Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol: #38

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #38

Monday 02 May 2016

EDITORIAL:

 Another week has flown by and it’s time once again for a new edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list to bring you all that we could track down of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the furthest corners of cyberspace.

Thirty years ago on 26 April 1986 reactor number four at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in what is now Ukraine and was then part of the USSR caught fire and exploded causing the biggest nuclear disaster up to that time that the world had seen. It was by no means the first such disaster an experimental reactor in Switzerland having gone into meltdown in 1969 and reactor number two at the Three Mile Island having gone into meltdown in 1979. The latter incident produced one of my favourite jokes in my days as a reader of New Scientist. I paraphrase:

“Initially American authorities referred to what had happened as the Three Mile Island Disaster. After some time had passed, trying to quieten things down somewhat, they began to refer to the Three Mile Island Incident. After more time had passed it became in official references the Three Mile Island Experience. What did Jimi Hendrix know that we don’t?”

When reactor four at Chernobyl exploded it blew a massive cloud of radioactive particles into the atmosphere, which drifted southwards across central Europe. Due to a rain storm a large part of that cloud came down over the area of Southern Germany where I live. Even today, thirty years after the incident the wild mushrooms that grow in the forests of Bavaria are still too radioactive to eat according to official regulations. This, of course, doesn’t stop people collecting and eating them.

The Chernobyl disaster started an intense debate about the use of nuclear power that continues today, the flames being fanned further by the Fukushima disaster in 2011. Some like the German Government want to see the end of nuclear power as inherently too dangerous to be considered viable. Others wish to see an increase in the use of nuclear power to replace the climate damaging fossil fuel power.

These nuclear disasters, their aftermath and the debate on clean energy have already become a subject of historians of science, technology and medicine and at some distant, or maybe not so distant, point in the future a generation of historians will look back at the era and try to make some sense out of the conflicting and oft contradictory arguments put forward by the various participants on the debate, how to produce the clean, safe energy that humanity so desperately needs.

Event of the Week:

26 April 1986 the Chernobyl Meltdown Occurred

Aerial view of the damaged core on 3 May 1986. Roof of the turbine hall is damaged (image center). Roof of the adjacent reactor 3 (image lower left) shows minor fire damage. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Aerial view of the damaged core on 3 May 1986. Roof of the turbine hall is damaged (image center). Roof of the adjacent reactor 3 (image lower left) shows minor fire damage.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The New Yorker: The Battles of Chernobyl

Visual News: Haunting Graffiti in the Heart of Abandoned Chernobyl

Not Even Past: Remembering Chernobyl

New York Times: Chernobyl’s Silent Exclusion Zone (Except for the Logging)

Plate 1 from “The Atlas of Caesium-137 Contamination of Europe after the Chernobyl Accident.”

Plate 1 from “The Atlas of Caesium-137 Contamination of Europe after the Chernobyl Accident.”

Quotes of the week:

“Those who can’t do legislate”. – Guy Longworth (@GuyLongworth)

“I don’t block people for disagreeing with me. I block them for being jerks”. – Katharine Hayhoe (@KHayhoe)

“Sir, more than kisses, let us mingle souls.” – John Donne to Sir Henry Wotton 1597 h/t @rayneinverted

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“if it’s a murder of crows, an unkindness of ravens, a tiding of magpies… then it’s got to be a lifetime of egrets” – Margaret Killjoy (@magpiekilljoy)

“Mathematics is like childhood diseases. The younger you get it, the better”. – Arnold Sommerfeld h/t @OnThisDayinMath

“There’s only one method in social anthropology, the comparative method. And that’s impossible” – Evans-Pritchard h/t @ProfDanHicks

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Don’t write what you know, write what you’re willing to discover. – Yusef Komunyakaa h/t @snoopydroopied

“We would be in a nasty position indeed if empirical science were the only kind of science possible.” – Edmund Husserl (1859-1938)

“It’s been said that the dreariness of the thought of having to get dressed every day once drove an Englishman to suicide”. – Emil du Bois-Reymond

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“Either mathematics is too big for the human mind or the human mind is more than a machine.” Kurt Gödel (1906-1978)

“Geometry is not true, it is advantageous.” – Henri Poincaré (1854-1912)

“Thought is only a flash between two long nights, but this flash is everything.” – Henri Poincaré (1854-1912)

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Jeremy Renner gave the truest version of what I have sometimes called the “onomatopology.” It’s not an apology, but it makes apology noises. – Linda Holmes (@nprmonkeysee)

“A homeopathic health service – you don’t have a hospital, you just have the memory of a hospital” – Andy Hamilton, News Quiz (@BBCRadio4)

“We are an impossibility in an impossible universe.” ― Ray Bradbury.

