Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol: #03

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #0

Monday 27 July 2015

EDITORIAL:

This week brings you the third edition of the second year of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list containing all that could be rounded up of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the Internet over the last seven days.

Recent years has seen an upsurge in the search for women in #histSTM who can and should function as role models for young women contemplating a career in a STM discipline. Unfortunately this search has produced a disturbing historical side effect. More and more articles appear, especially in the Internet, complaining about how one or other of these women was denied the acknowledgement she had earned for work or even had that acknowledgement stolen by a man. Why should I call this development unfortunate? It is unfortunate because in almost all cases the articles are not based on historical facts but on myths leading to massive distortion of the true story and a complete misrepresentation of what actually took place. Yes, many women have had difficulties getting recognition for their achievements in STM but spreading myths is not the right way to go about correcting the problem. A classic example of this problem is the story of Rosalind Franklin, who was born 25 July 1920, and her involvement in the discovery of the structure of DNA.

Rosalind Elsie Franklin Source: Wikimedia Commons

Rosalind Elsie Franklin
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The standard myth, repeated ad nauseam, is that James Watson was shown an X-ray image of DNA, Photo 51, taken by Franklin without her knowledge or permission and in a moment of epiphany realises that DNA is a double helix. This leads to the claim that it was Franklin and not Watson and Crick who discovered the structure of DNA. The story is completely false although it should be acknowledged that Watson’s book The Double Helix is the origin of this myth. For the true story of what happened you should read Matthew Cobb’s article in the Guardian or for greater detail his book Life’s Great Secret, the review of which is below in the book reviews section. The First chapter is available to read in the Sunday Times (first link under Earth & Life Sciences).

The Guardian: Sexism in science: did Watson and Crick really steal Rosalind Franklin’s data?

Physics Today: Rosalind Franklin and the double helix

ODNB: Franklin, Rosalind Elsie (1920–1958)

Quotes of the week:

“There is nothing good or evil save in the will”. – Epictetus

 “Never send to know for whom the web trolls; it trolls for thee”. – Scott B. Weingart

(@scott_bot)

“The set of all sets that wouldn’t be part of any set that would have them as a member. (Groucho’s Paradox)” – Scott B. Weingart (@scott_bot)

“I bet when we do make contact with an advanced alien race, their first message to us will be “Who are U2 and why do we have their album?”” – Dean Burnett {@garwboy)

“She decided to teach postcolonial theory instead of seventeenth-century poetry.

Because, well, you know, easier Said than Donne”. – William Germano (@WmGermano)

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something”. – Plato

“We know a lot more than we can prove.” – Richard Feynman

“Always acknowledge your sources. It will never diminish you”. – @upulie

Q: How many academics does it take to change a lightbulb?

A: Change???

Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“What is written without effort is generally read without pleasure”. – Samuel Johnson

“If you wish to be a writer, write”. – Epictetus

“To be clear. I am a woman and a historian (and many other things). I am *not* a ‘woman historian’. How many ‘men historians’ do you know?” – Joanne Paul (@Joanne_Paul_)

“If you fancy yourself at the telephone, there is one in the next room.”—G. H. Hardy

“In the interest of PC shouldn’t we talk about ‘diameter disadvantaged’ rather than dwarf planets?” – Thony Christie (@rmathematicus)

 “On 1 April 1898 Beatrix Potter’s paper “On the Germination of the Spores of Agaricineae” was presented at the Linnean Society”.

“Beatrix Potter was not in attendance to hear her paper in the Linnean Society since women were excluded”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“Science is competitive, aggressive, demanding. It is also imaginative, inspiring, uplifting. You can do it, too.” – Vera Rubin

“Success depends upon previous preparation, and without such preparation there is sure to be failure”. – Confucius

 “Memory is the treasury and guardian of all things”. – Cicero

 Birthdays of the Week:

Richard Owen born 20 July 1804

Richard Owen and his gorgonops by pelycosaur

Richard Owen and his gorgonops by pelycosaur

Letters from Gondwana: Owen, Dickens and the ‘Invention’ of Dinosaurs

The Friends of Charles Darwin: Sir Richard Owen: the archetypal villain

ucmp.berkeley.edu: Richard Owen (1804–1892)

NHM: Richard Owen

Deviant Art: Richard Owen and his Gorgonops

Moon landing 20 July 1969

“Stanley Kubrick was hired to fake the moon landing, but his perfectionism made them film it on location on the moon”. – Duncan MacMaster (@FuriousDShow)

“The moon is a rock against which the hope of many an imagined discovery has been shattered.” – LJ Wilson, 1925 h/t Meg Rosenburg (@trueanomalies)

A mounted slowscan TV camera shows Armstrong as he climbs down the ladder to surface Source: Wikimedia Commons

A mounted slowscan TV camera shows Armstrong as he climbs down the ladder to surface
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 Science Notes: Today in Science History – 20 July

Leaping Robot Blog: “Sir, That’s Not A Footprint…”

Forbes: The Locations of Every Moon Landing [Infographic]

DPLA: Apollo 11 Flight plan

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 21 July – Alan Shepard

Esquire: How Apollo Astronauts Took Out the Trash

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 24 July– The Return of Apollo 11

Command module Columbia of Apollo 11 after splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA

Command module Columbia of Apollo 11 after splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

University of Glasgow: Special Collections: Book of the Month: Nicolaus Copernicus De Revolutionibus

Medievalist.net: The Night the Moon exploded and other Lunar tales from the Middle Ages

Quanta Magazine: Famous Fluid Equations Are Incomplete

reddit: Ask Historians: The Manhattan Project

History Ireland: ‘The Hue and Cry of Heresy’ John Toland, Isaac Newton & the Social Context of Scientists

Cosmology: 1838: Friedrich Bessel Measures Distance to a Star

C. A. Jensen, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel, 1839  (Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek)

C. A. Jensen, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel, 1839
(Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek)

Darin Hayton: Astrolabes or Mariner’s Astrolabe – A Primer

AIP: From the Physics Today Archives (Pluto)

The Washington Post: The man who feared rationally, that he’d just destroyed the world

AMNH: Vera Rubin and Dark Matter

Brain Pickings: Pioneering Astronomer Vera Rubin on Science, Stereotypes, and Success

Vera Rubin

Vera Rubin

Dannen.com: Recommendations on the Immediate Use of Nuclear Weapons, June 16, 1945

Restricted Data: “We all aged ten years until the plane cleared the island”

Smithsonian.com: Can Sound Explain a 350-Year-Old Clock Mystery

The Getty Iris: Decoding the Medieval Volvelle

Astronomical Vovelle, from Astronomical and Medical Miscellany, English, late fourteenth century, shortly after 1386. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XII 7, fol. 51

Astronomical Vovelle, from Astronomical and Medical Miscellany, English, late fourteenth century, shortly after 1386. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XII 7, fol. 51

Physics Today: The Dayside: A tale of two papers

Restricted Data: The Kyoto Misconception

Dannen.com: Harry S. Truman, Diary, July 25, 1945

Dannen.com: Official Bombing Order, July 25, 1945

Darin Hayton: The Astronomy Exam at Haverford College in 1859

Atlas Obscura: The Lunar Colonies of Our Wildest Dreams

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: The Kangxi atlas in the King’s Topographical Collection

Library of Congress: Railroad Maps, 1820–1900

[Detail] State of Alabama. October. 2nd. 1866

[Detail] State of Alabama. October. 2nd. 1866

Cyprus Mail: Mapping out a journey

The Commercial Space Blog: Did RADARSAT-2 Find HMS Erebus?

Maps of the State Library of NSW: Embroidery: World with all the modern discoveries ca. 1785

tumblr_nrgnzrbO6T1ttttg2o1_1280

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

NYAM: Good eyes are your protection

Migraine Histories: Oliver Cromwell’s Migraine

Dittrick Museum Blog: By the Light of the Fever-, Gout- and Plague-Inducing Moon: Lunar Medicine

Frontispiece from Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae showing the moon reflecting the sun’s light like a mirror.

Frontispiece from Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae showing the moon reflecting the sun’s light like a mirror.

Collectors Weekly: Healing Spas and Ugly Clubs: How Victorians Taught Us to Treat People With Disabilities

Mosaic: Growing up as the world’s first test-tube baby

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 25 July – Louise Joy Brown’s birthday

Nursing Clio: Anne Bradstreet’s Elegies for her Grandchildren

Conciatore: Donato Altomare

NYAM: Spoiled by a Certain Englishman? The Copying of Andreas Vesalius in Thomas Geminus’ Compendiosa

Adam and Eve in the Academy’s copy of the 1559 English edition of Geminus’ Compendiosa.

Adam and Eve in the Academy’s copy of the 1559 English edition of Geminus’ Compendiosa.

CHSTM: News and Notes: Revolutions in the Atmosphere: Benjamin Rush’s Universal System of Medicine

Advances in the History of Psychology: History and the Hoffman Report: A Round-Up

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: San Giusto Alle Mura

Idle Words: Web Design: The First Hundred Years

Science Notes: Today in Science History –22 July – First solo flight around the world

Wiley Post waving to the crowd before taking off to make the first solo flight around the world. As he waved, he said “So long, see you in about six days!” Credit: Still taken from British Pathé newsreel 1933.

Wiley Post waving to the crowd before taking off to make the first solo flight around the world. As he waved, he said “So long, see you in about six days!” Credit: Still taken from British Pathé newsreel 1933.

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A double bicentennial – George contra Ada – Reality contra Perception

Rachel Laudan: Roman Glass: Transformation by Fire

The H-Word: Humphry Davy and the “safety lamp controversy”

Stephenson’s lamp (left) and Davy’s wire gauze lamp (right). On 25 January 1816, Davy reported to the Royal Society that prototypes of his gauze lamp had been tested “in two of the most dangerous mines near Newcastle, with perfect success”. From George Clementson Greenwell, A Practical Treatise on Mine Engineering (1869).

Stephenson’s lamp (left) and Davy’s wire gauze lamp (right). On 25 January 1816, Davy reported to the Royal Society that prototypes of his gauze lamp had been tested “in two of the most dangerous mines near Newcastle, with perfect success”. From George Clementson Greenwell, A Practical Treatise on Mine Engineering (1869).

Amiga 30: 30th Anniversary Event

Public Domain Review: The Mysteries of Nature and Art

History Today: George Stephenson’s First Steam Locomotive

Getting up steam: Stephenson's 'Blucher', 1814

Getting up steam: Stephenson’s ‘Blucher’, 1814

Rachel Laudan: My Great Grandmother’s Industrially Processed Food

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Sunday Times: Matthew Cobb, Life’s Greatest Secret: Chapter 1: Genes Before DNA

Alembic Rare Books: All The Animated Beings in Nature: An Illustrated Natural History Dictionary Published in 1802

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Brian Pickings: Gorgeous 19th-Century Illustrations of Owls and Ospreys

The Guardian: Natural History Museum’s Dippy the dinosaur to go on holiday

Darwin Project: Darwin’s Scientific Women

Smithsonian Libraries: Crocodiles on the Ceiling

The Sloane Letters Blog: Straight From the Horse’s Mouth

Public Domain Review: Bird Gods (1898)

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facebook: Paleontologists and their Prehistoric Pets

Notches: Red War on the Family: An Interview with Erica Ryan

NCSE Blog: The Very Hungry Jurist, Part 2

The EBB & Flow: The first null model war in ecology didn’t prevent the second one

Forbes: The Man Who Named The Dinosaurs Also Debunked Tales of Sea Serpents

The Guardian: Archaeologists find possible evidence of earliest human agriculture

Dan Hicks: Archaeology, Austerity and Why Historic Environment Records Matter

Data is Nature: From Constants of Optical Mineralogy

CHEMISTRY:

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Joseph Katz’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Richard Baker’s Interview

Forbes: Forgotten Faces of Science: Percy Julian [Comic]

Source Forbes

Source Forbes

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 23 July – Sir William Ramsey

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 26 July – William “Bill” Mitchell

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Now Apperaring: What is a fair review?

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Fit for print: developing an institutional model of scientific periodical publishing in England, 1665–ca.1714

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Journals, learned societies and money: Philosophical Transactions, ca. 1750–1900

The Best Schools: Sheldrake–Shermer Dialogue on the Nature of Science May thru July 2015

Conciatore: The Neighbors

storify: Delivering Impact: A collection of tweets from sessions at the BSHS annual conference and the SIP conference 2015

homunculus: Understanding the understanding of science

Sage Journals: PUS: …and the new editor of Public Understanding of Science will be…?

Rational Action: Warren Weaver on the Epistemology of Crude Formal Analysis: Relativistic Cosmology and the ‘General Theory of Air Warfare’

Willem de Sitter and Albert Einstein discuss the equations governing the dynamics of the universe

Willem de Sitter and Albert Einstein discuss the equations governing the dynamics of the universe

The New Yorker: In The Memory Ward

Aby Warburg (second from left) was the spirit behind the iconographic studies that dominated much of twentieth-century art history. CREDIT COURTESY THE WARBURG INSTITUTE

Aby Warburg (second from left) was the spirit behind the iconographic studies that dominated much of twentieth-century art history.
CREDIT COURTESY THE WARBURG INSTITUTE

the many-headed monster: The antiquarian listens: unexpected voices of the people

Journalism & Communication Monographs: Atomic Roaches and Test-Tube Babies: Bentley Glass and Science Communications

ESOTERIC:

History of Alchemy: Pico della Mirandola

distillatio: What makes a negromancer an alchemist?

The Recipes Project: Nicander’s snake repellent recipe. Part 1. Practical myth and magic

Tiresias, apparently not yet aware of having become a woman, beats up a pair of frisky snakes. Woodcut illustration, 1690 CE. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tiresias, apparently not yet aware of having become a woman, beats up a pair of frisky snakes. Woodcut illustration, 1690 CE. Source: Wikimedia Commons

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: The Weather Experiment: The Pioneers who Sought to see the Future

weather-experiment

The New York Times: Taking on ‘The Vital Question’ About Life

Science Book a Day: De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (On the fabric of the human body in seven books)

Der Spiegel: Die Roboter aus dem Morgenland

Dynamic Ecology Theory and Reality: An Introduction to Philosophy of Science by Peter Godfrey-Smith

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Story of Life: A First Book about Evolution

MrFOx-story-of-life-book

The Guardian: Life’s big surprises: The Vital Question and Life’s Greatest Secret reviewed

The Page 99 Test: Ill Composed

NEW BOOKS:

Amazon: Making “nature”: The History of a Scientific Journal

The University of Chicago Press: Osiris, Volume 30: Scientific Masculinities

Historiens de la santé: Working in a world of hurt: Trauma and resilience in the narratives of medical personal in warzones

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University of Pittsburgh Press: New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies

Math Geek: The New “Sine” of Mathematical Geekdom

OUP: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral? How eighteenth-century science disrupted the natural order

Historiens de la santé: Historical epistemology and the making of modern Chinese medicine

Historiens de la santé: Bodies, Speech, and Reproductive Knowledge in Early Mdern England

Historiens de la santé: Norm als Zwang, Pflicht und Traum: Normierende versus individualisierende Bestrebungen in der Medizin

ART & EXHIBITIONS

The J. Paul Getty Museum: Touching the Past: The Hand and the Medieval Book 7 July–27 September 2015

Abingdon County Hall Museum: Star Power: 50 years of Fusion Research

CP05j-438-01

MHS Oxford: ‘Dear Harry…’ – Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists

NHM: Britain’s First Geological Map

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The H-Word: The Skriker: global warming, eco-fairytales, and science on the stage

 Maxine Peake in the eponymous role in The Skriker at The Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for The Guardian

Maxine Peake in the eponymous role in The Skriker at The Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for The Guardian

Royal Exchange Theatre: The Skriker Closes: 1 August 2015

Arts Theatre: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Closes 31 July 2015

Young Vic: A Number 3 July–15 August 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Nature: Experimental psychology: The anatomy of obedience

trailers.apple.com: Experimenter: The Stanley Milgram Story

MHS Oxford: From Semaphore Flags to Telephones 1 August 2015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Harley-Street-Dreamstime-Banner

Wellcome Collection: Discussion: The Thing Is… Conflict Medicine 30 July 2015

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK:

GeorgeStephenson

George Stephenson – invented a Miner’s Safety Lamp in the second half of 1815 (simultaneously with Humphry Day)

TELEVISION:

BBC 4: Secret Knowledge: Wondrous Obsessions: The Cabinet of Curiosities

Fox 25: “Galileo’s World” exhibit at OU!

