Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #44

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Super-Sonic Owl

Volume #44

Monday 20 April 2015

EDITORIAL:

Back once again with Whewell’s Gazette #44 your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you as always as much of the histories od science, technology and medicine that our editorial staff could round up in the last seven days in the Internet and brought to you this week by our super-sonic currier owl.

A message for all those blogging or tweeting about #histSTM are you already included in Michael Barton’s (@darwinsbulldog) HistSci list? If not give the doggie a shout out!

Our birthdays of the week this week feature three people that one might not consider to be scientists Thomas Jefferson, Leonardo da Vinci and Hans Sloane. Jefferson and Sloane get, in our opinion too little attention in the history of science and Leonardo too much.

Jefferson represents a class of people in the history of science who get too little mainstream attention, the educators. Although an amateur scientist in his own right his major contribution to the history of science was as a politician ensuring that science got taught in schools and universities. A healthy scientific culture needs teachers of science and in the early days of the USA Jefferson did much to encourage and support the teaching of science, a service that should be acknowledge more often and more loudly.

Leonardo the epitome of the Renaissance man is every science writers darling and anybody writing about the history of science seems to try to find a way to drop his name into whatever they are writing with little thought given to the relevance. However as one of the posts from The Renaissance Mathematicus linked to here points out Leonardo’s actual influence on the evolution of science was almost nil. Maybe it’s time for historians of science to give more attention to the Jeffersons and Sloanes of this world and somewhat less to Leonardo.

Hans Sloane deserves to be mentioned in the history of science for several reasons but it is above all as a collector that he made his greatest contribution to that histories. The collectors of the Early Modern period made a massive contribution to several branches of the science, above all to the life sciences and the greatest of them all was almost certainly Hans Sloane. Just how great he was can be seen that not only was the British Museum founded on his collection but when part of that collection was split off, the Natural History Museum as well.

It pays to some time to stop and consider that the evolution of science is not just driven by ‘geniuses’ making great discoveries but also by people more in the background, such as Jefferson and Sloane doing more mundane things like furthering the teaching of science or building collections of scientific specimens.

Quotes of the week:

“How wonderful. John Evelyn described butterflies as ‘flying flowers’” – Andrea Wulf

A pitfall for the ‘woman scholar': she tries “to insist upon, & to apologize for, her

erudition in the same breath.” Payne-Gaposchkin, 1956

So cute to watch all the sheltered first-world 20-somethings in academia speak about “wisdom”.” @replicakill

Ein Narr der schweigt, geht für einen Weisen durch. – Christiaan Huygens

“In nature nothing exists alone.” – Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

I wish there was a pie chart showing the ratio of Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, Darwin and Einstein scholars to all historians of science. – Harun Küçük

“A purpose, an intention, a design, strikes everywhere even the careless, the most stupid thinker”. David Hume

“But science & everyday life cannot & should not be separated. Science, for me, gives a partial explanation for life.”- R. Franklin

“If any good came out of a) WWI, and b) astrology, it would have to be Holst’s The Planets suite.” – @smiffy

History is a race between education and catastrophe – HG Wells ”

Perfect numbers like perfect men are very rare. – Descartes

“A fool, Mr, Edgeworth, is one who has never made an experiment.” – Erasmus Darwin

Final (paper draft)≠(final paper) draft. Language is not associative. – Evelyn J Lamb

Birthdays of the Week:

Thomas Jefferson born 13 April

Miniature Portrait of Jefferson by Robert Field (1800) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Miniature Portrait of Jefferson by Robert Field (1800)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

“Happy Birthday, Thomas Jefferson. Enlightenment slaveowner; captures the American contradiction in one life”. – Tom Levenson

“Nature intended me for the tranquil pursuits of science, by rendering them my supreme delight.” – Thomas Jefferson

Constitution Day: 10 facts about Thomas Jefferson for his 272nd birthday

History of Geology: In Megalonyx We Trust: Jefferson’s patriotic monsters

Leonardo da Vinci born 15 April 1452

Portrait of Leonardo by Francesco Melzi Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Leonardo by Francesco Melzi
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Letters from Gondwana: Da Vinci and the Birth of Ichnology

The Guardian: Leonardo da Vinci’s earth-shattering insights about geology

Brain Pickings: Leonardo da Vinci’s Life and Legacy, in a Vintage Pop-Up Book

Lapham’s Quarterly: Leonardo da Vinci

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Pissing on a Holy Cow

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Is Leonardo da Vinci a great artist or a great scientist? Neither actually.

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Leonardo artist-engineer redux

Hans Sloane born 16 April 1660

Hans Sloane Source: British Museum

Hans Sloane
Source: British Museum

The British Museum: Sir Hans Sloane

Figaries: The case of five children: who were inoculated in Dublin, on the 26th of August, 1725

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: Sir Hans Sloane, Cocoa Magnate

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Silicon Republic: Ireland’s Greatest Woman Inventor Finalist – Annie Maunder, pioneering astronomer

American Scientist: Huygens’s Clocks Revisited

The Recipes Project: “Take Good Syrup of Violets”: Robert Boyle and Historical Recipes

Wallifaction: The Discovery of Titan: Huygens’s Cipher and Wallis’s Trick

John Wallis

John Wallis

Royal Observatory Greenwich Blog: Astro Art: cosmic bodies and our solar system

Margaret Maskelyne’s Orrery, by William Jones, ZBA4664. Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Margaret Maskelyne’s Orrery, by William Jones, ZBA4664.
Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Nature: Biography of a space telescope: Voices of Hubble

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Wakefield Wright’s Interview

Rejected Princess: Annie Jump Cannon

The Calculator Site: How To Convert Between Fahrenheit and Celsius

Irish Philosophy: Further Elucidations on Newton’s Thoughts

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Asterisms and Constellations and how not to confuse them with Tropical Signs

The constellation Virgo Source: Wikimedia Commons

The constellation Virgo
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto Blog: Giovanni Riccioli – a man of Encyclopedic Knowledge

Backreaction: A wonderful 100th anniversary gift for Einstein

Medium.com: Einstein, Schrödinger, and the story you never heard

Smithsonian.com: Why Albert Einstein, the Genius Behind the Theory of Relativity, Loved His Pipe

Slate: Einstein’s Brain Heist

BBC News: The strange afterlife of Einstein’s brain

The Mütter Museum: Exhibitions: Albert Einstein’s Brain

Philly.com: Science icon who struggled with fame

Scientias.nl: Archeologen ontdekken oudste horloge van Noord-Europa in Zutphen

quadrans

 

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Lines in the Ice: top five highlights

Robert Thorne, Orbis Universalis Descriptio [London : T. Dawson for T. Woodcocke, 1582]. British Library C.24.b.35  Untitled

Robert Thorne, Orbis Universalis Descriptio [London : T. Dawson for T. Woodcocke, 1582]. British Library C.24.b.35 Untitled

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Remedia: Peanut Panic

The Public Domain Review: An account of the late improvements in galvanism (1803)

Hiden City Philadelphia: The Curious Case of Body Snatching at Lebanon Cemetery

Niche: Animal Matter: The Making of ‘Pure’ Bovine Vaccine at the Connaught Laboratories and Farm at the Turn of the Century

The New York Times: Sheila Kitzinger, Childbirth Revolutionary, Dies at 86

Sheila Kitzinger complained that “our culture of birth is heavily medicalized,” with women submitting passively. Credit Rex Features, via Associated Press

Sheila Kitzinger complained that “our culture of birth is heavily medicalized,” with women submitting passively. Credit Rex Features, via Associated Press

Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry: Vol. 39 Issue 1 March 2015 – Medicalizing Heroin

Wellcome History: Dysfunctional diasporas?

Telegraph & Argus: How project uses history and technology to help tackle disease

George Campbell Gosling: Teaching Medical History

Dr Alun Withey: Edging the Competition: Surgical Instruments in the 18th-Century

It’s About Time: Early Herbals & Pharmacies

Neuron Culture: A rowdy, harrowing, vital book: My Times review of ‘Galileo’s Middle Finger,’ by Alice Dreger

It’s About Time: Making a Herbal with Leonhart Fuchs (1502–1566)

Leonhart Fuchs, De Historia Stirpium, Basel 1542, Sp Coll Hunterian L.1.13, Glasgow University Library Detail of illustrators at work from page 897

Leonhart Fuchs, De Historia Stirpium, Basel 1542, Sp Coll Hunterian L.1.13, Glasgow University Library Detail of illustrators at work from page 897

Nursing Clio: Sunday Morning Medicine

Ore. Exeter: The Birth of Psychedelic Literature: Drug Writing and the rise of LSD Therapy 1954–1964

TECHNOLOGY:

Distillations Blog: Moore’s Law: A Silicon Story

Distillations Blog: Moore and the Microprocessor

Distillations Blog: Three Reasons Why Moore’s Law Might Be Doomed

Gordon Moore Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gordon Moore
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Medium.com: Back Channel: How Gordon Moore Made “Moore’s Law”

CNET: Moore’s Law is the reason your iPhone is so thin and cheap

Wired: 50 Years On, Moore’s Law Still Pushes Tech to Double Down

 

The New York Times: The Enola Gay: A Minor Mystery, Solved!

BBC: Future: Why the fax machine isn’t quite dead yet

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The worst history of technology headline of the year?

Ptak Science Books: Tools of a Scientist, ca. 1700

Ptak Science Books: A Cutaway Infographic of the RAF Wellington, 1941

Atlas Obscura: Steampunk… or just Punk’d?

Conciatore: Glass or Rock?

Board of Longitude Project Blog: Decoding Harrison

The Guardian: Clockmaker John Harrison vindicated 250 years after ‘absurd’ claims

 

The Burgess B clock trial revealed the truth of the claim by John Harrison that he could build a land timepiece to keep time to within a second over 100 days.  Photograph: National Maritime Museum /.

The Burgess B clock trial revealed the truth of the claim by John Harrison that he could build a land timepiece to keep time to within a second over 100 days.  Photograph: National Maritime Museum /.

The Independent: John Harrison’s ‘longitude’ clock sets new record – 300 years on

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Amanz Gressly

Notches: Doing It With Food: Cooking and the History of Sexuality

History of Geology: Clash of the Titans: The Science behind the Iceberg that sank the Titanic

Irish Examiner: Who was John Tyndall?

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Patrick Russell

Yovisto: Augustus Lane-Fox Pitt Rivers – the Father of British Archaeology

Augustus Pitt Rivers

Augustus Pitt Rivers

Embryo Project: Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772–1844)

Embryo Project: Essay: The Cuvier-Geoffroy Debate

Yovisto: Nikolaas Tinbergen and the Study of the Instinct

academia.edu: How the Great Chain of Being Fell Apart: Diversity in natural history 1758– 1859

Embryo Project: Hans Adolf Eduard Driesch (1867–1941)

Thinking Like a Mountain: The History of the Plant: Cultivating Innovation at the John Innes Centre

Independent: Secret file reveals scandal of the eel expert, the archbishop and the Loch Ness Monster ‘sighting’ that sent Whitehall into a spin

Nessie Source: Getty

Nessie
Source: Getty

OUP Blog: Darwin’s “gastric flatus”

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: William Arkell

Dan Merkur: Freud’s Mushroom Hunting

Brain Pickings: Thinking with Animals: From Aesop to Darwin to YouTube

The Friends of Charles Darwin: 19th April, 1882: The Death of a hero

Embryo Project: “Evolution and Tinkering” (1977) by Francois Jacob

 

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus and the White Gold

Conciatore: Zaffer

Chemical Heritage Museum: That Beautiful Theory

Joseph Black.  CHF Collections.

Joseph Black.
CHF Collections.

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

China.org.cn: Preserving Tibetan medicine, astronomy & astrology systems

New APPS: Art, Politics, Philosophy, Science: Why is this philosophy?