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“A man ought to read just as inclination leads him; for what he reads as a task will do him little good”. – Dr Johnson h/t @welfordwrites

“In this universe, where the least things control the greatest…” – William Wordsworth h/t @telescoper

Birthday of the Week:

 Claude Elwood Shannon born 30 April 1916

 ClaudeShannon_MFO3807

“Thus we may have knowledge of the past but cannot control it; we may control the future but have no knowledge of it.” – Claude Elwood Shannon

“I’ve always loved that word, ‘Boolean.’” – Claude Elwood Shannon

The tragedy of Claude Shannon’s life is that the “inventor” of information died of Alzheimer’s. – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

 The Renaissance Mathematicus: Boole, Shannon and the Electronic Computer

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The New Yorker: Claude Shannon, The Father of the Information Age, Turns 1100100

A hundred years after his birth, Claude Shannon’s fingerprints are on every electronic device we own. CREDIT PHOTOGRAPH BY ALFRED EISENSTAEDT / THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION / GETTY

A hundred years after his birth, Claude Shannon’s fingerprints are on every electronic device we own.
CREDIT PHOTOGRAPH BY ALFRED EISENSTAEDT / THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION / GETTY

IEEE Spectrum: Claude Shannon: Tinkerer, Prankster, and Father of Information Theory

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Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Oral-History: Claude E. Shannon

OMNI: Interview Claude Shannon

IEEEXplore: The Bandwagon Claude E. Shannon

The Guardian: Without Claude Shannon’s information theory there would be no internet

Gizmodo: If it Weren’t for This Equation, You Wouldn’t be Here

AMS Blogs: Happy Birthday Claude Shannon

Yovisto: Claude Shannon – Father of Information Theory

Youtube: Claude Shannon demonstrates machine learning

Youtube: Claude Shannon Juggling

Hertha Marks Ayrton born 28 April 1854

 hertha-marks-ayrton-google-doodle

Independent: Hertha Marks Ayrton’s 162nd birthday: 5 facts about the British mathematician, engineer and inventor

International Business Times: Google marks award-winning mathematician, inventor and physicist Hertha Marks Ayrton

The Royal Society: The Repository: Almost a Fellow: Hertha Ayrton and an embarrassing episode in the history of the Royal Society

cwp.library.ucla.edu: Hertha Marks Ayrton (1854–1923)

Diagram of arc lighting electrodes from 1902 paper by Hertha Ayrton

Diagram of arc lighting electrodes from 1902 paper by Hertha Ayrton

The Guardian: Hertha Marks Ayrton: Guardian obituary of pioneering scientist, published 1923

 

Time: Google Doodle Honors Scientist Hertha Marks Ayrton

Yotube: The Fight for Fellowship (Hertha Marks Ayrton) – Objectivity #56

John James Audubon born 26 April 1785

John James Audubon 1826 Source: Wikimedia Commons

John James Audubon 1826
Source: Wikimedia Commons

British Library: Audubon’s The Birds of America

Facebook: American Museum of Natural History Audubon Video

Yale Alumni Magazine: Audubon’s works, off the endangered list

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

The Phnom Penh Post: Tech used to prove Angkor’s link to the sun

About Winfree Observatory: Some History

AHF: Mary Lou Curtis

io9: The Loneliness of the Long-Abandoned Space Observatory

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Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bill and Louise Cease’s Interview

Yovisto: Jan Hendrik Oort and the Oort Cloud

Ordered Universe: Time and Time Reckoning: Ordered Universe at Tor Vergata

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Astrolabe – an object of desire

Astrolabe Renners Arsenius 1569 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Astrolabe Renners Arsenius 1569
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Linda Hall Library: ‘Astronomer’ Doesn’t Begin to Cover Copernicus

Yovisto: Henri Poincaré – the Last Universalist of Mathematics

Science Alert: An ancient astronomer’s observations of a 1,000-year-old supernova have just been unearthed

National Catholic Observer: Mapping with the stars: Nuns instrumental in Vatican celestial survey

Members of the Sisters of the Child Mary use microscopes to review glass plates as they measure star positions. (CNS/Vatican Observatory)

Members of the Sisters of the Child Mary use microscopes to review glass plates as they measure star positions. (CNS/Vatican Observatory)

AHF: The Spy who Stole Urchin

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Humanities: The Osher Map Library invites the whole world in

Texas Public Radio: Rare Maps Confirm Texas’ Size and Boundaries

Yovisto: Edward Whymper and the Matterhorn

CHICC Manchester: New Japanese Maps Added to Our Digital Collections

Japanese 211 – Tokaido bunken ezu: animated view of 26 folds, 88 images.