Channel 4: The Saboteurs

ITV: The Day They Dropped the Bomb

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Kepler’s First Law of Motion – Elliptical Orbits (Astronomy)

Youtube: Picturing Galileo

Youtube: What Was The Young Earth Like? – Big History Project

Youtube: Professor Povey’s Perplexing Problems – Official Video

Critical Karaoke: Telstar 1: “A Day in the Life”

TED: Steve Silberman: The forgotten history of autism

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Making History: Tom Holland, Andrea Wulf and Dr Paul Warde discuss issues from environmental history

PODCASTS:

Ottoman History Project: Islamic Hospitals in Medieval Egypt and the Levant

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

edX: Internet course: The Book Histories Across Time and Space

University of York: Medical History William Bynum Essay Prize

go fund me: Dr Claudia Alexander Memorial Fund for academic scholarships in STEM

UCL STS: CfP: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2015

The Warburg Institute: Conference: Ptolemy’s Science of the Stars in the Middle Ages 5-7 November 2015

ICHST 2015: 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology Rio de Janeiro 23-29 July 2017

Durham University: Where science and society meet: University Museums Group and University Museums in Scotland joint conference 23-24 September 2015

Royal Society: Open House Weekend History of Science Lecture Series 19-20 September 2015

The Birkbeck Trauma Project: Conference: Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 15–16 April 2016

All Souls College Oxford: CfP: Charles Hutton (1737–1823): being mathematical in the Georgian period 17-18 December 2015

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: Women and Science (Forum–Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal)

H-Announce: Call for Contributions to a Special Issue of Environment and History on Parks and Gardens 31 December 2015

Macquarie University Sydney: CfP: Foreign Bodies, Intimate Ecologies: Transformations in Environmental History 11–13 February 2016

Ada Lovelace: Celebrating 200 years of a computer visionary: Student scholarship available for symposium

KOME: Call for articles in science studies

LOOKING FOR WORK:

The Royal Institution: Christmas Lectures Assistant

University of Leeds: Leeds Masters Scholarship Scheme

University of Warwick: Teaching Fellow in the History of Medicine

University of Nottingham: British Academy Fellowship for historical geography scholar

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #02

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #02

Monday 20 July 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome to the second edition of the second year of Whewell’s Gazette, the weekly #histSTM links lists, which brings you all that we could gather of the histories of science, technology and medicine throughout the Internet in the last seven days.

The last week has seen a great triumph for science and technology with the successful flypast of Pluto by the space probe New Horizons after more than nine years en route. This prompted many articles on the history of the discovery of Pluto and its discoverer Clyde Tombaugh.

However this week also saw the seventieth anniversary of what many consider to be the greatest ever fall from grace of science and technology with the detonation of the first atomic bomb at the Trinity nuclear test on 16 July 1945.

These two episodes show that science and technology being human activities are far from being the neutral subjects that many would like to claim them to be. Humans create science and technology and humans determine how they will be put to use. The achievements of both the New Horizons and the Manhattan Project teams are viewed objectively amongst the greatest technical triumphs that our approximately four thousand years of science have delivered. However whereas the one is a cause for jubilation the other, releasing as it did undreamed of forces of destruction, can only be viewed with horror by any rational human being.

The Triumph – Pluto:

Not that Pluto!

Not that Pluto!

Johns Hopkins: Happy 100th Birthday, Clyde Tombaugh

Clyde Tombaughs notebook

Clyde Tombaughs notebook

io9: When We Discovered Pluto, It Changed How We Saw The Solar System

Cosmographia: Pluto – Predicted

Nautilus: A Visual History of Humanity’s Exploration of Pluto

PACHSmörgåsbord: Interview with Clyde Tombaugh, March 31, 1996

Clyde Tombaugh with his "automobile" telescope

Clyde Tombaugh with his “automobile” telescope

Timothy Hughes: Rare & Early Newspapers: Planet Pluto officially discovered

The Mitchell Archives: The Discovery of Pluto

The New York Times: Says Pluto’s Size is That of Mars

Popular Science: How a ‘Farm Boy’ Found Pluto 85 Years Ago

Glass positive of The new planet Pluto; Lowell Observatory 42-inch Reflector

Glass positive of The new planet Pluto; Lowell Observatory 42-inch Reflector

Academy of American Achiements: Clyde Tombaugh Photo Gallery

Modern Mechanix: Pluto is an Exceedingly Minor Planet (Nov, 1934)

Mammoth Tales: On Planet X and Naming Names

The Atlantic: The Women Who Rule Pluto

The H-Word: Seeing Pluto: strain, pain and ‘awesome’ science

Paige Fossil History: Retaining Childhood Curiosity: Pluto & Scientific Achievement

True Anomalies: Pluto, Mars, Moon, Earth

The Guardian: Pluto and other historical first pictures of planets

The New York Times: Summer of Science

The level of detail on the latest #PlutoFlyby images is astounding! Source: Twitter originator unknown

The level of detail on the latest #PlutoFlyby images is astounding!
Source: Twitter originator unknown

 

The Fall From Grace – Trinity:

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge petition, mid-July 1945

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge petition, 13 July 1945

Dannen.com: July 17, 1945. Leo Szilard’s petition against using the atomic bomb

Ptak Science Books: The Atomic Bomb and Satan’s Release, 1947

Dannen.com: Target Committee, Los Alamos, May 10-11, 1945

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lilli Hornig’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: George Kistiakowsky’s Interview

The Washington Post: Senator: Compensate residents near site of atomic bomb test

The Trinity explosion, 16 ms after detonation. The viewed hemisphere's highest point in this image is about 200 metres (660 ft) high. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Trinity explosion, 16 ms after detonation. The viewed hemisphere’s highest point in this image is about 200 metres (660 ft) high.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Trinity test bomb was the model dropped over Nagasaki. The bomb dropped over Hiroshima was never tested–not enough U-235 to spare. Audra J. Wolfe (@ColdWarScience)

ARD Mediathek: Zündung der ersten Atombombe am (16.7.1945) podcast

The New York Times: The First Light of Trinity

Restricted Data: Brig. Gen. Thomas Farrell, on the Trinity test, July 16, 1945

Ptak Science Books: Eyewitness Account “Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima” April 1946

The Boston Globe: The deterrent that wasn’t

AHF: News Articles on Trinity Test

Restricted Data: Trinity at 70: “Now we are all sons of bitches”

 

Quotes of the week:

 “And remember, with great power comes great utilities bill”. – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

 “It’s the right idea, but not the right time.” – John Dalton.

“I don’t exactly know what I mean by that, but I mean it.” – J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

“Personally, I’m always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.” – Winston Churchill

“You have to be nice to humans and when they don’t behave properly you can’t kill them” – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

“It took 100s of years to map the continents on Earth; it took just 50 years to see all the planets up close”. – John Grunsfeld

“In astronomy, looking over a long distance also means looking through expanses of time”. – Marek Kukula (@marekkukula)

“Frederick Great asked young Humboldt if he planned to conquer world like namesake Alexander the Great: ‘yes sir, but with my head’” h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf)

“That men do not learn very much from lessons of history is the most important of all lessons that history has to teach.” – Aldous Huxley

“A coffee cup is homeomorphic to a donut”.

“A coffee cup with a broken handle is homeomorphic to a donut with a bite taken out”. – @TopologyFact

“There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed”. –Hemingway

“Nature never deceives us; it is we who deceive ourselves”. – Rousseau

“All a musician can do is to get closer to the sources of nature, and so feel that he is in communion with the natural laws” – John Coltrane

“I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.” – John Cage

“Physics is the unfolding of the laws of the intelligible world, pure mathematics is the unfolding of laws of human intelligence”. – J Sylvester

 Birthdays of the Week:

John Dee born 13 July 1527

The Renaissance Mathematicus: John Dee, the “Mathematicall Praeface” and the English School of Mathematics

A 16th-century portrait by an unknown artist Source: Wikimedia Commons

A 16th-century portrait by
an unknown artist
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee

English Historical Fiction Authors: “This Rough Magic”: The Secrets of the Tudor-Era Seers

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 15 July – Jocelyn Bell Burnell

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 2009 Source Wikimedia Commons

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 2009
Source Wikimedia Commons

Starchild: Jocelyn Bell Burnell

AIP: Leon Lederman

arXiv.org: Records of sunspots and aurora during CE 960–1279 in the Chinese chronicle of the Song Dynasty

Forbes: History of Science Notes: For Whom The Prague Tolls

NASA Mars Exploration: Mars @ 50

Royal Museums Greenwich: A Glimpse of Mars Through Fractured Illusion: The Materiality of the Stereo Image

Daily Sabah: Astrolabe: the 13th Century iPhone

1437076313625

Science 2.0: Big Science: Ernest Lawrence Gets His Hagiography

The New Atlantis: The Unknown Newton (Introduction)

The New Atlantis: The Unknown Newton (Articles)

Astronomy Magazine: Pioneering Rosetta mission scientist Claudia Alexander dead at 56

Claudia Alexander Source: Wikimedia Commons

Claudia Alexander
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Los Angeles Times: Claudia Alexander dies at 56; JPL researcher oversaw Galileo, Rosetta missions

Teyler’s Museum: Planetarium, George Adams, London

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Curiouser and Curiouser: The World’s Most Unusual and Beautiful Maps

Yovisto: Edward Whymper and the Matterhorn

Yovisto: Salomon August Andrée’s Artic Baloon Expedition of 1897

S. A. Andrée and Knut Frænkel with the crashed balloon on the pack ice, photographed by the third expedition member, Nils Strindberg

S. A. Andrée and Knut Frænkel with the crashed balloon on the pack ice, photographed by the third expedition member, Nils Strindberg

 

Ptak Science Books: The Unstoppable Mawson (1914)

Royal Museums Greenwich: Looking across the Atlantic in 18th-century maps

I Like: The Map That Came To Life

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Forensic Anna:thropology: the sent of death

Conciatore: Francesco and Bianca

Remedia: Cinchona

17th century jar of quinine. The jar is believed to be from the pharmacy of the Milosrdnych Bratri Monastery and Hospital Brno, in the Czech Republic. L0057596 Credit: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

17th century jar of quinine. The jar is believed to be from the pharmacy of the Milosrdnych Bratri Monastery and Hospital Brno, in the Czech Republic. L0057596 Credit: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

Morbid Anatomy: Fabulous Senior Thesis Project Inspired by Remmelin’s Flap Anatomy

The Telegraph: The pioneering surgeon who healed men scarred by war, a new monument created in his honour – and the remarkable twist of fate that links them

academia.edu: Médecine et hellénisme à la Renaissance: Le problème du grec chez Baillou

Nain, Mam and Me: Allenburys milk foods: a triumph of industrialisation

The Atlantic: The Victorian Anti-Vaccination Movement

A cartoon from a December 1894 anti-vaccination publication Courtesty of The Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

A cartoon from a December 1894 anti-vaccination publication
Courtesty of The Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

The Guardian: CIA torture is only part of medical science’s dark modern history

Mosaic: Step-by-step: prosthetic legs through the ages (gallery)

The Sloane Letters Blog: On Hans Sloane’s Copies of De Humani Corporis Fabrica

RCS: William Clowes – A prooved practice for all young chirurgiens, 1588

CHoM News: Bernard D. Davis Papers Processing Has Begun, as part of Maximizing Microbiology Project

Collectors Weekly: Bloodletting, Bone Brushes, and Tooth Keys: White-Knuckle Adventures in Early Dentistry

TECHNOLOGY:

Invention: A twist of Fate: The Invention of the Rubik’s Cube

Today’s Document: Eli Barum & Benjamin Brooks Still Patented 13 July 1808

Thick Objects: Remaking a local object: The Kirschmann coaxial colour mixer

National Museum of American History: Galileo Pendulum Clock Model, Replica

Nautilus: The Rube Goldberg Machine That Mastered Keynesian Economics

Schematic diagram of the MONIAC machine LSE Library collections, Meade/16/3

Schematic diagram of the MONIAC machine
LSE Library collections, Meade/16/3

web.stanford.edu: The Defecating Duck, Or The Ambiguous Origins of Artificial Life

The Guardian: The world’s first hack: the telegraph and the invention of privacy

The National Museum of Computing: EDSAC Shortlisted for prestigious ICON Award

Ptak Science Books: Heavy Electricity, 1879

Conciatore: Vitrum Flexile

Teyler’s Museum: Sound Synthesizer, after Helmholtz, Rudolph Koenig Paris

Vox: 7 horrifying attempts at building a better mousetrap

Yes, this is an actual mousetrap patent from 1882. Google patents

Yes, this is an actual mousetrap patent from 1882.
Google patents

Barron’s: Optical Inventions Opened the Modern World (google title and click on first link to circumnavigate pay wall!)

BBC: Flying Scotsman nearing end of decade-long overhaul

The York Press: Flying Scotsman restoration enters final stage

The New York Times: The Bicycle and the Ride to Modern America

Canadian Science and Technology Museum: Cycling: The Evolution of an Experience, 1818–1900

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 19 July – Percy Spencer and the Microwave Oven

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Nature: Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace

Embryo Project: Friedrich Tiedemann (1781–1861)

Environmental History Resources: Timeline of environmental history

Recipes Project: How to brew beer with a ‘paile of cold water’

The Bigger Picture: William Stimpson and the Smithsonian’s First Aquarium

An aquarium has recently become “a necessary luxury in every well-appointed household, both of Europe and America.” Henry D. Butler, The Family Aquarium (New York, 1858). Colored frontispiece, Biodiversity Heritage Library.

An aquarium has recently become “a necessary luxury in every well-appointed household, both of Europe and America.” Henry D. Butler, The Family Aquarium (New York, 1858). Colored frontispiece, Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Yovisto: Carl Woese and the Archaea

Embryo Project: Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov (Elie Metchnikoff) (1845–1916)

big think: Charles Darwin Would Be Ashamed of ‘Social Darwinism’

History of the Marine Biological Laboratory: The MBL Embryology Course 1939

Smithsonian Libraries: The Body Electric: Inspiring Frankenstein

OUP Blog: Alice down the microscope

Down the Microscope and what Alice found there. Biochemical Society, December 1927 by the Wellcome Library, London. CC-BY-4.0 - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/alice-microscope/#sthash.t8XwoS6I.dpuf

Down the Microscope and what Alice found there. Biochemical Society, December 1927 by the Wellcome Library, London. CC-BY-4.0 – See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/alice-microscope/#sthash.t8XwoS6I.dpuf

The Royal Society: The Repository: A bad break in the Lakes

The New York Times: David M. Raup, Who Transformed Field of Paleontology, Dies at 82

David M. Raup in 1981. Credit William Franklin McMahon/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

David M. Raup in 1981. Credit William Franklin McMahon/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

Why Evolution is True: David M. Raup, 1933–2015

The Nation: Can We Cure Genetic Diseases Without Slipping Into Eugenics?

AMNH: Epitonium scalare

10 Things Wrong With Environmental Thinking: The Pastoral, literal and environmental, defined

NPR: The Salt: We Didn’t Build This City on Rock’N’Roll. It Was Yogurt

Data is Science: Thomas Sopwith’s Stratigraphic Models

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 13 July – August Kekulé

1979 East German stamp of Kekulé, in honour of the sesquicentennial of his birth. Source: Wikimedia Commons

1979 East German stamp of Kekulé, in honour of the sesquicentennial of his birth.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

storify: Science on Tap: A History of the Chemical Elements for (Big) Kids

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ether Wave Propaganda: If You Read Joseph Agassi, Man and Nature Become More Complex

Niche: ICHG 2015: History and Geography in a Digital Age

JHI Blog: The Archival Agenda: Thinking Through Scientific Archives at the Royal Society

Museum of HSTM Blog: Gillinson Room Project

storify: Science in Public 2015

Environmental History Resources:

Bishop Blog: Publishing replication failures: some lessons from history

THE: Can history and geography survive the digital age?

