This Expedition Map

Channel Asia News: NLB launches its first festival on maps

MEDICINE:

Physician Gerolamo Mercuriale holding Vesalius's De Humani Corporis Fabrica c 1600 Painter: Lavinia Fontana (1552-1614)

Physician Gerolamo Mercuriale holding Vesalius’s De Humani Corporis Fabrica c 1600
Painter: Lavinia Fontana (1552-1614)

Mental Floss: Five Medical Innovations of the Civil War

MBS Birmingham: Saving teeth, removing inequalities: Fluoridation in Birmingham, 1964–2014

From the Hands of Quacks: Actina: A Wonder of the 19th Century

Discover: The Tragic History of Surgery for Schizophrenia

Fiction Reboot: MedHum Monday Presents: A Little Drop of Poison

The Recipes Project: Flower power: Cato’s medicinal recipes

AWH: Fe del Mundo, first female student at Harvard Medical School

The Recipes Project: Wild Thyme, Bitter Almonds, and Extract of Beavers – The Medicinal Recipes of Scribonius Largus

Wired: Strange Antique Medical Devices That Promised to Cure Everything with Electricity

 

 

Multi-purpose electrotherapy machine (Italy, 1922). This device could be used to treat muscle conditions, alleviate pain, or cauterize wounds.

Multi-purpose electrotherapy machine (Italy, 1922). This device could be used to treat muscle conditions, alleviate pain, or cauterize wounds.

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry Hall: Discovery and Synthesis of LSD

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Rosetta Stones: Wallace’s Woeful Wager: How a Founder of Modern Biology Got Suckered by Flat-Earthers

Darin Hayton: A. R. Wallace and “preter-human intelligences”

Notches: Umutoni: Why Histories of African Homosexualities Matter

The Embryo Project: Ross Granville Harrison

Ptak Science Books: A Cloud Map (1873)

Image from Arnold Guyot, Physical Geography, Scrinber's, New York, 1873

Image from Arnold Guyot, Physical Geography, Scrinber’s, New York, 1873

Evolution Institute: Yes, Darwinian Feminism Is Real. And It’s Growing

Dr Alun: ‘Rhythmical Essays on the Beard Question’: Beard haters in the 1860s!

Embryo Project: Edwin Stephen Goodrich (1868–1946)

 

Trowelblazers: Zonia Baber

Zonia Baber University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf1-00303], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Zonia Baber
University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf1-00303], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Notches: The King’s Favourite: Sex, Money and Power in Medieval England

 

History of Geology: “What a confusion for Geologists” – Geologizing with Darwin

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The Mummy That Wasn’t There

Yovisto: Lewis Terman and the Intelligence Quotient

Embryo Project: August Friedrich Leopold Weismann (1834-1914)

Cartooning Evolution Home 1861–1925

Harper's Weekly, August 19, 1871

Harper’s Weekly, August 19, 1871

TECHNOLOGY:

The Appendix: The Aviator’s Heart

Conciatore: Enamel Reprise

Ptak Science Books: Intel vs. Obelisk: The Renaissance Beauty of the Single-Chip Microprocessor

My medieval foundry: Real and possible misrepresentations about medieval copper alloy castings

Science Comma: Industrial Gas Museum, Athens – Creating and sharing knowledge about society

Mental Floss: Toilet Paper History: How America Convinced the World to Wipe

Ancient Origins: Ten amazing inventions from ancient times

Brain pickings: The Mirror and the Meme: A 600 Year History of the Selfie

Ptak Science Book: The Coming of Broadcast Television (1929)

Ptak Science Books: Killing London with the Future: City Planning with the Bressey Report, 1937

 

Ptak Science Books: Bicycle Story Without Words, 1869

6a00d83542d51e69e201bb07dcaa0c970d-500wi

Yovisto: Thomas Augustus Watson – Recipient of the Very First Phone Call

 

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The many-headed monster: Thinking about doing a PhD: who, where and how?

Live Mint: Mythology, history & science

Wonders & Marvels: Agnodice: Down and Dirty?

Chronologia Universalis: A Warning, part 1, or: Read the catalogues!

The Atlas of Early Printing

OUP Blog: Making the case for history in medical education

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Scientists as celebrities: Bad for science or good for society?

dhq: Beyond Gutenberg: Transcending the Document Paradigm in Digital Humanities

Today I found out: The Mysterious Fate of the Library of Alexandria

Discover: The 5 Retro Science Kits That Inspired a Generation of Tinkerers

Bridges, derricks and robots were common early Erector set projects. Even newer Meccano sets have spawned impressive projects, like the airplane below. Yale medical student William Sewell really thought outside the box when he used Erector parts to build the first artificial heart pump. Erector U.S./Meccano

Bridges, derricks and robots were common early Erector set projects. Even newer Meccano sets have spawned impressive projects, like the airplane below. Yale medical student William Sewell really thought outside the box when he used Erector parts to build the first artificial heart pump.
Erector U.S./Meccano

The New York Times: ‘Izzy, Did You Ask a Good Question Today?’