Japanese 211 – Tokaido bunken ezu: animated view of 26 folds, 88 images.

Yovisto: Ferdinand Magellan and the first Trip around the World

Royal Museums Greenwich: Ferdinand Magellan: How did the Pacific Ocean get its name and what did this Portuguese explorer have to do with it?

Canadian Mysteries: Interpretations of the Franklin mystery

JRSM: Sir John Franklin’s last arctic expedition: a medical disaster

Library of Congress: Computing Space 0: From Hypersurfaces to Algorithms: Saving Early Computer Cartography at the Library of Congress

History Today: Fantasy Worlds: A Gallery of Mythical Maps

The Asahi Shimbun: 17th century map, color plates show how Japan viewed the world

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

NYAM: Medical Rhymes

Pulse: Fighting the Legend of the “Lobotomobile”

NYAM: Cupid Out of Sorts – Is Advised to Take a Turkish Bath

The Hammam. In: Urquhart, Manual of the Turkish Bath, 1865.

The Hammam. In: Urquhart, Manual of the Turkish Bath, 1865.

Thomas Morris: Dancing Testicles

Revue d’histoire de la protection sociale 2015/1 (N° 8): Handicap et dépendance. Perspectives historiennes

Embryo Project: Methymercury and Human Embryonic Development

Atlas Obscura. The Illegal Birth Control Handbook that Spread Across College Campuses in 1968

Big Picture: The history of vaccination

Thomas Morris: Eye eye

The Chirugeon’s Apprentice: The Mad Dogs of London: A Tale of Rabies

 

 A mad dog on the run in a London street: citizens attack it as it approaches a woman who has fallen over. Coloured etching by T.L. Busby, 1826 1826 By: Thomas Lord. BusbyPublished: 1826. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images


A mad dog on the run in a London street: citizens attack it as it approaches a woman who has fallen over. Coloured etching by T.L. Busby, 1826
1826 By: Thomas Lord. BusbyPublished: 1826.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

The Atlantic: How the Poor Get Blamed for Disease

The Recipes Project: Women’s Health in the South Slavic Orthodox Tradition

Wellcome Trust: Image of the Week: Temple of Vaccinia

Atlas Obscura: The First Woman to put her Face on Packaging got Trolled Like Crazy

Upworthy: 19 fascinating pictures to remind us what polio used to look like

A young patient getting fit with a respirator in 1955. Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images.

A young patient getting fit with a respirator in 1955. Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images.

Thomas Morris: The human pincushion

Thomas Morris: A head of wheat in the bladder

Empire de la Mort: Macabre New York: the charnel house that almost was

TECHNOLOGY:

Historic England: What’s New in the Archive? – New: The Shadbolt Collection

Yale University Art Gallery: Automaton Clock in the Form of Diana on Her Chariot

Historic England: What was Proclaimed the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’ on Completion in 1843, but ‘An Entire Failure’ Just a Decade Later?

The Thames Tunnel

The Thames Tunnel

Eternal Egypt: Water Clock

Slate: A Marvel of Victorian Engineering Reopens as a Concert Venue in London

We Make Money Not Art: Menace 2, An Artificial Intelligence Made of Wooden Drawers and Coloured Beads

Conciatore: Borgo Pinti (Part 2)

Conciatore: Rosichiero Glass

Ephemera Society: Strange Trains

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Yovisto: Dit dit dit da dit – the first Morse Telegram

historywomble: Boaty McWhoseface? Or, some thoughts on ships’ names

storify: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain

Yovisto: Karl Drais and the Mechanical Horse

University of Glasgow Library: Building Foundations: Early Books on Architecture

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Royal College of Physicians: The Little Green Parrot

The Irish Times: Environmentalist. Conservationist. What’s the Difference?