The Renaissance Mathematicus: There is no such thing as Greek science

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: University of Glasgow Library

Inscape unimaginable: The Challenges of Beginning a Scholarly Debate in the 21st Century

Ellie Miles: Curator of the Future Conference

CHF: E-newsletter April 2015

JHI Blog: The Early History of Arabic Printing in Europe

Ether Wave Propaganda: Scientists and the History of Science: The Shapin View

Cambridge MA 7//08 Harvard University Professor Steven Shapin (cq) photographed for Ideas Section. Wiggs/Globe Staff Section:Metro; Reporter; slug:06shapin        Library Tag  07062008   Ideas

Cambridge MA 7//08 Harvard University Professor Steven Shapin (cq) photographed for Ideas Section. Wiggs/Globe Staff Section:Metro; Reporter; slug:06shapin Library Tag 07062008 Ideas

The New York Times: Starving for Wisdom

The Recipes Project: Of recipes, collectors, compilers and contributors

 

The #EncHist Weekly

HSS: Newsletter Vol. 44 No. 2 April 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich Collections Blog: Royal Museums Greenwich Photographic Studio

Wonders & Marvels: Cabinet of Curiosities: xviii

SciLogs: A Dissertation on Science Blogging

Madison.com: Siegfried, Robert

ESOTERIC:

Occult Minds: How does new age literature cherry-pick its science? A cognitive approach

Conciatore: Primordial Matter

Mining practices,  from Agricola, De Re Metallica

Mining practices,
from Agricola, De Re Metallica

 

Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet XIV

Prospect: Science gives power to the supernatural

Ptak Science Books: When a Non-Prediction Was and Wasn’t a Prediction (1651–1666)

distillatio: Making the oil of vitriol and why I’ve been using the wrong distillations equipment

BOOK REVIEWS:

Nature: Women at the edge of science

Thinking Like a Mountain: Scientists’ Expertise as Performance: Between State and Society, 1860-1960

Brain Pickings: Creative Courage for Young Hearts: 15 Emboldening Picture Books Celebrating the Lives of Great Artists, Writers, and Scientists

The Guardian: Stories that shape: What are the best novels about the politics of technology

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on Scientific Illustration

Society for Social Studies of Science: Rachel Carson Prize: Refining Expertise

Popular Science: The Vital Question – Nick Lane

Read Cube: Books in Brief: Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cats (and more)

Reviews in History: The History of Emotions: An Introduction

plamper

The New York Times: ‘Galileo’s Middle Finger,’ by Alice Dreger

The New York Review of Books: Einstein as a Jew and a Philosopher

NEW BOOKS:

Google Books: Rational Action: The sciences of Policy in Britain and America, 1940-1960 Preview

Historiens de la santé: Les Antipsychiatries: Une Histoire

Amazon.com: Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline

Amazon.com: Moore’s Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley’s Quiet Revolutionary

Harvard University Press: Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

THEATRE:

FILM:

Scientific American: Darwin: the Movie

TELEVISION:

The New York Times: General Electric Planning Television Series Covering Science and Tech

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Finding the Speed of Light with Peeps

 

Irtiqa Blog: Three excellent lectures by John Hedley Brooke on Galileo, Darwin and Einstein

Youtube: Kepler’s First Law of Motion – Elliptical Orbits (Astronomy)

Moreana: Thomas Moore and the Art of Publishing

Vimeo: Moore’s Law at 50

Vimeo: Charles Darwin: A Genius in the Heart of London, Part 2 A Final Journey to the Abbey

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Birkbeck: University of London: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2015 6-7 July

The Warburg Institute: Pseudo-Galenic Texts and the Formation of the Galenic Corpus 14-15 May 2015

University of Manchester (CHSTM): The Dog in 20th Century Science – Science in the 20th Century Dog 26 June 2015

University of Swansea: Technologies of Daily Life in Ancient Greece 2-3 July 2015

University of Manchester (CHSTM): Medicines, Translations and Histories 11-12 Jun 2015

University of Manchester (CHSTM): Stories about science: exploring science communication and entertainment media 4-5 June 2015

National University of Ireland – Maynooth: CfP: History of Science, technology and Medicine Network Ireland Annual Conference 13-14 November 2015

University of Pennsylvania: JAS 2015: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 16-17 October 2015

University of Cambridge: Department of History and Philosophy of Science: Easter Term 2015: Twentieth Century Think Tank

 

University of Cambridge: Department of History and Philosophy of Science: Easter Term 2015: Department Seminars

LOOKING FOR WORK:

National Museums Scotland: Keeper, Science and Technology

University of Konstanz: PhD: Simulation and Counterfactual Reasoning in Neuroscience

University of Bristol: Centre for Medical Humanities: Lecturer in Medical Humanities

 

Universitat Pompeu Fabra – Barcelona: 2 Marie Curie Grants – History of Nuclear Energy in Europe

Royal College of Surgeons: Curator Museums & Archives

University of Vienna: Studentship in HPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #43

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #43

Monday 13 April 2015

EDITORIAL: Welcome to the forty third edition of you weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all that we could find about the histories of science, technology and medicine presented in the Internet during the last seven days. As I type outside my window the reviving spring sun is shining in a blue sky tempting the green shoots and blossoms out of the trees and bushes bring an end to the long grey winter. Two hundred years ago nature demonstrated to the human race what can happen when spring doesn’t come and the cycle of growth is interrupted by an unexpected occurrence. On 10 April 1815 the volcano Tambora erupted on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa ejecting vast quantities of dust and ash into the atmosphere causing massive interruptions in the weather patterns of the whole world. The year 1816 became known at the year without summer and led to the worst famine in the nineteenth century causing the deaths of tens of thousands throughout the world. Since the beginning of the modern period humanity has lived with the dream, or should that be the illusion, that science will give us total dominion over world and all that it contains. So-called natural disasters such as the Tambora demonstrate to us just how fragile our grip on our lump of rock hurtling through space really is.

Aerial view of the caldera of Mount Tambora, formed during the colossal 1815 eruption. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Aerial view of the caldera of Mount Tambora, formed during the colossal 1815 eruption.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal Society: The Repository: ‘the world had turned to ash’

Letters From Gondwana: A Christmas Carol: Dickens and the Little Ice Age

Georgian Gentleman: 10th April 1815 – one of the most explosive days in recorded history

Quotes of the week:

“The Ultimate Answer to Life, The Universe and Everything is…42!” – Deep Thought

“We thought the future would be flying cars but it’s actually arguing with a motion sensor about whether or not your hands are in the sink”. – @MildlyAmused

The minority opinion that “they” isn’t a singular as well as a plural gender-neutral pronoun doesn’t change the fact that it is both. – @SnoozeinBrief

“At least 1 British uni. has restricted the number of bookshelves professors may have in their offices to discourage ‘personal libraries.’” – @joncgoodwin

Afraid I bridle at generalising “did THE GREEKS think?” M Finley always said “which Greeks? when?” Not unitary culture – @wmarybeard

“Wer die Vergangenheit nicht kennt, wird die Zukunft nicht in den Griff bekommen.” – Golo Mann (1909-1994)

“I think astronomy is a bad study for you. It makes you feel human insignificance too plainly” – Thomas Hardy

“Nature is like an oracle that points to one of various alternatives we suggest rather than answering us directly in a language of its own”. – @cratylus

“I would rather be a meteor every atom in me in magnificent glow than a sleepy permanent planet” – Jack London

“To know what people really think, pay regard to what they do, rather than what they say”. – Descartes

“When a man says he approves of something in principle, it means he hasn’t the slightest intention of putting it into practice.” – Bismarck h/t @jondresner

“To think is easy. To act is hard. But the hardest thing in the world is to act in accordance with your thinking”. – J. W. v. Goethe

“It is vain to do with more what can be done with less.” – William of Ockham

“Sometimes, the most brilliant and intelligent students do not shine in standardized tests because they do not have standardized minds” – Dianne Ravitch CCDUmdtWYAA695H.jpg-large “Many discoveries are reserved for ages still to come… Our universe is a sorry little affair unless it has in it something for every age to investigate…” – Seneca

“On philosophical grounds too I cannot see any good reason for preferring the Big Bang idea. Indeed it seems to me in the philosophical sense to be a distinctly unsatisfactory notion, since it puts the basic assumption out of sight where it can never be challenged by a direct appeal to observation” – Fred Hoyle (1915–2001) Proponent of the “steady-state” universe. Coined the term “Big Bang” while at the same time rejecting it on BBC radio (1949). h/t @hist_astro

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

New York Times: 70 Years On, Crowd Gets Close to the Birthplace of the Atomic Bomb

Medium.com: Battle of the Nobel Laureates

National Geographic: Time Line: A History of Telescopes

The New York Times: Our Cosmic Selves

Symmetry: Our flat universe

Qatar Digital Library: AL-BĪRŪNĪ: A high point in the development of Islamic Astronomy

Diagram of phases of the moon in al-Bīrūnī’s Kitāb al-tafhīm. Or. 8349, f. 31v

Diagram of phases of the moon in al-Bīrūnī’s Kitāb al-tafhīm. Or. 8349, f. 31v

Yovisto Blog: Kamerlingh Onnes and Superconductivity

Dataisnature: The Hindu Temple as a Model of Fractal Cosmology – Forecasting Architecture with Recursive Instruction

Yellamma Temple [Karnataka] – Paul Prudence

Yellamma Temple [Karnataka] – Paul Prudence

arXiv.org: The contribution of Giordano Bruno to the special principle of relativity

The Royal Society: Publishing Blog: Mary Somerville: A lesson in creativity and determination

Fine Books & Collections: Out of this World

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Meta Newson’s Interview

Christie’s The Art People: Jacques Bassantin, Astronomique Discours

The Irish Times: Annie Russell: A trailblazing Irish astronomer whose work eclipsed her husband’s

The Washington Post: Behind the scenes of the final mission to service the Hubble telescope

Christie’s The Art People: Decoding the stars: An expert introduction to Astrolabes, the beautiful objects that were the ‘medieval iPhones’

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Betsy Stuart’s Interview

2015 International Year of Light: Einstein Centenary

2015 International Year of Light: Discoverers of Light

Real Clear Science: The Real History of the Planet Vulcan: How a Planet’s Death Birth Relativity

The Guardian: Starwatch: Happy 25th birthday, Hubble

Science News: Celebrating 25 years of the Hubble Space Telescope

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Inside the most amazing map library you’ve never heard of

Medievalist.net: The Atlas Miller rsz_moleiro_article1_3-650x463 History Today: Fantasy Worlds: A Gallery of Mythical Maps

National Library of Scotland: Map Images: Coasts of Scotland on marine charts, 1580–1850

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Medievalist.net: Medieval Viagra

ChoM News: Tour an “ultramodern” hospital in the year 1900

NYAM: Treating Mad Men: Harry Levinson’s Men Management, and Mental Health

CHF: The Strange, Gruesome Search for Substance X

Our understanding of endorphins can be traced back to the head of a pig. (Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection)

Our understanding of endorphins can be traced back to the head of a pig. (Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection)

Perceptions of Pregnancy: Infertility and Infidelity in Early Modern England

The Recipes Project: The Politics of Chocolate: Cosimo III’s Secret Jasmine Chocolate Recipe

Medievalist.net: Medieval Medicine and Modern Science: An Interview with Freya Harrison

Brought to Light: 1920’s Nursing Uniforms from the “Aristocrat of Uniforms” mss20134_1_bobevansuniform1-589x1024 Embryo Project: Fetal Surgery

The Conversation: Why I wasn’t excited about the medieval remedy that works against MRSA

Social History of Medicine: Inhaling Democracy: Cigarette Advertising and Health Education in Post-war West Germany 150s–1975

Jennifer Sherman Roberts: Laughing at History

Greg Jenner: A Brief History of Menstruation

TECHNOLOGY:

Ptak Science Books: Human Computer Art, 1949 

Yovisto: Harold Eugene Edgerton and the High Speed Photography

IEEE Spectrum: What Kind of Thing Is Moore’s Law?

IEEE Spectrum: Is This Really the Anniversary of Moore’s Law

Ptak Science Books: Air-Punk: Underwater Cyborg Diving Suit (1797) 6a00d83542d51e69e2017742ffbae9970d-500wi Dhaka Tribune: Bengal Lights

Ptak Science Books: Cross-Section Series: Battleship “Deutschland”, 1931

Conciatore: Laughing in the Fern

Mad Art Lab: Grace Hopper and the Democratization of Computer Progamming (Women in Science 35)

Capitalism’s Cradle: Female Inventors of the Industrial Revolution Part 4: Henrietta Vansittart

Conciatore: Borgo Pinti

Medievalist.net: Shining Light on Medieval Illuminations: Pigments through the Ages

Ptak Science Books: The Old Bridge’s Future Bridge

Ptak Science Books: A Nickel-Plated Low-priced Arithmetical Godsend (1922)

The Telegraph: How Alan Turing’s secret notebook could disappear forever

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Irish Examiner: Who was John Tyndall?

Embryo Project: Amphioxus, and the Mosaic Theory of Development (1893), by Edmund Beecher Wilson

Embryo Project: The Inheritance of Acquired Characteristics (1924), by Paul Kammerer

Natural History Apostilles: The Cider Crisis and the Golden Pippin

Science News: Brontosaurus deserves its name, after all

Inside the Science Museum: The Micrographia Microscope

Microscope 1927-437. A full-size reconstruction of Robert Hooke’s compound microscope. © Science Museum/SSPL

Microscope 1927-437. A full-size reconstruction of Robert Hooke’s compound microscope. © Science Museum/SSPL

Your Thurrock: Thurrock Local History Society receives lottery boost: Raising Awareness of Alfred Russel Wallace in Thurrock

In Circulation: Man’s Interest in His Own Surroundings: Conserving a Collection of Early Modern Topology Books

Cell: Obituary: Ronald J. Konopka (1947–2015)

Advances in the History of Psychology: Special Issue: “Ordering the Social History of the Human Sciences in Modern China”

Notches: Sex and the American Quest for a Relatable Past

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Edward Drinker Cope

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Learning from wild boar

Wild boar on exhibit at the Latvian Museum of Natural History, Riga.

Wild boar on exhibit at the Latvian Museum of Natural History, Riga.

Ptak Science Books: On the Origins of Ripples (1883)

CHEMISTRY:

Skulls in the Stars: Kathleen Lonsdale: Master of Crystallography

Kathleen Yardley with her fellow students at the Royal Institution, via her Biographical Memoir

Kathleen Yardley with her fellow students at the Royal Institution, via her Biographical Memoir

Skulls in the Stars: One more anecdote about Kathleen Lonsdale

The Public Domain Review: The Nitrous Oxide Experiments of Humphry Davy

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Conciatore: Sonnet to a Barber

CHoM News: Warren Museum reaches new audiences

Chicago Journals: ISIS: Vol. 106 No. 1 March 2015

Wlfi.com: Purdue exhibit showcases the history of computer science

The exhibit shows how the field of computer science has changed since the 1950s. (WLFI Photo/Purdue University)

The exhibit shows how the field of computer science has changed since the 1950s. (WLFI Photo/Purdue University)

JOOMAG: The Medievalverse No. 10

Just Publics @ 365: A Guide to Blogging for Academics

The New York Society Library: Erudition and Encyclopedism: Adam Winthrop Reads Conrad Gesner’s “Mithridates”

Lego Ideas: Scientists In History Collection

Only Living Girl NY: Morbid Anatomy Museum: Dioramas

The Nature of Reality: The Myth of the “Next Einstein”

JHI Blog: Inverting the Pyramid: Notes on the Renaissance Society of America Meeting (26-28 March, Berlin)

THE: Why journals should not forget their past

Irish Philosophy: Who sharpened Occam’s Razor?

