Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #06

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #06

Monday 23 August 2015

EDITORIAL:

After a brief surgical break Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM is back bringing you all that the Internet has to offer in the histories of science, technology and medicine or at least all that we could find of it.

I entered the Internet #histsci community somewhat more than seven years ago. Five years ago one of my, by then, good #histsci colleagues, Rebekah Higgitt, announced that she would be co-leading a major research project into the activities of the British Board of Longitude in the long eighteenth century.

Over the last five years this research project carried out by the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich and Cambridge University has been incredibly active and I have got to know most of those involved through their diverse activities. These include Richard Dunn, Alexi Baker, Katy Barrett, Sophie Waring, Katherine McAlpine and Nicky Reeves. The project has finally come to an end and the results have been quite stunning. This small group of dedicated scholars have produced an amazing amount of absolutely first class history of science material.

If you don’t know it already you can spend many a happy hour reading the contributions to the project’s blog,  an exemplary use of Internet communication. The latest contribution to the blog is a farewell to the project written by Maritime Museum team co-leader Richard Dunn.

If you want to know what the participants have been doing for the last five years then go to the Board of Longitude Project: Project Outcomes Page, you will knocked out by their productivity.

This project has set standards for anybody contemplation research into a #histSTM subject and can be held up as a role model for all such researchers. We at Whewell’s Gazette wish to congratulate all those involved and wish them well in their future endeavours.

Quotes of the week:

“The only qualification for being a writer is actually writing. All else is angst and bullshit.” – Henry Rollins h/t @cultauthor

“Hellenologophobia is a fear of Greek terms”. – @weird_hist

“Yet again twttr reminds me how many scientists think that all science works the same way their sub sub field of science does”. – Justin Kiggins (@neuromusic)

“Old math teachers never die, they just lose control of their functions.” – @intmath

“autocorrect, can you please stop changing ‘scicomm’ to ‘sickroom’? thank you” – Tori Herridge (@ToriHerridge)

Shelf-righteous adj: a feeling of superiority about one’s bookshelf” – Powell’s Compendium of Readerly Terms

“Dear Apple, if I change back something you’ve autocorrected, Don’t. Autocorrect. It. Again.” – Eric Marcoullier (@bpm140)

“I’m starting a new band called Terrifying German Bibliography. Our first album will be called Intimidating Footnotes” – Kirsty Rolfe (@avoiding_bears)

“logic is like a secret society in this country. Hardly anyone knows how to use it.” –‪@Goethelover h/t @jondresner

“Ask a man his philosophy and he’ll be annoying for an hour; teach a man to do philosophy and he’ll be annoying for life”. – Keith Frankish (@keithfrankish)

“I quite realized,” said Columbus,

“That the earth was not a rhombus,

But I am a little annoyed

To find it an oblate spheroid.”

E. Bentley h/t @JohnDCook

Birthday of the Week:

Denis Papin baptised (born?) 22 August 1642

 

Denis Papin holding the plans for his steam engine. Unknown artist 1689 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Denis Papin holding the plans for his steam engine.
Unknown artist 1689
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 22 – Denis Papin

Yovisto: Denis Papin and the Pressure Cooker

Papin's steam digester 1679 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Papin’s steam digester 1679
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A household name

Jean Léopold Nicolas Frédéric (Georges) Cuvier born 23 August 1769

Georges Cuvier Portrait by François-André Vincent, 1795 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Georges Cuvier Portrait by François-André Vincent, 1795
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Embryo Project: Georges Cuvier (1769–1832)

Embryo Project: Essay: The Cuvier-Geoffroy Debate

Letters From Gondwana: Mary Anning’s Contribution to French Paleontology

Yovisto: Georges Cuvier and the Fossils

Forbes: How do we know what extinct species looked like?

Cuvier´s secret reconstruction of the Anoplotherium commune, shown in lifelike pose with its skeleton, musculature, and body-outline. Source: Forbes

Cuvier´s secret reconstruction of the Anoplotherium commune, shown in lifelike pose with its skeleton, musculature, and body-outline.
Source: Forbes

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE :

Corpus Newtonicum: Newton in Atlantis

arXiv.org: Greek Astronomy PhDs: The last 200 years (pdf)

Inside the Science Museum: How to land on Venus

Scientific American: Cocktail Party Physics: In Memoriam: Jacob Bekenstein (1947–2015) and Black Hole Entropy

Jacob Bekenstein Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jacob Bekenstein
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Shtetl–Optimized: Jacob Bekenstein (1947–2015)

ESA: The History of Sounding Rockets and Their Contribution to European Space Research (pdf)

Berkeley News: Pursuing charm in a singularly unfeminine profession

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Watercolour Meteor

Paul Sandby The Meteor of August 18, 1783, as seen from the East Angle of the North Terrace, Windsor Castle.

Paul Sandby The Meteor of August 18, 1783, as seen from the East Angle of the North Terrace, Windsor Castle.

History Extra: Life of the Week: Marie Curie

The Columbian: Vancouver woman’s Manhattan Project memories

The Local: Seven brainteasers to honour Schrödinger

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 20 – Fred Hoyle

National Radio Astronomy Observatory: Pre-History of Radio Astronomy

Yovisto: Viking 1 and the Mission to Mars

Restrcted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Hiroshima and Nagasaki at 70

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 23 – Charles-Augustin de Coulomb

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Slate Vault: The Roads Around Late–18th–Century London. Mapped in Close-Up Detail

Atlas Obscura: John Harrison’s Marine Chronometers

Harrison's first sea clock (H1) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Harrison’s first sea clock (H1)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: How High/Low Can You Go? – The Explorer Auguste Picard

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Der Erdapfel

Behaim's Erdapfel Source: Wikimedia Commons

Behaim’s Erdapfel
Source: Wikimedia Commons

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: Captain Cook Lands on Possession Island

NOAA: Who first charted the Gulf Stream?

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

History Matters: Donald Trump: Galenic Enthusiast?

Yovisto: Thomas Hodgekin – a Pioneer in Preventive Medicine

Yovisto: The Contraceptive Pill – One of the Most Influential Inventions of the 20th Century

The Recipes Project: Valuing “Caesar’s and Sampson’s Cures”

Rattle-snake with section of rattle and tooth, from Mark Catsby, (1731) The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

Rattle-snake with section of rattle and tooth, from Mark Catsby, (1731) The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

The Recipes Project: Adjudicating “Caesar’s Cure for Poison”

Ptak Science Books: Electropathic Pathology: the Invisible Quackhood of the Electric Brush (1884)

drive.google.com: Quistorp and ‘Anaesthesia” in 1718

Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry: From the Archive: Witchcraft and Healing in the Colonial Andes, 16th-17th Centuries

Journal of the American Revolution: For to Cure for the Etch

Thomas Morris: Brain of hare and turd of dog

Pinterest: Inside the Vintage Medicine Cabinet

Thomas Morris: Wine, the great healer

Wellcome Library Blog: Diary of an Asylum Superintendent

Thomas Morris: Leeches: for external and internal use

leeching

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: Gabriel Lipmann and the Colour Photography

Yovisto: Pierre Vernier and the Vernier Scale

Ptak Science Blog: An Automatic Page Turner, 1887

Yovisto: Making Photography Really Operational – Louis Daguerre

Christie’s The Art People: Mechanical miracles: The rise of the automaton

Engines of Our Imagination: No. 1703: IBM 360 Computer

Motherboard: The Soviet Architect Who Drafted the Space Race

Design for the technology module of the Mir space station (1980). Image: Galina Balashova Archives

Design for the technology module of the Mir space station (1980). Image: Galina Balashova Archives

Slate: The Mechanical Chess Player That Unsettled the World

The chess-playing Turk baffled and amazed Europe until it was revealed to be a hoax: the figure was actually controlled by a man hidden inside the box. Photographs: Bridgeman Images; AKG-Images

The chess-playing Turk baffled and amazed Europe until it was revealed to be a hoax: the figure was actually controlled by a man hidden inside the box. Photographs: Bridgeman Images; AKG-Images

Yovisto: William Murdock ‘enlights’ the 19th century

C&EN: Timeline: A Brief History of the Internet and Chemistry

The New York Review of Books: They Began a New Era

Yovisto: Paul Nipkow and the Picture Scanning Technology

The Guardian: Letters reveal Alan Turing’s battle with his sexuality

Yovisto: E.F. Codd and the Relational Database Model

The Telegraph: England’s last master cooper seeks apprentice

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Niche: The Herbarium: An Interior Landscape of Science

Der Beutelwolf–Blog: Alfred Russel Wallace

Letters from Gondwana: Climate Change and the Evolution of Mammals

Jonathan Saha: Animals in the Asylum

The Telegraph: Anger over Natural History Museum plans to bulldoze wildlife garden

Mental Floss: The Adventurous Life of Jane Dieulafoy, Pioneering Archaeologist, Artist, and Feminist

Jane Dieulafoy Image: Eugène L. Pirou

Jane Dieulafoy
Image: Eugène L. Pirou

Notches: “What can I do to be normal?” Queer Female Desires in Letters to Dr. Alfred Kinsey

The Victor Mourning Blog: Mary Vaux Walcott

Culture 24: The starfishes, octopuses and squid of scientists’ 70,00-mile 19th century journey to the deep sea

Public Domain Review: When the Birds and the Bees Were Not Enough: Aristotle’s Masterpiece

Embryo Project: George McDonald Church (1954)

Embryo Project: Eugenical Sterilization in the United States (1922), by Harry H. Laughlin

Paige Fossil History: Fossils vs Marine Biology: Which History of Science is More Fun

New York Times: John Henry Holland, Who Computerized Evolution, Dies at 86

Expedition Live: A Marvel of Unpreparedness

Forbes: Geology and Ancient Fossil’s Inspired H.P. Lovecraft to Write His Best Horror Story

Londoner Culture: The man who brought us drinking chocolate and his Chelsea past

Sir Hans Sloane

Sir Hans Sloane

Darwin Live: Celebrating the Life of Alfred Russel Wallace

Public Domain Review: Tempest Anderson: Pioneer of Volcano Photography

National Geographic: Phenomena: The Rise and Fall of America’s Fossil Dogs

AMNH: Shelf Life: Kinsey’s Wasps

CHEMISTRY:

Conciatore: Vitriol of Venus

Conciatore: Tartar Salt

Conciatore: Sulfur of Saturn

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 21 – Jean Servais Stas

Jean Servais Stas (1813-1891) Belgian Chemist Credit: OEuvres Complètes, Jean Baptiste Depaire, 1894

Jean Servais Stas (1813-1891) Belgian Chemist Credit: OEuvres Complètes, Jean Baptiste Depaire, 1894

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 17 – Walter Noddack

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 19 – Helium

Yovisto: Jules Janssen and the Discovery of Helium

1868 Pierre Jannsen observes new spectral line during a solar eclipse-later linked w:new element (He)

1868 Pierre Jannsen observes new spectral line during a solar eclipse-later linked w:new element (He)

CMsNVuHWEAAuJns

The Conversation: How science lost one of its greatest minds in the trenches of Gallipoli

Othmeralia: Lavoisier

Yovisto: Jöns Jacob Berzelius – One of the Founders of Modern Chemistry

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Fit for print: developing an institutional model of scientific publishing in England, 1655–ca. 1714

Historical Reflections: Appetite for Discovery: Sense and Sentiment in the Early Modern World

The Newyorker: What is Elegance in Science?

in propria persona: law, tech, history: Historians need to stop obsessing over writing books

Smithsonian Libraries: Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology

The Huntingdon: The Dibner History of Science Program

OHSU: Oral History Program

Brill: Journal of the Philosophy of History Contents

Lady Science: Subscribe to email newsletter

Centre for the History of Emotions: Major new grant to explore emotional health

academia.edu: The Catholic Cosmos Made Small: Athanasius Kircher and His Museum in Rome

Portrait of Kircher at age 53 from Mundus Subterraneus (1664) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Kircher at age 53
from Mundus Subterraneus (1664)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wolfram Alpha: Timeline of Systematic Data and the Development of Computable Knowledge

Oxford Today: From Hindu Paintings to Hebrew Manuscripts – the Digital Treasures of the Bodleian Library

New @ Northeastern: In Italy, students get a history lesson in science

Leaping Robot: Shifting Gears and Changing Rooms

University of London, Institute of Historical Research: Research Seminar: Questioning Theories of History Autumn Term 2015

Capitalism’s Cradle: “And it all started here in the US of A”

Long Reads: Our Sex Education: A Reading List

ESOTERIC:

Yovisto: Johann Valentin Andreae and the Legend of the Rosicrucians

Johannes Valentinus Andreae Source: Wikimedia Commons

Johannes Valentinus Andreae
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Atlantic: Rewriting Autism History

New York Times: ‘Neuro Tribes’ by Steve Silberman

New York Times Book Reviews Podcast

John Elder Robinson: Neurotribes – Steve Silberman’s new book on the history of autism

Nature: Autism: Seeing the spectrum entire

The Economist: Horrible history: The treatment of autistic children in the 20th century was shocking

Wired: How Autistic People Helped Shape the Modern World

Science Book a Day: NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity

The Guardian: Neurotribes review – the evolution of our understanding of autism

neurotribes

 

Science Book a Day: Einstein’s Masterwork: 1915 and the General Theory of Relativity

The Renaissance Mathematicus: To Explain the Weinberg: The discovery of a Nobel Laureate’s view of the history of science

Alembic Rare Books: How Men (and Women) Fly: Gertrude Bacon & Early Aviation

Science Book a Day: The Art of Medicine

Brain Pickings: Wheels of Change: How the Bicycle Empowered Women

Scientific American: Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cat

Forbes: New Book Explores Biogeography and the Human Adventure

NEW BOOKS:

Ashgate: Australia Circumnavigated: The Voyages of Matthew Flinders in HMS Investigator, 1801–1803

Juxtapost: Eva Wirtén Making Marie Curie: Intellectual Property and Celebraty Culture in an Age of Information

l_c967fbb0-2ec0-11e5-855b-bd6d15300024

University of Pennsylvania Press: Early Modern Cultures of Translation

ART & EXHIBITIONS

The Sydney Morning Herald: The League of Remarkable Women exhibition aims to break down barriers for women in science

JHI Blog: Reflections on “Treasured Possessions” and Material Culture

University of Lincoln: The Life and Legacy of George Boole

Boole-A4-Poster-V2-212x300

Union Station: Da Vinci The Exhibition Opens October 23

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations – D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics 21 August–25 October

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday and Wednesday

Royal Society: Seeing Closer: 350 years of microscopy 29 June–23 November

Wellcome Library: Kiss of Light 12 May–23 October

Museum of the Mind: The Maudsley at War: The Story of the Hospital During the Great War 6 July– 24 September 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Pleasance Courtyard Edinburgh: The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or The Survival of (R)Evolutionary Theories in the Face of Scientific and Ecclesiastical Objections: Being a Musical Comedy About Charles Darwin 26 August

Bedlam Theatre Edinburgh: Ada Runs until 30 August 2015

National Theatre: The Hard Problem

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Women and Medicine

Lady Mary Wortley Montague

Lady Mary Wortley Montague

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Sex and the City

U.S. National Library of Medicine: The Movies: The Human Body in Pictures: The Blood Vessels and Their Function