Irish Philosophy: Berkeley’s Foray into Experimental Philosophy

Ptak Science Books: A Half-Alphabet of Color by Isaac Newton and What the Colors “Naked” and “Dead” Are (1659)

The #EnvHist Weekly

Conciatore: Michel Montaigne

The New York Times: Dorothy Thomas, the ‘Mother’ of Bone Marrow Transplants, Dies at 92

Dorothy Thomas and her husband, Dr. E. Donnall Thomas. The couple worked together on research into transplants that could cure dying patients of leukemia.  Credit Jim Linna

Dorothy Thomas and her husband, Dr. E. Donnall Thomas. The couple worked together on research into transplants that could cure dying patients of leukemia.
Credit Jim Linna

 

HSS: Saton Medal Speech: Steven Shapin: “Praising Famous Men”

The Frailest Thing: Do Artifacts Have Ethics?

The Finch & Pea: Sunday Science Poem: Lord Byron’s Post-Apocalyptic Vision

Leaping Robot: Lasers, Pot Smoke, and the “Visual Art of the Future”

Athene Donald’s Blog: Science Policy and Impact: Lessons from History

ESOTERIC:

History of Alchemy: Cornelius Drebbel

academia.edu: Intermediary Beings (ch. 64, The Occult World) pdf

Heterodoxology: Esotericism in Antiquity: An Aries Special Issue

 

 

Tauroctony

Tauroctony

BOOK REVIEWS:

Remedia: Unassigned Reading

 

The Lancet: A history of chronic diseases

Science Book a Day: Downs: The history of a disability

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The Electric Wizard

Nikola Tesla lived a life of contradictions. Tesla was equal parts showman and inventor, and these qualities underpinned his success and contributed to his downfall. A multiple-exposure photograph shows Tesla in his Colorado Springs laboratory, where he explored wireless telegraphy and produced artificial lightning.  (The Tesla Collection)

Nikola Tesla lived a life of contradictions. Tesla was equal parts showman and inventor, and these qualities underpinned his success and contributed to his downfall. A multiple-exposure photograph shows Tesla in his Colorado Springs laboratory, where he explored wireless telegraphy and produced artificial lightning.
(The Tesla Collection)

NEW BOOKS:

Juan Biquert’s Blog: Ramon Llull: From the Ars Magna to Artificial Intelligence

Science Book a Day: Women in Science: Then and Now

women-in-science

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Guardian: Jane Hawking: ‘I firmly believed in Stephan and his brilliance’

Jane Hawking, Stephen Hawking’s first wife, at the premiere for The Theory of Everything last month. Photograph: Ian West/PA Wire

Jane Hawking, Stephen Hawking’s first wife, at the premiere for The Theory of Everything last month. Photograph: Ian West/PA Wire

TELEVISION:

The Telegraph: Wolf Hall programme-makers insist on straight, white teeth

SLIDE SHARE:

From Compass to Cellphone: A 4000 Year Journey @fadesingh

VIDEOS:

Manchester 1824: Kathleen Mary Drew (1901–1957) was a phycologist at Manchester

Royal Society: The Volcano Diaries – Objectivity ‘2

Vimeo: 120 years of watching movies together

Scientists You Must Know: Gordon Moore on Moore’s Law

RADIO:

The Guardian: A Selfish turn around CERN

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Chronologia Universalis: Early Modern Chronologies: RSA 2015 Annual Meeting, Berlin 26-28 March 2015

Wellcome Library: Pre-modern medicine seminars: Spring 2015 programme

 

Tokyo Institute of Technology: The International Workshop on the History of Chemistry, “Transformation of Chemistry from the 1920s to the 1960s,” March 2–4, 2015

St Cross College: University of Oxford: Centre for the History and Philosophy of Science: “Voltaire and the Newtonian Revolution” One-Day Conference 28 Feb 2015

SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OF EARLY MODERN STUDIES: CfP: “The Care of the Self in Early Modern Philosophy and Science”

Villa Dohrn, Ischia, Italy: Call for Applications: The Fourteenth Ischia Summer School on the History of the Life Sciences 27 June – 3 July 2015

 

LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender History: 2016 AHA CfP: Queer Migrations