Notches: The Sex Institute on Euston Road

The Recipes Project: Transcription-as-collaboration

The Linnaean Society: The Linnaean Collection

The University of Chicago Press: Journals: Reflecting on a Century of Scholarship: The Five Most Influential Isis Articles Ever Published

The #EnvHist Weekly

Science News: Top 10 science anniversaries of 2015

Medium.com: The Extraordinary Growing Impact of the History of Science

BBC News: The scientists who escaped the Nazis

Gustav Born is one of the last living links with the refugee scientists Source: BBC News

Gustav Born is one of the last living links with the refugee scientists
Source: BBC News

ESOTERIC:

Heterodoxology: New ESSWE website – and conference program available

New website, new look and feel. Breathing new fire into the field.

New website, new look and feel. Breathing new fire into the field.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry

The Curious Waveform: Top 10 popular chemistry books for the general reader

The New Yorker: Sight Unseen: The hows and whys of invisibility

The Wall Street Journal: The Miracle of the Heavens

Science Book a Day: Interviews Wade Allison

Science Book a Day: Rachel Carson and Her Book That Changed the World

Somatosphere: Nicolas Langlitz’s Neuropsychedelia: The Revival of Hallucinogen Research Since the Decade of the Brain neuropsychedlia-240x360 Brain Pickings: Radioactive: The Incredible Story of Marie Curie Told in Cyanotope

The Spectator: Moving heaven and earth: Galileo’s subversive spyglass

Science Book a Day: Interviews Bill Hayes

The Wall Street Journal: Science Books That Made Modernity Nature: Women at the edge of science

NEW BOOKS:

Amazon: Scientists at War: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research

Historiens de la santé: Wilhelm Reich, Biologist index Amazon: Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science and the World

Historiens de la santé: Paying with Their Bodies: American War and the Problem of the Disabled

THEATRE: FILM:

The Guardian: Batman v Superman writer to tackle Isaac Newton thriller

Open Culture: Frank Capra’s Science Film The Unchained Goddess Warns of Climate Change in 1958

TELEVISION: BBC: Drills, Dentures and Dentistry: An Oral History

SLIDE SHOW: Discover: A History of General Relativity o-GRAVITYPROBEB-facebook VIDEOS:

Youtube: Information Age: The microchip that changed the world

The Guardian: Shelf Life: How to time travel to a star

Youtube: Daphne Oram British composer and electronic musician

Science Dump: Sit back, relax, and let Richard Feynman talk to you about beauty

Wellcome Library: English folding almanac in Latin

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4extra: Dr Jacob Bronowski

PODCASTS:

Siren FM: History of Science – Power Plants

WCAI: How Naomi Oreskes Discovered the Roots of Climate Change Denial

Royal Society: Science on myself: Explore the history of self-experimentation in medicine 04-self-experimentation_310 ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Bucharest: IRH: Masterclass: Space, Time,, and Motion in the Early Modern Period 18-22 May 2015

University of Bucharest: Workshop: Natural History, Mathematics, and Metaphysics in the Seventeenth Century 26-27 May 2015

University of Newcastle: Workshop: The Diseases, Health Risks and Phobias of Modern and Fashionable Living Victorian Perspectives 18 June 2015

University of Newcastle: Workshop: Tuberculosis as a Romantic Disease: Artistic, Historical & Literary Perspectives

IEEE: The Bernard S. Finn IEEE History Prize: The prize is awarded annually to the best paper in the history of electrotechnology—power, electronics, telecommunications, and computer science—published during the preceding year: Deadline 15 April 2015

SIGCIS: The Mahoney Prize recognizes an outstanding article in the history of computing and information technology, broadly conceived. Deadline 15 April 2015

University of Notre Dame: Biennial History of Astronomy Workshops 24-28 June 2015

University of Oklahoma: Exhibition, Galileo’s World Starting August 2015 through 2016

CHF: Moore’s Law @ 50 Computer History Museum Mountain View 17 April 2015

Guardian Masterclasses: Everything you need to know about science communication 25 April 2015

University of Cardiff: CfP: Postgraduate Conference: Magic and the Supernatural in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods

Society for the History of Technology: The Levinson Prize

The Waring Library Society and the Waring Historical Library at the Medical University of South Carolina invite entries for the W. Curtis Worthington, Jr., Undergraduate and Graduate Research Papers Competition.

Maynooth University: CfP: HSTM Network Ireland Inaugural Conference 13-14 November 2015

University of Oxford: Centre for the History and Philosophy of Physics: “Physics and the Great War” One-Day Conference 13 June 2015

National Maritime Museum Greenwich: CfP: Ways of Seeing 17 July 2015

University of Berkeley California: Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society: “Faking It”: Counterfeits, Copies, and Uncertain Truths in Science, Technology, and Medicine 10-11 April 2015

Twin Café Sheffield: Coffee, Culture and Conversation in the Eighteenth Century 21 April 2015

Museum of Natural History Oxford: Lecture: Leviathan and the Air Pump 1 May 2015

University of Wales Trinity Saint David: Thirteenth Annual Conference of the Sophia Centre; Astrology As Art: Representation and Practice

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Manchester: CHSTM: Research preparation bursary

University of Leiden: Centre for the Arts in Society: 2 PhD’s in Ichthyology

University of Cambridge: Research Assistant: HSS-Bio project (Part Time, Fixed Term)

Science Museum: Associate Curator, Infrastructure and Built Environment AIP: Research Assistant

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Whewell’s Gazettte: Vol. #42

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #42

Monday 06 April 2015

EDITORIAL:

Back again after the long Easter weekend, it’s your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette #42, fuller than a basket of Easter eggs with all the best in the histories of science, technology and medicine collected by our busy bunnies from the Internet over the last seven days.

This week saw one of those sensationalist science headlines that journalists love. A medieval recipe for a salve for curing styes appears to be effective against the antibiotic resistant MRSA bacteria. This produced a flurry of activity amongst both medieval and medical historians, as well as those who are both. With Vanessa Heggie from, the by us much loved, H-Word blog leading the pack with a suggestion for “bioprospecting”. Note that word in your computer dictionaries dear readers; it’s a scientific research buzzword of the future. Remember you read it here first.

Taking the lead from Vanessa’s tweet: “Full commentary on the anglosaxon antibiotic coming soon ‪#watchthisspace – @HPS_Vanessa”, we have collected a research lab full of reports on this discovery and its consequences for your delectation to open this weeks edition of Whewell’s Weekly.

The H-Word: Anglo-Saxon antibiotics are just the start – it’s time to start bioprospecting in the past

Leeches were out of favour in Western for about 150 years, before we rediscovered them in the 20th century. Photograph: Reuters Source: The H-Word

Leeches were out of favour in Western for about 150 years, before we rediscovered them in the 20th century. Photograph: Reuters
Source: The H-Word

Panacea: What’s Old Is New Again: Medicine’s Blast From the Past

Medievalist.net: Can medieval drugs help modern patients?

New Scientist: Anglo-Saxon remedy kills hospital superbug MRSA

Medievalist.net: Anglo-Saxon medicine is able to kill modern-day superbug, researchers find

Archaeology: 100-Year-Old Salve Recipe Kills MRSA Culture

CNN: Thousand-year-old Angle-Saxon potion kills MRSA superbug

The Guardian: A medieval remedy for MRSA is just the start of it. Powdered poo, anyone?

Youtube: Antibiotics from the medieval medicine cabinet (1)

Quotes of the week:

C&H For WG

“I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way”. – Mark Twain

“Every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has a right to, but himself”.

John Locke

“If I was independently wealthy I’d be an academic”. – @DublinSoil

“Early in life I had noticed that no event is ever correctly reported in a newspaper.” – George Orwell

“Who does not understand should either learn, or be silent.” ― John Dee

“For I see a man must either resolve to put out nothing new or to become a slave to defend it” – Isaac Newton h/t @KeesJanSchilt

From 1871: ‘Much of history, as usually taught to children, is too much like a bound Police Gazette, a condensed Jack Sheppard.’ h/t @harbottlestores

“Nature makes the organs to suit the work they have to do, not the work to suit the organ.” Aristotle, Parts of Animals.

“The inquisition of Final Causes is barren, and like a virgin consecrated to God, produces nothing.” — Francis Bacon

“A scientific man ought to have no wishes, no affections – a mere heart of stone”. – Charles Darwin (letter to Huxley)

Alchemist insult: “Hollandus had more of the fire-art in his little finger as Helmont in his whole body.” -J. Kunckel h/t Paul Engle @Conciatore_org

“The true alchemists do not change lead into gold; they change the world into words”

W Douglas, 1855.

“Libraries should be open to all – except the censor-“― J,F.K.

“The freedom of putting a book aside is closely allied to that of walking out of performances” – @publichistorian cf.

“I know I generally feel alive and emancipated when I choose to walk out of something” Maggie Nelson h/t @publichistorian

“The multitude of books is making us ignorant.” – Voltaire

“I have a three-day weekend and so many books to read”. – @publichistorian

“The pen is not only mightier than the sword, it is considerably less messy”. – John Laurie

“The pun is mightier than the sword”. – @GustavHolmberg

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Royal Observatory Greenwich Blog: Women’s History Month – Ruth Belville

Ruth’s mother Maria Belville Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Ruth’s mother Maria Belville
Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Tri-City Herald: Early Hanford worker turns 100

AIP: Historic Sites Initiative

Ptak Science Books: Einstein and Fermi Immigration Papers, National Archive

Dannen.com: Albert Einstein, F.B.I. Interview

Tycho’s Nose: The Nobel Prize winner at the bottom of the garden

Ptak Science Books: Einstein, Frisch, Cockcroft: Atomic Physics Film, 1948

Yovisto: Sin-Itiro Tomonaga and Quantum Electrodynamics

Royal Museums Greenwich: Women’s History Month – 20th Century

Annie Maunder (centre) preparing to observe the 1900 eclipse in Algiers with the British Astronomical Association (from E. Walter Maunder (ed.), The Total Solar Eclipse of May 1900).

Annie
Maunder (centre) preparing to observe the 1900 eclipse in Algiers with the
British Astronomical Association (from E. Walter Maunder (ed.), The Total
Solar Eclipse of May 1900).

AHF: In Memoriam: Evelyne and Larry Litz

academia.edu: “Perhaps irrelevant”: the iconography of Tycho Brahe’s small brass quadrant

Nautilus: The 315-Year-Old Science Experiment

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Emmy the student and Emmy the communist!

Medievalist.net: The Concept of Time in the Medieval World View

Scripta Manent: “Lent approaches with a slow and weary step”

Verso: Einstein and the Astronomers

Classical Astronomy: A Brief History of Lunar Eclipses

Science 2.0: This Year Easter Falls On The Correct Date According To Newton

The Telegraph, Calcutta India: Astronomer without a telescope

Statue of Aryabhata on the grounds of Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune

Statue of Aryabhata on the grounds of Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune

Science 2.0: How Is The Date of Easter Calculated? The Science Answer

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Science Direct: The longitude question

Wonders & Marvels: How I write History…with Chet van Duzer

Slate Vault: A Chart of New Guinea in 1901, When the Island Was Halfway Between Unmapped and Mapped

"New Guinea," from George Franklin Cram's 1901 atlas, Cram's Standard American Railway System Atlas of the World. David Rumsey Map Collection

“New Guinea,” from George Franklin Cram’s 1901 atlas, Cram’s Standard American Railway System Atlas of the World.
David Rumsey Map Collection

Medievalist.net: Sayonara Diorama: Acting Out the World as a Stage in Medieval Cartography and Cyberspace

Longitude Project Blog: Happy Birthday Mr Harrison

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

The Guardian: Australian women in uniform: then and now – in pictures [includes nurses]

Active History.ca: Theme Week: Infectious Disease, Contagion and the History of Vaccines

Active History.ca: “Be Wise – Immunize!” Vaccine Promotion in Canada During the 20th Century

Active History.ca A Brief History of Vaccines in Colonial Africa

MHL: Browse over 3000 digitized volumes of historical medical journals

The Order of the Good Death: Curating a UK Medical Museum: Two Heads Are Better Than One

History of Medicine in Ireland Blog: The historical development of Irish Hospitals and the importance of their records

CHoM News: Staff Finds: L. Vernon Briggs, the Scrapbooker

Contagions: Plasmodium knowesi: A New Ancient Malaria Parasite

Library Queens University: Unrecorded Vesalius first edition discovered at Queen’s University

O Say Can You See?: Midwives on horseback: Saddlebags and science

The nurse-midwife carried two leather saddlebags—one on each side of the horse connected by a strap. She had one pair of saddlebags for general health care, and one for home deliveries. Nearly all babies were delivered at home. These saddlebags are from the 1930s.