The History Vault: Reading Anatomy in Francis J. Cole’s Collection

Francis J Cole Source: Franklin, K. J

Francis J Cole
Source: Franklin, K. J

Conciatore: Montpellier

Public Domain Review: Cat Pianos, Sound-Houses, and Other Imaginary Musical Instruments

University of Leicester: From Citizen Science to Citizen Humanities – 19th Century history in the digital age

Punk Rock Operations Research: Life was simple before World War II. After that, we had systems

A view from the bridge: Of mud pies, muscle and science education

Faith and Wisdom in Science: The Faith and Wisdom in Science Story in Three Steps

Spitalfields Life: Kirby’s Eccentric Museum, 1820

This wonderful boy, who in early age outstripped all former calculators, was born in Morton Hampstead on 14th June 1806

This wonderful boy, who in early age outstripped all former calculators, was born in Morton Hampstead on 14th June 1806

ESOTERIC:

tspace.library.utoronto.ca: Cultural Uses of Magic in Fifteenth-Century England (pdf)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Philadelphia City Paper: “What’s the Matter with Pluto?”

arts_col_pluto_rgb

Back Re(Action): Eureka by Chad Orzel

Popular Science: The Lightness of Being – Frank Wilczek

Los Angeles Review of Books: James K. A. Smith on The Territories of Science and Religion

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Psychiatry in Communist Europe

Remedia: Charismatic Substances

CHF: Pure Intelligence: The Life of William Hyde Wollaston

Historiens de la santé: The Evolution of Forensic Psychiatry: History, Current Developments, Future Directions

Historiens de la santé: Plague and Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean World. The Ottoman Experience, 1347–1600

9781107013384

Wiley Online Library: The International Handbooks of Museum Studies

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Irish Tech Times: Boolean expressions: Art meets maths to celebrate George Boole bicentennial at Lewis Glucksman Gallery, UCC

tatsuo-miyajima-life-palace-tea-room-designboom-04

tatsuo-miyajima-life-palace-tea-room-designboom-04

George Boole 200: The Life and Legacy of George Boole

The Irish Times: George Boole exhibition opens in UCC to mark bicentennial

Royal College of Physicians: Re-framing disability: portraits from the Royal College of Physicians

Natural History Museum: Images of Nature

The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: Gold Last Chance closes 26 July 2015

The Royal Society: Seeing Closer: 350 years of microscopy 29 June–23 November 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

What’s on Stage: Jonathan Holloway’s Jekyll & Hyde Starts 28 July 2015

Winterbourne Opera: Gounod’s Faust 28 July–1 August 2015

Worthing Theatres: Dr Bunhead’s Secret Science Lab 24-25 July 2015

National Theatre: The Curious Incidence of the Dog in the Night-Time 21-29 July 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Wellcome Collection: Minds and Bodies 23 July 2015

Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy Evenings Every Friday

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Sex and the City

nowvenerealdiseases

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK:

Gregor Johann Mendel (20 July 1822 – 6 January 1884)

ZGS4F2

From the Album Benary

TELEVISION:

HSS: PBS Series to Portray the History of Chemistry

SLIDE SHOW:

BHL: Sloths!

VIDEOS:

Youtube: The History and Philosophy of Science in 6 Easy Steps – Intro

Fusion: Why would a scientist inject gonorrhoea pus into his own penis?

Youtube: Unnatural histories Amazon

Royal Society Objectivity

Youtube: The Phoenix Index

The Telegraph: Apollo 11:12 key steps to the moon in video

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Natural Histories

PODCASTS:

Filament Communication: Episode 3: Matthew Cobb on writing science history

Folger Shakespeare Library: The Shakespearean Moons of Uranus

British Academy: Who reads Geography or History anymore? The challenge of audience in a digital age

Big Picture Science: It’s All Relative

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Framing the Face: CfP: One-day workshop Friend’s Meeting House Euston Road London 28 November 2015

Royal Society: 4th Notes and Records Essay Award

Imperial & Global Forum: CfP: Colonialism, War & Photography

University of York: Medical History William Bynum Essay Prize

HSS: Preliminary Program 2015 History of Science Society Meeting San Francisco 19–22 November

University of Toronto: HPS100 Trailer – Why History & Philosophy of Science?

Wikimedia: Wikipedia Science Conference: The Henry Wellcome Auditorium London 2-3 September 2015

University of Wuppertal: CfP: Workshop: Early modern Jesuit science in a digital perspective – The Jesuit Science Network 26–27 November 2015

V&A Museum: On the Matter of Books and Records: Workshop: 23 November 2015 – Programme

University of Oxford: CfP: 6th SHAC Postgraduate Workshop: Alchemy and Chemistry in Sickness and in Health 30 October 2015

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Call for Reviewers

Advances in the History of Psychology: CfP: Special Issue of HoP on History of Psychotherapy in North and South America

 

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Manchester University: CHSTM: Taught master’s in history of science, technology and medicine Applications close 31 July 2015

Notches: Assistant Editor Positions at Notches

Eccles Centre for American Studies: Eccles Centre Writers in Residence – 2016 Awards Applications Open

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: Research Assistant #histMed

Jacobs Foundation: Jacobs Science Writers Fellowship

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Program Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #01

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #01

Monday 13 July 2015

EDITORIAL: 

Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list returns today, after a short break, with the first edition of its second year bringing you all the best that out editorial staff could sweep up of the histories of science, technology and medicine in the Internet over the last seven days. During that period many of our supporters and readers, who also supply much of the material collected here, were gathered together in Swansea for the annual conference of the BSHS discussing lots of interesting topics from the history of science. One central theme that is a principal interest of our long-suffering chief sub-editor was, how can science communicators use history of science?

Many of those present in Swansea are highly active on Twitter and tweeted this discussion in great detail. Katherine McAlpine, a curator, collected and storified those tweets and we present her efforts in place of an editorial for this edition.

storify: How do we tell the history of science?

As a bonus a couple of other BSHS15 tweet storifies.

storify: #bshs15 outtakes – the hype (and) en route

storify: #bshs15 The first full day

“It never helps historians to say too much about their working methods. For just as the conjuror’s magic disappears if the audience knows how the trick is done, so the credibility of scholars can be sharply diminished if readers learn everything about how exactly their books came to be written. Only too often, such revelations dispel the impression of fluent, confident omniscience; instead, they suggest that histories are concocted by error-prone human beings who patch together the results of incomplete research in order to construct an account whose rhetorical power will, they hope, compensate for gaps in the argument and deficiencies in the evidence.” – Keith Thomas h/t Sharon Howard

Quotes of the week:

“Your password must contain a ferrous metal, an embarrassing sexual memory, at least one Norse god and the seeds of its own destruction”. – @daniel_barker

“First rule of Thesaurus Club. You don’t talk, discuss, converse, speak, chat, confer, deliberate, gab, or gossip about Thesaurus Club”. – @SwedishCanary

“How long until we find out if Pluto has feathers?” – Tom Swanson {@Swansontea)

“”Genital” is an anagram of “gelatin.” I wonder who’s responsible for that”. – Allen Stairs (@AllenStairs)

“The pen is writier than the sword”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

 “People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” – A.A. Milne (Winnie-the-Pooh)

“Buying books would be a good thing if one could also buy the time to read them in.” – Schopenhauer

“Part of making progress in science is about recognizing which problems are ready to be solved” – Frank Wilczek h/t Philip Ball

“‘Easy’ is a word to describe other people’s jobs.” – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“When you treat people like children, you get children’s work.” – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“It’s tempting to cover up boring with polish, but it rarely works.” – Seth Godin h/t @JohnDCook

“I’ve never known any trouble that an hour’s reading didn’t assuage.” ― Charles de Secondate.

“A man is responsible for his ignorance.” ― Milan Kundera

“The print codex is merely one form of “the book.” It is mutable, in both text & form. The change agent is human, not technological”. Shannon Supple (@mazarines) Tweet from #sharp15

“The age of innocent faith in science and technology may be over.” Barry Commoner (1966). h/t Michael Egan (@EganHistory)

“Science is about as emotion-free as poetry”. – Tom McLeish (@mcleish_t)

“In science, most ideas are obvious. It’s how to TEST them that requires cleverness”. – John Hawks (@johnhawks)

“Since it pissed off so many nerds yesterday, let me reiterate: evolutionary psychology is shoddy science used to uphold retrograde beliefs”. – Bailey (@the_author)

“Nature composes some of her loveliest poems for the microscope and the telescope”. – Theodore Roszak h/t @hist_astro  

Birthdays of the Week:  

90th Anniversary of the Scopes Trial 10 July  Peddling and Scaling God and Darwin: Ninetieth Anniversary of the Scopes Trial

The teacher at the center of proceedings, John Thomas Scopes Source: Wikimedia Commons

The teacher at the center of proceedings, John Thomas Scopes
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The New York Times: The Scopes Trial: Remembering When Teaching Evolution Went to Court

Smithsonian.com: The Scopes Trial Redefined Science Journalism and Shaped It to What It Is Today

Robert Fitzroy born 5 July 1805

Stay Thirsty: A Conversation with Juliet Aykroyd about Darwin & Fitzroy

FitzRoy later in life (probably mid-fifties). Source: Wikimedia Commons

FitzRoy later in life (probably mid-fifties).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dolly the Sheep

Embryo Project: Nuclear Transplantation

Dolly's taxidermied remains Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dolly’s taxidermied remains
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Embryo Project: Ian Wilmut (1944– )

Science Notes: Today in Science History – July 5 – Dolly the Sheep

Nikola Tesla born 10 July 1956

Mental Floss: The Time Nikola Tesla Paid for His Hotel Room With a “Death Ray”

Excluded Middle: Nikola Tesla’s Earthquake Machine

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 10 July – Nikola Tesla WSJ: The Wizard of Houston Street

Tesla wearing a folk costume, c. 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tesla wearing a folk costume, c. 1880
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Initial Tesla Polyphase

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Smithsonian.com: Urban Explorations: The Great Moon Hoax Was Simply a Sign of Its Time

Yovisto: Henrietta Swan Leavitt and the Light of the Cepheids

Yovisto: Macquorn Rankine and the Laws of Thermodynamics

arXiv.org: The Collaboration of Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein and his wife Mileva Maric Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein and his wife Mileva Maric
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Motherboard: A Visual Tribute to Isaac Newton’s ‘Principia’

Universe Today: Who Was Nicolaus Copernicus?

AHF: J. Carson Mark

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Dorothy Wilkinson’s Interview

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 7 July – Giuseppe Piazzi

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ralph Gates’s Interview

Atlas Obscura: Cincinnati Observatory

Plutovian: Planet X is 1200 times bigger than Earth – approximately

academia.edu: Learned modesty and the first lady’s comet: a commentary on Caroline Herschel (1787) ‘An account of a new comet’

AIP: Oral Histories: John Wheeler – Session I

AHF: John Wheeler

The Irish Times: The Grubbs: 19th-century Irish stargazers

Thomas Grubb: his apparent lack of formal education did not prevent him from tinkering with telescopes and becoming an astronomical observer Source: Irish Times

Thomas Grubb: his apparent lack of formal education did not prevent him from tinkering with telescopes and becoming an astronomical observer
Source: Irish Times

The New York Times: Reaching Pluto, and the End of an Era of Planetary Exploration

Black Hills Pioneer: 50 years of deep discovery

Pugwash: The Russell-Einstein Manifesto 9 July 1955

Voices of Manhattan: Ray Gallagher’s Accounts of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Missions

APS Physics: This Month in Physics History: Einstein and Women

The New York Times: Venetia Phair Dies at 90; as a Girl, She Named Pluto

academia.edu: A Book, a Pen, and the Sphere: Reading Sacrobosco in the Renaissance

Muslim Heritage: Glances on Calendars and Almanacs in the Islamic Civilization

Traditional Turkish Calendar (1452). This kind of calendar was based on a cycle of 12 months, each corresponding to a different animal. This calendar for the year of the monkey by Hamdi Mustafa b. Sunbul was presented to Mehmed II. Topkapi Palace Museum Library, MS B 309.

Traditional Turkish Calendar (1452). This kind of calendar was based on a cycle of 12 months, each corresponding to a different animal. This calendar for the year of the monkey by Hamdi Mustafa b. Sunbul was presented to Mehmed II. Topkapi Palace Museum Library, MS B 309.

International Year of Light 2015 – Blog: Heaven on Earth

AHF: Remembering the Trinity Test

Christie’s The Art People: Newton, Sir Isaac (1643–1727) Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathematica

National Geographic: Why Do We Call Them the ‘Dog Days’ of Summer?

Phys.Org: What is Halley’s Comet?

Discover: The Man Who (almost) Discovered Pluto…and Also (Almost) Discovered the Expanding Universe

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

BHL: The Description de L’Égyte: The Savants of Napoleon’s Egyptian CampaignHilaire 3 Canadaland: Q&A with Paul Watson, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist, on why he just Resigned from the Toronto Star (The Franklin Ships Erebus & Terror)

Linguistic Geographies: The Gough Map of Great Britain

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Atlas Obscura: The Pest House Medical Museum

From the Hands of Quacks: The Reed Hearing Test

Clinical Curiosities: History of Medicine at BSHS15

Forbes: Why Were Cases Of Autism So Hard To Find Before the 1990s?

Yovisto: Camillo Golgi and the Golgi Apparatus

The Recipes Project: Of Quacks and Caustics

Titlepage: Novum lumen chirurgicum Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

Titlepage: Novum lumen chirurgicum
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org

Dr Alun Withey: Religion & the Sickness Experience in Early Modern Britain

Fiction Reboot–Daily Dose: Are we running out of Bodies? Dissection, Cadavers, and Medical Practice

Notches: The Sacred Precincts of Marital Bedrooms: Religion and the Making of Griswold

Embryo Project: Wilhelm His, Sr. (1831–1904)

Christie’s The Art People: The ‘Google Maps’ of the human body

Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: The Skeleton Trade: Life, Death and Commerce in Early Modern Europe

Circulating Now: Medieval Herbals in Movable Type dsc1853 Nautilus: The Split Personality of the Color Yellow

NPR: The Salt: From Medicine to Modern Revival: A History of American Whiskey, In Labels

Nain, Mam and Me: Allenburys hygienic baby bottle: a picture of domestic bliss Concocting History: The snake-goddess, the satyr and the parturient: Jean Chièze’s Hippocratic illustrations

TECHNOLOGY:

Motherboard: This Is What 70 Years of Computing Sounds Like

Conciatore: True Colors

Aldrovandi's pica marina Source: Conciatore

Aldrovandi’s pica marina
Source: Conciatore

Conciatore: Don Giovanni in Flanders

Conciatore: The Material of All Enamels

Teylers Museum: Berliner Gramophone 4 sound clips

Canada Science and Technology Museum: Cycling: The Evolution of an Experience, 1818–1900

Smithsonian.com: Five Epic Patent Wars That Don’t Involve Apple

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 11 July – NASA’s Skylab space station returns to Earth

BuzzFeed: 11 Female Inventors Who Helped Power The Information Age

Harry Kalish / Chemical Heritage Foundation (CC BY-SA 3.0) / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Harry Kalish / Chemical Heritage Foundation (CC BY-SA 3.0) / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Wordnik: Come Fly With Me: 9 Common Words with Aviation Origins

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Wallace Medal LA Times: Alexander von Humboldt: The man who made modern nature

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Ernst Mayr

MSN News: The story of John Money: Controversial sexologist grappled with the concept of gender

Yovisto: Albert von Kölliker and the Origins of Embryology

xroads.viginia.edu: Alexander Wilson

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 6 July – Rabies Vaccine

Evolution Institute: Truth and Reconciliation for Social Darwinism

The Sloane Letters Blog: The Sad Kiss of 1722

Atlas Obscura: Thomas Jefferson Built This Country on Mastodons

Drawing of an early 19th century attempt at a mammoth restoration. Note the upside-down tusks. (Image: WikiCommons/Public Domain)

Drawing of an early 19th century attempt at a mammoth restoration. Note the upside-down tusks. (Image: WikiCommons/Public Domain)

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Early evolution pioneers’ artwork now online

The H-Word: Sexism in science: did Watson and Crick really steal Rosalind Franklins’ data?