Royal Institute of Navigation: Lecture: The Golden Age of Celestial Navigation, Edinburgh 4 Feb 2015

 

Wellcome Collections: Lecture: Wellcome’s Collectors 22 January 2015

National Library Board Singapore: Exhibition: Geo – Graphic: Celebrating Maps and their Stories 16 Jan–19 Jul 2015

map-festival-2-data

Historiens de la santé: CfP: NYAM: Fifth Annual History of Medicine Night 11 March 2015

Durham University: Final CfP: The History of Thermodynamics and Scientific Realism 12 May 2015

issuu: CfP: Pulse: A History of Sociology, and Philosophy of Science Journal: Open Issue (Vol. 3 2015)

Making Waves: Oliver Lodge and the Cultures of Science, 1875-1940: Workshop 4:  Scientific Lives: Oliver Lodge and the History of Science in the Digital Age 6 March 2015 Leeds Art Gallery

Kent CHOTS: 4th Annual H. G. Wells lecture in Science and Society FIGHTING FOR VOTE: SCIENCE AND SUFFRAGE IN WORLD WAR ONE Dr Patricia Fara 4 March 2015

Historiens de la santé: History of Pre-Modern Medicine Seminar Series: Programme for Spring 2015 Wellcome Library

OU History of Science Collection: Announcing the Galileo’s World exhibition

James Gregory Public Lectures on Science and Christianity: The science-and-religion delusion: towards a theology of science Tom McLeish 16 Feb 2015

Institute Of Historical Research: Lecture: “Captain Cook, Pyrotechnist” 27 Jan 2015

University of Sheffield: CfP: A History of Public Parks 11-12 September 2015

UCL: CfP: Brno Latour and Environmental Governance Workshop 18-19 May 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Bristol: Postdoctoral Research Assistant, History of Medicine (Life of Breath) based in the Department of Philosophy

Centre for the Study of the Book: Bodleian Libraries: Fellowships and Prizes

Harvard Kennedy School: STS Fellows Program

BSHS: Undergraduate Dissertation Archive Grants 2015

H-Environment: University of Alberta: Department of History and Classics: Doctoral Funding Opportunity – Northern Exposure

Conecta: Duke University History of Medicine Travel Grants

BSPS Doctoral Scholarship Competition 2015

Newton International Fellowships

Chemical Heritage Foundation: Digital Collections Archivist

The Heritage Consortium: 12 Fully Funded PhD Studentships In Heritage Studies

University of Oxford: CMRS Career Development Fellowship in Renaissance History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| Leave a comment

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #30

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #30

Monday 12 January 2015

EDITORIAL:

The week that is covered by the thirtieth edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list is one that saw a sad loss in the #histSTM community with the death of the historian of science David C. Lindberg at the age of 79 on 6 January 2015.

Lindberg an expert for the history of optics, medieval history of science in general and the relationship between science and religion in the Middle Ages was one of the true giants of the discipline whose scholarship influenced all of those who came into contact with him or his writings. I personally never had the honour of meeting him but my own development as a historian of science has been heavily influenced, certainly for the better, in particular by Lindberg’s writings on the history of optics. His Theories of Vision from Al-Kindi to Kepler is one of my all time favourite history of science books and I like, many, many others, have a copy of his The Beginnings of Western Science always close at hand. We have lost one of the greats but through his writings he will remain part of our community for a long time to come.

I humbly dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to the memory of David C. Lindberg, a fine scholar and a great teacher.

David Lindberg, History of Science, teaching class. © UW-Madison University Communications  608/262-0067 Photo by:  Jeff Miller Date:  9/00     File#:   0009-171c-16a

David Lindberg, History of Science, teaching class.
© UW-Madison University Communications 608/262-0067
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: 9/00 File#: 0009-171c-16a

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Death of Professor David C. Lindberg

UWMadScience: Lessons of a Lifetime

 

Birthdays of the Week:

Alfred Russel Wallace born 8 January 1823

A photograph of A.R. Wallace taken in Singapore in 1862

A photograph of A.R. Wallace taken in Singapore in 1862

History of Geology: The Forgotten Naturalist: Alfred Russel Wallace

History of Geology: A.R. Wallace on Geology, Great Glaciers and the Speed of Evolution

Fossil History: Wallace, Darwin, and Human Origins

 

Yovisto: Alfred Russel Wallace and the Natural Selection

http://blog.yovisto.com/alfred-russel-wallace-and-the-natural-selection/

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Plants and animals named after Wallace