The nurse-midwife carried two leather saddlebags—one on each side of the horse connected by a strap. She had one pair of saddlebags for general health care, and one for home deliveries. Nearly all babies were delivered at home. These saddlebags are from the 1930s.

History Today: Breastfeeding, corsets and ageing: the mysterious dangers of womanhood

 

Schuliosh School of Medicine & Dentistry: Top 10 Reasons Why Studying Medical History Will Make you a Better Doctor

The Quack Doctor: Dr Wheeler and the Bacillus of Death

ABC Science: Did arsenic poisoning make gods limp?

History Today: William Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood

Early Modern Medicine: Fumigating for Health

A woman with some flowers; representing the sense of smell. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

A woman with some flowers; representing the sense of smell.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

The Conversation: Floating wombs and fumigation – why Gwyneth Paltrow has ‘steam douching’ all wrong

Identities.Mic: What 6 Ridiculous Old-Timey Diseases All Have in Common

Royal College of Physicians: The eyes have it

The Recipes Project: “Look’d Like Milk”: Breastmilk Substitutes in New England’s Borderlands

BuzzFeed: Johns Hopkins Sued For $1 Billion Over Unethical STD Study

Providentia: The Heroin Miracle (Part one of Three)

TECHNOLOGY:

Medievalist.net: A Comprehensive History of Beer Brewing

Yovisto: The Visions of Emanuel Swedenborg

Conciatore: Isaac Hollandus

AEON: Preternatural Machines

City Lab: This 19th Century ‘Stench Map’ Shows How Smells Reshaped New York City

 

 

IEEE Spectrum: The Multiple Lives of Moore’s Law

Nemfrog: Telephones for every 100 people on January 1, 1947

PRI: Finding the forgotten women who programmed the world’s first electronic computer

 

 

The Belated Nerd: Revell Sells Secrets to the Soviets…For $2.98

revell-uss-george-washington

Conciatore: Carries the Palm

War Is Boring: The ‘Tsar Bomba’ Was a 50-Megaton Monster Nuke: But it was far too big to ever be a practical weapon

How We Get To Next: Happy 150th Birthday Crossness Pumping Station!

Bard Graduate Center: The Interface Experience: Forty Years of Personal Computing

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

History of Geology: The Four Layers of the Earth

TrowelBlazers: Bertha “Birdie” Parker

Bertha c. 1930 at Gypsum Cave, Nevada, with throwing sticks. Source: Acc. 90-105 Science Service Records, Smithsonian Institution Archives via Flickr.

Bertha c. 1930 at Gypsum Cave, Nevada, with throwing sticks. Source: Acc. 90-105 Science Service Records, Smithsonian Institution Archives via Flickr.

Embryo Project: Telomerase in Human Development

Wonders & Marvels: The Secret History of Cheese

Smithsonian: Department of Invertebrate Zoology News –No Bones: The Inspiring Mary Jane Rathbun – Women’s History Month Highlight

Mary Jane Rathbun, 1927, by John Howard Pearce (Acc. 90-105 - Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives)

Mary Jane Rathbun, 1927, by John Howard Pearce (Acc. 90-105 – Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives)

TrowelBlazers: Gudrun Corvinus

Embryo Project: James William Kitching (1922-2003)

Fossil History: A BIG Month for Paleoanthropology: March Roundup

sealevelrise: The Seal Rock

Slide11

Notches: Franca Viola says ‘No’: Gender violence, consent, and the law in 1960s Italy

Letters from Gondwana: The Megafauna Extinction in South America

Science News: Ancient hominids moved into Greece about 206, 000 years ago

Open Spaces: Recognizing Women’s Vital Contribution to Wildlife Conservation

The Public Domain Review: Tractatus de Herbis (ca. 1440)

Miniature of plants and a demon: the herb Ypericon, supposed to repel demons.

Miniature of plants and a demon: the herb Ypericon, supposed to repel demons.

Science News: Bright bird plumage resulted from natural, sexual selection

 

This View of Life: The Spandrels Of San Marco Revisited: An Interview with Richard C. Lewontin

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Beaver for Lent

Embryo Project: St. George Jackson Mivart (1827–900)

Embryo Project: Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider and Jack Szostak’s Telomere and Telomerase Experiments (1982-1989)

Science 2.0: Darwin’s ‘*Strangest Animals Ever Discovered’ Solved

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Ralph A. Bagnold

Vox CEPR’s Policy Portal: The myth of Europe’s Little Ice Age

CHEMISTRY:

The Guardian: Robert Bunsen did a whole lot more than invent the Bunsen burner

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Dr Jennifer Evans: RSA15 Berlin

Literacy of the Present: The Ignorant Library

OUP Blog: Cinderella Science

Charles Henry Bennett, ‘Wonderful Plants’, from John Cargill Brough, The Fairy-Tales of Science (1859). Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/03/cinderella-science/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=oupacademic&utm_campaign=oupblog#sthash.7b01S79M.dpuf

Charles Henry Bennett, ‘Wonderful Plants’, from John Cargill Brough, The Fairy-Tales of Science (1859). Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. – See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/03/cinderella-science/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=oupacademic&utm_campaign=oupblog#sthash.7b01S79M.dpuf

Jack Hoy.com: Summary of ‘Computing Machinery and Intelligence’ (1950) by Alan Turing

The many-headed monster: Food for thought: An Introduction to Theory via the History of Food and Drink

Situating Science: Letter from the Director: Situating Science and Beyond

University of Leicester: Former history student awarded scientific instrument prize posthumously

PLOS Blogs: How Articles Get Noticed and Advance the Scientific Conversation

University of Toronto Press: Canadian Journal of History 49.3 – History of Medicine

Wellcome Trust: New Capital Award for the Museum of Science & Industry

Wired: We Need To Stop Ignoring Women Scientists

UCL Department of Economics: The First 100 Years

American Science: Celebrating 50 Years of JAS-BIO

The H-Word: Destroyed Snowden laptop: the curatorial view

The remains of the PC desktop and the Mac laptop that GCHQ came to the Guardian’s offices in King’s Place and destroyed. Only the laptop is displayed in the exhibition. Photograph: Sarah Lee

The remains of the PC desktop and the Mac laptop that GCHQ came to the Guardian’s offices in King’s Place and destroyed. Only the laptop is displayed in the exhibition. Photograph: Sarah Lee

Homunculus: Who are you calling a journalist?

The #EnvHist Weekly

Conciatore: Don Antonio de’ Medici

Advances in the History of Psychology: Call for Participation: Interviews with Archival Researchers

AIP: Telling the Stories of Women and African Americans in the Physical Sciences

ISIS gets a makeover

Wo’s Weblog: Please, don’t put your papers on academia.edu

The Guardian: Why scientific truth may hurt

bonæ litteræ: What’s the purpose of a conference? Reflections on RSA 2015 Part I & Part II

ESOTERIC:

Inside MHS Oxford: Alchemy and the Laboratory

The Recipes Project: Animal Charms in the Later Middle Ages

Detail of a marginal drawing of a horse. British Library, Harley 1585 f. 68v

Detail of a marginal drawing of a horse. British Library, Harley 1585 f. 68v

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

From the Hands of Quacks: Sounds of Modern History: Auditory Culture in 19th and 20th Century Europe

Popular Science: A Scientist in Wonderland

Science Book a Day: Interviews David Wright author of Downs: The history of a disability

academia.edu: The Newton Papers: The Strange and True Odyssey of Isaac Newton’s Manuscripts

Ashgate Publishing Blog: The history of intelligence and ‘intellectual disability’

Forbes: ‘sapiens’: An All Too Brief History of Humanity

Science Book a Day: What is Life? How Chemistry Became Biology

Popular Science: Einstein Relatively Simple

Unknown

New Scientist: Eye of the Beholder: Life through a camera obscura

Literary Review: Three of a Kind: Naturalists in Paradise: Wallace, Bates and Spruce in the Amazon

The Steven Weinberg Controversy:

Physicist Steven Weinberg has written a book about the history of science that is not only very strongly Whiggish in its historical approach but also castigates historians of science for not being Whiggish. He repeated this point of view in an article this week for the Guardian in which he also recommends thirteen best science books for the general reader. We have collected together some relevant blog posts on the resulting controversy provoked by Weinberg’s attitude.

51xjauypCxL

The Guardian: To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science by Steven Weinberg

The Guardian: Science and nature: Point of view: Steven Weinberg: the 13 best science books for the general reader

The Wall Street Journal: Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History

(If you run into a pay wall google the title, Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History, and click on the first link!)

Double Refraction: Why historians shouldn’t write off scientists: On Steven Shapin’s review of Steven Weinberg’s Explain the World

Physics Today: To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science; In the Light of Science: Our Ancient Quest for Knowledge and the Measure of Modern Physics

Galileo’s Pendulum: Science by authority is a poor model for communication

Homunculus: This explains everything

The H-Word: An alternative 13 best books about science?

Forbes: Recommended science books for non-scientists

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Beastly encounters of the Raj: Livelihoods, livestock and veterinary health in India, 1790-1920

University of Chicago Press: Wicked Intelligence: Visual Art and the Science of Experiment in Restoration London

9780226017297

Wiley: The Clever Object

Historiens de la santé: The Fate of Anatomical Collections

Historiens de la santé: The Development of Brain Banks in the UK c.1970–c.2010

Ashgate: Geography, Technology and Instruments of Exploration

 

Historiens de la santé: Anatomy and Anatomist in Early Modern Spain

Wellcome Trust: Bookshelf: Latest Releases

THEATRE:

FILM:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

Scientific American: Saturn: A History [Slide Show]

VIDEOS:

iai tv: This is Our Church: Science as religion

Youtube: Gimlet: The history of the Gimlet, and its connections to early medicine, colonialism, and the rise of the multinational corporation.

Ri Channel: The Nature of Things – Crystals and Gems

Youtube: Scientists of the National Trust: Isaac Newton

CSH: Oral History: Ernst Mayr on Historian Michael Ruse

 

Vimeo: Laura J. Snyder Eye of the Beholder Reviewed by John w. Wilbanks

It’s OK to be Smart: Richard Feynman The Experimenters

Youtube: Revelations: Experiments in Photography trailer

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Far Side of the Moore

PODCASTS:

The Take Away: State Secretes Revealed? Hydrogen Bomb Architect Moves Forward with Memoir

CHF: Fads and Faith: Belief vs. Fact in the Struggle for Health

Here & Now: ‘Becoming Steve Jobs’ Attempts to Dispel Myths Chart an Evolution

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Wikimedia UK: Wikipedia Science Conference, Wellcome Collection Conference Centre, London, 2-3 September 2015

CHF: The Museum at CHF – Starting 4 April extended weekend hours

University of Chicago: CHSS: Lecture: “The Unfit Darwinist: Disability, Slander and the Evolution Trial Before Scopes.” Adam Shapiro, 10 April 2015

University of Chicago: CIS: Colloquium: Repurposing Magic 10 April 2015

The Philosophy of Science Association: Announcements

Folger Shakespeare Library: Exhibition: Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude 19 March–23 August 2015

Sussex Humanities Lab: Showcasing the Digital 8 April 2015

 

Royal College of Physicians: Exhibition: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee January–July 2016

dee_john_pr739_200

Pembokeshire Coast National Park: Exhibition: Wallace: The Forgotten Evolutionist? will be on display at Oriel y Parc until 25 November 2015.

NIH: U.S. National Library of Medicine: History of Medicine Lectures for 2015

University of Oxford: Lecture: Naturalists in paradise 24 April 2015

National Maritime Museum: Harrison Decoded: Towards a perfect pendulum clock 18 April 2015

The Royal Society: Archival afterlives 2 June 2015

NYAM: Presentations for History of Medicine Night: 19th and 20th Century Stories 6 May 2015

NIH: U.S. National Library of Medicine: NLM to Host “Images and Texts in Medical History: An Introduction to Methods, Tools, and Data from the Digital Humanities” 11-13 April 2015

University of Reading: The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology: Exhibition: The Antikythera Mechanism February–April 2015

HWO: History Workshop Online: Call for Contributor

Institute of English Studies: School of Advanced Studies London: Biennial London Chaucer Conference: Science, Magic and Technology 10-11 July 2015: Registration & Programme

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Royal Astronomical Society: Library Assistant (part time)

University of Exeter: Exeter REACT Collaborative Studentship: Playing with heritage: a historical and practical investigation of gamification in the heritage museum

Kosciuszko Foundation Visiting Professorship at the Faculty of “Artes Liberales”, University of Warsaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #41

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #41

Monday 30 March 2015

EDITORIAL: Welcome to the forty-first edition of you weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette, as always stuffed full of all the best that the Internet had to offer in the histories of science, technology and medicine over the last seven days.

This week we feature two science outsiders who share a birthday on 23 March and who have become historical icons over the years. First up is Amalie Emmy Noether the female mathematician from our own home base who set several milestones for women in the history of science in the early twentieth century. In a letter to the New York Times Albert Einstein wrote the following about her:

In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fräulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began. In the realm of algebra, in which the most gifted mathematicians have been busy for centuries, she discovered methods which have proved of enormous importance in the development of the present-day younger generation of mathematicians.

It is common practice to refer to Emmy as the greatest female mathematician of the twentieth century. This claim is however false, she was one of the greatest mathematicians male or female of the twentieth century.