Wonders & Marvels: History is Sometimes Made by Great Men (and Women)

Embryo Project: Studies in Spermatogenesis (1905), by Nettie Maria Stevens

PRI: Meet the man who gave the name to the creatures we now know as dinosaurs

Medievalist.net: Avalanches in the Middle Ages

Tand Online (OA): The Rat-Catcher’s Prank: Interspecies Cunningness and Scavenging in Henry Mayhew’s London

Cambrian News Online: 17th century nature under the microscope

Paige Fossil History: Additional Pieces of Neandertal 1: History Aiding Science

The Guardian: Conjoined piglets and two-faced kittens: Victorian oddities ­– in pictures

Preserved conjoined piglets, European, 19th century Photograph: Rosamund Purcell

Preserved conjoined piglets, European, 19th century
Photograph: Rosamund Purcell

The Recipes Project: A Cartography of Chocolate

Medievalist.net: Medievalist helps scientists rewrite climate records

Niche: ICHG 2015: Environmental, but not necessarily environmental history

The Scientist: Water Fleas, 1755

CHEMISTRY:

Open Culture: Marie Curie’s Research Papers Are Still Radioactive 100+ Years Later

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 9 July – Loenzo Romano Carlo Avogadro di Quarengna e di Cerreto

Back Re(Action): Liquid Helium

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (left) and Johannes Diderik van der Waals in 1908 in the Leiden physics laboratory, in front of the apparatus used later to condense helium. (Source: Museum Boerhaave, Leiden)

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (left) and Johannes Diderik van der Waals in 1908 in the Leiden physics laboratory, in front of the apparatus used later to condense helium. (Source: Museum Boerhaave, Leiden)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Nautilus: The Nautilus Weekly Science Quiz: How Much Science Is In The Constitution?

The Recipe Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Boots Archive

Niche: ICHG 2015: Big Ideas in Historical Geography and “Door Crashers”

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Scholars Spin Their Own Nursery Rhymes (Without the Happy Endings)

Jack and Jill Went up the hill To fetch a pail of water and met an anonymous peer reviewer they threw down the well   Douglas Hunter

Nautilus: How Science Helped Write the Declaration of Independence

flickr: University of Victoria Libraries

The Telegraph: A Clerk of Oxford’s guide to a bright old world

homunculus: Does anyone have any questions?

Royal Society: Conservative attitudes to old-established organs: Oliver Lodge and Philosophical Magazine

Digital Bodleian: Makes These Extraordinary Library Collection Available Online For The Very First Time…

Translation and Print: Translations and the making of Early English Print Culture (1473–1660)

CHF: Episode 200: Distillations Turns 200

PLOS Blogs: J. Andrew Bangham (1947–2014): Enterprising scientist who broke new ground in computational biology and image analysis

Andrew teaching in Italy

Andrew teaching in Italy

British Naval History: Why I Became a Historian: Peter Hore

Ether Wave Propaganda: The Benefits of Technology: Productivity as a Measure

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: On the word “Alchumy”, “Alconamye” and variations thereof in English

BOOK REVIEWS:

Popular Science: Chilled – Tom Jackson

Science Book a Day: The Door in the Dream: Conversations with Eminent Women in Science

Science Book a Day: The Earth: From Myths to Knowledge Krivine_TheEarth_JK_V3.indd British Journal for the History of Science: Book Reviews

TLS: Dissent of man: Piers J. Hale Political Descent: Malthus, mutualism, and the politics of evolution in Victorian England

Morbid Anatomy: The Call of Abandoned Souls: Guest Post and New Book By Ivan Cenzi of Bizzaro Bazar

The Financial Times: ‘A Beautiful Question’, by Frank Wilczek

The New York Review of Books: How You Consist of Trillions of Tiny Machines

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Indian Doctors in Kenya, 1895–1940: The Forgotten History index The Guardian: Colouring-in books boom continues with volume of mathematical patterns

Barnes & Nobel: History of Chemistry Books

Occult Minds: Forthcoming publications

ART & EXHIBITIONS

University of Lincoln: Exhibition to celebrate the life and legacy of George Boole forefather of the information age

Glucksman: Boolean Expressions: Contemporary art and mathematical expression 25 July–8 November 2015

John Craig Freeman: Platonic Solids

Gulf Times: Three great Muslim inventors

Shackleton 100: By Endurance we Conquer: The Polar Museum: Shackleton and his men 22 September 2015–18 June 2016

M Library Blogs: New Online Exhibit: Beer Brewing and Technology

Cecilia Brunson Projects: A Garden for Beatrix 20 May-July 24 2015

Lucia Pizzani A Garden for Beatrix Series

Lucia Pizzani A Garden for Beatrix Series

Life: Artatomy 5 June-6 September 2015

Science Museum: The Science and Art of Medicine

Grain: Album 31: Exhibition: 19 June-29 August 2015

The National Library of Wales: ‘The Secret Workings of Nature’ 7 July 2015–9 January 2016

Explore Art at Gracefield Arts Centre: Dumfries Crichton Royal – A Hidden Gem 18 July–22 August 2015

Chelmsford Museum: World of Wallace Last Chance closes 19 July

London Museum of Health and Medicine: The Riddle of Shock 17 July 2015–30 June 2016

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Young Vic: A Number 3 July-15 August 2015

Theatre Royal Haymarket: The Elephant Man 19 May-8 August 2015 246x380-TEM Arts Theatre: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein 14 July–31 July 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Science Museum: Beyond Vision: Photography, Art and Science symposium 12 September 2015

The Guardian: Guardian Masterclasses: Everything you need to know about science communication

The Royal Institution: To infinity and beyond: the story of the spacesuit 30 July 2015

Shadow and Act: Film Based on Story of Black Women Mathematicians Who Worked for NASA During the Space Race, in the Works

Margot Lee Shetterly Image Credit: NASA/David C. Bowman

Margot Lee Shetterly
Image Credit: NASA/David C. Bowman

Morbid Anatomy Museum: Morbid Anatomy One Year Anniversary Festival of Arcane Knowledge and Devil’s Masquerade Party Fundraiser with MC Even Michelson!

Discover Medicine: Walking Tour: The Making of Thoroughly Modern Medicine

Discover Medicine: Walking Tour: Healers and Hoaxers

The List: Lecture: Faith and Wisdom in Science York Minster 22 July 2015

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: He Told Me That His Garden… 16 July 2015

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK: “Newton” by William Blake, 1795–c. 1805

Newton 1795/c.1805 William Blake 1757-1827 Presented by W. Graham Robertson 1939 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N05058

Newton 1795/c.1805 William Blake 1757-1827 Presented by W. Graham Robertson 1939 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N05058

Dr. Philippe Pinel at the Salpêtrière, 1795 by Tony Robert-Fleury. Philippe_Pinel_à_la_Salpêtrière Pinel ordering the removal of chains from patients at the Paris Asylum.

TELEVISION:

Forbes: Review: ‘First Peoples’ Series Chronicles Origins And Spread of Modern Humans SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Revelations: The science of making a daguerreotype Museo Galileo: Pre-telescopic astronomy

Astronomy Central: Discovery: 100 Greatest Discoveries 1 of 9 Astronomy {History… Youtube: AHF: Trinity Test Preparations Youtube: AHF: Moving the Plutonium Core     RADIO:

BBC: HG and the H-Bomb

BBC: The Life Scientific: Dorothy Bishop

BBC Radio 4extra: Georg Mendel – A Monk and Two Peas

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Nuclear War Radio Series

BBC Radio 4:Science Stories: Seeing is Believing – The Leviathan of Parsonstown

PODCASTS:

Science Friday: The Ultimate Geek Road Trip

Route layout by Randal Olson

Route layout by Randal Olson

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

National Maritime Museum: Conference: Ways of Seeing 17 July 2015

St Anne’s College Oxford: Workshop: Texts and Contexts: The Cultural Legacies of Ada Lovelace 8 December 2015

University of Leeds: CfP: Alternative Histories of Electronic Music

George Boole 200: Get Involved: Celebrate the life and legacy of George Boole with UCC: Boole2School 2 November 2015

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy Conference 3-6 June 2016

Royal Society: Cells: from Robert Hooke to Cell Therapy – a 350 year journey 5-6 October 2015

Society for the Social History of Health: CfP: Health, Medicine and Mobility: International Migrations in Historical Perspective University of Prince Edward Island: 24-26 June 2016

Flamsteed Astronomy Society: Flamsteed Lecture

BSHS: Ayrton Prize

The Renaissance Diary: Call for Contributions: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

University of Bucharest: Master Class: Isaac Newton’s philosophical projects 6-11 October 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

The Royal Society: Newton International Fellowship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Curator of Cartography

University of Toronto: Assistant Professor – History of Technology

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #52

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #52

Monday 22 June 2015

EDITORIAL:

We are proud to present the fifty-second edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list, bringing all the best in the histories of science, technology and medicine from out of the depths of cyberspace onto computer screens all over the world.

Number fifty-two means that we have completed a nominal year. The calendar year was completed last week, as there was no edition for the week of Monday 25 May. Looking back over the completed year one can see that the production of #histSTM blog post and articles around the Internet is in a very healthy state being both extensive and diverse and covering a bewildering range of topics at a multitude of levels from totally popular to totally serious and very academic. It is to be hoped that the Internet #histSTM community continues to flourish and will, we hope, grow over the next year and for many years to come. We also hope that Whewell’s Gazette will continue to bring its readers, and may they too flourish and grow, all that it can find on its weekly expeditions through the depths of cyberspace.

As already announced last week, and posted in more detail on The Renaissance Mathematicus, out long suffering and intrepid chief sub-editor is going off to unsettle the good folks in the Bay Area of California for ten days so there will be a two week hiatus here at Whewell’s Gazette, with the fifty-third edition due to appear first on Monday 13 July, the fates willing.

Bill Watterson

Bill Watterson

Quotes of the week:

The Old English word for ‘solstice’ is ‘sunstede’, from sun + stede meaning ‘fixed place, position’ (cf. steadfast, homestead, Hampstead). – Eleanor Parker (@ClerkofOxford)

“Those who do not remember the past are condemned to misquote it”. – Erik Champion (@nzerik)

“It angers me when people use ‘critical thinking’ to mean ‘holds the same opinions that I do’” – @Canadian_Errant

“To think of any phase in history as altogether irrational is to look at it not as an historian but as a publicist, a polemical writer of tracts for the times”. — Collingwood, “The Idea of History” (1946) h/t @gabridli

“A man may be a Newton in either the political or mathematical world and still be a child in the ways of religion” – John Tyndall (1841)

“Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked”. h/t Mike Croucher (@walkingramdomly)

“Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.” – Alfred, Lord Tennyson

“It is the vice of a vulgar mind to be thrilled by bigness” – E. M. Forester h/t Christene D’Anca (@ChristeneDAnca)

“I’ve never felt I could claim to be a writer in that full sense. It just seems arrogant” – Anthony T. Grafton

“Through space the universe grasps me and swallows me up like a speck; through thought I grasp it” – Blaise Pascal , Penséees (1670)

“Do not look at stars as bright spots only. Try to take in the vastness of the universe” – Maria Mitchell h/t @hist_astro

“The truly learned are easily distinguished by their manners.” – Barthélemy Faujas de Saint-Fond, 1799 h/t Rebekah Higgitt (@beckyfh)

“To have pleasure, you need a bit of passion, a great & interesting purpose, a determined desire to learn” – Voltaire h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf)

“How I love people who say what they think! People who only half-think are only half alive’”– Voltaire h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf)

“There comes a time when you realize that everything is a dream, and only those things preserved in writing have any possibility of being real” – James Salter h/t Chris White (@bombaylychee)

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Event of the Week:

June 16 1963

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 16 – Valentina Tereshkova

Tereshkova in 1969 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tereshkova in 1969
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: The First Woman in Space – Valentina Treshkowa

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

AIP: Voices of the past reimagined

Phys Org: What is Halley’s Comet?

Starts With a Bang: A Quantum of Parody: The Journal of Jocular Physics, a Cosmic Birthday Tribute to Niels Bohr

AHF: Hans Bethe

Smithsonian.com: Los Alamos’s “Atomic Secretary” Was Never Told What the Manhattan Project Was For

Dannen.com: Recommendations on the Immediate Use of Nuclear Weapons, June 16, 1945

Yovisto: William Parsons and his Large Telescope

The largest telescope of the 19th century, the Leviathan of Parsonstown. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The largest telescope of the 19th century, the Leviathan of Parsonstown.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Sydney Morning Herald: Renaissance man emerged from shadows

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 18 June – William Lassell

AIP: Allan Sandage Interview

The Conversation: When science gets ugly – the story of Philipp Lenard and Albert Einstein

Phillipp Lenard in 1900.  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Phillipp Lenard in 1900. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Stanisluas Ulam’s Interview

The Conversation: From Newton to Hawking and beyond: a short history of the Lucasian Chair

arXiv.org: Edgar Allan Poe: the first man to conceive a Newtonian evolving universe

Wellcome Trust Blog: Image of the Week: The Earth’s orbit around the Sun

CH4NZpfWgAEI6Bk

NASA: Veteran NASA Spacecraft Nears 60,000th Lap Around Mars, No Pit Stops

Symmetry: Mathematician to know: Emmy Noether

Muslim Heritage: Arabic Star Names: A Treasure of Knowledge Shared by the World

The Renaissance Mathematicus: For those who haven’t been paying attention

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

J D Davies: The Lost Journal of Captain Greenvile Collins, Part 1

Yovisto: “Because it’s there” – George Mallory and Mount Everest

1921 Everest Expedition; Mallory at right on rear row; Bullock at left on rear row Source: Wikimedia Commons

1921 Everest Expedition; Mallory at right on rear row; Bullock at left on rear row
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Halley’s Log: Halley writes from the Downs

French of Outremer: The Oxford Outremer Map

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

BBC: Wales: What role did disabled people play during industrial revolution?

NYAM: The Legacy of Aloysius “Alois” Alzheimer

The Recipes Project: The Vegetarian Society, Victorian Style

Yovisto: Hubertus Strughold – the Father of Space Medicine

Mo Costandi: An Illustrated History of Trepanation

The operation of Trepan, from Illustrations of the Great Operations of Surgery: Trepan, Hernia, Amputation, Aneurism and Lithotomy, by Charles Bell, 1815. (John Martin Rare Book Room at the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, University of Iowa.)

The operation of Trepan, from Illustrations of the Great Operations of Surgery: Trepan, Hernia, Amputation, Aneurism and Lithotomy, by Charles Bell, 1815. (John Martin Rare Book Room at the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, University of Iowa.)

Remedia: Britain’s Sonic Therapy: listening to birdsong during and after the First World War

io9: This Fungus Was A Medieval Mass Murderer

The Paris Review: Monkey Glands for Everyone

Nursing Clio: The International History of Women’s Medical Education: What Does Imperialism Have To Do With It?

Stylisticienne: On his heid-ake: A Medieval Migraine

Strange Remains: The Macabre History of Harvard Medical School

Thomas Rowlandson: Resurrection Men, 18th century.  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Thomas Rowlandson: Resurrection Men, 18th century.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Royal Institution: Doctors – all over royalty like a rash

TECHNOLOGY:

Stuff Mom Never Told You: The Blog: 15 Rare Photos of Black Rosie the Riveters

Conciatore: Thévenot Continues East

DPLA: We, Robots: Robots from the 1920s to the 1990s

History Today: Mysticism and Machines

A scene from Karel Čapek's 1920 play R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots), showing three robots.

A scene from Karel Čapek’s 1920 play R.U.R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots), showing three robots.