Notches: Archives of Desire: Soft-Core Pornography and Activism in the 1960s

The Linnean Society: Alfred Russel Wallace

The Guardian: Fire guts Delhi’s natural history museum

Reuters: Blaze guts Delhi museum housing dinosaur fossil

Ptak Science Books: How Fast Stuff Is: Thought (1870)

Yovisto: Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon-Tiki

Kon-Tiki, 1947

Kon-Tiki, 1947

Yovisto: Herbert Spencer and Social Darwinism

CSI: 10 Astounding Moments in a Creationist Textbook: Revisiting Of Pandas and People

AEON: The medieval senses were transmitters as much as receivers

Nautilus: The Day the Mesozoic Died

Verso: Thomas Pennant’s Literary Appeal

Smithsonian.com: The Scientific Daredevils Who Made Yale’s Peabody Museum a National Treasure

Corkboard of Curiosities: Taphonomy

UCL: Underwhelming Fossil Fish of the Month April 2016

Forbes: The Origins of Geological Terms: Diamonds

Typical crystal of diamond on matrix

Typical crystal of diamond on matrix

Wikiwand: John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury

Penn Biographies: Joseph Leidy (1823–1881)

New Scientist: The story of Dolly is about us as much as cloning

History of Geology: The Volcano as Crematory – Paolo Gorini’s strange geological-anatomical experiments

The Conversation: Two decades after his death, Gerald Durrell is still making the world a better place

Smithsonian.com: Over 1,00 Years Later, Kennewick Man will be Given a Native American Burial

CHEMISTRY:

about education: Phlogiston Theory in Early Chemistry History

New York Times: Walter Kohn, Who Won Nobel in Chemistry, Dies at 93

Walter Kohn receiving an honor from Harvard in 2012. “Physics isn’t what I do,” Dr. Kohn once said. “It is what I am.” Credit Steven Senne/Associated Press

Walter Kohn receiving an honor from Harvard in 2012. “Physics isn’t what I do,” Dr. Kohn once said. “It is what I am.” Credit Steven Senne/Associated Press

Yovisto: Wallace Hume Carothers and the Invention of Nylon

Othmeralia: Wallace Hume Carothers

Yovisto: Franz Archard and the Sugar Beet

In the Dark: R.I.P. Harry Koto (1939–2016)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Wellcome Trust: Wellcome appoints new Head of Public Engagement

The Maintainers: A Conference: Introducing the Maintainers Blog

NYAM: Preservation Week Quiz

Lady Science: Midwest Junto for the History of Science Recap

AEON: A science without time

Capitalism’s Cradle: The Dutch Golden Age

The H-Word: People Power: how citizen science could change historical research

Frontispieces for the Midland Naturalist, 1878, and Science-Gossip, 1892. Photograph: Biodiversity Heritage Library/Public Domain

Frontispieces for the Midland Naturalist, 1878, and Science-Gossip, 1892. Photograph: Biodiversity Heritage Library/Public Domain

The Guardian: Let’s keep talking: why public dialogue on science and technology matters more than ever

Literacy of the Present: 3G Science Communication

eä: New Issues Online: Table of Contents: Vol. 6 N° 2 – November 2014 etc

The #EnvHist Weekly

AAHM: Orals Bibliographies for Students

British Library: Victorian Britain: The Great Exhibition

'General View of the Exterior of the Building' of the Great Exhibition.  Dickinson's Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851

‘General View of the Exterior of the Building’ of the Great Exhibition.
Dickinson’s Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851

ESOTERIC:

Atlas Obscura: A 19th-Century Map of Our ‘Square and Stationary’ Earth

Royal College of Physicians: John Dee’s Books at Middle Temple Library

De pictura prae stantissima. Leon Battista Alberti, published Basel, 1540

De pictura prae stantissima. Leon Battista Alberti, published Basel, 1540

BOOK REVIEWS:

James Snell: John Aubrey and Prose Style

John Gribbin Science: Strange but True

LSE: Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia Participation, Ethics by Jenny Kidd

Chemistry World: The chemistry book: from gunpowder to grapheme – 250 milestones in the history of chemistry

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Nature: Technology: Beyond the ‘InterNyet’

Good Reads: The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself

NEW BOOKS:

The Guardian: Ruth Scurr: ‘I wanted to make John Aubrey present and vivid in our times’