Youtube: Alfred Russel Wallace’s personal cabinet

Nicolas Steno born 11 January 1638

Steno as Bishop J. P. Trap 1868 derivative work Source: Wikimedia

Steno as Bishop
J. P. Trap 1868 derivative work
Source: Wikimedia

Yovisto: Nicolas Steno and the Principle of Modern Geology

History of Geology: Nicolas Steno and the Origin of Fossils

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Great American Eclipses: American eclipse observations of the 17th and 18th centuries

Uncertain Principles: Science Story: Night Owls

Magic Transistor: Thomas Orchard, The Astronomy of Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’

tumblr_nhl0v0Jjop1rtynt1o3_1280

The Renaissance Mathematicus: If you’re going to blog about history of science then at least do the legwork

ScienceNews: Bell’s math showed that quantum weirdness rang true

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Bog: When bad history meets bad journalism

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Simon Marius Anniversary Celebratios 2014 have been a great success

The Collation: From comet tales to bear tails

Nautilus: The Vulgar Mechanic and His Magical Oven: A Renaissance alchemist pioneers feedback control

ILLUSTRATION BY JONATHON ROSEN

ILLUSTRATION BY JONATHON ROSEN

Nautilus: The Glassmaker Who Sparked Astrophysics

Chronologia Universalis: Serendipity in provenance research, part 3

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

arXiv.org: The search for longitude: Preliminary insights from a 17th Century Dutch perspective (pdf)

Annie Smith Peck: A Woman’s Place is at the Top

“Men, we all know, climb in knickerbockers. Women, on the contrary, will declare that a skirt is no hindrance to their locomotion. This is obviously absurd… For a woman in difficult mountaineering to waste her strength and endanger her life with a skirt is foolish in the extreme.”  Peck, Outing Magazine, “Practical Mountain Climbing,” 1901.

“Men, we all know, climb in knickerbockers. Women, on the contrary, will declare that a skirt is no hindrance to their locomotion. This is obviously absurd… For a woman in difficult mountaineering to waste her strength and endanger her life with a skirt is foolish in the extreme.”
Peck, Outing Magazine, “Practical Mountain Climbing,” 1901.

British Library: American studies blog: Christmas, locked in the ice Nova: Shakleton’s Voyage of Endurance

 

MEDICINE:

Conciatore: The French Disease Reprise

The Times Scotland: Lunatic who exposed the asylum

Dittrick Museum: The Stomach and its Discontents: Digesting the Winter Holidays

Chom News: Oedipus and the Spjinx: a Gift for Isador H. Coriat

 

English Historical Fiction Authors: Witches and Midwives in Early Modern England

The Recipes Project: Something old – something new: Greek and Roman recipes in focus

NYAM: Louis Braille and His System: The Quest for a Universal Script

A competing English system of encoding text for the blind, using symbols close to legible letters. In William Moon, Light for the Blind, 1879, opposite page 66.

A competing English system of encoding text for the blind, using symbols close to legible letters. In William Moon, Light for the Blind, 1879, opposite page 66.

distillatio: Medieval treatments for sore joints

CHEMISTRY:

Philly.com: Restoration of 17th-century painting at Villanova reveals mysteries

 

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Gas Stations

Detail of a photo displaying gas masks developed during World War I. (Othmer Library)

Detail of a photo displaying gas masks developed during World War I. (Othmer Library)

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

History of Geology: January 6, 1912: Happy Birthday Continental Drift

 

The Embryo Project: Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples Italy 

Yovisto: Johan Christian Fabricius and his Classification System for Insects

Ptak Science Books: The Future of Oil in 1921

The Irish Times: Intrigue and egos in a tussle over Irish amphibian fossils in 1866

Old Weather Blog: A history of the World in 1,399,120,833 observations

The Embryo Project: “Experimental Studies on Germinal Localisation” (1904), Edmund B. Wilson

 

Yovisto: Elizabeth Gertrude Britton Knight and the Study of Mosses

Renaissance Utterances: Lecture: Exotic birds and animals in the 18th Century garden

Letters from Gondwana: A Brief Introduction to the Origins of Birds

Space: io9: This Geological Field Notebook is an Elegant Look at Mountain-Building

The Guardian: Earthquakes, tsunamis and a naked tribe. It’s Chile – and not just Galápagos – that inspired Darwin

Fuegian tribespeople encounter members of Darwin’s expedition in a 1839 illustration by members of the crew. Photograph: British Library/Rex

Fuegian tribespeople encounter members of Darwin’s expedition in a 1839 illustration by members of the crew. Photograph: British Library/Rex

TECHNOLOGY:

Slate: The Vault: How Photographs Tried to Capture the Terror of Night Zeppelin Raids During WWI