Democrat & Chronicle: George Eastman House collection honored

Yovisto: Henry Ford and the Ford Motor Company

Ptak Science Books: Empty and Missing Things9: the Skeleton of the Statue of Liberty

Tycho’s Nose: The violent history of train-wreck publicity

Conciatore: Weights and Measures

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 22 – The standard metre and kilogram

davidsharp.com: Manchester Baby Simulator

BBC: Remembering the US’s first female rocket scientist

Mary Sherman Morgan, c. 1950s Source: Wikimedia Commons

Mary Sherman Morgan, c. 1950s
Source: Wikimedia Commons

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Capitalism’s Cradle: How Microfinance helped farmers adjust to the Great Irish Famine

The Public Domain Review: Nature Through Microscope and Camera (1909)

14803701720_8eb9cee8de_o

Homunculus: Christiaan Huygens – the first astrobiologist?

Embryo Project: Charles Robert Cantor (1942– )

The Friends of Charles Darwin: The great Darwin fossil hunt

Embryo Project: Francois Jacob (1920–2013)

Paige Fossil History: The Rickety Cossack: A Great Title & Moment in History

The Public Domain Review: A Bestiary of Sir Thomas Browne

Look and Learn: The young naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace had three escapes from death

Alfred Russel Wallace watched the Helen go down consumed by fire

Alfred Russel Wallace watched the Helen go down consumed by fire

The History Girls: Dr Merryweather’s Un-Merry Weather

Natural History Apostilles: Lamarckism in Naval Timber and Arboriculture (Matthew 1831)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 20 June – Frederick Gowland Hopkins

Ptak Science Books: An Annotated Poetry of Clouds

British Library: Science Blog: Fishing from the Earliest Times: A very brief history

Wonders & Marvels: Cabinet of Curiosities: Ancient Animal Tales

Forbes: Without a Doubt, Kennewick Man Was Native American, Anthropologists Say

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 17 – William Crookes

Illustration portrait of William Crookes in 1875 (age 43). Credit: Popular Science Monthly Volume 10, 1876.

Illustration portrait of William Crookes in 1875 (age 43). Credit: Popular Science Monthly Volume 10, 1876.

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 19 – Friedrich Wilhelm Adam Sertürner

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The many-headed monster: What is history for: Doing history/thinking historically

Medicine, ancient and modern: Thoughts on Galen and Pseudo-Galenic Texts

Indian science.org: Science and Social Movements in India

The Royal Society: Email newsletters

New York Times: Naomi Oreskes, a Lightning Rod in a Changing Climate

Naomi Oreskes in her office at Harvard University's Science Center. She has been praised by climatologists for communicating climate science to the public. Kayana Szymczak for The New York Times

Naomi Oreskes in her office at Harvard University’s Science Center. She has been praised by climatologists for communicating climate science to the public.
Kayana Szymczak for The New York Times

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Scholars Talk Writing: Anthony Grafton

io9: Incredible Pictures of Early Science Labs

Capitalism’s Cradle: Can Policy boost Innovation? Lessons from 18th Century Scotland’s Linen Industry

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Three strikes and you’re out!

Indian Journal of History of Science: Why Did Scientific Renaissance Take Place in Europe And Not In Indian (pdf)

The Atlantic: Who’s Afraid of the Metric System?

The Telegraph: In pictures: 10 trailblazing British women in science and maths

Dame June Goodall Photo: AP

Dame June Goodall
Photo: AP

The Recipes Project: Exploring CPP 10a214: The Place of Devotion

The H-Word: The Geneva Protocol at 90: An Anchor for Arms Control?

Pay Scale: STEM is Important, But Let’s Not Forget About the Humanities

Conciatore: Old Post Road

Nature: Books and Art

HSHS: BJHS Preview: Issue 2, 2015

Science & Religion: Exploring The Spectrum

BBC: The women whom science forgot

Dublin Science Gallery: Fail Better

Alembic Rare Books: Watermarks & Foolscaps: Exploring the History of Paper Production

storify: Objects in Motion: Materiality in Transition

ESOTERIC:

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Interviews Michael Gordin

Babelia: La exploración de la mirada

The Public Domain Review: A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future (1894)

Notches: The Origins of Sex: An Interview With Faramerz Dabhoiwala

origins-of-sex-cover

Metascience: What’s so great about Feyerabend? Against Method, forty years on (oa)

Popular Science: The New Wild

Reviews in History: The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History

WSJ: They Really Do Speak Another Language

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Thomas Bartholin: The Anatomy House in Copenhagen

index

BSHS: He is no loss: Robert McCormick and the voyage of HMS Beagle

JISC: Scientific Controversies: A Socio-Historical Perspective on the Advancement of Science

Historiens de la santé: Stress in Post-war Britain. 1945–1985

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Strange Remains: The ‘Rembrants of anatomical preparation’ who turned skeletons into art

Engraving of a tableau by Frederik Ruysch (1744) Etching with engraving Image credit: . National Library of Medicine.

Engraving of a tableau by Frederik Ruysch (1744) Etching with engraving Image credit: . National Library of Medicine.

The Guardian: The impossible world of MC Escher

RCS: Surgeons at Work: The Art of the Operation Hunterian Museum 31 March–19 September

Modern Art Oxford: Lynn Hershman Leeson: Origins of the Species 29 May–9 August 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

National Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the Gielgud Theatre

Theatre Royal Haymarket: The Elephant Man

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Slate: Watch the Evolution of Movie Dinosaurs From 1914 through Today: (They’ve Definitely Improved.)

Popular Science: A Brief History of Science Gone Mad:

The Fly-Human Hybrid James Vaughan/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The Fly-Human Hybrid
James Vaughan/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

UCL: Grant Museum of Zoology: Strange Creatures: The art of unknown animals: Closes 27 June 2015

Science Museum: Revelations: Experiments in Photography 20 February–13 September 2015

io9: An Animated Musical About Lilian Todd, First Woman to Design an Airplane

Dudley News: Groundbreaking map celebrates its 200th birthday at Dudley Museum display

CHF: The Museum at CHF

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Sex and the City Dates see website

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: “Path-ologies”: A capital’s contagious geography

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Evolution of Mammals 27 June 2015

Bath Chronicle: Brought to Light: the 18th Century Book Explosion Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution 2 May–5September

Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution: Bath and the Nile Explorers Closes 27 June 2015

Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution: Online-Exhibition: Mr. Darwin’s Fishes

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

BBC: A Barber-Surgeon Attending to a Man’s Forehead

(c) Wellcome Library; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

(c) Wellcome Library; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: Catching History’s Criminals: The Forensics Story

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Always/Never: The Quest for Safety, Control, and Survivability – Part 1

TED: Steve Silberman: The forgotten history of autism

British Library: Voices of Science

Silicon Republic: Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell: Well-behaved women rarely make history

Museo Galileo: Mutimedia Helioscope

RADIO:

BBC: Science Stories

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Birkbeck Cinema: The Hidden Persuaders Project and the Birkbeck Institute: Workshop: Brainwash: History, Cinema and the Psy Professions 3-4 July 2015

Educación Científica, Educación Humanística: CfP: Llamada de la participación

Advances in the History of Psychology: CfP: Contribute to the Psychologist “Looking Back” Column!

University of Boulder: CHPS: 31st Boulder Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science: Emergence: 16-18 October 2015

University of Wuppertal: CfP: Before Montucla: Historiography of Science in the Early Modern Period 3-4 March 2015

UCL: Workshop: Psychoanalytic Filiations: Mapping the Psychoanalytic Movement 18 July 2015

Center for Khmer Studies, Siem Reap, Cambodia: CfP: 6th International Conference on The History of Medicine in Southeast Asia (HOMSEA 2016) 13–15 January 2016

German Chemical Society: Paul Bunge Prize 2016: History of Scientific Instruments: Call for Entries

Notches: CfP: Histories of Asian/Asian American Sexualities

Framing the Face: CfP: Workshop: Friends Meeting House, Euston Road London: 28 November 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Science Museum: Research Fellow History of British nuclear power in international context

Centre for History at Sciences Po Paris: Assistant Professor in Environmental History

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #51

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #51

Monday 15 June 2015

EDITORIAL:

 Another seven days have rushed past leaving in their wake a plethora of article and blog posts on the histories of science, technology and medicine scattered across the width and breadth of cyberspace, which we have scooped up and present here for your perusal and delectation in the fifty-first edition of your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette. I love Librarians Historians in general and #histSTM historians in particular would be lost and unable to carry out their research work without the active assistance of a world wide army of archivists and librarians those never tiring workers at the coalface of written records. Archivists and librarians collect, collate, catalogue and make available for the historical researcher all forms of written documents and records and without their work the life of the historians would be immeasurably harder and more strewn with strife than it already is. This being the case this edition of Whewell’s Gazette is humbly dedicated to all the archivists and librarians past, present and future who serve the historian in so many ways. Library Card     Quotes of the week:

Dance like there’s nobody watching, Love like you’ll never be hurt, Sing like there’s nobody listening, Mark all as read. – Ed Yong (@edyong209)

“I always have a quotation for everything – it saves original thinking.” – Dorothy L. Sayers

“History of science makes scientific stories richer and more interesting” – Deborah Blum

“Science is nothing but perception”. – Plato

“The mind was dreaming. The world was its dream.” – Jorge Luis Borges

“All my friends who weren’t at Bletchley think that The Imitation Game is wonderful, and all my friends who were think it’s rubbish” – Pamela Rose (Bletchley Girl)

“Leo Szilard never spelled his name Leó Szilárd after he left Hungary. Respect his choice. Avoid bad memes”. – Gene Dannen

“In the bathtub of history the truth is harder to hold than the soap, and much more difficult to find.” – Terry Pratchett

“There is, however, one trifling point on which I differ; viz. that I believe the high value of well-bred males is due to their transmitting their good qualities to a far greater number of offspring than can the female.” – Charles Darwin h/t @KeesJanSchilt

“The man who doesn’t read good books has no advantage over the man who can’t read them.”– Mark Twain

“Nobel Prizes don’t make one wise, but they’re a fine platform from wh. to reveal who you are” – Thomas Levenson (@TomLevenson)

“To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead” – Thomas Paine

“It is useful to the busy mind of man to be cautious in arguing about things exceeding its comprehension”. – John Locke

“Definition of a college professor: someone who talks in other people’s sleep”. – W H Auden

“Authority without wisdom is like a heavy axe without an edge, fitter to bruise than polish. Meditations Divine and Moral” ― Anne Bradstreet h/t @roos_annamarie

“Solitude is a sublime mistress, but an intolerable wife.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf) Goethe described himself in old age as ‘I appear to myself more and more historical’. h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf)

“CBT (Cognitive Beaverial Therapy) is…” (student spelling error in exam) h/t meta4RN Beaver PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 8–Giovanni Domenico Cassini

Corpus Newtonicum: Folding Pages (Scenes from the Library of Isaac Newton, Part 2)

Once upon a dog-ear (now folded back, but still clearly visible on both sides of the page).

Once upon a dog-ear (now folded back, but still clearly visible on both sides of the page).

The Conversation: Our latest scientific research partner was a medieval bishop

Brain Pickings: The Beauty of Uncertainty: How Heisenberg Invented Quantum Mechanics, Told in Jazz

Mental Floss: The Life and Times of Isaac Newton’s Apple Tree infographic-final-full ccat.sas.upenn.edu: Copernicus in China or, Good Intentions Gone Astray

Graham Farmelo: Talking Bohr and the Bomb in Copenhagen

Dannen.com: The Franck Report, June 11, 1945

The Independent: Albert Einstein’s private letters go up for sale at California auction

Restricted Data The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: What remains of the Manhattan Project

The Guardian: Five reasons we should celebrate Albert Einstein

Clerk Maxwell Foundation: James Clerk Maxwell: Maker of Waves

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 13 – Thomas Young

Standard Daily: Albert Einstein’s Letter explaining the link between Relativity Theory and Japan’s Atomic Bombing sold for $62,500

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Londonist: Compare Detailed Historic Maps With Today’s London

British Library: Online Gallery: Anglo-saxon Mappa Mundi

Anglo Saxon Mappa Mundi Cotton MS Tiberius B.V., 56v Copyright © The British Library Board

Anglo Saxon Mappa Mundi
Cotton MS Tiberius B.V., 56v
Copyright © The British Library Board

British Library: Maps and views blog: A Bohemian rhapsody*?

Library of Congress: World War II Military Situation Maps

JAAVSO Volume 43, 2015: Margaret Harwood and the Maria Mitchell Observatory

Progressive Geographies: Notes towards a critical history of cartography, part 1

Progressive Geographies: #MAPS/// Manifesto for an Alternative Cartography

The Afternoon Map: The First Printed Ottoman Map of Palestine, 1804

The Public Domain Review: The Travels of Ludovico di Varthema (1863)

UKPN Social Science: Coming in from the cold: nineteenth-century exploration and science in the Canadian Arctic

Yovisto: Harry Johnston and the “Scramble for Africa”

Christie’s The Art People: Catalogue: Valuable Books and Manuscripts Including Cartography

Yale News: Hidden secrets of Yale’s 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

Middle East Eye: The Chinese through Abbasid eyes

Halley’s Log: Able seaman wanted!

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Wonders & Marvels: Vesalius – The Ultimate Wedding Present?

Migraine Histories: On Migraines and the Eyes

Regional Medical Humanities: A Thirst for Knowledge

Circulating Now: Where to Find History of Medicine Collections

Atlas Obscura: Would You Like Some Heroin For Your Cough?

American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record, v.36, no. 6 March 25, 1900

American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record, v.36, no. 6 March 25, 1900

Ptak Science Books: Newspapers and Music in Bedlamia, 1850’s

Nursing Clio: A Short History of Homeopathy: From Hahnemann to Whole Foods

Over Newser: Madness Stones to New Age Medicine: A History of Drilling Holes in our Heads

The Recipes Project: In vino sanitas

Lapham’s Quarterly: Rogue Wounds

Early Modern Medicine: Inconvenient Incontinence

Diseases of Modern Life: Workshop Report: Working with 19th-Century Medical and Health Reports

Magic and Medicine: The Casebook Project

The Public Domain Review: Practical Hydrotherapy (1909) 18484496979_98845645b3_c The Public Domain Review: When Chocolate was Medicine: Colmenero, Wadsworth and Dufour

Notches: Astrological Birth Control: Fertility Awareness and the Politics of Non-Hormonal Contraception

Motherboard: A History of the Ice Pick Lobotomy

Medicine, ancient and modern: Thoughts on Galen and Pseudo-Galenic texts

storify: Medical Monopoly: Intellectual Property Rights and the Origins of the Modern Pharmaceutical Industry

Medievalist.net: Medieval Images of the Body

The 9th century scholar Hunayn ibn Ishaq wrote extensively about ophthalmology. This drawing of the eye is based on his works.

The 9th century scholar Hunayn ibn Ishaq wrote extensively about ophthalmology. This drawing of the eye is based on his works.