Simon & Schuster: The Gene: An Intimate History

Verdier: Droiture et mélancolie: Sur les écrits de Marc Aurèle

University of Chicago Press: The Experimental Self: Humphry Davy and the Making of a Man of Science

9780226351360

University of Ottawa Press: Récits inachevés: Réflexions sur la recherche qualitative en sciences humaines et sociales

Columbia University Press: Stem Cell Dialogues: A Philosophical and Scientific Enquiry Into Medical Frontiers

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Harvard Magazine: Before Social Media: Radio was the medium that broke the silence

Scenes from an exhibition: “Radio Contact” at Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments Photograph by Samantha van Gerbig/Courtesy of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments

Scenes from an exhibition: “Radio Contact” at Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments
Photograph by Samantha van Gerbig/Courtesy of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments

Horniman Museum & Gardens: H Blog: Tyrannosaurus and Tarbosaurus

Bodleian: Marks of Genius

The Houston Museum of Natural Science: Cabinet of Curiosities Opens 6 May 2016

Reviews in History: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee (Royal College of Physicians, 18 January – 29 July 2016)

Broadway World.com: Met Museum Exhibition to Celebrate Artistic, Technological, Cultural Legacy of the Seljuqs

Leaping Robot Blog: From Laser Art to Laserium

Grup d’estudis d’història de la cartografia: Exhibition about Renacentrist cartography in Bergamo 16 April–10 July 2016

Bonner Sterne: “Argelanders Erben” im Universitätsmuseum Bonn bis 31 Juli 2016

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

Bridging the World: Benjamin Baker of Frome 5 March–21 May 2016

Exhibition Nancy

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Bay Area Reporter: Wonderful worlds of 17th-century China: Asian Art Museum Runs till 8 May 2016 

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Globe Exhibition

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

CLOSING SOON: National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

Natural History Museum: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017 

Science Museum: Information Age

Cambridge Science Museum: Cosmic Runs still 30 Jun 2016

Wellcome Library: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Manchester Central Library: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 9 April–11 June 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Macrobert Arts Centre: The Trials of Galileo

Perth Concert Hall: The Trials of Galileo

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

BSHS: Upcoming Lecture: Henry Wellcome Pharmacist Royal Pharmaceutical Society 23 May 2016

The Leakey Foundation: The Curious Case of Homo naledi The California Academy of Sciences San Francisco 3 May 2016

London Fortean Society: Snake Oil! The Golden Age of Quackery in Britain and America 26 May 2016

Museum of History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Leeds University: History and Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects (Lecture 5) 10 May 2016

NYAM: Lecture: The Discovery of Insulin – A Miracle Drug, A Nobel Prize Controversy, and the Story of Elizabeth Hughes 10 May 2016

Museum of the History of Science, Oxford: Public Health and Private Pain: A Night of Medical History and Drama 5 May 2016

V&A: Courses: Sensing Time: The Art and Science of Clocks and Watches 18 June 2016

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Festival of Museums 2016 – Glasgow’s Marvellous Medicine 14 May 2016

Things

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: BETHLEM AND THE BRAIN: MUZZLING WILLIAM LAWRENCE’S MEDICAL MATERIALISM 7 May 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

Boston Medical Library: Lecture: Prescription Drug Abuse in American History:

The Polar Museum: Lucky 13 Storytelling from the polar regions of the world 13 May 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind 9 May 2016

Royal Society: Lecture: Hasok Chang: Who cares about the history of science? 10 May 2016

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

SciFRi talks

UCL: STS Haldane Lecture: Maja Horst, University of Copenhagen: Reframing Science Communication – Culture, Identity and Organisations 5 May 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Royal Society: Who cares about the history of science? 10 May 2016

Royal College of Physicians Museum: Dee Late: inside John Dee’s miraculous mind

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Leonardo da Vinci Gear Illustration

Leonardo da Vinci Gear Illustration

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

DocSlide: The Role of Hallucinogenic Plants in European Witchcraft

VIDEOS:

Museo Galileo: Globes

Facebook: DNALC Watson Base Pairing

Youtube: COPERNICUS –Animation Short Film 2013 – GOBELINS

Youtube: Albert Einstein in his office at Princeton University

RADIO & PODCASTS:

The Guardian: The Science of Shakespeare – Science Weekly Podcast

Institute of Historical Research: Citizen History and its discontents

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Euclid’s Elements

The Guardian: Revolutionary! Why was 1700s France such a fertile time for science?