Emmy shares her birthday with the nineteenth-century land surveyor and amateur geologist William Smith who produced the first ever geological map of an entire country; a map that celebrates its two hundredth birthday this year. Of working class origins Smith was originally treated with disdain by the gentleman of the Geological Society but they came to recognise their error and eventually awarded him their highest honour.

This edition of Whewell’s Gazette is dedicated to all those whose love of science is so great that they overcome the adversities that life throws into their paths to achieve their aims as did both Emmy and William

Quotes of the week:

When people on airplanes ask me what I do I used to say I was a physicist, which ended the discussion. I once said I was a cosmologist, but they started asking about makeup, and the title astronomer gets confused with astrologer. Now I say I make maps – Margaret Geller

‘When angry, count four; when very angry, swear.’ — Mark Twain h/t @girlinterruptin

“It’s a terrible tragedy & we can’t tell you anything meaningful so we won’t waste your time by speculating,” said no news broadcaster ever – Michael Brooks

Best panel title at Lunar & Planetary Sci Conf:”Your Last Chance to Talk about Ceres Before Data Wreck Your Theories” – Michael Robinson @ExplorationBlog

“Do not multiply emails beyond necessity” – Ockham’s Law of Academic Communication – Mark Eli Kalderon @PhilGeek

TELESCOPE, n. A device having a relation to the eye similar to that of the telephone to the ear, enabling distant objects to plague us with a multitude of needless details. Luckily it is unprovided with a bell summoning us to the sacrifice. – The Devil’s Dictionary – Ambrose Brice 1906 h/t @hist_astro

Galileo annoyed people in power; Ted Cruz is a person in power who annoys people – @drskyskull

“Pure mathematics, may it never be of any use to anyone.” A toast by Henry John Stephen Smith (1826-1883) h/t @cratylus

“Whoever becomes familiar with human anatomy and physiology, his faith in God increases.” – Ibn Rushd

There comes a time in life where a person is just left alone to walk and write. That’s true, isn’t it…isn’t it? – @DublinSoil

The great tragedy of Science – the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact -T.H. Huxley”

“Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.” – Richard Feynman “Members of the public can have useful insights that the experts may not have thought about” – @Roland_Jackson

“Ecclesiastical history is long, life is short” – Anthony Grafton

Birthday of the Week:

Emmy Noether born 23 March 1882 Noether   Google Doodle Archive: Emmy Noether’s 133rd Birthday Emmy Google Doodle   The Renaissance Mathematicus: The house where Emmy Lived

Emmy was born in this house on the Hauptstraße in Erlangen Photo: Thony Christie

Emmy was born in this house on the Hauptstraße in Erlangen
Photo: Thony Christie

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Emmy and the Habilitation

Time: New Google Doodle Honors Revolutionary Mathematician Emmy Noether

Vox: Emmy Noether revolutionized mathematics – and still faced sexism all her life

Galileo’s Pendulum: Emmy Noether and Symmetry, Revisited

The Washington Post: Emmy Noether Google Doodle: Why Einstein called her a ‘creative mathematical genius’

PACSL Finding Aids: Emmy Noether materials

Bitch Media: Happy birthday to brilliant mathematician Emmy Noether 3 Quarks Daily: Emmy Noether: Poet of Logical Ideas

William Smith born 23 March 1769

William Smith Source: Wikimedia Commons

William Smith
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BBC: William Smith: Seminal geological map rediscovered

Flickr: Rediscovered Smith Map

UCMP Berkeley: William Smith (1769-1839)

More than a Dodo: Celebrating Smith

Science Daily: Archivists unearth rare first edition of the 1815 ‘Map that Changed the World’

The Independent: Rare first edition of 200-year-old William Smith ‘map that changed the world’ found William Smith’s Maps – Interactive

History of Geology: A History of Geological Maps: I. From Outcrop to the first Map

The Geological Society: ‘Strata Identified by Organised Fossils…’ 1816–1819

Typical fossils found in the Lower Chalk stratum Image: Geological Society

Typical fossils found in the Lower Chalk stratum
Image: Geological Society

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY: Rundtaarn: The History

Rundetårn Copenhagen Source: Wikimedia Commons

Rundetårn Copenhagen
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Physics Today: Remembering the oil-drop experiment

Yovisto: Ulugh Beg – Astronomer

AHF: James B Conant

Intellectual Ventures Laboratory: A Story of Invention: the Laser

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Wakefield Wright’s Interview

The New York Times: Hydrogen Bomb Physicist’s Book Runs Afoul of Energy Department

Space.com: Astronomy’s Oldest Known ‘Nova’ a Cosmic Case of Mistaken Identity

A chart showing the position of a "nova" that appeared in 1670 and was dubbed Nova Vul 1670. It would later be renamed CK Vulpeculae. Its location was recorded by the famous astronomer Hevelius and was published by the Royal Society in England in its journal Philosophical Transactions.

A chart showing the position of a “nova” that appeared in 1670 and was dubbed Nova Vul 1670. It would later be renamed CK Vulpeculae. Its location was recorded by the famous astronomer Hevelius and was published by the Royal Society in England in its journal Philosophical Transactions.

Explore Whipple Collections: The parts of an astrolabe

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Rose Bethe’s Interview

AHF: Atomic Timeline

Polaroid: blipfoto: Inside Yale’s Van de Graaff Particle Accelerator

arXiv.org: The Reception of Newton’s Principia (pdf)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Who owns the time capsule found at historic Brashear factory?

Corpus Newtonicum: Elected by God

Yovisto: Aristarchus of Samos and the Heliocentric System

Luminarium.com: Medieval Cosmology

Novus Light: International Year of Light 2015: Celebrating Ibn Al-Haytham

Longitude Project Blog: Richard Dunn uncovers the story of Flamsteed’s well telescope

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Slate Vault: A 1935 Historical Map of Shanghai, Designed by an Enthusiastic Resident Expat

Carl Crow and the Shanghai Municipal Council, “Illustrated Historical Map of Shanghai,” 1935.

Carl Crow and the Shanghai Municipal Council, “Illustrated Historical Map of Shanghai,” 1935.

Longitude Project Blog: Observing at Greenwich with Dryden Goodwin 

Longitude Project Blog: Where should you put your meridian?

MEDICINE:

The James Lind Library

Fiction Rebbot: Daily Dose: Early Ectogenesis: Artificial Wombs in 1920s Literature

Embryo Project: Elinor Catherine Hamlin (1924– )

NYAM: Lost and Found

David Livingstone (1813–1873), in Livingstone, Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa, opposite page 1.

David Livingstone (1813–1873), in Livingstone, Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa, opposite page 1.

Nobelprize.org: Robert Koch and Tuberculosis

NYAM: Roget Beyond the Thesaurus

The Recipe Project: Was there a recipe for Korean ginseng?

Social History of Medicine Advance Access: ‘Nature Concocts & Expels’: The Agents and Processes of Recovery from Disease in Early Modern England

The Conversation: Faecal transplants: not the first prescription of medicinal poo

TECHNOLOGY:

Nasa: Gemini A Bridge to the Moon

National Archive: Today’s Document: Radio, RCA victor, Coil Winder

Nasa: Dr Robert H Goddard, American Rocketry Pioneer

Atlas Obscura: Objects of Intrigue: Micky Mouse Gas Mask

Astrolabes and Stuff: Historical navigational instruments on trial

The Recipes Project: New-Fashioned Recipe: Angle Food Cake and Nineteenth Century Technological Innovation

Conciatore: Chalcedony Glass

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.

17th century ribbed bottle,Brescia, Italy.

Conciatore: Aventurine

Small amphora in aventurine glass ”,  Murano, Salviati.

Small amphora in aventurine glass ”,
Murano, Salviati.

Opposing Views: Which Way Should Toilet Paper Be Put On A Holder? Original 1891 Patent Solves The Mystery (Photos)

Tech Republic: Hacking the Nazis: The secret story of the women who broke Hitler’s codes

Georgian Gent: Knives and scissors sharpened…

Low-Tech Magazine: Email in the 18th century: the optical telegraph

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Science News: Telling stories from stone tools

The Public Domain Review: Living Lights: a Popular Account of Phosphorescent Animals and Plants (1887) 14005583845_092af70f98_b Notches: Beyond penetration: rethinking the murder of Edward II

Avidly: The Inhuman Anthropocene

H-Grad: Environmental History a reading list

Bioscience: Darwin’s Children’s Art Saved a Bit of His Science

Charles Darwin's children drew serveral pictures on the original manuscript of his historic book "On the Origin of Species." (Source: American Museum of Natural History)

Charles Darwin’s children drew serveral pictures on the original manuscript of his historic book “On the Origin of Species.” (Source: American Museum of Natural History)

Niche: Met Techs, the Environment and Science at the Joint Artic Weather Stations, 1947–1972

Notches: Reading Silences in Histories of Religion and Sexuality

History of Geology: A History of the Use of Illustrations in the Geosciences: I. Seeing is Believing…

NYAM: Happy Bird-Day Conrad Gessner

Audra J Wolfe: Germs in Space – Joshua Lederberg, Exobiology, and the Public Imagination, 1958– 1964

AIP: The Discovery of Global Warming

The Sloane Letters Blog: Of a leveret brought up by a cat V0021351 A hare. Coloured wood engraving.

CHEMISTRY:

Meteorite Manuscripts: John Dalton and the Curious Album Page

C&EN: 100 Years of Chemical Weapons

Narratively: Isabella Karle’s Curious Crystal Method

Sitting in her sunroom, Dr. Karle reviews her husband's research documents and publications.

Sitting in her sunroom, Dr. Karle reviews her husband’s research documents and publications.

The Royal Society: Rumford – the colourful Count

CHF: James Bryant Conant

Embryo Project: Diethystibestrol (DES) in the USA

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The DDT Collector

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Centre for Medical Humanities: Why Medical Humanities?

Niche: Postcards from America I Slide1 Conciatore: Mother Dianora

The Bigger Picture: Science Service, Up Close: “Stealth Authors” and An Appreciation of Honesty

Huffpost Tech: Gather Your Allies, Engage in Unorthodox Thinking – 300 Year Old Lessons in Innovation

Nature: A criticism of ‘science fandom’ prompts online reflection

CHF: Distillations: Spring 2015 Volume 1 Number 1

AHA Today: AHA Issues Letter of Support for the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine

CHoM News: Getting the Word Out

NCSE: Friends of Darwin and Friend of the Planet awards for 2015

Ptak Science Books: Great Babies: Baby Einstein, Baby Feynman, Baby Schroedinger, and More

Niels Bohr, 1890, age about 5. Source: http://www.nbi.ku.dk/english/www/niels/bohr/barndom/

Niels Bohr, 1890, age about 5. Source: http://www.nbi.ku.dk/english/www/niels/bohr/barndom/

The Guardian: Remembering an overlooked treaty

From Factory to the Future in Ambler Pennsylvania: History. Health. Community.

Storify: Museum objects and non-museum objects: bicycles and chairs: An exploration Mapping the Past with Linked Data in OpenHistoricalMap

The Washington Post: Ted Cruz invokes Galileo to defend climate scepticism – and historians aren’t happy

Compasswallah: The Needle and the Rainbow

Blink: The light and the sea

Reflected glory ‘The Shipwreck of the Minotaur’ (1810) by JMW Turner, who was the first to tear down the distinction between subject and object, presaging what would be later known as impressionism. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Reflected glory ‘The Shipwreck of the Minotaur’ (1810) by JMW Turner, who was the first to tear down the distinction between subject and object, presaging what would be later known as impressionism.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

JHI Blog: The Bookends of Chronicles: Decisions About Time

ESOTERIC:

Open Culture: Goethe’s Theory of Colors: The 1810 Treatise That Inspired Kandinsky & Early Abstract Painting goethe-color-first-plate-of-Zur-Farbenlehre Forbidden Histories: Carl Gustav Jung and the Clairvoyant, Mrs. Fäßler

BOOK REVIEWS:

The New York Times: Apple Opens Up to Praise New Book on Steve Jobs, and Criticize an Old One

Rosetta Stones: A Perfect Book for Hooking Kids on Rocks

Self-Awareness.com Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leuwenhoek and the Reinvention Of Seeing

Thinking Like a Mountain: Anatomy & the Organisation of Knowledge, 1500–1850

L0021649 A. Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org 'Tertia musculatorum' (third muscle man). De humani corporis fabrica libri septem Andreas Vesalius Published: 1543 Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

L0021649 A. Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
‘Tertia musculatorum’ (third muscle man).
De humani corporis fabrica libri septem
Andreas Vesalius
Published: 1543
Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews: Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History

Science Book a Day: Street-Fighting Mathematics: The Art of Educated Guessing and Opportunistic Problem Solving

Science Mag: Ivan Pavlov, revealed

The Wall Street Journal: Through a Glass, Brightly

n+1 Magazine: What Did You Do In The War, Doctor?