Science Museum: Beyond Vision: Photography, Art and Science symposium 12 September 2015

Wellcome Collection: Discussion: The Blue Corpse 27 August 2015

MHS Oxford: Lecture: Harry’s Nobel Prize 25 August 2015

Royal Observatory Greenwich: The Great Eclipse Expedition Mystery 27 August 2015

Oxford Biomedical Research Group: Open Doors – How blood flows to and around the brain Tour: 11 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Piltdown-gang-007

John Cooke’s 1915 painting of the ‘Piltdown Gang’

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: The Secret of Quantum Physics

 

PBS: The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements

Forbes: PBS’s The Mystery of Matter and its Message for Chemistry

Youtube: Manhattan Season Two Trailer

BBC Four: Genius of the Ancient World: Socrates

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Ri: Cloud Chamber: The Birth of Helium Atoms

Youtube: The Hereford World Map – Mappa Mundi

Youtube: The Man Who Saved Geometry (excerpt)

Vimeo: The Man Who Saved Geometry (complete)

Youtube: Ri: The Race to Crack the Genetic Code with Matthew Cobb

Two Nerdy History Girls: Friday Video: The Clock That Changed the World

Gresham College: Cannabis Britannica: The rise and demise of a Victorian wonder-drug

Youtube: Royal Society: Field Microscope – Objectivity #30

History Physics: Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity

Youtube: Scream – The History of Anaesthetics

Youtube: Betrand Russell – Man’s Peril

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Inside Science Matthew Cobb on Life’s Greatest Secret (14m39)

BBC Radio 4: Book of the Week: Spirals in Time

PODCASTS:

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Peter Galison’s Interview

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of York: Centre for Global Health Histories: Public Lectures 22 September–12 November 2015

University of Paderborn, International Workshop: The Self-Determined Individual in the Enlightenment 14 September 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: The Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies International Medieval Congress University of Leeds 3–7 July 2016

Manchester Medieval Society: CfP: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference University of Hull: 6–8 January 2016

University of the Pacific: The Invention of Nature – Talk and Book Signing with Andrea Wulf

Royal Society: Open House Weekend – History of Science Lecture Series 19 September 2015

Royal Historical Society: Public History Prize

Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science: CfP: 6–7 November 2015

University of Klagenfurt: International Conference on Science, Research and Popular Culture Programme 17–18 September 2015

University of London, Birkbeck: CfP: Religion and Medicine: Healing the Body and Soul from the Middle Ages to the Modern Day 15–16 July 2016

SocPhiSciPract: CfP: 2nd Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Group in India 19–21 December 2015

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering: CfP: History of Computing – International Communities of Invention and Innovation 25–29 May 2016

History of Science Society: Call for Posters: HSS Meeting San Francisco 17 August 2015

IRH–UNIBUC: Master-class on Isaac Newton’s Philosophical Projects

Amherst College: Books and Prints between Cultures, 1500–1900 18–19 September 2015

 

The Royal Society: Lecture: A 13th century theory of everything

ADAPT: CfP: Hands on History: Exploring New Methodologies for Media History Research Geological Society London 8–10 February 2016

 

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Princeton University: Call for Applications: Fellowships at Davis Center 2016–17 Risk and Fortune

University of Utrecht: PhD Candidate History of Art, Science and Technology

University of Utrecht: Postdoc History of Art, Science and Technology

USA Jobs: Department of the Air Force: Historian

The Royal Society: Newton International Fellowship

Aarhus University: Intuitions in Science and Philosophy: 2 Postdocs & 1 PhD Studentship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Shouldering a mini-hiatus.

I am going into hospital tomorrow for a minor operation on my right shoulder. As I won’t be home again till Monday, assuming all goes well, and as I am a one hand (right) one finger typist and do not know when I shall be able to type again there will be no edition of Whewell’s Gazette this coming Monday, 17 August. Hopefully, normal service will be resumed on Monday 24 August with Whewell’s Gazette 2,6.

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #05

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #05

Monday 10 August 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days of all that the Internet has to offer in #histSTM gathered together for your delectation in the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly links list for the histories of science, technology and medicine.

Three weeks ago in our editorial we described the Trinity Test on 16 July 1945, as the greatest ever fall from grace of science and technology. Three weeks after this test science, technology, politics and ethics were hurled into a vortex of conflict in the mushroom cloud that rose over Hiroshima as the first atomic bomb used in war exploded above that Japanese city on 6 August 1945, killing at least 140 000 people. Three days later this crime against humanity was compounded, as the second, and till now last, atomic bomb used in warfare exploded above Nagasaki killing another 70 000.

There are very few moments in history that ‘changed the world for ever’ as the purveyors of hyperbole are all to fond of parroting but the moment when that first atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima is truly one such.

Now seventy years later the Internet has spat out many words documenting this inhuman tragedy. We have collected many of them together for this edition of Whewell’s Gazette that is humbly dedicated to the victims and survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The watch of Kengo Nikawa which stopped forever at 8.15 on the day the nuclear bomb fell on Hiroshima.

The watch of Kengo Nikawa which stopped forever at 8.15 on the day the nuclear bomb fell on Hiroshima.

“It was like something out of hell, and I didn’t feel like taking many pictures.” — Yoshito Matsushige

 “’Little Boy’ kills 140000 on August 6 in Hiroshima, ‘Fat Man’ kills 70000 on August 9 in Nagasaki at first moment”.

 “The use of the atomic bomb on Japan will come to be seen as one of the greatest blunders in all of history.” – Leo Szilard

 The bomb was dropped at 11:02 a.m., 1,650 feet above the city [Nagasaki]. The explosion unleashed the equivalent force of 22,000 tons of TNT. h/t @ferwen

Dannen.com: International Law on the Bombing of Civilians

Dannen.com: Groves-Oppenheimer Transcript, August 6, 1945

Dannen.com: A Petition to the President of the United States

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge Petition, July 13, 1945

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge Petition, mid-July, 1945

Dannen.com: The Franck Report, June 11, 1945

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Were there alternatives to the atomic bombings?

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The Kyoto misconception

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Were there alternatives to the atomic bombings?

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The Hiroshima Phone Call (1945)

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: A Day Too Late

The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Atomic Editorial Cartoons (August 1945)

The New Yorker: Nagasaki: The Last Bomb

Tech Times: Interview: Alex Wellerstein and David Saltzberg Discuss Getting History and Science Right on ‘Manhattan’

IDEAS: What options were there for the United States regarding the atomic bomb in 1945?

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ray Gallagher and Fred Olivi’s Interview – Part 1

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lawrence Litz’s Interview (2012)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: The Hiroshima Mission

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Jacob Besser’s Lecture

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ray Gallagher’s Accounts of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Missions

AHF: William “Deak” Parsons

AHF: Using the Atomic Bomb – 1945

Scientific American: Cross Check: Bethe, Teller, Trinity and the End of the Earth

Scientific American: Cross Check: Historian Contemplates “Ugly” Reality of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

AP Was There: US drops atomic bombs on Japan in 1945

The National Security Archive: The Nuclear Vault: The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II

L.A. Times: New evidence of Japan’s effort to build atom bomb at the end of WWII

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Seven decades after Hiroshima, is there still a nuclear taboo?

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: The harrowing story of the Nagasaki bombing mission

The Boston Globe: The deterrent that wasn’t

Smithsonian.com: How Physics Drove the Design of the Atomic Bombs Dropped on Japan

Chicago Tribune: Was using an atomic bomb necessary to end WWII?

BBC: Hiroshima marks 70 years since atomic bomb

British Library: Sound and vision blog: Memories of Hiroshima and After

New York Times: Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors Pass Their Stories to a New Generation

The Curious Wavefunction: The enduring legacy of Leo Szilard, father of the atomic age

Priceonomics: Leó Szilárd: A Forgotten Father of the Atomic Bomb

Ars Technica: The bomb and a new scientific and technical landscape

Scientific American: Survivor of the Hiroshima Nuclear Bomb Recalls the Bombing and Its Aftermath

Scientific American: Survivor of the Nagasaki Atom Bomb Describes His Experience

Members.peak.org: Leo Szilard, Interview: President Truman Did Not Understand

Jappan Times: How the Japan Times reported the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Bulletin of Atomic Scientists: Nuclear Notebook: Nuclear Arsenals of the World

The Bigger Picture: Science Service, Up Close: Covering the Atom, August 1945

History Today: Truman and the Bomb

Newclear Thinking: Remembering Hiroshima: Death, Tourism, and Social Media

Discover: On the70th Anniversary of Hiroshima Bombing Photos Document the Devastation. Plus: Personal Reflections

Circulating Now: The First Calamity of the Nuclear Age

Oregon Live: Hiroshima at 70: The Oregonian’s front page coverage of 1945 atomic bomb was chilling, apocalyptic (photos)

The Conversation: The little-known history of secrecy and censorship in wake of atomic bombings

Smithsonian Institution Archive: The Manhattan Project Videohistory Collection

The New York Times: Nagasaki, the Forgotten City

The Guardian: Nuclear fallout: the mental health consequences of radiation

Roger Williams University Docs: The United States Strategic Bombing Survey: The Effects of Atomic Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, June 30, 1946

Pressing Issues: When Truman Failed to Pause in 1945 – and the War Crime That Followed

The Irish Times: The Irish eyewitness to the atomic bomb at Nagasaki

Quotes of the week:

Can we please get over the idea that “many technologies” “progress” exponentially? – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

“It is a rare occurrence that a census taker has ever heard of a physicist…one is often tempted to register as a chemist” – A. W. Hull, 1944

“The æther will come back. This old and faithful comrade of the human mind in its imaginative flights cannot be dead forever” – K. Darrow 1944

‘Books are deadlier than drugs. It is a pity that we do not burn our libraries once a century.’ – (Sunday Express, 1922) h/t @harbottlestores

“The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers he is one who asks the right questions”

“The sources of history are threefold: written, spoken, & neither written nor spoken. The last falls to the archaeologist.” – C.R. Fish 1910 h/t @ProfDanHicks

“Journalists: Ban “scientists say” from your lexicon. You wanna know why? Scientists say.” – Josh Rosenau (@JoshRosenau)

“Reading an underlined library book is like being interrupted during a great conversation by a yappy dog. You, underliner, are the yappy dog.

“There is something reassuring in the fact that those who deface library books by underlining them rarely make it out of chapter one”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“I wonder if I’ll live long enough to witness people understanding that science and engineering are not the same thing”. – Bev Gibbs (@bevgibbs)

“Remember, there is a happy space between impostor syndrome and unrepentant bullshitting. Find it & live there…” – David Andress (@ProfDaveAndress)

“Why does philosophy matter?”

“I don’t know, why does science matter?”

“Well because scie…”

“Annnnnnnd you are doing philosophy”

“The learning and knowledge that we have, is, at the most, but little compared with that of which we are ignorant”. – Plato

“As an ‘extremely young earth’ creationist, I’m not sure I believe that the eighties actually existed”. – @gravbeast

“The father of Zoology was Aristotle … but the name of its mother has not come down to us” – Ambrose Bierce

“There is nothing more necessary to the man [sic] of science than its history” – Lord Acton, quoted by Popper and now by David Wootton

“And what should the scientist & citizen learn from the hist of sci?” Wootton adds in The Invention of Science. “That nothing endures.” h/t Philip Ball (@philipcball)

“Technology is neither good nor bad, nor is it neutral.” – Melvin Kranzberg

“What astrologers say about the influence of the constellations should really be attributed to the Sun”. – Athanasius Kircher

“The most damaging phrase in the language is: “we have always done it this way”.” – Grace Hopper

Birthdays of the Week:

P.A.M. Dirac born 8 August 1902

Paul Dirac with his wife in Copenhagen, July 1963 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Paul Dirac with his wife in Copenhagen, July 1963
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Graham Farmelo: The Strangest Man

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 8 – Paul Dirac

AIP: P. A. M. Dirac – Session I

Yovisto: Paul Dirac and the Quantum Mechanics

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

NPR: Cosmos & Culture: Pinning Down One Scientist’s Legacy

Vintage Ads: Atomic Ads, a Sunday Sampler

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AIP: Marlan Scully

Tand Online: John Tyndall and the Early History of Diamagnetism (oa) (pdf)

Irish Philosophy: What has Hamilton to do with philosophy?

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Crucial Instances in the Principia

Starts With a Bang: Einstein, Edison and an Aptitude for Genius

Yovisto: Victor Franz Hess and the Cosmic Radiation

Collections Online: Letter from Benjamin Franklin to [John Franklin] (copy), 25 December 1750

AIP: Roger Penrose

Yovisto: Sir Roger Penrose and the Singularity

ESA: GAIA: A History of Astrometry – Part I Mapping the Sky From Ancient to Pre-Modern Times

Stone tablet of Shamash, the Sun-god, from the ancient Babylonian city of Sippar. Credit: © Trustees of the British Museum.

Stone tablet of Shamash, the Sun-god, from the ancient Babylonian city of Sippar. Credit: © Trustees of the British Museum.

ESA: GAIA: A History of Astrometry – Part II Telescope Ignites the Race to Measure Stellar Distances

Yovisto: Ernest Lawrence and the Cyclotron

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Collection items: Anglo-Saxon world map

History Extra: The Northwest Passage search: behind the scenes of the expedition that found Franklin’s HMS Erebus

Atlas Obscura: 7 Gorgeous Sea Maps From the Age of Exploration

Frederik De Wit's 1654 Dutch Sea Atlas. Image courtesy of the Harvard Map Collection

Frederik De Wit’s 1654 Dutch Sea Atlas. Image courtesy of the Harvard Map Collection

Yale News: Hidden secrets of Yale’s 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

British Library online Gallery: Depiction of the Isle of Wight 1600

Medievalist.net: Medieval Maps of Britain

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

William Savage: Pen and Pension: Daily Medicine: Georgian-style

NPR: How a Scientist’s Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies’ Lives

Nurcing Clio: A Pot of Herbs, A Plastic Sheet, and Thou: A Historian Goes for a “V-Stream,”

Forbes: Why Did My Grandmother Try LSD for Multiple Sclerosis in the 1960s?

Derelict Places: Selly Oak Hospital

Vesalius Fabrica: A Guide to the Historiated Capitals of the 1543 Fabrica

R Cap A continuation of the theme of Q. Three medical putti dissecting a thorax.

R Cap A continuation of the theme of Q. Three medical putti dissecting a thorax.

Yovisto: Johann Friedrich Struensee – A Royal Affair

Yovisto: Joseph Carey Merrick – the Elefant Man

Ask the Past: How To Use Chocolate, 1672

The Recipes Project: Swimming in Broth: Medicated Baths in Eighteenth-Century Europe

CHSTM: News and Notes: Treating the Black Body: Race and Medicine in American Culture, 1800–1861

Advances in the History of Psychology: BBC Mind Changers: New Episodes on Carol Dweck and B.F. Skinner

Advances in the History of Psychology: BBC Mind Changers: Carl Rogers and the Person-Centred Approach

New York Times:Louis Sokoloff, Pioneer of PET Scan, Dies at 93

Conciatore: Filippo Sassetti

NYAM: Adventures in Rare Book Cataloging

Anthony Rhys: Victorian Photographs of Disability

MetaFilter: RIP Frances O. Kelsey, Ph.D., M.D.

