Tag Archives: Isaac Newton

Visiting Woolsthorpe

Recently, on an evocatively misty day, I finally had the chance to visit Woolsthorpe Manor, the National Trust property that was once Isaac Newton’s family home. It was, you might think, high time I did so, given my interest in Newton’s … Continue reading

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Three in one, and all alone

On Saturday I was in Cambridge, with the Cambridge Science Festival in full flow. I was there to be a panelist for an event called Can You Make A Difference? but during the afternoon I also took in the play Let Newton Be!, written … Continue reading

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Newton and alchemy: a constant surprise?

Recently there was an article in the New York Times, which, surprisingly enough, reported reasonably accurately and interestingly on the work of an historian of science, William Newman (who I mentioned in my previous post on 19th-century views of alchemy). In the … Continue reading

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Representing astronomers: absent-minded or drunk?

Prompted by the call for posts on ‘Visuals and Representation’ for the Giants’ Shoulders Blog Carnival, I fell to thinking about the National Maritime Museum‘s print collection, which includes a nice range of images of astronomy and its practitioners. Astronomers … Continue reading

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Newton’s First and Second

As we usually learn it, Newton’s second law of motion is: F=ma If we try to interpret Newton’s first law of motion in terms of algebraic equations, it’s very natural to take it as simply describing the case where the … Continue reading

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