Trowelblazers: Archaeology, Sexism, and Scandal

Popular Science: Scientific Babel – Michael D. Gordin

Science Direct: The Age of Scientific Naturalism: Tyndall and his Contemporaries Forbes: Steven Weinberg Tackles The History of Science

NEW BOOKS:

University of Chicago Press: Making Marie Curie 9780226235844 Historiens de la santé: Too Hot To Handle: A Global History of Sex Education

THEATRE:

FILM:

Exploring the Past: National Geographic Films and Historical Progress

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Brunelleschi IMHS: Galileo’s Telescope the Invention

Youtube: AMNH: Inside the Collections: Wasps

Bloggingheads.tv: Science Faction John Hogan & Neuroskeptic

Brain Pickings: Jane Goodall Tells Her Remarkable Life-Story, Animated

BBC: A History of Ideas

Science Daily: On the hunt for astronomical artifacts

Vimeo: Engineering fiction: literature and science in interwar Britain

Youtube: Houghton Library: Starry Messengers

Youtube: Emily Winterburn discusses Caroline Herschel’s 1787 account of a new comet

Youtube: Erwin Schrödinger – Do Electrons Think? (BBC 1949)

RADIO:

Siren FM: History of Science – Power Plants

BBC: In Our Times: The Curies Graham Farmelo: Wells and the Bomb

PODCASTS:

Science Friday: Writing Women Back Into Science History

Nature: Audiofile: Music and the making of science

Physics Buzz Blog: Manhattan Project Historical Park

Blog Talk Radio: Virtually Speaking Science: Kelly Hills & Alice Dreger – Galileo’s Middle Finger

365 Days of Astronomy: Cultural Astronomy – Easter and the Missing Days

Star Date: African Astronomy

BBC: The Clocks Go Forward Tonight

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Museum Boerhaave: Registration: Materia Medica on the move: trading, studying, and using plants in the early modern period 15-17 April 2015

Pisa: CfP: HaPoC: Third International Conference for the History and Philosophy of Computing 8–11 October 2015

The Royal Society: Science on myself: Explore the history of ethics and self-experimentation in medicine 9 April 2015

INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON SCIENCE AND LITERATURE DIVISION of HISTORY of SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL UNION for the HISTORY and PHILOSOPHY of SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL ON SCIENCE AND LITERATURE Greek island of Andros 22-26 June 2015

The Royal Society: Mendel’s legacy 2 June 2015

academia.edu: Programme: The History of the Body: Approaches and Directions Institute of Historical Research, London 16 May 2015

SIGGIS: Call for Submissions: Computer History Museum Prize

Oxford MHS: Exhibition: ‘Dear Harry…’ – Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War 14 May–18 October 2015

H-ArtHist: Call for Publications: Tales from the Crypt: Museum Storage and Meaning

Main Point Books: Book Launch with Paul Halpern for Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cats 18 April 2015 Bryn Mawr

Oxford University: Unique Course: The History and philosophy of Evidence-Based Health Care 15–19 June 2015

Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona: International Workshop: A Comparative Study of Nuclear Energy Programs from the 1940s until the 1970s 7-8 May 2015

AJS Annual Meeting 2015 Boston – CfP: Jewish medical knowledge and rabbinic discourse(s) in Late Antiquity

University of Edinburgh: Beyond Leeches and Lepers: Medieval & Early Modern Medicine 2 May 2015

The Royal Society: Archival afterlives 2 June 2015

Science History Publications/USA: Savant Remains: Brains and Remains of Scientists 4th Watson Seminar in the Material and Visual History of Science Organized by Marco Beretta, Maria Conforti, Paolo Mazzarello University of Pavia, Pavia, September 4th, 2015.

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Register Now for 70th Anniversary Events 2-3 June 2015

SHNH: Invitation for submissions to the Stearn Student Essay Prize 2015 for natural history

Centre for the History and Philosophy of Physics: Physics and the Great War One-Day Conference Oxford 8 June 2015

Natural History Museum: Talk: Robert Hooke and the Miracles of the Miniature 1 April 2015

CHF: First Friday: The Alchemist’s Cookbook 3 April 2015

CHoM News: Lecture: Gettysburg to Boylston Street: The Legacy of Civil War Medicine in the 21st Century Center for the History of Medicine Harvard 13 April 2015

Heterodoxology: ContERN meeting at ESSWE5 in Riga 18 April 2015

BSHM: LMS 150th Anniversary BSHM–LMS De Morgan Day 9 May 2015

SEAC 2015: Astronomy in Past and Present Cultures

New University of Lisbon: CfP: 2nd Portuguese-Brazilian Meeting on the History of Tropical Medicine 14-16 October 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Swansea University: Fully-funded PhD Studentship: Swansea Science: The First 100 Years

Birkbeck: University of London: PhD Studentship

Swansea University: AHRC Funded PhD Studentship: Calculating Value: Using and Collecting the Tools of Early Modern Mathematics

ADHO: Apply to Become AHDO’s Next Communications Fellow

Conecta: History of science/history of medicine Ph. D. opportunities at University of Glasgow: deadline 03/04/15

University of Warwick: Assistant Professor in the History of Medicine

Mendeley Blog: Lets talk about science – Scopus Young Researchers’ Award for science communications

Burns Library, Boston College: Head of Public Services and Instructional Outreach

The dual carriageway to Damascus: Assistant for the public engagement project Nappy Science Gang

Queens University: Term Adjunct appointment to teach history of medicine

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #40

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Strutting Owl

Volume #40

Monday 23 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

The fortieth edition of your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Weekly, comes strutting out of the darkness at noon (it was actually a bit earlier but poetic licence and all that) of a solar eclipse. It was only a partial eclipse in Europe but that didn’t stop the masses going out onto the streets in hordes to stare into the heavens, their faces hidden but cardboard spectacles like something out of a third rate horror movie.

Eclipses have of course played an important role in the history of astronomy. The Babylonians developed an algebraic algorithm to successfully predict lunar eclipses. They had a similar algorithm for solar eclipses, which however was not quite as good. It could only predict when solar eclipse might occur according to celestial geometry but could not compute a further factor that prevented the occurrence of some of those potential eclipses. This was not so good given the role that eclipses played in Babylonian omen astrology, the principle motivation for Babylonian astronomical investigations.

According to Greek legend, although probably more mythological than legendary, Thales of Meletius was the first Greek to accurately predict an eclipse of the sun in the sixth century BCE.

Christopher Columbus famously used the prediction of a lunar eclipse, calculated with the help of the ephemerides of Regiomontanus, to impress some bolshie natives in the Caribbean. (see History Matters post below)

As Rebekah “Becky” Higgitt reminded us on Twitter, “Comparing times at which eclipses occurred was the first way that differences of longitude could be established”.

Medieval eclipse

Also on Twitter A Clerk of Oxford offered us this medieval explanation of solar eclipses

Ælfric explains eclipses: ‘Hit getimað hwiltidum, þonne se mona beyrnþ on ðam ylcan strican þe seo sunne yrnð, þæt his trendel underscyt ðære sunnan to ðan swiðe þæt heo eall aðeostrað, 7 steorran æteowiað swylce on nihte. Ðis gelimpð seldon, 7 næfre buton on niwum monan.’

‘It happens sometimes, when the moon is running in the same course as the sun, that its orb passes under the sun’s in such a way that it is completely darkened, and the stars appear just as at night. This happens rarely, and never except at the new moon.’ (De Temporibus Anni)

 

Sacrobosco

Sacrobosco

 

 Trinity College Library, Cambridge: Eclipses

A plain description of the Sun's appearance in the Eclipse on Fryday (in the morning) April, 1715

A plain description of the Sun’s appearance in the Eclipse on Fryday (in the morning) April, 1715

Solar Eclipses in History

Ottoman astronomer İbrahim Tiflisi in 1479

Ottoman astronomer İbrahim Tiflisi in 1479

MHS Oxford: Eclipseometer

Eclipseometer

 

Royal Society Publishing: Observations of the Late Total Eclipse of the Sun on the 22nd April Past …

Lunar and SolarEclipse described by Ottoman philosopher İbrahim Müteferrika about 300 years ago

Lunar and SolarEclipse described by Ottoman philosopher İbrahim Müteferrika about 300 years ago

The Independent: Solar eclipse: humans have been frightened and fascinated by the moon hiding the sun since beginning of time

This morning we hope to see a partial eclipse of the Sun, just like these Londoners in 1748

This morning we hope to see a partial eclipse of the Sun, just like these Londoners in 1748

History Matters: THE DARKER SIDE OF KNOWLEDGE: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE SOLAR ECLIPSE

Solar eclipse from a 16th century cosmography of Qazwini

Solar eclipse from a 16th century cosmography of Qazwini

Quotes of the week:

“Dammit there are so many idiots whose asses I have to kick.” Edward Elric, Fullmetal Alchemist h/t @JoshRosenau

I’ve been a freelance writer & I’ve been a sex worker and sex work was not the career that made me feel exploited and disposable. – @avflox

“The sciences don’t try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models.” J. v. Neumann! h/t @GeorgeShiber

The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled – Plutarch

The man who cannot speak both eloquently and wisely should speak wisely without eloquence, rather than eloquently without wisdom. – Augustine

Not believing in force is the same as not believing in gravitation – Thomas Hobbes

That which is now called natural philosophy, embracing the whole circle of science, of which astronomy occupies the chief place, is the study of the works of God, and of the power and wisdom of God in his works, and is true theology – Thomas Paine

Astronomy is not only pleasant but also very useful…this art unfolds the admirable wisdom of God – John Calvin 1554

Does anyone suppose that any woman in all the ages has had a fair chance to show what she could do in science?… The laws of nature are not discovered by accidents; theories do not come by chance, even to the greatest minds; they are not born of the hurry and worry of daily toil; they are diligently sought, they are patiently waited for, they are received with cautious reserve, they are accepted with reverence and awe. And until able women have given their lives to investigation, it is idle to discuss the question of their capacity for original work. – Maria Mitchell

 

Birthdays of the Week:

Anna Atkins born 16 March 1799

Anna Atkins 1861 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Anna Atkins 1861
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The H-Word: Anna Atkins: Google’s tribute to a pioneer of botany and photography

Anna Atkins Google Doodle

Anna Atkins Google Doodle

The Independent: Anna Atkins: This is why British scientist who produced first photographic book has been given a Google Doodle

A cyanotype photogram made by Atkins which was part of her 1843 book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions Source: Wikimedia Commons

A cyanotype photogram made by Atkins which was part of her 1843 book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post: Anna Atkins: Google Doodle artfully celebrates a true-blue photographic pioneer

Motherboard: The Hauntingly Beautiful Photos of Anna Atkins, Creator of Botanical Photography

Caroline Herschel born 16 March 1750:

Caroline Lucretia Herschel 1829  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Caroline Lucretia Herschel 1829
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: Herschel, Caroline Lucretia

Royal Museums Greenwich: Caroline HerschelC Herschel poster

Poetry Foundation: Planetarium by Adrienne Rich: Thinking of Caroline Herschel

History Today: Birth of Caroline Herschel

Caroline Herschel Letter

Caroline Herschel Letter

Starchild: Caroline Herschel

History Physics Today: Caroline Herschel’s birthday

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science: Résumé of Observations Concerning the Solar Eclipse of May 29, 1919, and the Einstein Effect

Ptak Science Books: A Million Violinists Playing Everything at the Same Time

Yovisto: Frederick Reines and the Neutrino

Irish Philosophy: John Stewart Bell: The Nature of Reality

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Richard Yalman’s Interview

A Clerk of Oxford: The Days of Creation

God creating the world (BL Royal 1 E VII, f. 1v, 11th century, Canterbury)

God creating the world (BL Royal 1 E VII, f. 1v, 11th century, Canterbury)

Space Watchtower: Historic Brashear Telescope Factory Wall Collapses

Pittsburgh Post Gazette.com Historic Pittsburgh factory being levelled after wall collapse

Yovisto: The Life and Work of Philippe de La Hire

tekepart: A Legacy of Discovery Going Strong for More Than 150 Years

St John’s College: The Way to the Stars: Build Your Own Astrolabe

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The continuing saga of io9’s history of science inanities

 

Science Museum Group Journal: Curating the collider: using place to engage museum visitors with particle physics

AHF: Emilio Segrè

BBC News: Isaac Newton royal medal design discovery

Queen Anne Medal Source: BBC News

Queen Anne Medal
Source: BBC News

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Calendrical confusion or just when did Newton die?

The Seattle Times: Vision quest: Curator catalogs the world’s oldest telescopes

Tech Times: Corning Museum Curator Documenting Oldest Telescopes In The World

APS: This Month in Physics History: March 20, 1800: Volta describes the Electric Battery

Gigal Research: The Menkaura Stellar Observatory

AMNH Shelf Life: How to Time travel to a Star

Oxford Journals: An astronomical murder?

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Letters from Gondwana: The Challenger Expedition and the Beginning of Oceanography

Atlas Obscura: The Most Remarkable Globe in the World is in a Brooklyn Office Building

The Public Domain Review: Elizabeth Bisland’s Race Around the World

The 18th-Century Common: What the Abyssinian Liar Can Tell us about True Stories: Knowledge, Skepticism, and James Bruce’s Travels to Discover the Source of the Nile

James Bruce by E. Topham. Etching, published 1775. NPG D13789. National Portrait Gallery, UK. Used under Creative Commons Limited Non-Commercial License.

James Bruce by E. Topham. Etching, published 1775.
NPG D13789. National Portrait Gallery, UK. Used under Creative Commons Limited Non-Commercial License.