BBC: Anti-thalidomide hero Frances Oldham Kelsey dies at 101

Dr Kelsey received a presidential award from John F Kennedy in 1962

Dr Kelsey received a presidential award from John F Kennedy in 1962

NPR: Frances Kelsey, FDA Officer Who Blocked Thalidomide, Dies at 101

The Cut: What the 17th Century Can Teach Us About Vaginas

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

TECHNOLOGY:

Slide Rule Museum: Circular Slide Rules and selected Disc Charts

Mashable: 1890–1968 Flying Cars

Atlas Obscura: The History of Vending Machines Goes Back to the 1st Century

Iowa State University Library Special Collections Department Bog: Engineering the Home: Domestic Comfort via Science

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 4 August – Phoenix Mars Lander

NYC Department of Records: Hindenburg (Airship)

Yovisto: On the Road with Bertha Benz

Bertha Benz and the ‘Patent Motorwagen’

Bertha Benz and the ‘Patent Motorwagen’

Yovisto: Road Trippin’ with Alice Ramsey

Alice Ramsey (1886 – 1983) Image: Library of Congress

Alice Ramsey
(1886 – 1983)
Image: Library of Congress

Independent: The London: After 350 years, the riddle of Britain’s exploding fleet is finally solved

Conciatore: Decolorization of Glass

Neatorama: The Wonderful World of Early Computers

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Made in Nürnberg

Schöner Celestial Globe 1535 Source: Science Museum London

Schöner Celestial Globe 1535
Source: Science Museum London

Wired: Birth of the Microphone How Sound Became Signal

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 6 August – Electric Chair

History Today: The First Execution by Electric Chair

DSFP’s Spaceflight History Blog: Failure Was an Option: What If an Apollo Saturn Rocket Exploded on the Launch Pad?

KCET: When Oil Derricks Ruled the L.A. Landscape

ESA: History Of Europe in Space: ESA’s ‘First’ Satellite: COS-B

Atlas Obscura: The Almost Perfect World War II Plot to Bomb Japan With Bats

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

jardine’s book of martyrs: The Scottish Hurricane of 1675

Dr Jennifer Evans: A Little find in the archive

The Sloane Letters Blog: Shell Games: Martin Lister and the Conchological Collections of Sir Hans Sloane

Melo aetheopica, Sloane 2374, Natural History Collection next to its portrayal by Susanna Lister in the Historiae, Table 801. Note she altered the perspective so it is possible to see the distinguishing characteristic of the umbilicus. Photo by Anna Marie Roos, © The Natural History Museum, London.

Melo aetheopica, Sloane 2374, Natural History Collection next to its portrayal by Susanna Lister in the Historiae, Table 801. Note she altered the perspective so it is possible to see the distinguishing characteristic of the umbilicus. Photo by Anna Marie Roos, © The Natural History Museum, London.

Bucknell University: Archive to Arctic

BBC Earth: How do we know that evolution is really happening?

Natural History Apostilles: On spinach & iron: König 1926

Natural History Apostilles: On spinach & iron: Richardson 1848 & Wolff 1871

NCSE: Fact, Theory, and Path Again, Part 2

Forbes: This 1831 Geological Journey Was Decisive For Darwin’s Scientific Career

Letters from Gondwana: The Legacy of the Feud Between Florentino Ameghino and P. Moreno

RCS: Hamsters in the Library

preview

The Sloane Letters Blog: Public and Private Gardens in the Eighteenth Century

Public Domain Review: Shells and other Marine Life from Albertus Seba’s Cabinet of Natural Curiosities (1734)

The Guardian: Sir Jack Goody obituary

National Geographic: Phenomena: Curiously Krulwich

Making Science Public: Carbon Pollution

Heritage Daily: Bones of the Victims at Roman Herculaneum

AGU Blogosphere: 16th century Italian earthquake changed river’s course

Partial reproduction of a 16th century painting showing the position of the Po River (corso principale del Po) and Ferrara (yellow arrow) before the river changed course. Credit: Egnazio Danti

Partial reproduction of a 16th century painting showing the position of the Po River (corso principale del Po) and Ferrara (yellow arrow) before the river changed course.
Credit: Egnazio Danti

Smithsonian Libraries: Underworlds: Fossils and Geology: What lies beneath?

The New York Times: The Great Victorian Weather Wars

Nautilus: The Dueling Weathermen of the 1800s

BBC: Tyndal’s climate message, 150 years on

Embryo Project: William Bateson (1861–1926)

Embryo Project: Ernst Haeckel’s Biogenetic Law (1866)

CHEMISTRY:

Science Note: Today in Science History – 3 August – Richard Willstäter

Richard Willstätter (1872-1942) 1915 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Richard Willstätter (1872-1942) 1915 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Oesper Collections: The Oesper Collections in the History of Chemistry

Science Notes: Today in Science History – August 9 – Amedeo Avogadro

Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856) Italian chemist known for his gas law and the constant that bears his name.

Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856) Italian chemist known for his gas law and the constant that bears his name.

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The Guardian: Terrawatch: The lost art of specimen illustration

Steven Gray’s Blog: On Pigeonholing

Double Refraction: Are scientists who do history like tourists? Thoughts on Steven Weinberg’s analogy

the many-headed monster: What is History? Or: Doing history/thinking historically

Chemical and Engineering News: Science Historians Revive Ancient Recipes

LIFE CASTING In the 16th century, encasing living objects—such as flowers in metal was a popular endeavor. Credit: Making & Knowing Project

LIFE CASTING
In the 16th century, encasing living objects—such as flowers in metal was a popular endeavor.
Credit: Making & Knowing Project

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford

Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources

JHI Blog: Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading in the Archive (II)

Lady Science: Archive

MIT Technology Review: Tech’s Enduring Great-Man Myth

The Royal Society: Notes and Records: 350 Years of scientific periodicals Table of Contents

Ether Wave Propaganda: Joseph Agassi’s Philosophy and Influence Resist Simple Answers

The Scientist: Foundations: Science History

George Boole 200*: About George Boole

Frontiers in Psychology: Fifty psychological and psychiatric terms to avoid: a list of inaccurate, misleading, misused, ambiguous, and logically confused words and phrases

Ptak Science Books: Books are Weapons in the War of Ideas

The #EnvHist Weekly

Wellcome Collection: A cat among the collection

Excavating Jacquetta Hawkes

BHL: The Arcadia Fund Awards Grant to Support The Field Book Project

academia.edu: Legislating Truth: Maimonides, the Almohads and the 13th Century Jewish Enlightenment

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Reports from Parnassus

Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511) Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail).

Rafael – El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)
Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail).

History of Alchemy: Episode 70: Distillation

Atlas Obscura: Edison’s Last Breath at the Henry Ford Museum

BOOK REVIEWS:

Cell Press: The untenability of faithism

H–Environmental Roundtable Reviews: Kendra Smith-Howard Pure and Modern Milk: An Environmental History since 1900

H-Net: Kenneth Garden The First Islamic Reviver: Abu Hamid al-Ghazali and His Revival of the Religious Sciences

The Lancet: How chemists came to matter

Nature: Books & Arts Special

Reviews in History: Notebooks, English Virtuosi, and Early Modern Science

Chris Aldrich: Musings of a Modern Day Cyberneticist: Breaking the Code – The Economist

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Annotated Malay Archipelago

9789971698201_1024x1024

Science Book a Day: The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves

NEW BOOKS:

OUP: Mathematicians and Their Gods: Interactions between mathematics and religion

The Geological Society of America: Recollections of a Petrologist: Joseph Paxson Iddings

The Royal Society: Shortlist for 2015 Winton Prize for Science Books announced

Nature: A scintillating shortlist for the Royal Society prize

Springer: Leibniz’s Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms

HSS: Isis Books Received April–June 2015

Enfilade: William Hunter’s World

51obh-1q4tl-_sx351_bo1204203200_

Truman State University Press: Bridging Traditions: Alchemy, Chemistry, and Paracelsian Practices in the Early Modern Era

Routledge: Domestic Disturbances, Patriarchal Values

EM Spanish History Notes: Skaarup, Anatomy & Anatomists in EM Spain

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Journal of Art in Society: Science Becomes Art

Joseph Wright of Derby, An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768)

Joseph Wright of Derby, An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768)

Royal College of Physicians: Power and beauty: seals, charters and the story of identity 1 September–23 December 2015

New Walk Museum and Gallery Leicester: World of Wallace: Alfred Russel Wallace and his life in the field 22 August–25 October 2015

CHF: The Artist in the Laboratory:

The Hans India: Hyd gallery to be in National Museum map show 11 August–11 October

University of Glasgow Library: Skeletons and Injections: William Hunter’s Lectures on Anatomy and Aesthetics

The Irish Times: The limits of reason: Boolean links between art and science

Chicago Booth Museum: Exhibit Explores Ancient Money and Business

Science Museum: Cosmos and Culture 23 July 2009­–31 December 2015

Wellcome Collection: Medicine Man Permanent Exhibition

MOSI: Meet Baby Runs every Tuesday and Wednesday

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The Guardian: Not actually a scientist

“The Element In The Room” being performed at the Tangram Theatre. Photograph: Alex Brenner

“The Element In The Room” being performed at the Tangram Theatre. Photograph: Alex Brenner

Young Vic: A Number: Closes 15 August 2015

National Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Royal College of Physicians: Free drop in tours – monthly, every first Wednesday 1.30pm

Wellcome Library: John Quekett, Victorian Microscopist 11 August 2015

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Bethlem Museum of the Mind: Open and Expand Your Mind: A Museum Object Handling Drop-In Session 13 August 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Frontispiece of the Rudolphine Tables

Tabulae Rudolphinae: quibus astronomicae …

Tabulae Rudolphinae: quibus astronomicae …

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: Genius Of the Ancient World: Socrates 12 August 2015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: London’s Plagues

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

AEON Video: Kempelen’s chess–playing automaton

Youtube: Eddie Izzard Venn

Youtube: Susannah Gibson: “Animal, Vegetable, Mineral?” 

Climate Denial Crock of the Week: We are The Asteroid

RADIO:

G. C. Gosling: NHS History on Radio 4

PODCASTS:

History of Philosophy without gaps: Juhana Toivanen on Animals in Medieval Philosophy

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Nottingham: Conference: Science, Society and the State (1870–1935) 4 September 2015

University of Bucharest: CfP: Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science 6–7 November 2015

Wikimedia UK: Booking open for Wikipedia Science Conference 2–3 September 2015

University of Oxford: Medicine of Words: Literature, Medicine, and Theology in the Middle Ages 11–12 September 2015

Bodleian Libraries: Gough Map Symposium 2015: Mr Gough’s ‘curious map’ of Britain: old image, new techniques 2 November 2015

Madison: CfP: Workshop: Pharmacopoeias in the Early Modern World 1–2 April 2016

Victorian Persistence: Text, Image, Theory: CfP: Becoming Animal with the Victorians Université Paris Diderot 4–5 February 2016

V & A Museum: Conference: On the Matter of Books and Records: Forms, Substance, Forgeries, and Meanings Beyond the Lines 23 November 2015

Barcelona: CfP: 2016 Joint ESHHS/Cheiron Meeting

National Library of Medicine: Workshop: Images and Texts in Medical History 11-13 April 2016

THATCamp: The History of Science Society hosts its second annual THATCamp on November 19 2015

Pursey House Oxford: Library and Information History Group Conference 2015: Libraries and the Development of Professional Knowledge 19 September 2015

University of Leuven: Conference: What do we loose when we loose a library? 9-12 September 2015

Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal: Call for Papers Women and Science Issue

itp: Colloquium: Celebrating 30 years of the mobile phone in the UK University of Salford 12 September 2015

Contagions: CfP: Medieval Landscapes of Disease ICMS Kalamazoo MI 12–15 May 2016

Technology and Culture: Call for Abstracts: Special Issue Africanizing the History of Technology

LOOKING FOR WORK:

British Museum: Director of Scientific Research

Wellcome Trust: Wellcome Trust Centres

Environmental Humanities: Four new Associate Editors

Yale University: Professor History of Science

University of Warwick: Department of History, Centre for History of Medicine Research Fellow (2 posts)

University of Warwick: Department of History, Centre for History of Medicine Research Fellow (Public Engagement) (2 posts)

AIP: Research Assistant

CRASSH: Visiting Fellows at CRASSH Early Modern Conversations: Religions, Cultures, Cognitive Ecologies

British Library: Applications are invited for Eccles British Library Writer in Residence Award 2016

University of Vienna: Four-year doctoral studentship in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science

Science Museum Group: Website Editor

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #04

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #04

Monday 03 August 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days another edition of your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bring you the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine garnered from the last seven days throughout the Internet.

There is a tradition to date the beginning of the scientific revolution to 1543 because two classic books were published in that year Copernicus’ De revolutionibus and Vesalius’ De fabrica. The latter was instrumental in bringing the study of anatomy to the fore in medicine in the Renaissance.

The historian of astronomy spent many years conducting a census of the surviving copies of the first two editions of De revolutionibus providing an important research tool for his fellow historians.

 Daniel Magoesy and Mark Somos are conducting a worldwide survey of all extant copies of Vesalius’ Fabrica If your library has a copy please help the gentlemen in their endeavour.

University of Glasgow Library: Vesalius’ 1543 Fabrica: who owned it and how was it used?