Science Museum: Drawn by Light: The Royal Photographic Society Collection

History News Network: The Nuclear Disaster You Never Heard of

 

Priceonomics: The Invention of the Slinky

Images from James’ patent, filed in August 1946 and approved January 1947

Images from James’ patent, filed in August 1946 and approved January 1947

Conciatore: Anatomy of a Misconception

Fig. of glass drop, Thomas Hobbes, Problematica Physica, 1662

Fig. of glass drop,
Thomas Hobbes, Problematica Physica, 1662

Conciatore: Le Fritte

BT’s Let Talk: Information Age – a turning point for society

Thick Objects: The Chambers’ Micromanipulator (1921)

 

Yovisto: Joseph Weizenbaum and his famous Eliza

BBC: “I was there” At the launch of the ‘worst gadget in history’ in 1985

Yovisto: The Watches of Abraham-Louis Bréguet

Ether Wave Propaganda: Schaffer on Machine Philosophy, Pt. 6: The Ideology of Charles Babbage

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:Inside Higher Ed: Pop History

U.S. National Library of Medicine: History of Medicine Finding Aids Consortium

 

Project Muse: Casebooks in Early Modern England: Medicine, Astrology, and Written Records

Journal of Digital Humanities: A Distinction Worth Exploring: “Archives” and “Digital Historical Representation”

jamesungureanu: Visions of Science: Epilogue

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Experimental Philosophy and Mechanical Philosophy I: The Case of Henry More and Henry Stubbe

Notches: 365 Notches: (re)marks on our 1st anniversary

 

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: New York Academy of Medicine

International Commission on the History of Meteorology: History of Meteorology – Volume 6 (2014)

Homunculus: The birth of the scientific journal

Museum Two: What I Learned about Strangers from Jane Jacobs on my Winter Vacation

Wellcome History: Issue 54: Winter 2014

New: The Cultural History of Philosophy Blog: Altruism

 

Early Television Museum: Ed Reitan – Obituary

About 40 years ago, when Ed got his Model 5

About 40 years ago, when Ed got his Model 5

The Quad Video Tape Group: Restoring the Earliest Know Color Quad Tape: The Dedication of WRC-TV/NBC Washington DC

HASS: STS Reading List

Museum of Cycladic Art: Exhibition: Hygieia: Health, Illness, Treatment from Homer to Galen 19.11.2014–31.5.2015

ESOTERIC:

Wellcome Library: Spotlight: the power of angels – a charm against plague

A charm against the plague from Leech Book I, folio 30v, MS. 404, late 15th century. Wellcome Images L0073819.

A charm against the plague from Leech Book I, folio 30v, MS. 404, late 15th century. Wellcome Images L0073819.

Dis/unity of Knowledge: Models for the study of modern esotericism and science (pdf)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Time to Eat the Dogs: Inventing the American Astronaut

9781137025272

Heterodoxology: The Occult World – a new reference work for heterodoxologists

Brain Pickings: Albert Einstein’s Little-Known Correspondence with W.E.B. Du Bois on Race and Racism

 

NEW BOOKS:

The University of Chicago Press: Hawking Incorporated: Stephen Hawking and the Anthropology of the Knowing Subject

Historiens de la santé: The Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919: Perspectives from the Iberian Peninsula and the Americas

Notre Dame Press: The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters

P03151

Historiens de la santé: Healing Bodies, Saving Souls: Medical Missions in Asia and Africa

University of Pittsburgh Press: New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Guardian: Every great individual stands on the shoulders of others

Science Observed: The opposite of a “lone genius”

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

Ron Townsend: From Problems to Solutions: Recruiting, Training, and Placing History PhDs in Non-Faculty Careers

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Jonathan Foyle discusses RCP ceremony and tradition

 

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Munich: Environmental Histories of Design: A workshop in Munich 19 June 2015

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: Lent 2015 Programme

 

University of Budapest: The CEU Summer University invites applications from MA and PhD students to the course “Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe” 29 June-4 July 2015

Diseases of Modern Life: CfP: Working with Nineteenth-Century Medical and Health Periodicals St. Anne’s College, Oxford 30 May 2015

La Lettre de L’Ehess: Mardi 27 Janvier 2015 Une autre histoire: Jacques Le Goff Journée d’étude organisée par la BnF et l’EHESS

The Swedenborg Society: Talks and Readings: Professor Simon Schaffer: Swedenborg’s Lunars542d2a9e819b0

The registration deadline for attending the 6th Norwegian Conference on the History of Science, which will take place in Oslo, Norway, 11-13 February 2015, is fast approaching.