Ptak Science Books: A Fine and Interesting Map of Air Routes, 1956

homunculus: The Saga of the Sunstones

The Viking Sunstone Compass made by researchers at the University of Rennes. Note the double bright spots in the cavity.  Source: Phillip Ball

The Viking Sunstone Compass made by researchers at the University of Rennes. Note the double bright spots in the cavity.
Source: Phillip Ball

Board of Longitude Project: Harrison Decoded: Towards a perfect pendulum clock

MEDICINE:

The Quack Doctor: The bogus lady doctor

British Library: Science blog: Shell shocked

Dr Alun Withey: Crooked or Straight: Creating the ideal posture in 18th-century Britain

The neck swing, from Timothy Sheldrake’s ‘Essay on the Various Causes and Effects of the Distorted Spine’, 1783

The neck swing, from Timothy Sheldrake’s ‘Essay on the Various Causes and Effects of the Distorted Spine’, 1783

NYAM: What Things are Good and Holesome for the Braine

academia.edu: “From Practice to Print: Women Crafting Authority at the Margins of Orthodox Medicine”

Slate: Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

London Evening Standard: Florence Nightingale’s medical books put online for free viewing

Yale News: Creating a malaria test for ancient human remains

Early Modern Medicine: Maternity Wear: To Conceal or Reveal?

NYAM: Brain Awareness Week

Niche: Vaccines and the Environmental History of Medicine

The Recipes Project: Spa Culture, Recipes, and Eighteenth-Century Elite Healthcare

The Comforts of Bath, 1798. Thomas Rowlandson. Image Credit: Wikigallery.org

The Comforts of Bath, 1798. Thomas Rowlandson. Image Credit: Wikigallery.org

Joanne Bailey Muses on History: Foetus: From the Sensory to the Scan

Time-Life: How Sword Swallowing Contributed to Modern Medicine

We’re History: Before Ebola, there was Yellow Fever

Explore the incredible Bethlem records

Groovy Historian: What Were Believed to be the Causes of and Treatments for Melancholy & Madness During the Renaissance and Early Modern Period?

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Sara Vincx

Tycho’s nose: There’s something in the water

Engineering and Technology History Wiki

Sage Journals: Institution of Mechanical Engineers Proceedings June 1847

History Matters: Heritage, History and Community: Engaging with the past in a former industrial village

My medieval foundry: Maybe a sighting of a double action bellows?

Conciatore: Dyed In The Grain

Dyeing wool cloth, from "Des Proprietez des Choses" Bartholomaeus Anglicus, 1482 British Library Royal MS 15.E.iii, folio 269

Dyeing wool cloth, from “Des Proprietez des Choses”
Bartholomaeus Anglicus, 1482
British Library Royal MS 15.E.iii, folio 269

io9: 50 Years Ago, The First Spacewalk Nearly Ended in Tragedy

IEEE Spectrum: Moore’s Curse

Conciatore: Cristallo

Ptak Science Books: Babbage Obituary and Other Babbage Bits

Wired: Prop-Driven ‘Rail Zeppelin’ Is Many Kinds of Awesome

Schienenzeppelin

Schienenzeppelin

Slate Vault: A Telephone Map of the United States Shows Where You Could Call Using Ma Bell in 1910

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Notches: Sex and the American Quest for a Relatable Past

Embryo Project: Cornelia Clapp

Notches: Organized Labor, Gay Liberation and the Battle Against the Religious Right, 1977–1994

Natural History Apostilles: Matthew (1831) spliced Steuart’s (1828) quote of Loudon (1806)

NYAM: Roget Beyond the Thesaurus

History of Geology: Celebrating the Irish-Geological Heritage

The first published image of the Giant’s Causeway by local artist Christopher Cole Foley was used to illustrate an account by Samuel Foley, Bishop of Down and Connor, in 1694. However both the drawing and the engraving from it were considered inadequate depictions of this peculiar Irish landscape.

The first published image of the Giant’s Causeway by local artist Christopher Cole Foley was used to illustrate an account by Samuel Foley, Bishop of Down and Connor, in 1694. However both the drawing and the engraving from it were considered inadequate depictions of this peculiar Irish landscape.

Philosophical Transactions B: The unseen world: reflections on Leeuwenhoek (1677) ‘Concerning little animals’

Science Gossip: Piecing Together the Story of a Female Naturalist through Victorian Journals

The Rest Project: A 19th-century Naturalist’s Daily Schedule: Alfred Russel Wallace in Singapore

 

Thinking Like a Mountain: Enlightenment Ghosts and Ecological Utopianism in the Scottish Highlands

Londonist: How Would You Describe a Kangaroo?

Husbandry Book Blog: Marches Husbandry: Beware of birds!

Natural History Apostilles: The Naval Timber Controversies: poor Billington

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Amadeus William Grabau

 

Embryo Project: The Human Genome Project (1990–2003)

Embryo Project: The inductive capacity of oral mesenchyme and its role in tooth development (1969-1970), by Edward J. Kollar and Grace R. Baird

Earth Touch news: These Beautiful 19th-centuary Illustrations capture Dinosaur ‘Death Poses’

Image: The Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences

Image: The Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences

 

UCMP Berkeley: Adam Sedgwick (1785–1873)

Famous Scientists: Agnes Arber

 

CHEMISTRY:

Othermalia: Photo essay of female lab workers 1946

1946 volume of the corporate publication Research Today by Lily Research Laboratories

1946 volume of the corporate publication Research Today by Lily Research Laboratories

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Against the division of the library of the López Piñero Institute

Clio@King’s: The History Department Blog: Who Should We Write History For?

ChoM News: From the MHL: “Seeing With a Better Eye”

 

Open Quaternary: Launching Open Quaternary

Open Quaternary: Submitting an Article Online

The Edinburgh Reporter: Writing women of science back into history

Hedy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr

ChoM News: From the MHL: Why Digital Collections, Why Now?

The Atlantic: The Problem With History Classes

THE: Female science writers celebrated

Historiens de la santé: Medical History Volume 59, Issue 02, April 2015

Quanta Magazine: Science’s Path From Myth to Multiverse

The Conversation: Why do we need the humanities?

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: MedHum Mondays: Why Medical Humanities?

Society for the History of Astronomy

The Incluseum: Museums and the Reproduction of Disadvantage

The National Archives: England’s immigration records 1330–1550 now online

Love Imperial War Museum Library: Outraged about research room charges

 

Gaudy Night: Women’s History Month 2015: Science and Medicine

Concocting History: Pythagoreans, lore, science… and sadness

Ether Wave Propaganda: “I am a sadist; you are a masochist; so let us have some fun together”: Agassi on Feyerabend, Feyerabend on Agassi

 

Cross-Check: Everyone, Even Jenny McCarthy, Has the Right to Challenge “Scientific Experts”

Historians.org: AHR Exchange On The History Manifesto

JHI Blog: The Republic of Intellectual History

Darin Hayton: HistorySTM March Madness Round 1

Making Science Public: The Co-production Confusion

The #EnvHist Weekly

Chemical Connections: A quantitative analysis of how often Nature gives a fuck

ESOTERIC:

Philly.com: Delving into a 400-year-old puzzle book, through song

JHL: Science, Mysticism, and Dreams in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

distillatio: There is a lot more to research in medieval alchemical manuscripts than people know of

 

Illustation similar in intent to those in the Ripley Scrolls, which are a late 15th/ early 16th invention. (Stolen from the British Library website, they seem to be copyright free)

Illustation similar in intent to those in the Ripley Scrolls, which are a late 15th/ early 16th invention. (Stolen from the British Library website, they seem to be copyright free)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: The Anatomist: A True Story of Gray’s Anatomy

THE: How to Write a Thesis, by Umberto Eco

Science Book a Day: Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen

Wellcome Library: Women, plumbers and doctors: sanitation in the home

Contaminated drinking water. Wellcome Library reference: b20424863.

Contaminated drinking water. Wellcome Library reference: b20424863.

Brain Pickings: The Illustrated Story of Persian Polymath Ibn Sina and How He Shaped the Course of Medicine

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Empty Sleeves: Amputation in the Civil War South

 

Basic Books: Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cats

9780465075713

Profile Books: Scientific Babel: The language of science from the fall of Latin to the rise of English

Vanderbilt University Press: Medicine and Nation Building in the Americas, 1890–1940

THEATRE:

FILM:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Science Dump: There’s a reason for all the madness in Alice in Wonderland, it’s maths!

Youtube: Nick Lane discusses Leeuwenhoek’s observations of “little animals” under a microscope

New York Times: Animated Life: Pangea

Youtube: Under The Knife, Episode 7 – Medieval Urine Wheels

Irish Philosophy: Why Study…James Ussher

Youtube: Using Maxwell’s Equations Before the Electron

RADIO:

BBC Radio Ulster: The Lady Computer of Strabane: Annie Maunder

PODCASTS:

Nature Podcast: Why is English the language of science?

AHF: Podcast: Manhattan Project National Historical Park

The Leonard Lopate Show: The Painter and the Philosopher Who Taught Us How to See

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

CfP: The Forum for the History of Chemical Sciences (FoHCS) and the Commission for the History of Modern Chemistry (CHMC) are setting up a panel After Ypres: the integration of science into war for the next HSS meeting in San Francisco, November 2015.

Call for Publications: Tales from the Crypt: Museum Storage and Meaning

Yale University: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 27-28 March 2015

NYAM: Lecture: Dr Vivian Nutton Vesalius Correcting Vesalius 31 March 2015

ChoM News: Lecture: Pregnancy and Personhood – The Maternal-Fetal Relationship in America, 1850 to the Present Harvard Medical School 2 April 2015

Maritime @ Greenwich: New Researchers in Maritime History Conference 10 April 2015

University of Durham: CfP: Hume and Naturalism 16-17 July 2015

University of Sydney: Rethinking Intellectual History 2015 7-9 April

King’s College London: CfP: Working Across Species: Comparative Practices in Modern Medical, Biological and Behavioural Sciences 7-8 January 2016

 

Durham University: The 10th UK Integrated History and Philosophy of Science Workshop 16-17 April 2015

Philos-L: Call for Papers The Journal of Philosophy and Medicine

CHF: Make Your Own Books of Secrets: A Workshop 13 June 2015

CHoM News: Gettysburg to Boylston Street – The Legacy of Civil War Medicine in the 21st Century Harvard Center for the History of Medicine 13 April 2015

 

UCL: STS seminar: “How Does Science Blind Itself – and Then Society Too? A Brief History of Scientific Knowledge of Radiocaesium Behaviour in Soils, and the post-Chernobyl Sheep-Contamination Prediction Fiasco” 25 March 2015

 

The Ninth Conference on The Inspiration of Astronomical Phenomena 23-28 August 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Oxford: AHRC Doctoral Studentship in collaboration with the Imperial War Museum: Contemporary Art and Conflict at IWM

Museums and the Web: Visiting Assistant/Associate Professor, Museum & Digital Culture

Society and the History of Chemistry and Alchemy: The SHAC Award Scheme

University of Kent: 50th Anniversary Research Scholarship in the History of Science

Science Museum Group: Associate Curator, Infrastructure and Built Environment

H-Net: The History Makers seek a full time Oral History Researcher

University of Warwick: Assistant Professor in the History of Medicine

Simmons: School of Library and Information Science: The James A. Lindner Digital Archive Summer Fellowship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #39

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #39

Monday 16 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome to the thirty-ninth edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list brought to you on the wings of an owl. All the blog posts and Internet articles on the histories of science, technology and medicine that our hard working editorial team could round up for your pleasure in a week that saw the 136th anniversary of the birth of Albert Einstein in the year which sees the centenary of the publication of his General Theory of Relativity. This week also saw the Internet go more than a little loopy about an American form of writing the date so-called once in a century Pi day, a phenomenon that doesn’t occur in any other countries form of writing the date.

All of this raises the question, why do we consider anniversaries of all sorts to be so significant in history? Is a theory more important when it’s some multiple of 365 days old than on any other day? Should we give more thought to a scientist on her or his birthday than on other days of the year? Does our obsession with marking #histSTM anniversaries somehow trivialise the study of history. We here at Whewell’s Gazette offer no answers to these questions, but merely suggest that all STM historians should give them some thought should they feel so inclined.

Quotes of the week:

Don’t worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats ~ Howard Aiken h/t @OnThisDayinMath

One Science only will one Genius fit;

So vast is Art, so narrow Human Wit – Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism

Vladimir Nabokov had a ‘genitalia cabinet’ in which he kept his collection of male blue butterfly genitalia. It’s now housed at Harvard. – @InterestingLit

Heuristic: never nitpick a heuristic – @nntaleb

If the misery of our poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin – Charles Darwin

Birthday of the Week:

Albert Einstein born 14 March

Albert Einstein in 1921 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein in 1921
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: Albert Einstein

AIP Center for History of Physics: A. Einstein Image and Impact

AIP: 2015 The Centennial of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity

NJ.com: Albert Einstein’s birthday, deep connection to Princeton celebrated on special 3-14-15 Pi Day

The New York Times: Einstein Flees Berlin to Avoid Being Feted

Symmetry: Einstein’s most famous equation

The Age: Genius found inspiration in silent spaces

Yahoo News: Beyond Reletivity: Albert Einstein’s Lesser-Known Work

Fossilist of the week:

Mary Anning Died 9 March 1847

Mary Anning  Google Doodle

Mary Anning
Google Doodle

Letters from Gondwana: Remembering Mary Anning

Mary Anning

Regency History; Mary Anning (1799-1847)

Mary Anning's Ichtyosaurus communis skull, by Elizabeth Philpot, 1814

Mary Anning’s Ichtyosaurus communis skull, by Elizabeth Philpot, 1814

Evolve or Die: Mary Anning

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Berfois: Tempo Shifts:

BBC Earth: Why does time always run forwards and never backwards?