On View: Center for the History of Medicine: Andreas Vesalius

“In 1543 Vesalius suggested that when preparing a anatomically skeleton one might as well keep the ear bone for a necklace…” h/t Mathe Bjerragaard (@museumgoggles)

Quotes of the week:

“Being a historian can sometimes be like painting a portrait of someone based solely on the contents of their handbag. We only know so much”. – Greg Jenner (@greg_jenner)

“A home without books is a body without soul”. – Cicero

“Learning without thought is labor lost; thought without learning is perilous”. –Confucius

“pico-newtons per square micron — that’s a nice fancy term for a pascal ….” – @Eaterofsun

“Today’s diploma is tomorrow’s wallpaper. But today’s learning is tomorrow’s wisdom.” – John Piper h/t @JohnDCook

“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices”. – William James

“I admit that mathematical science is a good thing. But excessive devotion to it is a bad thing.” – Aldous Huxley

“I love the philosophy of science”. – Alfredo Ovalle (@Fredthegrand)

“A hangover is the wrath of grapes.” ― Dorothy Parker

“One can even set up quite ridiculous cases. A cat is penned up in a steel chamber, along with the following device (which must be secured against direct interference by the cat): in a Geiger counter there is a tiny bit of radioactive substance, so small, that perhaps in the course of the hour one of the atoms decays, but also, with equal probability, perhaps none; if it happens, the counter tube discharges and through a relay releases a hammer which shatters a small flask of hydrocyanic acid. If one has left this entire system to itself for an hour, one would say that the cat still lives if meanwhile no atom has decayed. The psi-function of the entire system would express this by having in it the living and dead cat (pardon the expression) mixed or smeared out in equal parts”. – Erwin Schrödinger h/t Paul Halpern (@phalpern)

 Birthdays of the Week:

Jeremiah Dixon born 27 July 1733

 

Charles Mason (right) and Jeremiah Dixon (left, with sextant)

Charles Mason (right) and Jeremiah Dixon (left, with sextant)

On Display Blog: Playing with Museum Representations of 18th Century American Encounters

 Jeremiah Dixon (17733–1779) – A Biographical Note

Library of Congress: A plan of the west line or parallel of latitude, which is the boundary between the provinces of Maryland and Pensylvania : a plan of the boundary lines between the province of Maryland and the Three Lower Counties on Delaware with part of the parallel of latitude which is the boundary between the provinces of Maryland and Pennsylvania

The National Archives Catalog: Journal of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon

Beatrix Potter born 28 July 1866

20120904-104043

Brain Pickings: Beatrix Potter, Mycologist: The Beloved Children’s Book Author’s Little-Known Scientific Studies and Illustrations of Mushrooms

The Birch Wathen Lenox STEM Initiative

Maria Mitchell born 1 August 1818

Maria Mitchell, painting by H. Dasell, 1851 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Maria Mitchell, painting by H. Dasell, 1851
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Brain Pickings: Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science

Motherboard: How a Victorian Astronomer Fought the Gender Pay Gap, and Won

Patheos: Not in vain do we watch the setting and rising of stars

Vassar College Library: Maria Mitchell

Yovisto: Maria Mitchell and the Comets

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Grandma Got STEM: Sophie Brahe

Yovisto: The Astronomical Achievements of Sir George Biddell Airy

George Biddell Airy caricatured by Spy in Vanity Fair Nov 1875 Source: Wikimedia Commons

George Biddell Airy caricatured by Spy in Vanity Fair Nov 1875
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 28 July – Otto Hahn

ESA: Space Science: 28 July 1851: First photo of a solar eclipse

Physics: Focus: Invention of the Maser and Laser

Taylor & Francis Online: This Day in Physics

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Bob Caron’s Tape to Joe Papalia

Nature: History: From blackboards to bombs

Time: Edwin Hubble: A Classic Portrait of a Genius at Work

Astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble looking though the eyepiece of the 100-inch telescope at the Mt. Wilson Observatory. MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE—THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

Astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble looking though the eyepiece of the 100-inch telescope at the Mt. Wilson Observatory.
MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE—THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

io9: Michael Faraday Was the World’s Most Badass Insurance Investigator

The Renaissance Mathematicus: σῴζειν τὰ φαινόμενα, sozein ta phainomena

AIP: I. I. Rabi – Session I

Corpus Newtonicum: To the unknown scribe – Isaac Newton’s assistants

Jardine’s book of martyrs: The Supernova of 1667: Cassiopeia A was observed in Scotland

Taylor & Francis Online: ‘Land-marks of the universe’: John Herschel against the background of positional astronomy. (oa) (pdf)

Dannen.com: Bomb Production Schedule, July 30 1945

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 31 July – Lunar Prospector crashes into the Moon

AIP: A profile in American Innovation

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lew Kowarski’s Interview – Part 2

Ideas Beta: What options were there for the United States regarding the atomic bomb in 1945?

Washington Post: Five myths about the atomic bomb

Dannen.com: Einstein to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Sorry Caroline but Maria got there first!

Caroline Herschel at age 92

Caroline Herschel at age 92

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Online Gallery: Galway Ireland 1611

British Library: Online Gallery: Chester 1585

British Library: Online Gallery: North East Corner of Kent 1585

The Hakluyt Society Blog: Essay Prize Series Part 1: Printing the Pacific

Halley’s Blog: Halley writes from Spithead

New York Public Library: Sea Blazers and Early Scriveners: The First Guidebooks to New York City

Sfera. Dati, Gregorio (1362-1436)

Sfera. Dati, Gregorio (1362-1436)

The Map House: Map of the Month

City Lab: A New Yorker’s Delightfully Stereotypical Map of America

cbcnews: Franklin expedition to Arctic included cannibalism, researches say

Medievalist.net: The World in 1467

Yovisto: Jean-François de La Pérouse and his Voyage around the World

NASA: Beyond Earth: This Month in Exploration – August

Medievalist.net: Ten Beautiful Medieval Maps

The Mappa Mundi of Saint Beatus of Liébana (c.730 – c.800)

The Mappa Mundi of Saint Beatus of Liébana (c.730 – c.800)

La Catoteca: Las más antiguas representaciones cartográficas de las corrientes marinas

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Nursing Clio: A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news

Isulin Nation: Dr Banting: Called a Failure, Discovers Insulin

Banting and Dog 1923 Banting House National Historic Site of Canada I often stare at an old photograph of Dr. Frederick Banting, the discoverer of insulin, to get ideas. I am inspired by his sheer tenacity. Against all odds, he succeeded in bringing insulin treatment into the world. I am completely in awe of how he had an idea and gave up everything right down to his old Ford to continue his research. He may have been trained as a surgeon with a special interest in orthopedics, but he forever changed the way diabetes is treated. After Dr. Banting finished his residency at the Sick Children’s Hospital in Toronto and the hospital failed to give him an appointment on staff, he set up practice in London, Ontario. Unfortunately, during his first month of practice, he only saw one patient. He needed a paying job, so he took a position as an assistant professor of physiology at the University of Western Ontario.

Banting and Dog 1923
Banting House National Historic Site of Canada
I often stare at an old photograph of Dr. Frederick Banting, the discoverer of insulin, to get ideas. I am inspired by his sheer tenacity. Against all odds, he succeeded in bringing insulin treatment into the world. I am completely in awe of how he had an idea and gave up everything right down to his old Ford to continue his research. He may have been trained as a surgeon with a special interest in orthopedics, but he forever changed the way diabetes is treated.
After Dr. Banting finished his residency at the Sick Children’s Hospital in Toronto and the hospital failed to give him an appointment on staff, he set up practice in London, Ontario. Unfortunately, during his first month of practice, he only saw one patient. He needed a paying job, so he took a position as an assistant professor of physiology at the University of Western Ontario.

Yale Books Unbound: Illness from the Patient’s Perspective

New Statesman: “Hunger, filth, fear and death”: remembering life before the NHS

The H-Word: Aliens, immigrants, religion, and the health service in Britain

A ward in the Manchester Jewish Hospital, early twentieth century. Photograph taken from the collection of the Manchester Jewish Museum, based in a former Spanish and Portuguese synagogue, the oldest in the city. Photograph: Christopher Thomond/Manchester Jewish Museum/ Christopher Thomond

A ward in the Manchester Jewish Hospital, early twentieth century. Photograph taken from the collection of the Manchester Jewish Museum, based in a former Spanish and Portuguese synagogue, the oldest in the city. Photograph: Christopher Thomond/Manchester Jewish Museum/ Christopher Thomond

New Scientist: Plague may not be solely to blame for Black Death’s mortality

EurekAlert!: Barrow scientists ‘rewrite’ history books

Public Domain Review: Reenactment of First Operation under Ether (ca. 1850)

Advances in the History of Psychology: Networking the Early Years of the American Journal of Psychology

The Recipes Project: Swimming in Broth: Medicated Baths in Eighteenth-Century Europe

The Lancet: An once of prevention

History Today: Heroin A Hundred-Year Habit

New York Times: Howard W. Jones Jr., a Pioneer of Reproductive Medicine, Dies at 104

History of Modern Biomedicine: The Development of Narrative Practices in Medicine c.1960–c.2000 (pdf)

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Olearius on Glass

Conciatore: Turquoise Glass

Conciatore: Art of Fire

houzz: The Sketches of Earl S. Tupper’s Pre-Tupperware Inventions

More Intelligent Life: The Proto-Internet

INTELLIGENT LIFE MAGAZINE JULY / AUG 2015 Early internet map - The Eastern Telegraphic System and its General Connections.

INTELLIGENT LIFE MAGAZINE JULY / AUG 2015
Early internet map – The Eastern Telegraphic System and its General Connections.

Ptak Science Books: Tubular, Streamlined Boat Construction, 1935/6

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 29 July – NASA

flickr: Cycling found by the community fr…

History of Technology: SHOT Newsletter

My medieval foundry: Latten maille and the uses of brass in war

NASA History: The NACA’s First Victory

NASA Law

NASA Law

boingboing: “The Computer Girls,” 1967 Cosmopolitan magazine article on women working with technology

Smithsonian.com: A Brief History of Pierre L’Enfant and Washington, D.C.

Modern Mechanix: “Boat Tunnel” for Habor Crossing (Aug, 1932)

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Thurrock Gazette: Down Memory Lane ­ Free lecture on town’s top scientist Wallace

Remedia: Meat

Ri Science: Finger Prints

Nature: Archaeology: The milk revolution

International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature: Who is the type of Homo sapiens?

New Scientist: Megafauna extinction: DNA evidence pins blame on climate change

NYAM: Robert Hooke’s Micrographia (Item of the Month)

The title page of Hooke’s Micrographia.

The title page of Hooke’s Micrographia.

Forbes: Ancient Stories Provided An Early Warning About Potential Seattle Earthquakes

The Sloane Letters Blog: Eighteenth-Century English Gardens and the Exchange with Europe

H-Environment: Wells. ‘Car Country’, Roundtable Review, Vol. 5, No. 5 (pdf)

Science Friday: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word Clone

Vox: A Renaissance painting reveals how breeding changed watermelons

Christie Images LTD 2015/Shutterstock The watermelon, then and now.

Christie Images LTD 2015/Shutterstock
The watermelon, then and now.

The Siberian Times: First glimpse inside the Siberian cave that holds the key to man’s origins

NCSE: Listening to the Grand Canyon’s Story

Notches: Queers, Homosexuals, and Activists in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain

Notches: Archives of Desire: A Lavender Reading of J. Edgar Hoover

BHL: Notes & News from the BHL Staff: The Conchologists: Searching for Seashells in 19th Century America

Say, Thomas. American Conchology. pl. 29. (1830-38). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/7959406.

Say, Thomas. American Conchology. pl. 29. (1830-38). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/7959406.

Georgian Gent: Edward Jenner, completely cuckoo! And news of a new book

The Dispersal of Darwin: Recent Darwin/evolution articles from the Journal of the history of Biology

NCSE: Fact, Theory, and Path Again, Part 1

Embryo Project: Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

Natural History Apostilles: Further comments on spinach and iron: part 1

Natural History Apostilles: Further comments on spinach and iron: part 2

Forbes: Leonardo a Vinci’s Geological Observations Revolutionized Renaissance Art

Londonist: Who is Old Father Thames?

Dirty Father Thames comes from a poem in Punch magazine, in 1848.

Dirty Father Thames comes from a poem in Punch magazine, in 1848.

Nautilus: Once Upon a Gemstone

Yovisto: Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and the Evolution

Atlas Obscura: Francisco Hernandez: The Coolest Explorer You’ve Never Heard Of

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 27 July – John Dalton

Dalton in later life by Thomas Phillips, National Portrait Gallery, London (1835). Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dalton in later life by Thomas Phillips, National Portrait Gallery, London (1835).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Stephanie Kwolek and the Bullet-proof vest

Stephanie Kwolek,

Stephanie Kwolek, “I don’t think there’s anything like saving someone’s life to bring you satisfaction and happiness”, “Women in Chemistry”, Chemical Heritage Foundation
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Primo Levi and The Periodic Table

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

JHI Blog: Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading in the Archive (I)

ICRC: Now open: ICRC archives from 1966–1975

IEEE Spectrum: When Innovation Fails

Roger Smith: The Fontana/Norton History of the Human Sciences: Full, corrected text now freely available on line

UBC: Online Companion to Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735: An Anthology of Literary Texts and Contexts

The Cullen Project: The Medical Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen

Mausoleum, bearing a profile in relief, erected in the mid-nineteenth century over Cullen's grave in the burial-ground at Kirknewton, Midlothian by the Royal College and the physician's descendants.

Mausoleum, bearing a profile in relief, erected in the mid-nineteenth century over Cullen’s grave in the burial-ground at Kirknewton, Midlothian by the Royal College and the physician’s descendants.

The #EnvHist Weekly

Physics World.com: Curing the Curie Complex

AHF: July Newsletter

The Atlantic: Why Aren’t There More Women Futurists?

Collecting and Connecting: I prefer not to talk about it

Wynken de Worde: how to destroy special collections with social media

The Conversation: How to value research that crosses more than one discipline

SciLogs: How Do You Define Science Communications

Mail Online: Anger after Science Museum which has been free since 2001 announces it is to start charging families to use Lauchpad gallery

Slate: When Science Doesn’t Have a Simple Answer

Mint on Sunday: Separating Fact from Ancient Indian Science Fiction

Victorian Web: John Tyndall: Address Delivered Before the British Association Assembled at Belfast With Additions, 1874

John Tyndall circa 1850 Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Tyndall circa 1850
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Advances in the History of Psychology: Historiography in the Social History of Medicine: Records at the NIH and the UK Web Archive

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: Some notes on “Misticall words and Names Infinite” by Humphrey Locke

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Technology and Society: Raf de Bont Stations in the Field: A History of Place-Based Animal Research, 1870–1930

WSJ: Preaching to the Converted (Google title and click on first link to beat paywall)

Inside Higher Ed: On the Verge of De-Extinction

Washington Post: The vast and complicated universe inside a seashell

Spirals in Time

The Guardian: A Beautiful Question: Finding Nature’s Deep Design by Frank Wilczek

The Wall Street Journal: Petal to the Metal (Google title and click on first link to beat paywall)

THE: The Matter Factory: A History of the Chemistry Laboratory, by Peter J. T. Morris

Science, Technology, and Society: Making Marie Curie: Intellectual Property and Celebrity Culture in an Age of Information

Los Angeles Review of Books: Two-Way Monologue: How to Get Past Science vs. Religion

The American Scholar: It Takes a Laboratory

Kiwiwalks in Speculative Fiction: “The Voice of the Dolphins” by Leo Szilard

NEW BOOKS:

NPL: The Birth of Atomic Time – Essen’s memoirs published

essen-book-cover

 ART & EXHIBITIONS

UCL: Queen of the Sciences: A Celebration of Numbers and the London Mathematical Society February–December 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Prize for Illustration 2015 – Eleanor Taylor

The Finch & Pea: The Art of Science: Radical Elements

The Guardian: Bridges 2015: a meeting of maths and art – in pictures

NHM: Amazonian artwork by pioneers of evolutionary theory now online

London art trail: What’s In Your DNA?