Digital Humanities Awards 2014 Nominations

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: Medicine, Translations and Histories 11-12 June 2015 CHSTM Manchester

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) now accepting open panel proposals for 2015 meeting Denver Colorado 11-15 November

Society for Social Studies of Science (4S): Call for Open Panels: Denver 2015

University of Birmingham: Seminars and Conferences: Thursday 29 January Dr Clare Hickman: ‘Dr John Coakley Lettsom and the Mangle-Wurzel: Botany, Agriculture and Medical Practitioners in the Eighteenth-century’

Fourth Conference on History of Quantum Physics: Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain), 16-18 July, 2015. Palacio de Miramar

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens: CfP: University Heritage and Cultural Engagement of European Universities 11‐13 June 2015

Confessions of a Curator: Call for Chapter Proposals: The 21st Century Special Collections Reader: contemporary approaches for special collections Due 1 Feb 2015

‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: 15 January Dr Yossef Rapoport (Queen Mary, University of London). ‘The World Map in the Fatimid Book of Curiosities (c.1050): Mathematical Geography between Late Antiquity and Islam’

University of Leeds: CfP: The History and Future of Rationing 25 March 2015

 

Università degli Studi di Palermo (Italy): CfP: “Medical Terminology and Epistemology for a Dictionary of Genetics and its Degenerations from Hippocrates to ICD-10” 4-6 May 2015

8th Munich-Sydney-Tilburg (MuST) Conference: OBJECTIVITY IN SCIENCE Tilburg University, The Netherlands10–12 June 2015

Making Science Public: Citizen Science

Hektoen International: Third Hektoen Grand Prix Essay Competition

8TH  EUROPEAN SPRING SCHOOL ON HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND POPULARIZATION CfP: LIVING IN A TOXIC WORLD (1800-2000) EXPERTS, ACTIVISM, INDUSTRY AND REGULATION Maó (Menorca), 14-16 May 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Oxford: Directorship of the Pitt Rivers Museum

Institute for Humanities Research Arizona State University (2015-2016) “Monsters and Monstrosity” Fellows Call for applications

 

 The School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science at the University of Leeds is pleased to inform potential applicants for postgraduate study that it is able to offer up to 18 fully-funded PhD scholarships for UK/EU students for 2015-16 entry, plus further scholarships for international students.

 

Durham Visual Culture Studentship: If you are interested in researching the history of science and visual culture, please contact me and I can direct you to an appropriate department which might be interested in your project.  I note that the deadline is 28 January 2015.

Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine Fellowships

CHoM News: 2015-2016 Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

CHoM News: 2015-2016 Countway Fellowships: Application Period Open

New York University: Post Doctoral Fellowship in the History of Science and Technology

ConsortiumHSTM: Fellowships

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Duke University History of Medicine Travel Grants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| Leave a comment

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #29

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #29

Monday 05 January 2015

 

 

EDITORIAL:

Well our editorial staff has survived New Years Eve and they are back on the treadmill generating electricity so that we can bring you the first edition of your weekly #histSTM links list for the year 2015, which a couple of the mathematics buffs on Twitter have pointed out in a palindrome in binary code the universal language of computers, 11111011111. Its also rather nice in base eight 3737 and base four 133133.

 

Quotes of the Week:

Quote of the week

They say there are no atheists in foxholes, and this is a good argument against atheism. I think it’s a better argument against foxholes. – Kurt Vonnegut

‘The authorities of the British Museum have had another abuse to contend against & that is the practice of families sending a harmless lunatic member to spend the day in the Reading Room, thus providing them with an asylum…at the cost of nothing’ ‪1890s – @britishlibrary

“When it comes to science most of the jingoists and religious fanatics-particularly Hindus and Muslims, just love to revel in the past. There have been biases in writing of history and history of science but this can’t be set right by dubious claims. Stick to facts not fantasies”. – @irfhabib

 Birthdays of the Week:

Andreas Vesalius born 31 December 1514

220px-Tintorretto-Andreas-Vesalius-engrav-Tavernier

Special Collections & Archives at Mizzou: Happy Birthday Andreas Vesalius

News Works: Skepticism in medicine turns 500

RCS: Vesalius: 500 years on Lecture by Professor Vivian Nutton

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Space Age Archaeology: Shadows of the Moon: an ephemeral archaeology

Dawn Journal: December 29

Giuseppe Piazzi points the way to his discovery, the planet Ceres. (Dawn’s route there is more complex than Piazzi might have guessed.) Credit: Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo - S

Giuseppe Piazzi points the way to his discovery, the planet Ceres. (Dawn’s route there is more complex than Piazzi might have guessed.) Credit: Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo – S