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 14 June – Karl Landsteiner

TECHNOLOGY:

Irish Examiner: UN marks impact of George Boole

Yovisto: John Smeaton – the Father of Civil Engineering

Smithsonian.com: How Pyrex Reinvented Glass For a New Age

NASA: Robert Goddard: A Man and His Rocket

History Today: Automata in Myth and Science

The mechanical duck, constructed by Jacques de Vaucanson (1709-1782), inventor of silk-weaving machinery. - See more at: http://www.historytoday.com/john-cohen/automata-myth-and-science#sthash.n0bM8N12.dpuf

The mechanical duck, constructed by Jacques de Vaucanson (1709-1782), inventor of silk-weaving machinery. – See more at: http://www.historytoday.com/john-cohen/automata-myth-and-science#sthash.n0bM8N12.dpuf

Ptak Science Books: The Telephone-Wife (Lonely No More), 1925

The Guardian: The secret history of 19th century cyclists

The Wall Street Journal: The Enduring Genius of the Ballpoint Pen

Ptak Science Books: The Proposed Balloon Car of 1895

Conciatore: Neri in Pisa

Conciatore: Travels To The East

Wales On Line: Napoleon’s telescope found in cellar of Welsh country house

Daily Post: Napoleon’s spyglass found at Plas Neydd on Anglesey

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 11 Carl von Linde

Ptak Science Books: A Remarkably- and Completely-Disappeared Invention from 1890

Gizmodo: How This Revolutionary Industrial Glass Made Its Way Into Your Kitchen

Scientific American: Inventions: 70 Years That Changed the World, 1845–1915

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Stir-fried Science: An evolutionary excursion 

UCL: Museums and Collections Blog: Specimen of the Week 191: Rhaphorhynchus wing cast

Embryo Project: Francis Harry Compton Crick (1916–2004)

The Conversation: Revealed: the great geologist behind the Origin of Species

Embryo Project: Eric Wieschaus (1947– )

Sotheby’s: Darwin Charles Autograph Letter [1877]

Forbes: This 1783 Volcanic Eruption Changed The Course of History

Embryo Project: Patrick Christopher Steptoe (1913–1988)

European Geosciences Union: Floods as war weapons – Humans caused a third of floods in past 500 years in SW Netherlands

Data is Nature: ‘You Really Do Not See a Plant Until You Draw it’ – Botanical Wall Charts at the Academic Heritage Foundation

Bladstanden – A.A.Van Voorn

Bladstanden – A.A.Van Voorn

I am Safari: Life on the Forest Floor #1 – Wallace’s legacy

Quartz: To revolutionize biology, Charles Darwin got inspiration from the science of rocks

James C Ungureanu: Darwin and the Divine Programmer

Laelaps: A Dinosaur Reading List for Everyone

Yovisto: The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau

The Guardian: The unseen women scientists behind Tim Hunt’s Nobel Prize

Natural History Apostilles: A.P. De Candolle’s anticipation of natural selection (1820)

Niche: #EnvHist Worth Reading: May 2015

CHEMISTRY:

Homunculus: Set for chemistry: a longer view

A chemical manual from c.1894, in which the link to stage magic is clear. (Harry Price Library, UCL)

A chemical manual from c.1894, in which the link to stage magic is clear. (Harry Price Library, UCL)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Research Resources

The Chronicle of Higher Education: The Attack on Truth

imgur: The History of Science Fiction (created as an entry to a science mapping exhibit at Indiana University)

dataphys.org: List of Physical Visualizations

SciLogs: No, Writing Intelligibly Is Not ‘Dumbing It Down’

National Museums of Scotland: Delving into the past for International Archives Day 2015

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland in 1932.

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland in 1932.

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland today. Image © Andrew Lee.

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland today. Image © Andrew Lee.

James B Sumner: Sites and resources on history and science communications

The Science and Entertainment Lab: Stories About Science: Symposium Round-up

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Announcing the 2015–2016 Lemelson Center Fellows

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Creating a holy cow

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Now We Are Six

Pooh Sticks E. H. Shepard

Pooh Sticks E. H. Shepard

academia.edu: Curiosity, Horror and Freedom in the Wunderkammer

The Irish News: Pioneer of science journalism Mary Mulvihill dies aged 55

William & Mary: Whodunit: What learned hand wrote all over Isaac Newton’s masterpiece?

Leaping Robot: Worldly Devils

History NASA: The Impact of Science on Society – James Burke – Jules Bergman – Isaac Asimov

British Society for the History of Mathematics: New Website

HNN: Why Historians Should Use Social Science Insights When Writing History

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: We were Trojans

Ptak Science Books: Reading Symbolism in Raymond Lull’s Portrait

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

Independent.ie: Magic, myth and secrecy – WB Yeats and the occult

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: Life’s Greatest Secret: The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code   9781781251409 THE: Birds and Frogs: Selected Papers, 1990–2014, by Freeman Dyson

The Guardian: A Natural History of English Gardening by Mark Laird review – gorgeous and diverse

The Guardian: Agents of Empire by Noel Malcolm review – a dazzling history of the 16th-century Mediterranean

NEW BOOKS:

A Canadian Treasury of Medical History: Champagne and Strawberries to Celebrate New Books in Canuk HM and HN

Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine: Human Gene Mapping Workshops c.1973–c.1991 Free Download!

Amazon: The Cybernetic Moment: Or Why We Call Out Age The Information Age

Historiens de la santé: August Weismann: Development, Heredity, and Evolution 9780674736894-lg University of Chicago Press: How Our Days Became Numbered

Harvard University Press: Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

ART: The Paris Review: True Blue

Full title: The Virgin in Prayer Artist: Sassoferrato Date made: 1640-50 Source: http://www.nationalgalleryimages.co.uk/ Contact: picture.library@nationalgallery.co.uk Copyright © The National Gallery, London

Full title: The Virgin in Prayer
Artist: Sassoferrato
Date made: 1640-50
Source: http://www.nationalgalleryimages.co.uk/
Contact: picture.library@nationalgallery.co.uk
Copyright © The National Gallery, London

University of Durham: Workshop: ‘Visual Culture in Medical Humanities’ 18 June 2015

National Museum of Scotland: Photography: A Victorian Sensation 19 June–22 November 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Arts Theatre: The Waiting Room Closes 19 June 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

THE: Science inspired by fiction

The Guardian: Rare footage surfaces of Amelia Earhart shortly before she vanished

Royal Society: Last Chance: Philosophical Transactions: 350 years of publishing Closes 23 June 2015

National Library of Scotland: Last Chance: The Forth Bridge: Building an icon Closes 21 June 2015

Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy Evenings

MHS Oxford: Family Friendly: Beam me up, Harry! Discover the story of Harry Moseley

Royal College of Physicians: ‘This calamitous year’: plague, doctors and death

John Baines Tours: Wallace in the Malay Archipelago 8-25 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

BBC: Sir William Crookes (17 June 1832–4 April 1919) by Charles Albert Ludovici

(c) National Portrait Gallery, London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

(c) National Portrait Gallery, London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

ISSUU.com: Actes D’hisòria De La Ciència I De La Tècnica: Volume 7 2014: Science on Television

BBC: Catching History’s Criminals: The Forensics Story

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS: Youtube: National Geographic: From Patents to Profits – American Genius

Youtube: The Royal Institute Channel

HUMLab: HUMlab Seminars Video Archive

Strata Smith: The Man & The Map

V&A: Printing and Binding a Handmade Book

Museo Galileo: Galileo’s disciples

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories

PODCASTS:

ODNB: Roy Porter Historian

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Manchester: Symposium: The university reimagined: past and Present 16 September 2015

LMU: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society: Workshop: Back to a Sustainable Future: Visions of Sustainability in the History of Design 19 June 2015

University of Aarhus: Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice (SPSP) Fifth Biennial Conference 24-26 June 2015

UCL: Seminar: History of the Psychological Disciplines Series 16 June 2015

Galileo Teacher Training Program: Eratosthenes Experiment 15-17 June 2015 Eratosthenes-June-2015-banner University of Manchester: How do we tell the history of science? 19 June 2015

Rijks Museum: Conference Art and Science in the Early Modern Low Countries 17-18 September 2015

HSTM Network Ireland: Conference: Food as Medicine 9-10 October 2015

University of Wuppertal: Workshop: Before Montucla: Historiography of Science in the Early Modern Era 3–4 March 2016

edtechteacher: Summer Workshop: Teaching History with Technology 23–24 July 2015

Ant Spider Bee: CfP: A Campfire Conversation About Small Data and Big Stories, ASEH 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

The Programming Historian: Training Programme: Programming Historian Live, British Library 19 October 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

National Science Foundation: NSF Historian

ETH Zurich: Professor of History of Exact Sciences

Universitat de València: Programa de Doctorado en Estudios Históricos y Sociales sobre Ciencia, Medicina y Comunicación Científica

Universitat de València: Máster Universitario en Historia de la Ciencia y Comunicación Cientifica

University of Sussex: Research Fellow in Digital Humanities/Digital History (Fixed Term)

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #50

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #50

Monday 08 June 2015

EDITORIAL:

Somewhat delayed, you can now admire, read, consume, criticise, use, abuse or simple ignore the fiftieth edition of the weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine, which our special team of search owls could dig up over seven days in the Internet, to computer screen all over the world.

The fiftieth edition! When I decided to lay On Giants’ Shoulders the monthly history of science blog carnival to rest and to start this weekly links list in its place, I naively thought that in doing so I would reduce my workload. Each edition being only a quarter of a month would only require a quarter of the effort, right? Unfortunately my own fervour, tendency to perfection and nerd desire for completeness have meant that the Gazette has grown into monster of undreamed of dimensions, consuming far more of my time and energy than On Giants’ Shoulders ever did.

The above should not be seen in anyway as a complaint. Perverse as I am, I enjoy the work and as a good friend of mine used to say, it keeps me off the streets and stops me beating up old ladies. Although I’m now approaching the period of life where the old ladies are more likely to beat me up rather than the other way around.

As long as I have a working computer and the necessary health to continue I see no reason why Whewell’s Gazette shouldn’t continue to collate and present the Internet’s contributions to #histSTM to those eager to consume them. The next two weeks will see the nominal year completed with the fifty-first and fifty-second editions then there will be a brief hiatus, as I shall be off on an adventure more about which more will be revealed on The Renaissance Mathematicus in due time.

@Grammarly

Quotes of the week:

“They must often change, who would be constant in happiness or wisdom”. – Confucius

“I don’t know why we are here, but I’m pretty sure that it is not in order to enjoy ourselves”. – Wittgenstein

“Watch out for the fellow who talks about putting things in order! [That] always means getting other people under your control”. – Diderot

“When scholars work alone, mistakes are made in private. When scholars collaborate, mistakes are made in public, and everyone learns”. – Tom Scheinfeldt (@foundhistory)

“For what could be more beautiful than the heavens which contain all beautiful things?” – Nicolaus Copernicus

Them “You’re too angry. You’ll catch more flies with honey…”

Me “Why the fuck would I want to catch flies.” – @Evie_Eliot

“’Historians’ who put ideology ahead of actual research should simply shut up” – Samuel McLean (@Canadian_Errant)

History doesn’t have to be old. History starts only a few hours ago.” – ESA Space History

History is that certainty produced at the point where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation.” – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

“People remember stories, not facts. Scientists need to use stories or storytellers will (are) make(ing) bad science stick” – Mhari Stewart (@ScienceArtReach)

“Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.” – Mark Twain

“To talk is the best way not to speak about the essential” – Arjen Dijksmam (@materion)

“Before I begin speaking, there is something I’d like to say.” – Raymond Smullyan

“My daughter just asked why we say “hang up” the phone and now I feel 90”. – Jason English (@EnglishJason)

“Thou lookest like the backe syde of my barrell of small beere!” – Insult 1610 h/t Jonathan Healey (@SocialHistoryOx)

“One 17th century newspaper was described by its critics as ‘an increaser of Bum-fodder’.” – Jonathan Healey (@SocialHistoryOx)

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Ptak Science Books: Anti-Gravity Anti-Gravitas

Image source:  My Ear Trumpet via Ptak Science Books

Image source: My Ear Trumpet via Ptak Science Books

arXiv.org: Galileo in early modern Denmark, 1600–1650

Slate: Genius move: Max Planck, the unlikely founder of quantum physics, knew how to change his mind.

Popular Science: Here’s Where Astronomers Discovered We Are All Star Stuff

Big Island Now: Caltech To Shut Down Observatory in September

Phys.org: History of the NASA Skylab, America’s first space station

astro.uni.edu: Ptolemaic System Simulator

AIP: Werner Heisenberg on the scientific style of Bohr and others

Yovisto: Carnot and Thermodynamics

Epoch Times: Music and Physics: The Connections Aren’t Trivial

tuson.com: Astronomer Bart Bok studied the Milky Way

The Hindu: The monsoon watchers

The astronomical observatory in Thiruvananthapuram is one of the oldest in the India. Photo: Anand Narayanan

The astronomical observatory in Thiruvananthapuram is one of the oldest in the India. Photo: Anand Narayanan

The Jerusalem Post: Hebrew University unveils new statue of Albert Einstein on Jerusalem campus

arXiv.org: The Marquise du Chatelet: A Controversial Woman of Science

Ptak Science Books: Isaac Newton, Alpha and Omega

Pacific Standard: Without Christianity, What Year Would It Be?

Forbes: Twenty Years of Bose-Einstein Condensation

Ptak Science Books: Early “Image” of Hiroshima – as a Cartoon

Brunellesci: Operations of the Geometric and Military Compass of Galileo Galilei (pdf)

Discover: A History of General Relativity

AZ Daily Sun.com: The View from Mars Hill: The discovery of Charon has Flagstaff roots

Teylers Museum: Fluroscoop naar Becquerel, J. Duboscq

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

arXive.org: The search for longitude: Preliminary insights from a 17th Century Dutch perspective

Mapping London: Hexagonal Map of London

Halley’s Log: Return to sea

The Bodleian’s Map Room Blog: Cartoon Maps

European Revue, Kill that Eagle, Published by Geographia in 1914 and drawn by J. Amshewitz. C1 (407)

European Revue, Kill that Eagle, Published by Geographia in 1914 and drawn by J. Amshewitz. C1 (407)

Yovisto: Knud Rasmussen – the Father of Eskimonology

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: “Secta Empírica y Dogmáticos Racionales”: medicine and the ESD in early modern Spain

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Bladder-Stone Operation: A Most Unusual Composition

New York Times: Medicine’s Hidden Roots in an Ancient Manuscript

Forbes: Castration Affected Skeleton of Famous Opera Singer Farinelli, Archaeologists Say

Mosaic: How to mend a broken heart

Discover: Researchers’ Quest for an Artificial Heart

Mad Art Lab: Lymph, There It Is: Florence Sabin, Pioneer Woman of Medical Research (Women in Science 39)

FlorenceSabin

NYAM: An Eye for Conservation: William Clift, Fenwick Beekman, and John Hunter

Northumberland Archives: Mary Ann Fulcher – School Headmistress

Medievalist.net: What’s Wrong with Early Medieval Medicine?

Inside the Science Museum: A mystery object

Advances in the History of Psychology: Remembering Oak Ridge: A Digital Exhibit

A Canadian Treasury of Medical History

The Atlantic: The Tampon: A History

The Walrus: Archaic instruments from the attic of Montreal’s Royal Victoria Hospital

Wellcome Collection: Exhibitions: Treating yourself

TECHNOLOGY:

Inside The Science Museum: Wonderful Things: Ancient Egyptian Curling Tongs

The Public Domain Review: The Forth Bridge: Building an Icon

Detail from “Plans and sections for a bridge of chains proposed to be thrown over the Frith of Forth at Queensferry”, James Anderson, 1818.

Detail from “Plans and sections for a bridge of chains proposed to be thrown over the Frith of Forth at Queensferry”, James Anderson, 1818.