Ben Franklin’s World: Episode 049: Malcolm Gaskill, How the English Became American

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Trinity College Cambridge: The Venues of Scholarly Output: Collections, Treatises, Textbooks, Archives 25 June 2016

Let’s Talk About Sex: CfP: History of Sexuality PGR/ECR Workshop University of Exeter 26–27 June 2016

Queen Mary University of London:Upcoming History of Emotions Work in Progress Seminars

Conferene

University of Reading: CfP: Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums  23 September 2016 Deadline: 15 June 2016

BSHS: Registration Open: The Body and Pseudoscience in the Long Nineteenth Century Newcastle University 18 June 2016

University of St. Andrews: Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy (SSEMP VII) 5–6 May 2016 Programme

MSH Lorraine, Nancy: “Mathématiques et mathématiciens à Metz (1750-1870): dynamiques de recherche et d’enseignement dans un espace local” 12 Mai 2016

Barts Pathology Museum: CfP: The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries 24 September 2016

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Leicester: Centre for Medical Humanities: Seminars:

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware: CfP: Making Modern Disability: Histories of Disability, Design, and Technology 28 October 2016

EHESS, Paris: Journée d’étude: Genre, humeurs et fluides corporels. Moyen Âge & Époque moderne 19 Mai 2016

New York City: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 30 September–1 October 2016

Columbia University: The Center for Science & Society: Exploring the Philosophy of Émilie du Châtelet 1–3 June 2016

Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology (Rio de Janeiro, 23-29 July 2017): CfP: Blood, Food, and Climate: Historical Relationships Between Physiology, Race, Nation-Building, and Colonialism/Globalization

CFP Early Modern World

 

Organisé par Alexandre Klein (Université d’Ottawa): Histoire des relations de santé aux XIXe et XXe siècles 11 mai 2016

History at the Open University: Women and Gender in Early Modern Britain and Ireland: A Conference in Honour of Anne Laurence Institute of Historical Research London 4 June 2016

IHPST, Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques, Paris: CfP: International Doctoral Conference in Philosophy of Science 29-30 September 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Ian Ramsey Centre Conference, University of Oxford: Workshop “Early Modern Laws of Nature: Secular and Divine” 7 July 2016 Call for Abstract: deadline 30 April 2016

History and Philosophy of Science Department, University of Cambridge: Workshop: Informal Aspects of Uncertainty Evaluation 20 May 2016

Annals of Science: Annals of Science Essay Prize for Young Scholars

Religion & Medicine

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CFP: Blood, Food & Climate – Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology

2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics Pöllau, Austria 5–7 September 2016

University of Cambridge: Cabinet of Natural History: Seminars Easter Term 2016

Science in Public

University of Leeds: Northern Renaissance Seminar: Programme: Communication, Correspondence and Transmission in the Early Modern World 12-13 May 2016

British Library: Conference: Transforming Topography 6 May 2016

he International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST): Invites submissions for the fourth DHST Prize for Young Scholars, to be presented in 2017.

Warburg Institute: ESSWE Thesis Workshop 7 July 2016

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Society and th Sea

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

Swansea University: Inaugural Lecture 5 May 2016: David Turner: Locating Disability in Britain’s Industrial Revolution

Notches: CfP. Histories of Music and Sexuality

Vatican Library Conference

University of London: Birkbeck: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2016: 11 July 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Annual Conference Programme 28–30 May 2016

Women hist phil

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

irkbeck, University of London: CfP: Embarrassing Bodies: Feeling Self-Conscious in the Nineteenth Century 17 June 2016

University of Warwick: Workshop: Early Modern Experimental Philosophy, Metaphysics, and Religion 10–11 May 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Wuppertal: Junior Professor in Philosophy with a specialization in Philosophy of Physics

Kuwait Science Museum: We are currently developing content for a set of national museums in Kuwait and are looking for experts to review some of the galleries for us, to make sure we are conveying the correct messages for visitors.

University of Edinburgh: Science, Technology and Innovation Studies: Senior Lecturer

National Media Museum: Bradford: Associate Curator of Science and Technology

University of Oxford: Departmental Lecturer in the History of Medicine

University of Leeds: History of Health, Medicine and Society MA

Sciences Po, Paris: Tenured Professorship in History

Kingston University London: Lecturer in Critical and Historical Studies Film-Making

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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