 

Space Watchtower: New Year did not always begin on January 1

The Eclipse Expeditions of the Lick Observatory and the Dawn of Astrophysics (PDF)

Science 2.0: A Brief History of Exo-Earths and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Preach truth – serve up myths

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Cicero’s Map to the Stars

jamesungureanu: Vision of Science: Mary Somerville

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

MEDICINE:

The Embryo Project: Harry Hamilton Laughlin (1880–1943)

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Mummies and the Usefulness of Death

Center for Israel Education: First nursing graduates in the Land of Israel

December 7, 1921 Twenty-two women graduate from the Nurses’ Training Institute at Rothschild Hospital in Jerusalem

December 7, 1921
Twenty-two women graduate from the Nurses’ Training Institute at Rothschild Hospital in Jerusalem

Of Microbes and Men: The Curious Case of Tiny Tim Cratchit

The Recipes Project: How to Translate a Recipe (2)

The Conversation: Ancient hangover cures to get you through the new year

Early Modern Medicine: Infertility, Miscarriage and Men

Instagram: meta4rn: The first Australian mental health nurse

Atlas Obscura: Numbers Instead of Names on the Forgotten Graves of Asylum Patients

CHEMISTRY:

About Education: History of Fireworks

The Recipes Project: Dyeing to Impress: Hair Products and Beauty Culture in Nineteenth-Century America

"Bogles Hair Dye" in Walton's Vermont Register and Farmers' Almanac for 1862 (Montpelier: S. M. Walton, 1862). Image courtesy of Archive.org:

“Bogles Hair Dye” in Walton’s Vermont Register and Farmers’ Almanac for 1862 (Montpelier: S. M. Walton, 1862). Image courtesy of Archive.org:

 

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

NewsWorks: Volcanoes may have contributed to dinosaurs’ demise, Princeton scientists find

 

History of Geology: A tribute to the Year of Crystallography – Haüy’s Models

 

National Geographic: The Plate: What’s Best for Baby’s Tummy? The History of Baby Food

Road to Paris: A very short history of climate change research

The TrowelBlazers 2014 Review

Dumbarton Oaks: The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century

580d1114-2984-4215-a193-7dd02070e7fb

Woods Hole Museum: Cornelia Clapp and the Earliest Years of the MBL

Fossil History: Happy Birthday Marcellin Boule

jamesungureanu: Visions of Science: Charles Lyell

 

These Bones of Mine: Interview with Liz Eastlake: Dental Delights and Estonian Escapades

 

TECHNOLOGY:

The Royal Society: Microscope and oxy-hydrogen lamp projector

 

Image number: RS.10747 Credit: © The Royal Society

Image number: RS.10747
Credit: © The Royal Society

Conciatore: Faux Pearls Reprise

Conciatore: Neri the Scholar

Atlas Obscura: The 19th-Century Iron Balls Still Cleaning The Paris Sewers

The Institute: Five Famously Wrong Predictions About Technology

Flickr: Sani-Phone Hygienic Telephone Discs

The Conversation: A history of fireworks: how about some flaming artichokes to blast in the new year?

Fireworks on the River Thames, Monday May 15 1749.

Fireworks on the River Thames, Monday May 15 1749.

Live Science: Ancient Middle East Shipwrecks Shed Light on Shipbuilding History

Georgian Gentleman: What is your hobby?

Ackermanns-repository-1819

Chemical Heritage Magazine: In the Pink

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Museum of the History of Science: January Newsletter

Voices: Gone in 2014: Remembering 10 Notable Women in Science

British biologist Lorna Casselton  Credit: Bruce Sampson/Wikimedia Commons (CC-BY)

British biologist Lorna Casselton
Credit: Bruce Sampson/Wikimedia Commons (CC-BY)

TCP: EEBO-TCP Phase I Public Release: What to expect on January 1

Ether Wave Propaganda: The “MIT and the Transformation of American Economics” Conference and Maturation in the Historiography of Economic Thought

Michael Crichton: Why Politicized Science is Dangerous

IEEE: Bell Labs’ milestones dedications ceremony held Dec. 18 in Murray Hill

Mental Floss: Winston Churchill’s 1932 Predictions for 50 Years Hence

Nature: Time for the social sciences

Cultures of Knowledge: Merry Christmas and Glad Tidings

Robert Boyle (1627-91): Welcome to the Boyle Papers Online!

Journal of Universal Rejection

Wellcome Trust: Image of the Week: Happy New Year 2015!