Tylers Museum: Instrumentzaal: Set telefoons, naar Bell, door Maldant & Cie, 1880

Nature: Ancient humans brought tools to Europe

Louis Prang and Chromolithography: Lithographer

Today’s Document: Patent Drawing for T. Newman’s Poison Warning Bottle 6/2/1908

The Public Domain Review: The Nightwalker and the Nocturnal Picaresque

Ptak Science Books: Socialism, Civilization, and Fertilizer…and Nazis (1945)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A twelve-year flash of genius

James Eckford Lauder: James Watt and the Steam Engine: the Dawn of the Nineteenth Century, 1855

James Eckford Lauder: James Watt and the Steam Engine: the Dawn of the Nineteenth Century, 1855

Inside the Science Museum: Revealing the invisible

The Enlightened Economist: Inventors and manufacturers, and their economics

AEON: Losing the thread

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

APP: In memoriam: Zofia Kielan-Jaworowska (1925–2015)

Geschichte der Geologie: Die Geburt and der Tod von Kontinente

Amgueddfa Blog: Wallace Goes West…

Embryo Project: Charles Benedict Davenport (1866–1944)

Evolution News: Darwin, Design, and Phototropism

Fossil History: On Being Remembered: Huxley, Busk, & Scientific Friendship

1876nygraphicaug14

Thinking Like a Mountain: Understanding & Altering the Climate: Historical Perspectives

USGS: The Early History of Seismology (to 1900)

Yovisto: James Hutton – the Father of Modern Geology

Popular Science: The Church of George Church

Embryo Project: Petr Alekseevich Kropotkin (1842–1921)

Trowelblazers: Gertrude Caton Thompson

Caton-Thompson_Gertrude_1_full-580x783

Science Comma: CHOTS Away! At Down House

The Alfred Russel Wallace Correspondence Project: Annual report on work of the project 14 May 2014–13 May 2015

National Geographic: Read Francis Crick’s $6 Million Letter to Son describing DNA

The Royal Society: The Repository: Nature’s pins and needles

BHL: World Oceans Day: Ernst Haeckel and Art Forms in Nature

Ocean Portal: Art Forms in Nature: Marine Species From Ernst Haeckel

The siphonophores are an order of marine animals in the phylum Cnidaria (the same phylum containing jellyfish).  Credit: Ernst Haeckel, Kunstformen der Natur / Biodiversity Heritage Library

The siphonophores are an order of marine animals in the phylum Cnidaria (the same phylum containing jellyfish).
Credit: Ernst Haeckel, Kunstformen der Natur / Biodiversity Heritage Library

Braintree & Witham Times: Free new exhibition at Chelmsford Museum explores the exotic collections of Alfred Russel Wallace

Trowelblazers: Nieves López Martínez

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Richard Smalley – the Father of Nanotechnology

Buckminsterfullerene C60

Buckminsterfullerene C60

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ptak Science Books: An Alphabet of Ages of Scientific Terms

Newsweek: Frankenstein Has Been Given a Bad Rap – And Science Suffers

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Huntingdon Library

NYAM: Recommended Resources

Harvard Gazette: ‘a completely new life was beckoning’: Beyond the reach of monsters, Gerald Holten found infinite possibilities

Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Professor of the History of Science, Emeritus Gerald Holton is pictured in his Cambridge home. He first arrived at Harvard in 1943. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Professor of the History of Science, Emeritus Gerald Holton is pictured in his Cambridge home. He first arrived at Harvard in 1943. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

AIP: New Oral Histories Website

The Partially Examined Life: Science, Technology and Society IV: Paul Feyerabend

In the Middle: How Do We Write? Dysfunctional Academic Writing

Reflections: Blog of the STS Department at the University of Vienna: The Science of Science Maps

Connected Histories: Digital Resources

The Guardian: Readers suggest the 10 best unsung female scientists

Informs: History and Traditions

How do we tell the history of science?

LSE: The Academic Book of the Future: exploring academic practices and expectations for the monograph

Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: Setting “Objects” in Motion

History Womble: Toe-dipping in the mainstream

Popular Science: My Temple, My Mountain

Enviromental History: Volume 20 Issue 3 July 2015 Table of Contents

Open Culture: The History of Philosophy, from 600 B.C.E. to 1935, Visualized in Two Massive, 44-Foot High Diagrams

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Agnolo della Casa

Conciatore: Dear Friends

Conciatore: Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750) Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Acq. nr. M.68-1962

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)
Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
Acq. nr. M.68-1962

Astrolabes and Stuff: Drawing up a medieval horoscope

Beyond the Reading Room: Another Book from the Library of Isaac Newton

Corpus Newtonicum: The world has heeded my plea! Another Newton book found

academia.edu: Dis/unity of Knowledge: Models for the Study of Modern Esotericism and Science

BOOK REVIEWS:

National Geographic: In Age of Science, Is Religion ‘Harmful Superstition’?

Scientific American Blogs: Cross–Check: Book by Biologist Jerry Coyne Goes Too Far Denouncing Religion, Defending Science

Wall Street Journal: Preaching to the Converted

THE: Radium and the Secret of Life, by Luis A. Campos

Radium-and-the-secret-of-life-by-Luis-Campos

St John’s History Department: Book Review: Laura J. Snyder Eye of the Beholder

Termessos: The Born Family in Göttingen and Beyond

Viktor Weisskopf, Maria Göppert and Max Born on bicycles in Göttingen in the 1920s

Viktor Weisskopf, Maria Göppert and Max Born
on bicycles in Göttingen in the 1920s

Popular Science: Professor Povey’s Perplexing Problems

NEW BOOKS:

Ashgate: Renaissance Mad Voyages and the ‘Culture of Play, 1300–1700’ series

Historiens de la santé: When Good Drugs Go Bad: Opium, Medicine, and the Origins of Canada’s Drug Laws

51AZYyTiNHL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

ART:

Royal Museums Greenwich: Strange Creatures: The Art of Unknown Animals at the Grant Museum

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo), George Stubbs, 1772

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo), George Stubbs, 1772

The Recipes Project: Clear as Crystal: Leonardo da Vinci’s Walnut Oil

Science Museum: First operation performed using anaesthesia, 1846

Science Museum: The Rise of Anatomy, a dissection in the 14th century

Science Museum: Exhibition: Revelations: Experiments in Photography 20 March–13 September 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Theatre Royal Winchester: Matchbox Theatre in conversation with Michael Frayn (Copenhagen)

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Glasgow Science Festival: Festival of Light: Illuminating James Clerk Maxwell 13 June 2015

Glasgow Science Festival: Science on the Street 13 June 2015

Welcome Collection: Exhaustion Then and Now 11 June 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

The Surgeon Barber

DAVID TENIERS THE YOUNGER, The surgeon-barber , oil on cloth 57,15 x 73,66 cm The Chrysler Museum of Art,  Norfolk, VA. Gift Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

DAVID TENIERS THE YOUNGER, The surgeon-barber , oil on cloth 57,15 x 73,66 cm The Chrysler Museum of Art,
Norfolk, VA. Gift Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

TELEVISION:

ITV News: A long-lost microscope

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

University of Cambridge: Rebekah Higgitt – Longitude found

Torch Oxford: Aristotle on Perceiving Objects

Youtube: Robert Oppenheimer speaking at UCLA 5/14/1964

Youtube: Albert Einstein statue unveiled in Jerusalem

Ustream: Webcast: Unseen Connections – A Natural History of the Cellphone

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

De Uzeren Eeuw: Een nieuwe wereld Aflevering 10: Dubois en Lorentz

Youtube: What Range of subjects did Newton study at Cambridge?

Youtube: Information Age: The microchip that changed our world

RADIO:

cbc radio: Ideas: Science Under Siege, Part 1

cbc radio: Ideas: Science Under Siege, Part 2

BBC: Lisa Jardine on Desert Island Discs

Source: The Independent 10 June 2015 Photographer: Unknown

Source: The Independent 10 June 2015 Photographer: Unknown

PODCASTS:

History of Philosophy without any gaps: Full of Potential: Thirteenth Century Physics

Open Culture: Listen as Albert Einstein Calls for Peace and Social Justice in 1945

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Gresham College: Lecture: Babbage and Lovelace 19 January 2016

University of Notre Dame: Locating Forensic Science and Medicine. University of Notre Dame Global Gateway, London: 24-25 July 2015

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Exhibition: Specimens of Natural History: Komunitas Salihara Gallery Jakarta 15 August–15 September 2015

eä Journal of Medical Humanities & Social Studies of Science and Technology: CfP: Deadline 15 June 2015

Difficult Women Conference: CfP: Difficult Women in the Long Eighteenth Century: 1680–1830 University of York 28 November 2015

University of Umeå: Workshop: CfP: History of field research stations at Umeå University 26–27 August 2015

University of Swansea: Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies Regional Conference: Technologies of Daily Life in Ancient Greece 2–3 July 2015

University of Durham: Feyerabend 2015: Forty Years ‘Against Method’ 15–16 July

York Festival of Ideas: Talk: The Occult Roots of Modern Psychology 13 June 2015

The Hidden Persuaders Project and the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image present:

Brainwash: History, Cinema and the Psy Professions 3-4th July 2015

Discover Medical London: Study Tour: Path–ologies: A capital’s contagious geography 29 June 2015

Discover Medical London: Women and Medicine – For dates see website

The Royal Institution: Talk: The story of life – Matthew Cobb & Nick Lane 11 June 2015

Morbid Anatomy: New Conference Devoted to 19th Century Eccentric, Naturalist, Traveler and Taxidermist Charles Waterton, July 31 – August 1, West Yorkshire, England

University of Wales Trinity Saint David: Sophia Centre: Astrology as Art 27-28 June 2015

Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry: An incredibly varied spring meeting, from alchemy to Arrhenius, elixirs to electrons Clare Hall Cambridge 15 June 2015

CHF: Synthesis Lecture Series: Joseph Gabriel, “Medical Monopoly: Intellectual Property Rights and the Origins of the Modern Pharmaceutical Industry”

Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: About 18–20 June 2015

University of Kent: Conference: Science and Engineering in Cultural Context 25–26 June 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Valencia: Master in History of Science and Scientific Communication

RCN Foundation: Monica Baly Bursary for Scholarship in Nursing History

King’s College London: Research and Teaching Associate History of Science and Medicine

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #49

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #49

Monday 01 June 2015

EDITORIAL:

Although this is the forty-ninth edition of your weekly #histSTM links list this time it actually brings you some of the best in the histories of science, technology and medicine, not from the last seven days but from the last fourteen as I spent most of the last week travelling to and back from the North of England, as mentioned in the last edition, in order to attend the funeral of my elder brother. Despite this somewhat melancholic interruption we have another bumper crop of #histSTM delight for you perusal and edification.

In place of an editorial I have brought together some articles and comments about writing the history of science. To kick off we have an excellent article from Philip Ball about writing about the role of women in #histSTM.

Chemistry World: How do we solve a problem like Marie?

© Science Source/Science Photo Library

© Science Source/Science Photo Library

Illustrated by an example of how not to do it

The Guardian: The 10 best unsung female scientists

and a couple of pertinent comments picked up from Twitter

I think a fruitful direction for popular #histSTM would be re-examining our criteria for “greatness.” – Meg Rosenburg

“Women’s scientific work has been “obscured or devalued by the ideology of scientific heroism” – (Oreskes, 1996)

and an  excellent older article on the problems of hagiography in #histSTM

The Toast: On Heroic Scientists and Hagiography

The OUP blog goes as far as to ask

Is the history of science still relevant?

Two major articles tackle the problems generated by Steven Weinberg’s recent blast on the history of science

Springer Link: Whose History Is It?

Shells and Pebbles: Weinberg, Whiggism, and The World in History of Science

Which elicited this comment from Rebekah “Becky” Higgitt: “Writing the history of physics deserves to be multi-faceted”

We close with two articles on the problematic presentation of the role of catholic clergy in the history of science

The Wall Street Journal: Planets, Priests and a Persistent Myth

Crown River Media.com: Climate of change: The Catholic church’s dance with science

Quotes of the week:

“Make tea not war.” – @AlmostSenseless

“The best way to find manuscript typos is to click submit”. – @AcademicsSay

“Every time someone brings up Gödel’s incompleteness theorem in a non-math context, God makes another theorem unprovable.” – @existentialscoms

“Some people think themselves clever if one has to be clever to understand them”. – Erasmus

“If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you read the newspaper, you’re mis-informed.” ― Mark Twain

“In philosophy, if you think the answer is obvious, you haven’t understood the question”. – @keithfrankish

“Can you imagine what we could achieve if all the philosophers in the world got together?”

“Nothing?”

“Exactly!” – @ethicistforhire

“I shall assume that your silence gives consent”. – Plato

“Never laugh at the old when they offer counsel, often their words are wise.” —Hávamál

”No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.” – Albert Einstein

“How did we let “overmorrow” (meaning “the day after tomorrow”) obsolesce? It’s useful and beautiful”. – Ned Morrell

“One of the hardest and least frequently learned lessons of blogging is how to remain silent when you have nothing useful to add”. – Chad Orzel

“If at first you don’t succeed, read the instructions”. – @kellyflorentia

“Having a blog (or whatever) and making it work are two different things and that needs to be recognised!” – Richard Blakemore (@historywomble)

“I had rather be an oyster than a man, the most stupid and senseless of animals”. – George Berkeley

“The less men think, the more they talk”. – Montesquieu

“The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it”. – John Locke

“Having an open mind is not the same as having an empty head”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“No man is free who is not master of himself”. – Epictetus

“It is not irritating to be where one is. It is only irritating to think one would like to be somewhere else.” – John Cage

“Books are better than ever but there is no time for books, we must kill the internet.” – @mims

“A pencil is a magic wand that conjures whole worlds from graphite and dreams.” – @DublinSoil

Birthdays of the Fortnight:

Mary Anning born 21 May 1799

Mary Anning with her dog, Tray, painted before 1842; the Golden Cap outcrop can be seen in the background Source: Wikimedia Commons

Mary Anning with her dog, Tray, painted before 1842; the Golden Cap outcrop can be seen in the background
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Natural History Museum: Mary Anning: the unlikeliest pioneer of palaeontology

History of Geology: The historical problem for women geologists: Travel and Gear

Letters from Gondwana: Mary Anning, The Carpenter’s Daughter

Forbes: Mary Anning: From Selling Seashells To One of History’s Most Important Paleontologists

BBC: Forgotten fossil found to be new species of ichthyosaur

Letters From Gondwana: Mary Anning’s Contribution to French Paleontology

Trowelblazers: Happy Birthday TrowelBlazers! And Happy Birthday Mary Anning!

Albrecht Dürer born 21 May

The earliest painted Self-Portrait (1493) by Albrecht Dürer, oil, originally on vellum (Louvre, Paris) Source: Wikimedia Commons

The earliest painted Self-Portrait (1493) by Albrecht Dürer, oil, originally on vellum (Louvre, Paris)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Surviving Transition: Albrecht Dürer: Diary of a Journey to the Netherlands (July, 1520–July 1521)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A maths book from a painter

Geschichte der Geologie: Kunst & Geologie: Albrecht Dürers Landschaftsbilder

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

The Institute: Did You Know? Someone Else Wrote Maxwell’s Equations

True Anomalies: Exploring “Genius Day” with Annie Jump Cannon

Annie Jump Cannon Source: True Anomalies

Annie Jump Cannon
Source: True Anomalies

The Physics Mill: The Men Who Weighed Mountains

Time in Art: 1 Yemini Astrolabe

Descartes Project: Isaac Beeckman

Skulls in the Stars: 1975: The year that quantum mechanics met gravity

Royal Museums Greenwich: Spring Forward: 100 years of British Summer Time

Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage: The History of Early Low Frequency Radio Astronomy in Australia

Teylers Museum: Water hammer, 1874

Tand Online: Advances in optics in the medieval Islamic world

Science 2.0: The Culturally Subjective Nature of Good Acoustics

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Collection Online: Eclipse of the Sun

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Let’s talk about science: Van Gogh’s ‘Starry’ study

Space.com: The Father of SETI: Q6A with Astronomer Frank Drake

Starts With A Bang: Throwback Thursday: When We Changed The Laws of Gravity

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft: A solar eclipse sheds light on physics

John Gribbin Science: Why the Sky is Dark at Night

Ptak Science Books: A Not-Beautiful Confusion (1912)

Yovisto: The Life and Work of Georg von Peuerbach

AIP: Oral History Transcripts – Dr Martin Schwarzschild

Corpus Newtonicum: How to recognise a Newton library book in 60 seconds

James Musgrave’s bookplate, with the Barnsley Park shelfmark (here Case R. E.4.)

James Musgrave’s bookplate, with the Barnsley Park shelfmark (here Case R. E.4.)

AIP: Oral History Transcript – J. Robert Schrieffer

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Ptak Science Books: Zones of the Variable (Maps of the Winds, 1886)

Ptak Science Books: A Map of Currents and Seaweed, 1886

British Library: Plan of Plymouth harbour, 1693

Ptak Science Books: Ghost Trails of the Mississippi River: Harold Fisk’s Geological Map of 1944

Ménestral: Medievalists on the map (French)

Bibliothèque Numérique Patrimoine Des Ponts: Cartes et documents de CH-J. Minard

History Today: Alberto Cantino’s World Map

The Hakluyt Society Blog: The Cabot Project

Henry VII’s letter to John Morton, re William Weston, c. 1499, C82/332 piece 61 out of 74, TNA:PRO. Courtesy of The National Archives

Henry VII’s letter to John Morton, re William Weston, c. 1499, C82/332 piece 61 out of 74, TNA:PRO.
Courtesy of The National Archives

Made From History: 10 Medieval Maps of Britain

Canadian GIS & Geomatics: Collection of Early Canadian Maps (1556 to 1857)

Blink: The Compass Chronicles: A game of whispers

The New Yorker: Project Exodus: What’s behind the dream of colonizing Mars?