RCS: Surgeons at Work: The Art of the Operation 31 March–19 September

MOSI: Meet Baby Runs every Tuesday and Wednesday

art at the heart of the RUH: Fusion – Where Two Minds Collide 17 July –2 October

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Bedlam Theatre: ADA  August 5-6, 8-11, 13-18, 20-25, 27-30

Platform Theatre: Jekyll and Hyde Last Chance 8 August 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks: Fermat’s Room

Advances in the History of Psychology: ‘37’ – A Forthcoming Film on the Kitty Genovese Case

Eccles Centre (British Library) Summer Scholars Series 2015: Over the Ice: When Polar Explorers Took to the Skies & Sea Birds, Lost Bodies, and Phantom Islands on the Event Horizon of the New World 7 August 2015

New York Public Library: Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing, with Laura J. Snyder, Fulbright scholar, professor at St. John’s University, and also the author of “The Philosophical Breakfast Club” and “Reforming Philosophy” 4 August 2015

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscopy

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Harley-Street-Dreamstime-Banner

Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy Evenings

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK:

150746-004-3F4BD323

Albrecht Dürer Rhinocerus

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

The History of Modern Biomedicine: Josephine Arendt

Guardian: Life’s big surprises: two videos and a question

Youtube: Harry Potter and the History of Alchemy

Gizmodo: How It Felt to Work at Bell Labs in the 60s

Youtube: Triple Helix DNA

OU: Youtube: What can we earn from Ancient Greek medicine?

CHF: Youtube: Women in Chemistry: Stephanie Kwolek

Medievalist.net: Hildegard’s Cosmos and Its Music: Making a Digital Model for the Modern Planetarium

RADIO:

BBC World Service: Salt and its Diverse History – Part OnePart Two

BBC World Service: The Colour Purple

BBC Radio 4: The Life Scientific: E O Wilson

Youtube: Erwin Schrödinger – “Do Electrons Think?” (BBC 1949)

PODCASTS:

Historical Climatology: A Conversation with Dr. Geoffry Parker

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Engaging With Communication: Celebrating 30 years of mobile phone in the UK University of Salford 12 September 2015

Portal to the Heritage of Astronomy: Hawaiian, Oceanic and Global Cultural Astronomy: Tangible and Intangible Heritage Hilo Hawai’i 16–20 August 2015

University of Bucharest: Master-Class: Isaac Newton’s Philosophical Projects 6–11 October 2015

Open University: Open Learn: The body in antiquity

SSHM: CfP: Workshop: Framing The Face Friend’s Meeting House Euston London 28 November 2015

h-madness: CfP: Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities Belfast: Gruelling Ordeals: The Irish Workhouse Diet, 1850–1950 12 October 2015

AAHM: CfP: Annual Meeting Minneapolis 28 April–1 May 2016

Economic History Society: CfP: Urban History Group 2016: Re-Evaluating the Place of the City in History Robinson College Cambridge 31 March–1 April 2016

Science Museum London: Who Cares? Interventions in ‘unloved’ museum Collections: The Conference 6 November 2015

Mosaic the science of life: Call for pitches: Digg and Mosaic want you!

The Warburg Institute: Ptolemy’s Science of the Stars in the Middle Ages 5–7 November 2015

Economic History Society: CfP: Annual Conference Robinson College Cambridge 1–3 April 2016

h-madness: CfP: The Victorian Brain Victorian Network Deadline: 15 August 2015

Food as Medicine: Historical perspective Programme

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Warwick: Teaching Fellow in the History of Medicine

University of Warwick: Teaching Fellow in the History of Science and Medicine

University of Greenwich: MPhil/PhD Scholarship – Professions and the Press 1690–1920

Scientific Instrument Society: Research grants

University of Leicester: AHRC funded PhD Studentship: The Changing Cultures of Government Science Since 1979: Exploring Privatisation and Commercialisation through Life Histories

University of York: Chair in Sociology/Science and Technology Studies

Christ’s College Cambridge: Junior Research Fellow

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol: #03

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #03

Monday 27 July 2015

EDITORIAL: This week brings you the third edition of the second year of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list containing all that could be rounded up of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the Internet over the last seven days. Recent years has seen an upsurge in the search for women in #histSTM who can and should function as role models for young women contemplating a career in a STM discipline. Unfortunately this search has produced a disturbing historical side effect. More and more articles appear, especially in the Internet, complaining about how one or other of these women was denied the acknowledgement she had earned for work or even had that acknowledgement stolen by a man. Why should I call this development unfortunate? It is unfortunate because in almost all cases the articles are not based on historical facts but on myths leading to massive distortion of the true story and a complete misrepresentation of what actually took place. Yes, many women have had difficulties getting recognition for their achievements in STM but spreading myths is not the right way to go about correcting the problem. A classic example of this problem is the story of Rosalind Franklin, who was born 25 July 1920, and her involvement in the discovery of the structure of DNA.

Rosalind Elsie Franklin Source: Wikimedia Commons

Rosalind Elsie Franklin
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The standard myth, repeated ad nauseam, is that James Watson was shown an X-ray image of DNA, Photo 51, taken by Franklin without her knowledge or permission and in a moment of epiphany realises that DNA is a double helix. This leads to the claim that it was Franklin and not Watson and Crick who discovered the structure of DNA. The story is completely false although it should be acknowledged that Watson’s book The Double Helix is the origin of this myth. For the true story of what happened you should read Matthew Cobb’s article in the Guardian or for greater detail his book Life’s Great Secret, the review of which is below in the book reviews section. The First chapter is available to read in the Sunday Times (first link under Earth & Life Sciences).

The Guardian: Sexism in science: did Watson and Crick really steal Rosalind Franklin’s data?

Physics Today: Rosalind Franklin and the double helix ODNB: Franklin, Rosalind Elsie (1920–1958)

Quotes of the week: “There is nothing good or evil save in the will”. – Epictetus  

“Never send to know for whom the web trolls; it trolls for thee”. – Scott B. Weingart (@scott_bot)

“The set of all sets that wouldn’t be part of any set that would have them as a member. (Groucho’s Paradox)” – Scott B. Weingart (@scott_bot)

“I bet when we do make contact with an advanced alien race, their first message to us will be “Who are U2 and why do we have their album?”” – Dean Burnett {@garwboy)

“She decided to teach postcolonial theory instead of seventeenth-century poetry. Because, well, you know, easier Said than Donne”. – William Germano (@WmGermano)

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something”. – Plato

“We know a lot more than we can prove.” – Richard Feynman

“Always acknowledge your sources. It will never diminish you”. – @upulie

Q: How many academics does it take to change a lightbulb?

A: Change??? Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“What is written without effort is generally read without pleasure”. – Samuel Johnson “If you wish to be a writer, write”. – Epictetus

“To be clear. I am a woman and a historian (and many other things). I am *not* a ‘woman historian’. How many ‘men historians’ do you know?” – Joanne Paul (@Joanne_Paul_)

“If you fancy yourself at the telephone, there is one in the next room.”—G. H. Hardy

“In the interest of PC shouldn’t we talk about ‘diameter disadvantaged’ rather than dwarf planets?” – Thony Christie (@rmathematicus)  

“On 1 April 1898 Beatrix Potter’s paper “On the Germination of the Spores of Agaricineae” was presented at the Linnean Society”.

“Beatrix Potter was not in attendance to hear her paper in the Linnean Society since women were excluded”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“Science is competitive, aggressive, demanding. It is also imaginative, inspiring, uplifting. You can do it, too.” – Vera Rubin

“Success depends upon previous preparation, and without such preparation there is sure to be failure”. – Confucius  

“Memory is the treasury and guardian of all things”. – Cicero  

Birthdays of the Week:

Richard Owen born 20 July 1804

Richard Owen and his gorgonops by pelycosaur

Richard Owen and his gorgonops by pelycosaur

Letters from Gondwana: Owen, Dickens and the ‘Invention’ of Dinosaurs

The Friends of Charles Darwin: Sir Richard Owen: the archetypal villain

ucmp.berkeley.edu: Richard Owen (1804–1892)

NHM: Richard Owen

Deviant Art: Richard Owen and his Gorgonops

Moon landing 20 July 1969

“Stanley Kubrick was hired to fake the moon landing, but his perfectionism made them film it on location on the moon”. – Duncan MacMaster (@FuriousDShow)

“The moon is a rock against which the hope of many an imagined discovery has been shattered.” – LJ Wilson, 1925 h/t Meg Rosenburg (@trueanomalies)

A mounted slowscan TV camera shows Armstrong as he climbs down the ladder to surface Source: Wikimedia Commons

A mounted slowscan TV camera shows Armstrong as he climbs down the ladder to surface
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 Science Notes: Today in Science History – 20 July

Leaping Robot Blog: “Sir, That’s Not A Footprint…”

Forbes: The Locations of Every Moon Landing [Infographic]

DPLA: Apollo 11 Flight plan

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 21 July – Alan Shepard

Esquire: How Apollo Astronauts Took Out the Trash

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 24 July– The Return of Apollo 11

Command module Columbia of Apollo 11 after splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA

Command module Columbia of Apollo 11 after splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

University of Glasgow: Special Collections: Book of the Month: Nicolaus Copernicus De Revolutionibus

Medievalist.net: The Night the Moon exploded and other Lunar tales from the Middle Ages

Quanta Magazine: Famous Fluid Equations Are Incomplete

reddit: Ask Historians: The Manhattan Project

History Ireland: ‘The Hue and Cry of Heresy’ John Toland, Isaac Newton & the Social Context of Scientists

Cosmology: 1838: Friedrich Bessel Measures Distance to a Star

C. A. Jensen, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel, 1839  (Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek)

C. A. Jensen, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel, 1839
(Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek)

Darin Hayton: Astrolabes or Mariner’s Astrolabe – A Primer

AIP: From the Physics Today Archives (Pluto)

The Washington Post: The man who feared rationally, that he’d just destroyed the world

AMNH: Vera Rubin and Dark Matter

Brain Pickings: Pioneering Astronomer Vera Rubin on Science, Stereotypes, and Success

Vera Rubin

Vera Rubin

Dannen.com: Recommendations on the Immediate Use of Nuclear Weapons, June 16, 1945

Restricted Data: “We all aged ten years until the plane cleared the island”

Smithsonian.com: Can Sound Explain a 350-Year-Old Clock Mystery

The Getty Iris: Decoding the Medieval Volvelle

Astronomical Vovelle, from Astronomical and Medical Miscellany, English, late fourteenth century, shortly after 1386. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XII 7, fol. 51

Astronomical Vovelle, from Astronomical and Medical Miscellany, English, late fourteenth century, shortly after 1386. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XII 7, fol. 51

Physics Today: The Dayside: A tale of two papers

Restricted Data: The Kyoto Misconception

Dannen.com: Harry S. Truman, Diary, July 25, 1945

Dannen.com: Official Bombing Order, July 25, 1945

Darin Hayton: The Astronomy Exam at Haverford College in 1859

Atlas Obscura: The Lunar Colonies of Our Wildest Dreams

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: The Kangxi atlas in the King’s Topographical Collection

Library of Congress: Railroad Maps, 1820–1900

[Detail] State of Alabama. October. 2nd. 1866

[Detail] State of Alabama. October. 2nd. 1866

Cyprus Mail: Mapping out a journey

The Commercial Space Blog: Did RADARSAT-2 Find HMS Erebus?

Maps of the State Library of NSW: Embroidery: World with all the modern discoveries ca. 1785

tumblr_nrgnzrbO6T1ttttg2o1_1280

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

NYAM: Good eyes are your protection

Migraine Histories: Oliver Cromwell’s Migraine

Dittrick Museum Blog: By the Light of the Fever-, Gout- and Plague-Inducing Moon: Lunar Medicine

Frontispiece from Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae showing the moon reflecting the sun’s light like a mirror.

Frontispiece from Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae showing the moon reflecting the sun’s light like a mirror.

Collectors Weekly: Healing Spas and Ugly Clubs: How Victorians Taught Us to Treat People With Disabilities

Mosaic: Growing up as the world’s first test-tube baby

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 25 July – Louise Joy Brown’s birthday

Nursing Clio: Anne Bradstreet’s Elegies for her Grandchildren

Conciatore: Donato Altomare

NYAM: Spoiled by a Certain Englishman? The Copying of Andreas Vesalius in Thomas Geminus’ Compendiosa

Adam and Eve in the Academy’s copy of the 1559 English edition of Geminus’ Compendiosa.

Adam and Eve in the Academy’s copy of the 1559 English edition of Geminus’ Compendiosa.

CHSTM: News and Notes: Revolutions in the Atmosphere: Benjamin Rush’s Universal System of Medicine

Advances in the History of Psychology: History and the Hoffman Report: A Round-Up

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: San Giusto Alle Mura

Idle Words: Web Design: The First Hundred Years

Science Notes: Today in Science History –22 July – First solo flight around the world

Wiley Post waving to the crowd before taking off to make the first solo flight around the world. As he waved, he said “So long, see you in about six days!” Credit: Still taken from British Pathé newsreel 1933.

Wiley Post waving to the crowd before taking off to make the first solo flight around the world. As he waved, he said “So long, see you in about six days!” Credit: Still taken from British Pathé newsreel 1933.

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A double bicentennial – George contra Ada – Reality contra Perception

Rachel Laudan: Roman Glass: Transformation by Fire

The H-Word: Humphry Davy and the “safety lamp controversy”

Stephenson’s lamp (left) and Davy’s wire gauze lamp (right). On 25 January 1816, Davy reported to the Royal Society that prototypes of his gauze lamp had been tested “in two of the most dangerous mines near Newcastle, with perfect success”. From George Clementson Greenwell, A Practical Treatise on Mine Engineering (1869).

Stephenson’s lamp (left) and Davy’s wire gauze lamp (right). On 25 January 1816, Davy reported to the Royal Society that prototypes of his gauze lamp had been tested “in two of the most dangerous mines near Newcastle, with perfect success”. From George Clementson Greenwell, A Practical Treatise on Mine Engineering (1869).

Amiga 30: 30th Anniversary Event

Public Domain Review: The Mysteries of Nature and Art

History Today: George Stephenson’s First Steam Locomotive

Getting up steam: Stephenson's 'Blucher', 1814

Getting up steam: Stephenson’s ‘Blucher’, 1814

Rachel Laudan: My Great Grandmother’s Industrially Processed Food

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Sunday Times: Matthew Cobb, Life’s Greatest Secret: Chapter 1: Genes Before DNA

Alembic Rare Books: All The Animated Beings in Nature: An Illustrated Natural History Dictionary Published in 1802

000118e_1024x1024

Brian Pickings: Gorgeous 19th-Century Illustrations of Owls and Ospreys

The Guardian: Natural History Museum’s Dippy the dinosaur to go on holiday

Darwin Project: Darwin’s Scientific Women

Smithsonian Libraries: Crocodiles on the Ceiling

The Sloane Letters Blog: Straight From the Horse’s Mouth

Public Domain Review: Bird Gods (1898)

19862820776_ef38fd9994_z-2

facebook: Paleontologists and their Prehistoric Pets

Notches: Red War on the Family: An Interview with Erica Ryan

NCSE Blog: The Very Hungry Jurist, Part 2

The EBB & Flow: The first null model war in ecology didn’t prevent the second one

Forbes: The Man Who Named The Dinosaurs Also Debunked Tales of Sea Serpents

The Guardian: Archaeologists find possible evidence of earliest human agriculture

Dan Hicks: Archaeology, Austerity and Why Historic Environment Records Matter

Data is Nature: From Constants of Optical Mineralogy

CHEMISTRY:

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Joseph Katz’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Richard Baker’s Interview

Forbes: Forgotten Faces of Science: Percy Julian [Comic]

Source Forbes

Source Forbes

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 23 July – Sir William Ramsey

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 26 July – William “Bill” Mitchell

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Now Apperaring: What is a fair review?