Ancient Chinese wooden geomantic compass and perpetual calendar

Ancient Chinese wooden geomantic compass and perpetual calendar

LaCrosse Tribune.com: Museum to spotlight Wisconsin science

Blink: Can India have a scientific revolution?

The Guardian: Ivor Gattan-Guinness obituary

Pacific Standard: The Science of Society: What Is the Point of Academic Books?

JHI Blog: What Does Early Modern Bibliography Have to Do With a Blog?

Homunculus: There goes the neighbourhood

Reading the History of Western Science: A List of Good Places to Start

Motherboard: Should Unprovable Physics be Considered Philosophy?

C Net: Ancient Indian aircraft on agenda of major science conference

Plans for an ancient Indian flying machine Wikimedia Commons

Plans for an ancient Indian flying machine
Wikimedia Commons

Audra Wolfe: Doing Scholarship from Outside Academe

ESOTERIC:

The History of Phrenology on the Web: Johann Gaspar Spurzheim (1776-1832)

Special Collections & Archives at Mizzou: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them in Special Collections

BOOK REVIEWS:

Empathy Library: A History of Bombing

Forbes: John Farrell: Book of the Year: Alice Roberts On Evolution and the Making of Us

Science Book a Day: Steam-Powered Knowledge: William Chambers and the Business of Publishing, 1820-1860

steam-powered-knowledge NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Schreiben am Rand: Die »Bernische kantonale Irrenanstalt Waldau« und ihre Narrative (1895-1936)

Historiens de la santé: The Antibody Molecule: From Antitoxins to therapeutic antibodies

Ashgate: Australia Circumnavigated: The Voyage of Matthew Flinders in HMS Investigator, 1801-1803

Pickering & Chatto: The Correspondence of John Tyndall

Historiens de la santé: Medicine and Public Health in Latin America: A History

THEATRE:

The Guardian: After Turing and Hawking, now it’s the stage story of Robert Oppenheimer, the man behind the bomb

Robert Oppenheimer, right, with Albert Einstein in 1947. Photograph: Alfred Eisenstaedt/Life Picture Collection/Getty

Robert Oppenheimer, right, with Albert Einstein in 1947. Photograph: Alfred Eisenstaedt/Life Picture Collection/Getty

FILM:

Indiegogo.com: A Film and Interactive Media Project about Navy Rear Admiral and Computer Pioneer, Grace Hopper.

Grace Murray Hopper at the UNIVAC keyboard, c. 1960 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Grace Murray Hopper at the UNIVAC keyboard, c. 1960
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Scientific American: Guest Blog: Stephen Hawking, Hawking Incorporated, and the Myth of the Lone Genius

The Theory of Everything, film review: Eddie Redmayne plays Stephen Hawking brilliantly

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

RADIO:

BBC: Wittgenstein’s Jet

Ludwig Wittgenstein Photographed by Ben Richards, Swansea, Wales, 1947 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Ludwig Wittgenstein
Photographed by Ben Richards, Swansea, Wales, 1947
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

PODCASTS:

NPR: Mae Keane, The Last ‘Radium Girl,’ Dies at 107

Employees of the U.S. Radium Corp. paint numbers on the faces of wristwatches using dangerous radioactive paint. Dozens of women, known as "radium girls," later died of radium poisoning. The last radium girl died this year at 107. Argonne National Laboratory

Employees of the U.S. Radium Corp. paint numbers on the faces of wristwatches using dangerous radioactive paint. Dozens of women, known as “radium girls,” later died of radium poisoning. The last radium girl died this year at 107.
Argonne National Laboratory

History of the Earth: December 31. The 6th Extinction

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Sixth International Workshop on the History of Human Genetics Glasgow, UK (Scotland), June 5-6, 2015 CfP: ‘Human Gene Mapping’ and ‘Oral History of Human Genetics’

ECREA: CfP: Communications History Bridges and Boundaries Conference 16-18 September 2015

The Royal Society: Conference: Publish or Perish? The past, present and future of the scientific journal 19-21 March 2015

 

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Australian and New Zealand Society of the History of Medicine – 14th Annual Conference Sydney 30 June-4 July 2015

 

LOOKING FOR WORK:

UCAR: Senior Science Writer and Public Information Officer

 

The Bibliographical Society: Katharine F Pantzer Jr Research Awards

RCP: Project Coordinator – – UK Medical Heritage Library (UK-MHL) project

Uppsala University: Postdoctoral associate

M-Phi: Jobs at LMU Munich: Three assistant Professorships in Logic and Philosophy of Language

M-Phi: Jobs at LMU Munich: Two Postdoctoral Positions in Philosophy of Mathematics

The Morgan Library & Museum: Assistant Curator, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| Leave a comment