Awesome Archives: From Endangered Archives Project 619: Pilot project to locate and digitise endangered single-copy pencil drawn Thakbast/mouza maps in selected Bangladeshi districts

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MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Forbes: Rotten Roman Baby Teeth Blamed on Honey, Porridge

JHU Collections Web: Online Exhibition: Explore the Wall

Atlas Obscura: See These Stunning Photos of Brain Surgery’s Earliest Patients

Oxford University Press: The Perils of Peace: The Public Health Crisis in Occupied Germany: Open Access Title

Mo Costandi: Harvey Cushing: The Father of Modern Neurosurgery

The Recipes Project: Hunting for herbs: chasing migraine remedies across the centuries

Seven different types of sage (Salvia species): Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Seven different types of sage (Salvia species): Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Spitalfields Life: In Search of Culpeper’s Spitalfields

NYAM: Damien the Leper (Part 3 of 3)

Forbes: Roman Forum Yields Stash of Teeth Extracted by Ancient Dentist

Erowid Experience Vaults: Remarks on the Effects of the Mescal Button: Peyote Extract by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell 1896

The Recipes Project: Conference Report: Materia Medica on the Move, Leiden, 15-17 April 2015

Early Modern Practitioners: Working Papers

Berfrois: The Poet, the Physician and the Birth of the Modern Vampire

Circulating Now: Physiological Ads for the Modern Self

Slate: How to Tell If You’re Dead: The 19th-century doctor who wanted to create a “death thermometer”

NYAM: Did Corsets Harm Women’s Health?

The title page of “Fashion’s Slaves,” 1892.

The title page of “Fashion’s Slaves,” 1892.

The East End: The London Burkers

Slate: A 16th-Century GIF Tour of the Inside of the Brain

The Art of Saving a Life. Edward Jenner’s Smallpox Discovery

TECHNOLOGY:

Ptak Science Books: Bad Sounds Department: the V-1, 1944

Ptak Science Book: Technical Report on the V-1, 1945

Conciatore: A Deeper Accomplishment

Conciatore: The Casino di San Marco

Conciatore: Don Antonio de’ Medici

Ptak Science Books: TomorrowVision: U-235, Project Orion, and City-Sized Space Ships, 1941–1968 (+)

Nova News Now.com: Dartmouth project unearths part of Shubenacadie canal’s history

Spitalfields Life: The Principle Operations of Weaving, 1748

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ODNB: Edwin Beard Budding

Gebloggendings: Identifying ships in aerial photographs of the Crossroads Baker nuclear threat

Ptak Science Books: German Submarine Importance in Graphical Comparison, 1912

The Paris Review: A Brief History of Spacefarers

The Public Domain Review: The Emphatic Camera: Frank Norris and the Invention of Film Editing

Mental Floss: 6 More Magnificent Women in Their Flying Machines

KATHERINE STINSON

KATHERINE STINSON

Special Collections & Archives at Mizzou: The Modern Geometrical Stair Builders Guide

Telegraph of India: History of Weave – Of tapestries, hookahs and howdas

Ptak Science Books: Pause-Giving Photographs of Artillery Shell Vastness, ca. 1917

Ptak Science Books: Electro-LUXurious 3: Anti-erection “Body Wear” 1889

Conciatore: Rosichiero Glass

Conciatore: The Importance of Being Diligent

Conciatore: A Matter of Plagiarism

Ptak Science Books: WWII Aircraft Cross Sections – the Schematics Work of G.H. Davis

Inside the Science Museum: Space pioneer Alexi Leonov on the birth of the space age

Ptak Science Books: Calculating Machine Article, 1885 – Full Text

Ptak Science Books: Another Rooftop Airport/Helipad, 1945

Vox: Meet Margaret Hamilton, the badass ‘60s programmer who saved the moon landing

Margaret Hamilton in an Apollo Command Module.

Margaret Hamilton in an Apollo Command Module.

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Mental Floss: How One Woman’s Discovery Shook the Foundations of Geology

The Alfred Russel Wallace Correspondence Project: Mini Biographies of Wallace’s Correspondents

NMNH: The Plant Press: Botanical Treasures #1. Wilkes collection type specimen: holotype of Argyroxiphium macrocephalum

The first botanical treasure is the holotype of Argyroxiphium macrocephalum (US 59690).

The first botanical treasure is the holotype of Argyroxiphium macrocephalum (US 59690).

Concocting History: The curious incident of the dog and the palm tree

Genome Biology: Raymond Gosling: the man who crystallised genes

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: William King Gregory

Embryo Project: Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002)

Many Headed Monster: Women’s Work in Rural England, 1500–1700

Geschichte der Geologie: Kunst & Geologie: Eduard von Grützner – Der Mineraloge

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Oliver Perry Hay

Richard Carter: Sir Thomas Browne observes a murmuration of starlings

AMNH: Darwin Manuscript Project

Blastr: Researcher photographs Leeuwenhoek’s ‘animalcules’ after 340 Years

The Mountain Mystery: Henry Hess and the Sea’s Floor

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Things named after Wallace: Alternative Realities

Scientific American: Why Carbon Is the Best Marker for the New Human Epoch

Quartz: Lessons from Charles Darwin on working from home

Essex Chronicle: Historical specimens from across the world arrive in Chelmsford

Trowelblazers: Elizabeth Anderson Gray

Elizabeth Anderson Gray spent her entire life fossil hunting. Her collections were vital to our understanding of early life on earth. © The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London

Elizabeth Anderson Gray spent her entire life fossil hunting. Her collections were vital to our understanding of early life on earth. © The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London

The Genealogical World of Phylogenetic Networks: Naudin, Wallace and Darwin: – the tree idea

The Friends of Charles Darwin: We receive feedback

The Washington Post Whoops! A creationist museum supporter stumbled upon a major fossil find

Nature: Correspondence: The mystery of the microscope in mud

CHEMISTRY:

Othmeralia: How best to use a blow pipe

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The Royal Institution: Interactive timeline: Humphry Davy

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Angie Higgins: The Institute of Sexology

Maybe It’s Because: Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime

The Hindu Business Line: Rohit Gupta’s The Compass Chronicles

Medium.com: How to write a blogpost from your journal article

LSU Ichthyology: On Being a Natural History Curator

History Department at the University of York: Time to share some of the achievements of our department

Arms Control Association: Getting to Know Alex Wellerstein

Alex Wellerstein works at his home in Hoboken, New Jersey, on January 19. (Courtesy of Alex Wellerstein)

Alex Wellerstein works at his home in Hoboken, New Jersey, on January 19. (Courtesy of Alex Wellerstein)

Curie: History matters to the present and the future

Panacea: Achoo!!!: The Humble Sneeze

Museums Association: Nine projects given green light for £98m HLF investment

The Atlantic: Reviving the Female Cannon

The Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 12: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 6 – BETWEEN

Society for Social Studies of Science: Primer Coloquio Colombiano de Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la tecnología

Inside the Science Museum: Space pioneer Alexei Leonov heralds Cosmonauts Exhibition

Storify: Cosmonauts exhibition announcement

Edge: We Need A Modern Origin Story: A Big History

The Royal Society: The Repository: The paper chase

The #EnvHist Weekly

The Guardian: Peter Gay obituary

The Telegraph: Libraries could outlast the internet, head of British Library says

UCL Press: Lisa Jardine: Temptation in the Archives: Essays in Golden Age Dutch Culture Free Download

The H-Word: Scientific publishing: how have changes over the last 50 years affected scientists?

The #EnvHist Weekly

Hooke’s Books.com: Robert Hooke’s Books

Ejournals@Cambridge: The Collected Papers of Einstein: Princeton University Press has made the Collected Works of Albert Einstein digitally available on an Open Access site. academia.edu: When the Printer Met the Virtuoso

Physics Today: The Dayside: Kissed by a prince

The Last Word on Nothing: Storia

The Boston Globe: Atop a sacred mountain, a skirmish between pure science and religion

A galaxy discovered in 2004 was identified by combining the power of the Hubble telescope and telescopes on Mauna Kea. ESA, NASA VIA REUTERS

A galaxy discovered in 2004 was identified by combining the power of the Hubble telescope and telescopes on Mauna Kea.
ESA, NASA VIA REUTERS

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: Is this an unusual and often overlooked piece of alchemical equipment?

Here it is, in a free copy of the picture taken from the, IIRC, 16th century copy in the Ferguson collection in Glasgow University:

Here it is, in a free copy of the picture taken from the, IIRC, 16th century copy in the Ferguson collection in Glasgow University:

Alchemical Emblems, Occult Diagrams, and Memory Arts: 20 Books to get started in alchemical studies

Jonathan Saha: The Imperial Science of Hypnotic Adverts

The Champlain Society: Listening through the Séance Trumpets: A Strange History of Communications in Canada

BOOK REVIEWS:

Claes Johnson on Mathematics and Science: Tragedy of Modern Physics: Schrödinger and Einstein, or Quantum Mechanics as Dice Game?

Occam’s Corner: Water Surprise: The Water Book Reviewed

New Scientist: Case of the Rickety Cossack reveals unease about our fossil past

Science, Technology and Society: Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe’s Early Modern World

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JHI Blog: Meredith Ray, Daughters of Alchemy

New Scientist: Einstein and Schrödinger: The price of fame

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Teaching the Revolution

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Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry: Jenkin’s “Extraordinary Conditions: Culture and Experience in Mental Illness”

Science Direct: The forgotten man of DNA

The Washington Post: Behind the making of a super bomb

New Books in Biblical Studies: Tom McLeish Faith and Wisdom in Science

Science Book a Day: Kevin Orrman-Rossiter Reviews The Romantic Machine: Utopian Science and Technology after Napoleon

Science Book a Day: It Began With Babbage: The Genesis of Computer Science

JHI Blog: Long Vacations: Big Histories

New Scientist: The whole hog: Unpacking our love-hate relationship with the pig

The Catholic World Report: Galileo was Right – But So Were His Critics

Byrne’s Blog: book review: before the industrial revolution

NEW BOOKS:

The Linnean Society: The Curious Mister Catesby – Book Launch

Brepols Publishers: Analysis of Ancient and Medieval Texts and Manuscripts: Digital Approaches

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Griffin and the Dinosaur

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Profile Books: Life’s Greatest Secret

Historiens de la santé: Healing Words: The Printed Handbills of Early Modern London Quacks

ART:

World of Wallace: Exhibition Alfred Russel Wallace Collection Chelmsford Museums, 6 June – 19 July:

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: Held Exhibition, London, 30 May 2015 – 21 August

Bournemouth University: BLAST: Exhibition, Atrium Gallery, 30 May – 20 June

National Maritime Museum, Greenwich: The Art & Science of Exploration, 1768-80, Open until 26 July:

Museum of the History of Science, Oxford: Last Days: Alchemy and the Laboratory, Open until 7 June:

AreByte London: Last Days: The Microbial Verdict: You Live Until You Die, , Open until 06 June:

Florence Nightingale Museum: The Kiss of Light, Open until 23 October 2015:

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Swansea City Opera on Tour: Faust, Opera by Charles-François Gounod June 3

Harrogate Theatre, Harrogate

The Drayton Arms Theatre, London: Chamber Musical by Neil Bartram and Brian Hill The Theory of Relativity

National Theatre, London: The Hard Problem. A play by Tom Stoppard

Playing until 27 May 2015

The Guardian: Science on stage: should playwrights respect history and truth?

IEEE Spectrum: The Demo, a Musical About the Mouse

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Symetry Movie.com: Symmetry. A dance and opera film in collaboration with CERN

The Royal Society: Mendel’s Legacy. Celebrate 150 years since Mendel’s lectures

6:30 pm – 7:30 pm, June 2

Wellcome Collection: Bernard Spilsbury: Forensic Pathologist 6 pm – 7 pm, June 4

MHS Oxford: From Crystals to Atoms. How did Henry Moseley investigate atoms using x-rays and crystals? June 7

Fine Books & Collections: Waterloo and More at 36th London Map Fair 6-7 June 2015

Taylor’s World: Conference: Celebrating the achievements and legacy of Frederick Winslow Taylor 24-25 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Wellcome Library: Dr Jenner Performing His First Vaccination, 1796 Oil painting by Ernest Board

National Gallery: Joseph Wright: An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump, 1768, oil-on-canvas, 

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: Inside the Medieval Mind. Knowledge

BBC Four: The last Explorers: John Muir

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Ri Channel: Christmas Lectures 1980: Max Perutz – Haemoglobin: The breathing molecule

Torch: Leviathan and the Air Pump: Thirty Year On

Youtube: The Royal Society: Science stories – controversy

Youtube: The Trowelblazers Channel

Youtube: John von Neumann Documentary

archive.org: Librarian, The (1947)

Youtube: The Royal Society: Science Stories

Graftoniana: Conference Program and Videos

Youtube: Fossil

Youtube: “Dum docent discunt”: vernacular pedagogy in medieval astronomy

RADIO:

BBC: Aryabhata: The Boat of Intellect

BBC: Science in Action: Exploring the State of Science in India (includes section on the history of science)

PODCASTS:

University of Oxford: Centre for the Study of the Book: Podcasts

CHF: Old Brains, New Brains: The Human Mind Past and Present

Triceratops: The Perils of Imagination: Why Historians Don’t Like Counterfactuals

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal Historical Society: CfP: Making ‘Big Data’ Human: Doing History in a Digital Age – deadline 20 June 2015

BSHS: 2015: Swansea: Registration and Programme

University of Strathclyde: Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare: Health, Healthcare and Society: Environment, Markets, Lifecycle and Location: Ten Years On’ 18–19 June 2015

Oral History Society: Oral histories of Science, Technology and Medicine: Royal Holloway, University of London 10-11 June 2015

Historiens de la santé: Conférence de Marie-Claude Thifault: Le branle-bas général à Saint-Jean-de-Dieu: Expérience de la désinstitutionnalisation, 1930-1976 03 juin 2015

Royal Society: “Archival Afterlives: Life, Death, and Knowledge-Making in Early Modern Scientific and Medical Archives” 2 June 2015

H-Histsex: CfP. Migration and Sexuality

British Academy/University of Warwick Interdisciplinary Workshop: Addiction and Culture since 1800 26 June 2015

King’s College London: Programme: Collections in Use: 6 July 2015

University of Durham: Lecture: Medical Ethics in 19th-Century Colombia

Royal Institution: Lecture: Hasok Chang, “If you can spray phlogiston, is it real?” 1 June 2015

Museum Boerhaave: Onthulling ‘nieuwe’ Leeuwenhoek-microscoop 2 Juni 2015

CRASSH: Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition 18-20 June 2015

University of Michigan: CfP: International Conference Scientific Utopias in Soviet Union

University of Valencia Instituto de Historia de la Medicina y de la Ciencia López Piñero CFP: ASTRONOMY AND ASTRONAUTICS UNDER DICTATORIAL REGIMES 24–25 September 2015

American Society for Environmental History: Award Submissions

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP Deadline Extended: 2015 Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine University of Pennsylvania 16-17 October

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Edinburgh: Postdoctoral Teaching and Research Fellow – History of Medicine

University of Leeds: New round of Wellcome/LHRI Postdoctoral Fellowships

University of Kent: Material World: Three PhD Studentships

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: Centre for History in Public Health: New Research Fellow position available

University of York: History Department: Teaching Fellow in the History of Science and Medicine

University of Portsmouth: PhD Studentships

University of Aarhus: Associate Professorship in the History of Ideas (History of Science and Technology)

University of St. Andrews: Postdoctoral Researcher: Publishing the Philosophical Transactions

BSHS: Master’s Degree Bursaries

University of Leicester: AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships

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