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Fit for print: developing an institutional model of scientific periodical publishing in England, 1665–ca.1714

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Journals, learned societies and money: Philosophical Transactions, ca. 1750–1900

The Best Schools: Sheldrake–Shermer Dialogue on the Nature of Science May thru July 2015

Conciatore: The Neighbors

storify: Delivering Impact: A collection of tweets from sessions at the BSHS annual conference and the SIP conference 2015

homunculus: Understanding the understanding of science

Sage Journals: PUS: …and the new editor of Public Understanding of Science will be…?

Rational Action: Warren Weaver on the Epistemology of Crude Formal Analysis: Relativistic Cosmology and the ‘General Theory of Air Warfare’

Willem de Sitter and Albert Einstein discuss the equations governing the dynamics of the universe

Willem de Sitter and Albert Einstein discuss the equations governing the dynamics of the universe

The New Yorker: In The Memory Ward

Aby Warburg (second from left) was the spirit behind the iconographic studies that dominated much of twentieth-century art history. CREDIT COURTESY THE WARBURG INSTITUTE

Aby Warburg (second from left) was the spirit behind the iconographic studies that dominated much of twentieth-century art history.
CREDIT COURTESY THE WARBURG INSTITUTE

the many-headed monster: The antiquarian listens: unexpected voices of the people

Journalism & Communication Monographs: Atomic Roaches and Test-Tube Babies: Bentley Glass and Science Communications

ESOTERIC:

History of Alchemy: Pico della Mirandola

distillatio: What makes a negromancer an alchemist?

The Recipes Project: Nicander’s snake repellent recipe. Part 1. Practical myth and magic

Tiresias, apparently not yet aware of having become a woman, beats up a pair of frisky snakes. Woodcut illustration, 1690 CE. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tiresias, apparently not yet aware of having become a woman, beats up a pair of frisky snakes. Woodcut illustration, 1690 CE. Source: Wikimedia Commons

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: The Weather Experiment: The Pioneers who Sought to see the Future weather-experiment

The New York Times: Taking on ‘The Vital Question’ About Life

Science Book a Day: De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (On the fabric of the human body in seven books)

Der Spiegel: Die Roboter aus dem Morgenland

Dynamic Ecology Theory and Reality: An Introduction to Philosophy of Science by Peter Godfrey-Smith

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Story of Life: A First Book about Evolution MrFOx-story-of-life-book

The Guardian: Life’s big surprises: The Vital Question and Life’s Greatest Secret reviewed

The Page 99 Test: Ill Composed

NEW BOOKS:

Amazon: Making “nature”: The History of a Scientific Journal

The University of Chicago Press: Osiris, Volume 30: Scientific Masculinities

Historiens de la santé: Working in a world of hurt: Trauma and resilience in the narratives of medical personal in warzones

51zkzLWhFuL._SX300_BO1,204,203,200_

University of Pittsburgh Press: New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies

Math Geek: The New “Sine” of Mathematical Geekdom

OUP: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral? How eighteenth-century science disrupted the natural order

Historiens de la santé: Historical epistemology and the making of modern Chinese medicine

Historiens de la santé: Bodies, Speech, and Reproductive Knowledge in Early Mdern England

Historiens de la santé: Norm als Zwang, Pflicht und Traum: Normierende versus individualisierende Bestrebungen in der Medizin

ART & EXHIBITIONS

The J. Paul Getty Museum: Touching the Past: The Hand and the Medieval Book 7 July–27 September 2015

Abingdon County Hall Museum: Star Power: 50 years of Fusion Research

CP05j-438-01

MHS Oxford: ‘Dear Harry…’ – Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists

NHM: Britain’s First Geological Map

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The H-Word: The Skriker: global warming, eco-fairytales, and science on the stage

 Maxine Peake in the eponymous role in The Skriker at The Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for The Guardian

Maxine Peake in the eponymous role in The Skriker at The Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for The Guardian

Royal Exchange Theatre: The Skriker Closes: 1 August 2015

Arts Theatre: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Closes 31 July 2015

Young Vic: A Number 3 July–15 August 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Nature: Experimental psychology: The anatomy of obedience

trailers.apple.com: Experimenter: The Stanley Milgram Story

MHS Oxford: From Semaphore Flags to Telephones 1 August 2015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Harley-Street-Dreamstime-Banner

Wellcome Collection: Discussion: The Thing Is… Conflict Medicine 30 July 2015 PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK:

GeorgeStephenson

George Stephenson – invented a Miner’s Safety Lamp in the second half of 1815 (simultaneously with Humphry Day)

TELEVISION:

BBC 4: Secret Knowledge: Wondrous Obsessions: The Cabinet of Curiosities

Fox 25: “Galileo’s World” exhibit at OU!

Channel 4: The Saboteurs ITV: The Day They Dropped the Bomb

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Kepler’s First Law of Motion – Elliptical Orbits (Astronomy)

Youtube: Picturing Galileo

Youtube: What Was The Young Earth Like? – Big History Project

Youtube: Professor Povey’s Perplexing Problems – Official Video

Critical Karaoke: Telstar 1: “A Day in the Life”

TED: Steve Silberman: The forgotten history of autism

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Making History: Tom Holland, Andrea Wulf and Dr Paul Warde discuss issues from environmental history

PODCASTS:

Ottoman History Project: Islamic Hospitals in Medieval Egypt and the Levant

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

edX: Internet course: The Book Histories Across Time and Space

University of York: Medical History William Bynum Essay Prize

go fund me: Dr Claudia Alexander Memorial Fund for academic scholarships in STEM

UCL STS: CfP: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2015

The Warburg Institute: Conference: Ptolemy’s Science of the Stars in the Middle Ages 5-7 November 2015

ICHST 2015: 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology Rio de Janeiro 23-29 July 2017

Durham University: Where science and society meet: University Museums Group and University Museums in Scotland joint conference 23-24 September 2015

Royal Society: Open House Weekend History of Science Lecture Series 19-20 September 2015

The Birkbeck Trauma Project: Conference: Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 15–16 April 2016

All Souls College Oxford: CfP: Charles Hutton (1737–1823): being mathematical in the Georgian period 17-18 December 2015

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: Women and Science (Forum–Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal)

H-Announce: Call for Contributions to a Special Issue of Environment and History on Parks and Gardens 31 December 2015

Macquarie University Sydney: CfP: Foreign Bodies, Intimate Ecologies: Transformations in Environmental History 11–13 February 2016

Ada Lovelace: Celebrating 200 years of a computer visionary: Student scholarship available for symposium

KOME: Call for articles in science studies

LOOKING FOR WORK:

The Royal Institution: Christmas Lectures Assistant

University of Leeds: Leeds Masters Scholarship Scheme

University of Warwick: Teaching Fellow in the History of Medicine

University of Nottingham: British Academy Fellowship for historical geography scholar

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #02

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #02

Monday 20 July 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome to the second edition of the second year of Whewell’s Gazette, the weekly #histSTM links lists, which brings you all that we could gather of the histories of science, technology and medicine throughout the Internet in the last seven days.

The last week has seen a great triumph for science and technology with the successful flypast of Pluto by the space probe New Horizons after more than nine years en route. This prompted many articles on the history of the discovery of Pluto and its discoverer Clyde Tombaugh.

However this week also saw the seventieth anniversary of what many consider to be the greatest ever fall from grace of science and technology with the detonation of the first atomic bomb at the Trinity nuclear test on 16 July 1945.

These two episodes show that science and technology being human activities are far from being the neutral subjects that many would like to claim them to be. Humans create science and technology and humans determine how they will be put to use. The achievements of both the New Horizons and the Manhattan Project teams are viewed objectively amongst the greatest technical triumphs that our approximately four thousand years of science have delivered. However whereas the one is a cause for jubilation the other, releasing as it did undreamed of forces of destruction, can only be viewed with horror by any rational human being.

The Triumph – Pluto:

Not that Pluto!

Not that Pluto!

Johns Hopkins: Happy 100th Birthday, Clyde Tombaugh

Clyde Tombaughs notebook

Clyde Tombaughs notebook

io9: When We Discovered Pluto, It Changed How We Saw The Solar System

Cosmographia: Pluto – Predicted

Nautilus: A Visual History of Humanity’s Exploration of Pluto

PACHSmörgåsbord: Interview with Clyde Tombaugh, March 31, 1996

Clyde Tombaugh with his "automobile" telescope

Clyde Tombaugh with his “automobile” telescope

Timothy Hughes: Rare & Early Newspapers: Planet Pluto officially discovered

The Mitchell Archives: The Discovery of Pluto

The New York Times: Says Pluto’s Size is That of Mars

Popular Science: How a ‘Farm Boy’ Found Pluto 85 Years Ago

Glass positive of The new planet Pluto; Lowell Observatory 42-inch Reflector

Glass positive of The new planet Pluto; Lowell Observatory 42-inch Reflector

Academy of American Achiements: Clyde Tombaugh Photo Gallery

Modern Mechanix: Pluto is an Exceedingly Minor Planet (Nov, 1934)

Mammoth Tales: On Planet X and Naming Names

The Atlantic: The Women Who Rule Pluto

The H-Word: Seeing Pluto: strain, pain and ‘awesome’ science

Paige Fossil History: Retaining Childhood Curiosity: Pluto & Scientific Achievement

True Anomalies: Pluto, Mars, Moon, Earth

The Guardian: Pluto and other historical first pictures of planets

The New York Times: Summer of Science

The level of detail on the latest #PlutoFlyby images is astounding! Source: Twitter originator unknown

The level of detail on the latest #PlutoFlyby images is astounding!
Source: Twitter originator unknown

 

The Fall From Grace – Trinity:

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge petition, mid-July 1945

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge petition, 13 July 1945

Dannen.com: July 17, 1945. Leo Szilard’s petition against using the atomic bomb

Ptak Science Books: The Atomic Bomb and Satan’s Release, 1947

Dannen.com: Target Committee, Los Alamos, May 10-11, 1945

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lilli Hornig’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: George Kistiakowsky’s Interview

The Washington Post: Senator: Compensate residents near site of atomic bomb test

The Trinity explosion, 16 ms after detonation. The viewed hemisphere's highest point in this image is about 200 metres (660 ft) high. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Trinity explosion, 16 ms after detonation. The viewed hemisphere’s highest point in this image is about 200 metres (660 ft) high.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Trinity test bomb was the model dropped over Nagasaki. The bomb dropped over Hiroshima was never tested–not enough U-235 to spare. Audra J. Wolfe (@ColdWarScience)

ARD Mediathek: Zündung der ersten Atombombe am (16.7.1945) podcast

The New York Times: The First Light of Trinity

Restricted Data: Brig. Gen. Thomas Farrell, on the Trinity test, July 16, 1945

Ptak Science Books: Eyewitness Account “Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima” April 1946

The Boston Globe: The deterrent that wasn’t

AHF: News Articles on Trinity Test

Restricted Data: Trinity at 70: “Now we are all sons of bitches”

 

Quotes of the week:

 “And remember, with great power comes great utilities bill”. – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

 “It’s the right idea, but not the right time.” – John Dalton.

“I don’t exactly know what I mean by that, but I mean it.” – J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

“Personally, I’m always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.” – Winston Churchill

“You have to be nice to humans and when they don’t behave properly you can’t kill them” – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

“It took 100s of years to map the continents on Earth; it took just 50 years to see all the planets up close”. – John Grunsfeld

“In astronomy, looking over a long distance also means looking through expanses of time”. – Marek Kukula (@marekkukula)

“Frederick Great asked young Humboldt if he planned to conquer world like namesake Alexander the Great: ‘yes sir, but with my head’” h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf)

“That men do not learn very much from lessons of history is the most important of all lessons that history has to teach.” – Aldous Huxley

“A coffee cup is homeomorphic to a donut”.

“A coffee cup with a broken handle is homeomorphic to a donut with a bite taken out”. – @TopologyFact

“There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed”. –Hemingway

“Nature never deceives us; it is we who deceive ourselves”. – Rousseau

“All a musician can do is to get closer to the sources of nature, and so feel that he is in communion with the natural laws” – John Coltrane

“I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.” – John Cage

“Physics is the unfolding of the laws of the intelligible world, pure mathematics is the unfolding of laws of human intelligence”. – J Sylvester

 Birthdays of the Week:

John Dee born 13 July 1527

The Renaissance Mathematicus: John Dee, the “Mathematicall Praeface” and the English School of Mathematics

A 16th-century portrait by an unknown artist Source: Wikimedia Commons

A 16th-century portrait by
an unknown artist
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee

English Historical Fiction Authors: “This Rough Magic”: The Secrets of the Tudor-Era Seers

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 15 July – Jocelyn Bell Burnell

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 2009 Source Wikimedia Commons

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 2009
Source Wikimedia Commons

Starchild: Jocelyn Bell Burnell

AIP: Leon Lederman

arXiv.org: Records of sunspots and aurora during CE 960–1279 in the Chinese chronicle of the Song Dynasty

Forbes: History of Science Notes: For Whom The Prague Tolls

NASA Mars Exploration: Mars @ 50

Royal Museums Greenwich: A Glimpse of Mars Through Fractured Illusion: The Materiality of the Stereo Image

Daily Sabah: Astrolabe: the 13th Century iPhone

1437076313625

Science 2.0: Big Science: Ernest Lawrence Gets His Hagiography

The New Atlantis: The Unknown Newton (Introduction)

The New Atlantis: The Unknown Newton (Articles)

Astronomy Magazine: Pioneering Rosetta mission scientist Claudia Alexander dead at 56

Claudia Alexander Source: Wikimedia Commons

Claudia Alexander
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Los Angeles Times: Claudia Alexander dies at 56; JPL researcher oversaw Galileo, Rosetta missions

Teyler’s Museum: Planetarium, George Adams, London

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Curiouser and Curiouser: The World’s Most Unusual and Beautiful Maps

Yovisto: Edward Whymper and the Matterhorn

Yovisto: Salomon August Andrée’s Artic Baloon Expedition of 1897

S. A. Andrée and Knut Frænkel with the crashed balloon on the pack ice, photographed by the third expedition member, Nils Strindberg

S. A. Andrée and Knut Frænkel with the crashed balloon on the pack ice, photographed by the third expedition member, Nils Strindberg

 

Ptak Science Books: The Unstoppable Mawson (1914)

Royal Museums Greenwich: Looking across the Atlantic in 18th-century maps

I Like: The Map That Came To Life

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Forensic Anna:thropology: the sent of death

Conciatore: Francesco and Bianca

Remedia: Cinchona

17th century jar of quinine. The jar is believed to be from the pharmacy of the Milosrdnych Bratri Monastery and Hospital Brno, in the Czech Republic. L0057596 Credit: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

17th century jar of quinine. The jar is believed to be from the pharmacy of the Milosrdnych Bratri Monastery and Hospital Brno, in the Czech Republic. L0057596 Credit: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

Morbid Anatomy: Fabulous Senior Thesis Project Inspired by Remmelin’s Flap Anatomy

The Telegraph: The pioneering surgeon who healed men scarred by war, a new monument created in his honour – and the remarkable twist of fate that links them

academia.edu: Médecine et hellénisme à la Renaissance: Le problème du grec chez Baillou

Nain, Mam and Me: Allenburys milk foods: a triumph of industrialisation

The Atlantic: The Victorian Anti-Vaccination Movement

A cartoon from a December 1894 anti-vaccination publication Courtesty of The Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

A cartoon from a December 1894 anti-vaccination publication
Courtesty of The Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

The Guardian: CIA torture is only part of medical science’s dark modern history

Mosaic: Step-by-step: prosthetic legs through the ages (gallery)

The Sloane Letters Blog: On Hans Sloane’s Copies of De Humani Corporis Fabrica

RCS: William Clowes – A prooved practice for all young chirurgiens, 1588

CHoM News: Bernard D. Davis Papers Processing Has Begun, as part of Maximizing Microbiology Project

Collectors Weekly: Bloodletting, Bone Brushes, and Tooth Keys: White-Knuckle Adventures in Early Dentistry

TECHNOLOGY:

Invention: A twist of Fate: The Invention of the Rubik’s Cube

Today’s Document: Eli Barum & Benjamin Brooks Still Patented 13 July 1808

Thick Objects: Remaking a local object: The Kirschmann coaxial colour mixer

National Museum of American History: Galileo Pendulum Clock Model, Replica

Nautilus: The Rube Goldberg Machine That Mastered Keynesian Economics

Schematic diagram of the MONIAC machine LSE Library collections, Meade/16/3

Schematic diagram of the MONIAC machine
LSE Library collections, Meade/16/3

web.stanford.edu: The Defecating Duck, Or The Ambiguous Origins of Artificial Life

The Guardian: The world’s first hack: the telegraph and the invention of privacy

The National Museum of Computing: EDSAC Shortlisted for prestigious ICON Award

Ptak Science Books: Heavy Electricity, 1879

Conciatore: Vitrum Flexile

Teyler’s Museum: Sound Synthesizer, after Helmholtz, Rudolph Koenig Paris

Vox: 7 horrifying attempts at building a better mousetrap

Yes, this is an actual mousetrap patent from 1882. Google patents

Yes, this is an actual mousetrap patent from 1882.
Google patents

Barron’s: Optical Inventions Opened the Modern World (google title and click on first link to circumnavigate pay wall!)

BBC: Flying Scotsman nearing end of decade-long overhaul

The York Press: Flying Scotsman restoration enters final stage

The New York Times: The Bicycle and the Ride to Modern America

Canadian Science and Technology Museum: Cycling: The Evolution of an Experience, 1818–1900

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 19 July – Percy Spencer and the Microwave Oven

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Nature: Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace

Embryo Project: Friedrich Tiedemann (1781–1861)

Environmental History Resources: Timeline of environmental history

Recipes Project: How to brew beer with a ‘paile of cold water’

The Bigger Picture: William Stimpson and the Smithsonian’s First Aquarium

An aquarium has recently become “a necessary luxury in every well-appointed household, both of Europe and America.” Henry D. Butler, The Family Aquarium (New York, 1858). Colored frontispiece, Biodiversity Heritage Library.

An aquarium has recently become “a necessary luxury in every well-appointed household, both of Europe and America.” Henry D. Butler, The Family Aquarium (New York, 1858). Colored frontispiece, Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Yovisto: Carl Woese and the Archaea

Embryo Project: Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov (Elie Metchnikoff) (1845–1916)

big think: Charles Darwin Would Be Ashamed of ‘Social Darwinism’

History of the Marine Biological Laboratory: The MBL Embryology Course 1939

Smithsonian Libraries: The Body Electric: Inspiring Frankenstein

OUP Blog: Alice down the microscope

Down the Microscope and what Alice found there. Biochemical Society, December 1927 by the Wellcome Library, London. CC-BY-4.0 - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/alice-microscope/#sthash.t8XwoS6I.dpuf

Down the Microscope and what Alice found there. Biochemical Society, December 1927 by the Wellcome Library, London. CC-BY-4.0 – See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/alice-microscope/#sthash.t8XwoS6I.dpuf

The Royal Society: The Repository: A bad break in the Lakes

The New York Times: David M. Raup, Who Transformed Field of Paleontology, Dies at 82

David M. Raup in 1981. Credit William Franklin McMahon/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

David M. Raup in 1981. Credit William Franklin McMahon/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

Why Evolution is True: David M. Raup, 1933–2015

The Nation: Can We Cure Genetic Diseases Without Slipping Into Eugenics?

AMNH: Epitonium scalare

10 Things Wrong With Environmental Thinking: The Pastoral, literal and environmental, defined

NPR: The Salt: We Didn’t Build This City on Rock’N’Roll. It Was Yogurt

Data is Science: Thomas Sopwith’s Stratigraphic Models

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 13 July – August Kekulé

1979 East German stamp of Kekulé, in honour of the sesquicentennial of his birth. Source: Wikimedia Commons

1979 East German stamp of Kekulé, in honour of the sesquicentennial of his birth.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

storify: Science on Tap: A History of the Chemical Elements for (Big) Kids

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ether Wave Propaganda: If You Read Joseph Agassi, Man and Nature Become More Complex

Niche: ICHG 2015: History and Geography in a Digital Age

JHI Blog: The Archival Agenda: Thinking Through Scientific Archives at the Royal Society

Museum of HSTM Blog: Gillinson Room Project

storify: Science in Public 2015

Environmental History Resources:

Bishop Blog: Publishing replication failures: some lessons from history

THE: Can history and geography survive the digital age?

The History Vault: Reading Anatomy in Francis J. Cole’s Collection

Francis J Cole Source: Franklin, K. J

Francis J Cole
Source: Franklin, K. J

Conciatore: Montpellier

Public Domain Review: Cat Pianos, Sound-Houses, and Other Imaginary Musical Instruments

University of Leicester: From Citizen Science to Citizen Humanities – 19th Century history in the digital age

Punk Rock Operations Research: Life was simple before World War II. After that, we had systems

A view from the bridge: Of mud pies, muscle and science education

Faith and Wisdom in Science: The Faith and Wisdom in Science Story in Three Steps

Spitalfields Life: Kirby’s Eccentric Museum, 1820

This wonderful boy, who in early age outstripped all former calculators, was born in Morton Hampstead on 14th June 1806

This wonderful boy, who in early age outstripped all former calculators, was born in Morton Hampstead on 14th June 1806

ESOTERIC:

tspace.library.utoronto.ca: Cultural Uses of Magic in Fifteenth-Century England (pdf)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Philadelphia City Paper: “What’s the Matter with Pluto?”

arts_col_pluto_rgb

Back Re(Action): Eureka by Chad Orzel

Popular Science: The Lightness of Being – Frank Wilczek

Los Angeles Review of Books: James K. A. Smith on The Territories of Science and Religion

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Psychiatry in Communist Europe

Remedia: Charismatic Substances

CHF: Pure Intelligence: The Life of William Hyde Wollaston

Historiens de la santé: The Evolution of Forensic Psychiatry: History, Current Developments, Future Directions

Historiens de la santé: Plague and Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean World. The Ottoman Experience, 1347–1600

9781107013384

Wiley Online Library: The International Handbooks of Museum Studies

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Irish Tech Times: Boolean expressions: Art meets maths to celebrate George Boole bicentennial at Lewis Glucksman Gallery, UCC

tatsuo-miyajima-life-palace-tea-room-designboom-04

tatsuo-miyajima-life-palace-tea-room-designboom-04

George Boole 200: The Life and Legacy of George Boole

The Irish Times: George Boole exhibition opens in UCC to mark bicentennial

Royal College of Physicians: Re-framing disability: portraits from the Royal College of Physicians

Natural History Museum: Images of Nature

The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: Gold Last Chance closes 26 July 2015

The Royal Society: Seeing Closer: 350 years of microscopy 29 June–23 November 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

What’s on Stage: Jonathan Holloway’s Jekyll & Hyde Starts 28 July 2015

Winterbourne Opera: Gounod’s Faust 28 July–1 August 2015

Worthing Theatres: Dr Bunhead’s Secret Science Lab 24-25 July 2015

National Theatre: The Curious Incidence of the Dog in the Night-Time 21-29 July 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Wellcome Collection: Minds and Bodies 23 July 2015

Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy Evenings Every Friday

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Sex and the City

nowvenerealdiseases

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK:

Gregor Johann Mendel (20 July 1822 – 6 January 1884)

ZGS4F2

From the Album Benary

TELEVISION:

HSS: PBS Series to Portray the History of Chemistry

SLIDE SHOW:

BHL: Sloths!

VIDEOS:

Youtube: The History and Philosophy of Science in 6 Easy Steps – Intro

Fusion: Why would a scientist inject gonorrhoea pus into his own penis?

Youtube: Unnatural histories Amazon

Royal Society Objectivity

Youtube: The Phoenix Index

The Telegraph: Apollo 11:12 key steps to the moon in video

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Natural Histories

PODCASTS:

Filament Communication: Episode 3: Matthew Cobb on writing science history

Folger Shakespeare Library: The Shakespearean Moons of Uranus

British Academy: Who reads Geography or History anymore? The challenge of audience in a digital age

Big Picture Science: It’s All Relative

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Framing the Face: CfP: One-day workshop Friend’s Meeting House Euston Road London 28 November 2015

Royal Society: 4th Notes and Records Essay Award

Imperial & Global Forum: CfP: Colonialism, War & Photography

University of York: Medical History William Bynum Essay Prize

HSS: Preliminary Program 2015 History of Science Society Meeting San Francisco 19–22 November

University of Toronto: HPS100 Trailer – Why History & Philosophy of Science?

Wikimedia: Wikipedia Science Conference: The Henry Wellcome Auditorium London 2-3 September 2015

University of Wuppertal: CfP: Workshop: Early modern Jesuit science in a digital perspective – The Jesuit Science Network 26–27 November 2015

V&A Museum: On the Matter of Books and Records: Workshop: 23 November 2015 – Programme

University of Oxford: CfP: 6th SHAC Postgraduate Workshop: Alchemy and Chemistry in Sickness and in Health 30 October 2015

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Call for Reviewers

Advances in the History of Psychology: CfP: Special Issue of HoP on History of Psychotherapy in North and South America

 

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Manchester University: CHSTM: Taught master’s in history of science, technology and medicine Applications close 31 July 2015

Notches: Assistant Editor Positions at Notches

Eccles Centre for American Studies: Eccles Centre Writers in Residence – 2016 Awards Applications Open

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: Research Assistant #histMed

Jacobs Foundation: Jacobs Science Writers Fellowship

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Program Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #01

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #01

Monday 13 July 2015

EDITORIAL: 

Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list returns today, after a short break, with the first edition of its second year bringing you all the best that out editorial staff could sweep up of the histories of science, technology and medicine in the Internet over the last seven days. During that period many of our supporters and readers, who also supply much of the material collected here, were gathered together in Swansea for the annual conference of the BSHS discussing lots of interesting topics from the history of science. One central theme that is a principal interest of our long-suffering chief sub-editor was, how can science communicators use history of science?

Many of those present in Swansea are highly active on Twitter and tweeted this discussion in great detail. Katherine McAlpine, a curator, collected and storified those tweets and we present her efforts in place of an editorial for this edition.

storify: How do we tell the history of science?

As a bonus a couple of other BSHS15 tweet storifies.

storify: #bshs15 outtakes – the hype (and) en route

storify: #bshs15 The first full day

“It never helps historians to say too much about their working methods. For just as the conjuror’s magic disappears if the audience knows how the trick is done, so the credibility of scholars can be sharply diminished if readers learn everything about how exactly their books came to be written. Only too often, such revelations dispel the impression of fluent, confident omniscience; instead, they suggest that histories are concocted by error-prone human beings who patch together the results of incomplete research in order to construct an account whose rhetorical power will, they hope, compensate for gaps in the argument and deficiencies in the evidence.” – Keith Thomas h/t Sharon Howard

Quotes of the week:

“Your password must contain a ferrous metal, an embarrassing sexual memory, at least one Norse god and the seeds of its own destruction”. – @daniel_barker

“First rule of Thesaurus Club. You don’t talk, discuss, converse, speak, chat, confer, deliberate, gab, or gossip about Thesaurus Club”. – @SwedishCanary

“How long until we find out if Pluto has feathers?” – Tom Swanson {@Swansontea)

“”Genital” is an anagram of “gelatin.” I wonder who’s responsible for that”. – Allen Stairs (@AllenStairs)

“The pen is writier than the sword”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

 “People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” – A.A. Milne (Winnie-the-Pooh)

“Buying books would be a good thing if one could also buy the time to read them in.” – Schopenhauer

“Part of making progress in science is about recognizing which problems are ready to be solved” – Frank Wilczek h/t Philip Ball

“‘Easy’ is a word to describe other people’s jobs.” – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“When you treat people like children, you get children’s work.” – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“It’s tempting to cover up boring with polish, but it rarely works.” – Seth Godin h/t @JohnDCook

“I’ve never known any trouble that an hour’s reading didn’t assuage.” ― Charles de Secondate.

“A man is responsible for his ignorance.” ― Milan Kundera

“The print codex is merely one form of “the book.” It is mutable, in both text & form. The change agent is human, not technological”. Shannon Supple (@mazarines) Tweet from #sharp15

“The age of innocent faith in science and technology may be over.” Barry Commoner (1966). h/t Michael Egan (@EganHistory)

“Science is about as emotion-free as poetry”. – Tom McLeish (@mcleish_t)

“In science, most ideas are obvious. It’s how to TEST them that requires cleverness”. – John Hawks (@johnhawks)

“Since it pissed off so many nerds yesterday, let me reiterate: evolutionary psychology is shoddy science used to uphold retrograde beliefs”. – Bailey (@the_author)

“Nature composes some of her loveliest poems for the microscope and the telescope”. – Theodore Roszak h/t @hist_astro  

Birthdays of the Week:  

90th Anniversary of the Scopes Trial 10 July  Peddling and Scaling God and Darwin: Ninetieth Anniversary of the Scopes Trial

The teacher at the center of proceedings, John Thomas Scopes Source: Wikimedia Commons

The teacher at the center of proceedings, John Thomas Scopes
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The New York Times: The Scopes Trial: Remembering When Teaching Evolution Went to Court

Smithsonian.com: The Scopes Trial Redefined Science Journalism and Shaped It to What It Is Today

Robert Fitzroy born 5 July 1805

Stay Thirsty: A Conversation with Juliet Aykroyd about Darwin & Fitzroy

FitzRoy later in life (probably mid-fifties). Source: Wikimedia Commons

FitzRoy later in life (probably mid-fifties).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dolly the Sheep

Embryo Project: Nuclear Transplantation

Dolly's taxidermied remains Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dolly’s taxidermied remains
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Embryo Project: Ian Wilmut (1944– )

Science Notes: Today in Science History – July 5 – Dolly the Sheep

Nikola Tesla born 10 July 1956

Mental Floss: The Time Nikola Tesla Paid for His Hotel Room With a “Death Ray”

Excluded Middle: Nikola Tesla’s Earthquake Machine

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 10 July – Nikola Tesla WSJ: The Wizard of Houston Street

Tesla wearing a folk costume, c. 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tesla wearing a folk costume, c. 1880
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Initial Tesla Polyphase

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Smithsonian.com: Urban Explorations: The Great Moon Hoax Was Simply a Sign of Its Time

Yovisto: Henrietta Swan Leavitt and the Light of the Cepheids

Yovisto: Macquorn Rankine and the Laws of Thermodynamics

arXiv.org: The Collaboration of Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein and his wife Mileva Maric Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein and his wife Mileva Maric
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Motherboard: A Visual Tribute to Isaac Newton’s ‘Principia’

Universe Today: Who Was Nicolaus Copernicus?

AHF: J. Carson Mark

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Dorothy Wilkinson’s Interview

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 7 July – Giuseppe Piazzi

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ralph Gates’s Interview

Atlas Obscura: Cincinnati Observatory

Plutovian: Planet X is 1200 times bigger than Earth – approximately

academia.edu: Learned modesty and the first lady’s comet: a commentary on Caroline Herschel (1787) ‘An account of a new comet’

AIP: Oral Histories: John Wheeler – Session I

AHF: John Wheeler

The Irish Times: The Grubbs: 19th-century Irish stargazers

Thomas Grubb: his apparent lack of formal education did not prevent him from tinkering with telescopes and becoming an astronomical observer Source: Irish Times

Thomas Grubb: his apparent lack of formal education did not prevent him from tinkering with telescopes and becoming an astronomical observer
Source: Irish Times

The New York Times: Reaching Pluto, and the End of an Era of Planetary Exploration

Black Hills Pioneer: 50 years of deep discovery

Pugwash: The Russell-Einstein Manifesto 9 July 1955

Voices of Manhattan: Ray Gallagher’s Accounts of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Missions

APS Physics: This Month in Physics History: Einstein and Women

The New York Times: Venetia Phair Dies at 90; as a Girl, She Named Pluto

academia.edu: A Book, a Pen, and the Sphere: Reading Sacrobosco in the Renaissance

Muslim Heritage: Glances on Calendars and Almanacs in the Islamic Civilization

Traditional Turkish Calendar (1452). This kind of calendar was based on a cycle of 12 months, each corresponding to a different animal. This calendar for the year of the monkey by Hamdi Mustafa b. Sunbul was presented to Mehmed II. Topkapi Palace Museum Library, MS B 309.

Traditional Turkish Calendar (1452). This kind of calendar was based on a cycle of 12 months, each corresponding to a different animal. This calendar for the year of the monkey by Hamdi Mustafa b. Sunbul was presented to Mehmed II. Topkapi Palace Museum Library, MS B 309.

International Year of Light 2015 – Blog: Heaven on Earth

AHF: Remembering the Trinity Test

Christie’s The Art People: Newton, Sir Isaac (1643–1727) Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathematica

National Geographic: Why Do We Call Them the ‘Dog Days’ of Summer?

Phys.Org: What is Halley’s Comet?

Discover: The Man Who (almost) Discovered Pluto…and Also (Almost) Discovered the Expanding Universe

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

BHL: The Description de L’Égyte: The Savants of Napoleon’s Egyptian CampaignHilaire 3 Canadaland: Q&A with Paul Watson, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist, on why he just Resigned from the Toronto Star (The Franklin Ships Erebus & Terror)

Linguistic Geographies: The Gough Map of Great Britain

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Atlas Obscura: The Pest House Medical Museum

From the Hands of Quacks: The Reed Hearing Test

Clinical Curiosities: History of Medicine at BSHS15

Forbes: Why Were Cases Of Autism So Hard To Find Before the 1990s?

Yovisto: Camillo Golgi and the Golgi Apparatus

The Recipes Project: Of Quacks and Caustics

Titlepage: Novum lumen chirurgicum Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

Titlepage: Novum lumen chirurgicum
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org

Dr Alun Withey: Religion & the Sickness Experience in Early Modern Britain

Fiction Reboot–Daily Dose: Are we running out of Bodies? Dissection, Cadavers, and Medical Practice

Notches: The Sacred Precincts of Marital Bedrooms: Religion and the Making of Griswold

Embryo Project: Wilhelm His, Sr. (1831–1904)

Christie’s The Art People: The ‘Google Maps’ of the human body

Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: The Skeleton Trade: Life, Death and Commerce in Early Modern Europe

Circulating Now: Medieval Herbals in Movable Type dsc1853 Nautilus: The Split Personality of the Color Yellow

NPR: The Salt: From Medicine to Modern Revival: A History of American Whiskey, In Labels

Nain, Mam and Me: Allenburys hygienic baby bottle: a picture of domestic bliss Concocting History: The snake-goddess, the satyr and the parturient: Jean Chièze’s Hippocratic illustrations

TECHNOLOGY:

Motherboard: This Is What 70 Years of Computing Sounds Like

Conciatore: True Colors

Aldrovandi's pica marina Source: Conciatore

Aldrovandi’s pica marina
Source: Conciatore

Conciatore: Don Giovanni in Flanders

Conciatore: The Material of All Enamels

Teylers Museum: Berliner Gramophone 4 sound clips

Canada Science and Technology Museum: Cycling: The Evolution of an Experience, 1818–1900

Smithsonian.com: Five Epic Patent Wars That Don’t Involve Apple

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 11 July – NASA’s Skylab space station returns to Earth

BuzzFeed: 11 Female Inventors Who Helped Power The Information Age

Harry Kalish / Chemical Heritage Foundation (CC BY-SA 3.0) / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Harry Kalish / Chemical Heritage Foundation (CC BY-SA 3.0) / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Wordnik: Come Fly With Me: 9 Common Words with Aviation Origins

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Wallace Medal LA Times: Alexander von Humboldt: The man who made modern nature

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Ernst Mayr

MSN News: The story of John Money: Controversial sexologist grappled with the concept of gender

Yovisto: Albert von Kölliker and the Origins of Embryology

xroads.viginia.edu: Alexander Wilson

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 6 July – Rabies Vaccine

Evolution Institute: Truth and Reconciliation for Social Darwinism

The Sloane Letters Blog: The Sad Kiss of 1722

Atlas Obscura: Thomas Jefferson Built This Country on Mastodons

Drawing of an early 19th century attempt at a mammoth restoration. Note the upside-down tusks. (Image: WikiCommons/Public Domain)

Drawing of an early 19th century attempt at a mammoth restoration. Note the upside-down tusks. (Image: WikiCommons/Public Domain)

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Early evolution pioneers’ artwork now online

The H-Word: Sexism in science: did Watson and Crick really steal Rosalind Franklins’ data?

Wonders & Marvels: History is Sometimes Made by Great Men (and Women)

Embryo Project: Studies in Spermatogenesis (1905), by Nettie Maria Stevens

PRI: Meet the man who gave the name to the creatures we now know as dinosaurs

Medievalist.net: Avalanches in the Middle Ages

Tand Online (OA): The Rat-Catcher’s Prank: Interspecies Cunningness and Scavenging in Henry Mayhew’s London

Cambrian News Online: 17th century nature under the microscope

Paige Fossil History: Additional Pieces of Neandertal 1: History Aiding Science

The Guardian: Conjoined piglets and two-faced kittens: Victorian oddities ­– in pictures

Preserved conjoined piglets, European, 19th century Photograph: Rosamund Purcell

Preserved conjoined piglets, European, 19th century
Photograph: Rosamund Purcell

The Recipes Project: A Cartography of Chocolate

Medievalist.net: Medievalist helps scientists rewrite climate records

Niche: ICHG 2015: Environmental, but not necessarily environmental history

The Scientist: Water Fleas, 1755

CHEMISTRY:

Open Culture: Marie Curie’s Research Papers Are Still Radioactive 100+ Years Later

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 9 July – Loenzo Romano Carlo Avogadro di Quarengna e di Cerreto

Back Re(Action): Liquid Helium

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (left) and Johannes Diderik van der Waals in 1908 in the Leiden physics laboratory, in front of the apparatus used later to condense helium. (Source: Museum Boerhaave, Leiden)

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (left) and Johannes Diderik van der Waals in 1908 in the Leiden physics laboratory, in front of the apparatus used later to condense helium. (Source: Museum Boerhaave, Leiden)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Nautilus: The Nautilus Weekly Science Quiz: How Much Science Is In The Constitution?

The Recipe Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Boots Archive

Niche: ICHG 2015: Big Ideas in Historical Geography and “Door Crashers”

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Scholars Spin Their Own Nursery Rhymes (Without the Happy Endings)

Jack and Jill Went up the hill To fetch a pail of water and met an anonymous peer reviewer they threw down the well   Douglas Hunter

Nautilus: How Science Helped Write the Declaration of Independence

flickr: University of Victoria Libraries

The Telegraph: A Clerk of Oxford’s guide to a bright old world

homunculus: Does anyone have any questions?

Royal Society: Conservative attitudes to old-established organs: Oliver Lodge and Philosophical Magazine

Digital Bodleian: Makes These Extraordinary Library Collection Available Online For The Very First Time…

Translation and Print: Translations and the making of Early English Print Culture (1473–1660)

CHF: Episode 200: Distillations Turns 200

PLOS Blogs: J. Andrew Bangham (1947–2014): Enterprising scientist who broke new ground in computational biology and image analysis

Andrew teaching in Italy

Andrew teaching in Italy

British Naval History: Why I Became a Historian: Peter Hore

Ether Wave Propaganda: The Benefits of Technology: Productivity as a Measure

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: On the word “Alchumy”, “Alconamye” and variations thereof in English

BOOK REVIEWS:

Popular Science: Chilled – Tom Jackson

Science Book a Day: The Door in the Dream: Conversations with Eminent Women in Science

Science Book a Day: The Earth: From Myths to Knowledge Krivine_TheEarth_JK_V3.indd British Journal for the History of Science: Book Reviews

TLS: Dissent of man: Piers J. Hale Political Descent: Malthus, mutualism, and the politics of evolution in Victorian England

Morbid Anatomy: The Call of Abandoned Souls: Guest Post and New Book By Ivan Cenzi of Bizzaro Bazar

The Financial Times: ‘A Beautiful Question’, by Frank Wilczek

The New York Review of Books: How You Consist of Trillions of Tiny Machines

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Indian Doctors in Kenya, 1895–1940: The Forgotten History index The Guardian: Colouring-in books boom continues with volume of mathematical patterns

Barnes & Nobel: History of Chemistry Books

Occult Minds: Forthcoming publications

ART & EXHIBITIONS

University of Lincoln: Exhibition to celebrate the life and legacy of George Boole forefather of the information age

Glucksman: Boolean Expressions: Contemporary art and mathematical expression 25 July–8 November 2015

John Craig Freeman: Platonic Solids

Gulf Times: Three great Muslim inventors

Shackleton 100: By Endurance we Conquer: The Polar Museum: Shackleton and his men 22 September 2015–18 June 2016

M Library Blogs: New Online Exhibit: Beer Brewing and Technology

Cecilia Brunson Projects: A Garden for Beatrix 20 May-July 24 2015

Lucia Pizzani A Garden for Beatrix Series

Lucia Pizzani A Garden for Beatrix Series

Life: Artatomy 5 June-6 September 2015

Science Museum: The Science and Art of Medicine

Grain: Album 31: Exhibition: 19 June-29 August 2015

The National Library of Wales: ‘The Secret Workings of Nature’ 7 July 2015–9 January 2016

Explore Art at Gracefield Arts Centre: Dumfries Crichton Royal – A Hidden Gem 18 July–22 August 2015

Chelmsford Museum: World of Wallace Last Chance closes 19 July

London Museum of Health and Medicine: The Riddle of Shock 17 July 2015–30 June 2016

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Young Vic: A Number 3 July-15 August 2015

Theatre Royal Haymarket: The Elephant Man 19 May-8 August 2015 246x380-TEM Arts Theatre: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein 14 July–31 July 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Science Museum: Beyond Vision: Photography, Art and Science symposium 12 September 2015

The Guardian: Guardian Masterclasses: Everything you need to know about science communication

The Royal Institution: To infinity and beyond: the story of the spacesuit 30 July 2015

Shadow and Act: Film Based on Story of Black Women Mathematicians Who Worked for NASA During the Space Race, in the Works

Margot Lee Shetterly Image Credit: NASA/David C. Bowman

Margot Lee Shetterly
Image Credit: NASA/David C. Bowman

Morbid Anatomy Museum: Morbid Anatomy One Year Anniversary Festival of Arcane Knowledge and Devil’s Masquerade Party Fundraiser with MC Even Michelson!

Discover Medicine: Walking Tour: The Making of Thoroughly Modern Medicine

Discover Medicine: Walking Tour: Healers and Hoaxers

The List: Lecture: Faith and Wisdom in Science York Minster 22 July 2015

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: He Told Me That His Garden… 16 July 2015

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK: “Newton” by William Blake, 1795–c. 1805

Newton 1795/c.1805 William Blake 1757-1827 Presented by W. Graham Robertson 1939 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N05058

Newton 1795/c.1805 William Blake 1757-1827 Presented by W. Graham Robertson 1939 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N05058

Dr. Philippe Pinel at the Salpêtrière, 1795 by Tony Robert-Fleury. Philippe_Pinel_à_la_Salpêtrière Pinel ordering the removal of chains from patients at the Paris Asylum.

TELEVISION:

Forbes: Review: ‘First Peoples’ Series Chronicles Origins And Spread of Modern Humans SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Revelations: The science of making a daguerreotype Museo Galileo: Pre-telescopic astronomy

Astronomy Central: Discovery: 100 Greatest Discoveries 1 of 9 Astronomy {History… Youtube: AHF: Trinity Test Preparations Youtube: AHF: Moving the Plutonium Core     RADIO:

BBC: HG and the H-Bomb

BBC: The Life Scientific: Dorothy Bishop

BBC Radio 4extra: Georg Mendel – A Monk and Two Peas

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Nuclear War Radio Series

BBC Radio 4:Science Stories: Seeing is Believing – The Leviathan of Parsonstown

PODCASTS:

Science Friday: The Ultimate Geek Road Trip

Route layout by Randal Olson

Route layout by Randal Olson

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

National Maritime Museum: Conference: Ways of Seeing 17 July 2015

St Anne’s College Oxford: Workshop: Texts and Contexts: The Cultural Legacies of Ada Lovelace 8 December 2015

University of Leeds: CfP: Alternative Histories of Electronic Music

George Boole 200: Get Involved: Celebrate the life and legacy of George Boole with UCC: Boole2School 2 November 2015

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy Conference 3-6 June 2016

Royal Society: Cells: from Robert Hooke to Cell Therapy – a 350 year journey 5-6 October 2015

Society for the Social History of Health: CfP: Health, Medicine and Mobility: International Migrations in Historical Perspective University of Prince Edward Island: 24-26 June 2016

Flamsteed Astronomy Society: Flamsteed Lecture

BSHS: Ayrton Prize

The Renaissance Diary: Call for Contributions: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

University of Bucharest: Master Class: Isaac Newton’s philosophical projects 6-11 October 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

The Royal Society: Newton International Fellowship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Curator of Cartography

University of Toronto: Assistant Professor – History of Technology

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