Medievalist.net: Early medieval science: the evidence of Bede

AHF: The Hydrogen Bomb – 1950

AIP: “Gravitational collapse” by Hong-Yee Chiu, May 1964

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Seth Wheatley’s Interview

Espace.net: Szilard’s Patent 12 March 1934: Improvements in or relating to the transmutation of chemical elements

Voices of the Manhattan Project: George Kistiakowsky’s Interview

APS: This Month in Physics History: March 13, 1781: Herschel Discovers Uranus

Frederick William Herschel

Frederick William Herschel

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Eugene Wigner’s Interview

Darin Hayton: Where Did De Revolutionibus Go?

Chart showing where copies of De Revolutionibus went. Created by Darin Hayton

Chart showing where copies of De Revolutionibus went.
Created by Darin Hayton

Medievalist.net: Ironing Out the Myth of the Flat Earth

Science Notes: What Is a Jiffy?

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: London through the artist’s eye

Wenceslaus Hollar, On the North Side of London , 1664  Maps K. Top. 28.9-e. - Source: British Library

Wenceslaus Hollar, On the North Side of London , 1664 Maps K. Top. 28.9-e. – Source: British Library

British Library: Maps and views blog: A Rum Lot of Maps

Yovisto: Richard E. Byrd, Jr. – Aviator and Polar Explorer

The Public Domain Review: The Maps of Piri Reis

MEDICINE:

Conciatore: The Béguines of Mechelen

A Béguine of Antwerp, from Pierre Hélyot, L'Histoire des ordres monastiques… 1719 (v.8)

A Béguine of Antwerp,
from Pierre Hélyot,
L’Histoire des ordres monastiques… 1719 (v.8)

BBC: Medieval monastic bones in Ipswich could aid arthritis research

British Library: Beautiful Minds: Alexander Fleming (1881–1951): A noble life in science

The National Archives: Death of Sir Alexander Fleming, discoverer of penicillin, 11 March 1955

Scientific American: Neurobiology of the Placebo Effect

academia.edu: Augmentative, Alternative, and Assistive: Reimagining the History of Mobile Computing and Disability

CBC:ca: A History of Chimps in Medical Research

Longreads: A Very Naughty Little Girl

Blood transfusion bottle. Photo via Wellcome Trust, Wikimedia Commons.

Blood transfusion bottle. Photo via Wellcome Trust, Wikimedia Commons.

Royal College of Physicians: ‘From her truly affectionate friend’

Duke University Libraries: Digital Collections: Anatomical Fugitive Sheets

BBC: Five research papers that revolutionised health

academia.edu: “Obstetrical and Gynecological Texts in Middle English” (1992), with an edition of “The Nature of Womman”

Medievalist.net: Is There a Doctor in the Castle?

TECHNOLOGY:

Lapham’s Quarterly: People Will Look: The tricycle has come to stay

Wome's Trike

History Today: Time Pieces: Working Men and Watches

City Lab: Now More Than Ever, London Needs a ‘Death Pyramid’

Yovisto: Howard H. Aiken and the Harvard Mark I

The Public Domain Review: Kodak No.1 Circular Snapshots

Cram Swansea: CRAM staff explain their research…

The Guardian: Berenice Abbott: the photography trailblazer who had supersight

Culture 24: Before the Apple Watch: Six of the best timepieces used through the centuries

Balance spring pocket watch in silver case (1675-1679)

Balance spring pocket watch in silver case (1675-1679)

Wellcome Collection blog: Death in a Nutshell

AEON: American petro-topia

Conciatore: Reticello

Smithsonian.com: Would You Pass Thomas Edison’s Employment Test?

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Dating the Past: Dating is Important for Understanding Past (and Future) Climate Change

Embryo Project: Wilhelm Friedrich Phillip Pfeffer (1845–1920)

International Science Times: Wooly Mammoth Poop Analysis May Solve Extinction Mystery; Beast May Have Relied Too Much On Flowers In Their Diet

Scientists still don't know what killed off the woolly mammoth. But the latest theory suggests it had to do with their diet of little yellow flowers. (Photo: Shutterstock)

Scientists still don’t know what killed off the woolly mammoth. But the latest theory suggests it had to do with their diet of little yellow flowers. (Photo: Shutterstock)

Tucson.com: UA researchers use tree rings to rewrite history

Niche: The Cold that Binds: Ice, Climate History, and a Hobbit Hole

The Public Domain Review: Sex and Science in Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora

Illustration showing “Cupid Inspiring Plants with Love”, in this case specifically the Strelitzia reginae or Queen Plant, a plate from Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora (1807) – Source: Wellcome Library.

Illustration showing “Cupid Inspiring Plants with Love”, in this case specifically the Strelitzia reginae or Queen Plant, a plate from Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora (1807) – Source: Wellcome Library.

NPR: Tea Tuesdays: The Scottish Spy Who Stole China’s Tea Empire

The Shells tell the Truth: Molluscs, some Stratigraphic Order and early Evolution

BBC: Anthropocene: New dates proposed for the ‘Age of Man’

The New York Times: Did Earth’s ‘Anthropocene’ Age of Man Begin With the Globalization of Disease in 1610?

Nature: Anthropocene: The human age

Notches: Globalizing the History of Sexology

Fossil History: Buckland’s Red Lady

The Guardian: Italian scientists ‘recreate DNA’ of fascist warrior-poet from semen stains

The Artful Amoeba: Ever Wish You Could Put Ernst Haeckel on Your Lamp Shade? Now You Can

Brown University Library: Curio: The Unicorn of the Sea Comes to Brown

The Recipes Project: Locating traditional plant knowledge in household recipes

io9: These Scientific Names Were Chosen Purely to Insult Certain People

BBC: JBS Haldane: Blue plaque for genetics pioneer

History of Geology: The Geology of the Mountains of Madness

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: Dial chem for murder

Chemical evidence helped convict Marie Lafarge of poisoning her husband © Mary Evans Picture Library / Alamy

Chemical evidence helped convict Marie Lafarge of poisoning her husband © Mary Evans Picture Library / Alamy

Yovisto: Jeremias Richter and the Law of Definite Proportions

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The many-headed monster: We the People, 1535–1787: Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part III

Public History Commons: The AHA on the path to public history

American Science: Links for 9 March 2015

Distillation Blog

MPIFTHS: Engineering, Cartography, and the Culture of Knowledge in Late-Sixteenth-Century Rome

Gresham College: The Gresham College App

UCL: STS Observatory: UK archives of post-war science – notes towards a list

Bodleian History Faculty Library: Social Media for Historians (pdf)

Bonhams: Turing, Alan Mathison. 1912-1954 Composition notebook

Now Appearing: Hit by a Newton bomb

The #EnvHist Weekly

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Discovery is a process not an act

Ether Wave Propaganda: “The Rational Life”: Issues in Quote Truncation

Rational Action: What did Warren Weaver mean when he spoke of “the rational life”?

Hyperjeff: Visual timelines to accompany Peter Adamson’s History of Philosophy without any gaps

Ether Wave Propaganda: Why Joseph Agassi Is No Longer Read as Much, An Introduction

HNN: Why Historians Should Use Twitter: An Interview with Katrina Gulliver

ESOTERIC:

History of Alchemy: Faust

Laham’s Quarterly: Animal Magnetism

Franz Anton Mesmer Source: Wikimedia Commons

Franz Anton Mesmer
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Collation: Early modern eyebrow interpretations, or what it means to have a unibrow

BOOK REVIEWS:

academia.edu: Emil du Bois-Reymond and the tradition of German physiological science

academic.edu: Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self and Society in Nineteenth Century Germany

Science Book a Day: Haeckel’s Embryos: Images, Evolution, and Fraud

New Scientist: How fudged embryo illustrations led to drawn-out lies

haeckels-embryos

History to the Public: Humdinger in the everyday: Greg Jenner’s A Million Years in a Day

Popular Science: Professor Stewart’s Incredible Numbers

Centre for Medical Humanities: The Severed Head Capital Visions

Science Book a Day: Drugged: The Science and Culture Behind Psychotropic Drugs

The Guardian: Half Life: The Divided Life of Bruno Pontecorvo, Physicist or Spy by Frank Close – review

Biodetectives: Life science books everyone should read

The Guardian: John Aubrey: My Own Life review – the taxidermist of a dying England

Project Muse: The Princess and the Philosopher: Letters of Elisabeth of the Palatine to Rene Descartes

BSHS Dingle Prize Short List:

University of Chicago Press: Earth’s Deep History

Yale University Press: Voyaging in Strange Seas

Harper Collins Publishers: Finding Longitude

University of Chicago Press: Visions of Science

9780226203287

WellCome Book Prize Shortlist 2015:

The Guardian: Wellcome Trust 2015 Book Prize shortlist announced

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: More Than Medicine: A History of the Feminist Women’s Health Movement

Taylor & Francis: Reimagining (Bio)Medicalization, Pharmaceuticals and Genetics

Ashgate: Boyle Studies

Routledge: Spaces for Feelings: Emotion and Sociabilities in Britain 1650-1850

9781138828179

University of Washington Press: Feminist Technosciences

Salon: Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing” – An Excerpt

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Why the Imitation Game is a disaster for historians

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Bertrand Russell – Face to Face Interview (BBC, 1959)

Youtube: Be curious… about AIR QUALITY

Youtube: Fifty billion chips and counting

Youtube: The Genius of Einstein: The Science, the Brain, the Man

Laughing Squid: A Look at Four Lesser-Known Scientific Discoveries and the Women Behind Them

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Native American Medicine: The Sequah Limited: Commoditising the Native

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Bucharest: Workshop: Natural History, Mathematics and Metaphysics in the Seventeenth Century 26-27 April 2015

Museum Boerhaave and Naturalis Biodiversity Centre: Materia medica on the move. Collecting, trading studying and using medicinal plants in the early modern period 15-17 April 2015

ChoM News: Lecture: Pregnancy and Personhood: The Maternal-Fetal Relationship in America, 1850 to the Present Harvard Medical School 2 April 2015

John Innes Centre: Cultivation Innovations 14 April 2015

University of Oxford: CfP: Space, place, and landscape in the history of communications 16 June 2015

University of Durham: The History of Thermodynamics and Scientific Realism 12 May 2015

University of Manchester: Stories about Science 4-5 June 2015

Open Quaternary: Call for Papers

IHPST: Announcements

Computer History Museum: Book Prize 2015: Call for submissions

London Medieval Society: Medieval London and the World 2015 1-4 May 2015

Parasynchronies: CfP: Divergent Bodies and the Making of the Middle Ages

CRASSH: Graphical Displays: Challenges for Humanists 18 May 2015

History of Education Society (UK): Conference: CfP: Science, Technologies, and Material Culture in the History of Education Liverpool Hope University 20-22 November 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Food as Medicine: Historical Perspectives 9-10 October 2015 Dublin

Dittrick Medical History Centre: Upcoming Events

University of York: CfP: Epistolary cultures – letters and letter-writing in early modern Europe

BSHS: Conference: Leibniz-scientist, Leibniz-philosopher University of Wales Lampeter 3-5 July 2015

BSHS: Conference: Ruling Climate The Theory and practice of environmental governmentality 1500-1800 University of Warwick 16 May 2015

Morbid Anatomy: The Lost Museum Symposium: Providence Rhode Island 6-8 May 2015

10th International Conference on the History of Chemistry: CfP: Chemical Biography Aveiro Portugal 9-12 September 2015

H–Environment: CfP: Workshop: Experiencing the Global Environment MPIFTHOS Berlin 4-6 February 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Chester: Lecturer in Early Modern Global History 1650–1800

University of Sydney: Associate Lecturer History of Science

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarships

University of Chester: Lecturer in Historic Landscapes and Environments

How We Get to Next: Editor and Staff Writer

King’s College London: Lecturer in the History of Science and Technology

University of Kent: Postgraduate Funding

University of Leeds: Studentship: Object Journeys: Community co-production of collections knowledge and displays at a national museum

CHF: Public History Fellow

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #38

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

aceo___owl_grandma_by_ashanti_whitefur-d3clqjb

Volume #38

Monday 09 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list has been around for just thirty-eight issues counting this one but 6 March saw the three hundred and fiftieth birthday of the world’s first (maybe) and oldest (definitely) science journal the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, which has been celebrating its birthday in real style. There are free open access birthday editions of both the A edition (mathematical and physical sciences) and the B edition (the life sciences) with lots of history of science content so get stuck in and download all of those goodies.

The Royal Society: Publishing Blog: Free access to 350 years of science publishing

University of Toronto: Exhibit – 350 Years of Scientific Discovery: The Royal Society’ Philosophical Transactions 6–31 March

The Guardian: 350 years of the scientific journal: celebrating the anniversary of Philosophical Transactions

Youtube: Science Stories: Publishing 350

Yovisto: The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society

Quotes of the week:

“Describe your methodology” – Well, I read things and then think about them. That good enough? @LeapingRobot

“Judging by how hard it is to get some people to do either of those things, it sounds pretty rigorous.” @TryingBiology

Women’s History Month – International Women’s Day

Google Doodle IWD

Google Doodle IWD

Sunday was International Women’s Day and March is also Women’s History Month so this edition of Whewell’s Gazette starts with a special women’s section.

A Don’s Life: International Women’s Day for historians

PLOS Blogs: Pentimento: Revealing the Women Obscured in Science History

Trowelblazers: Women in archaeology, geology, and palaeontology

Wikipedia: WikiProject Women’s History/NIH Women’s History Month Edit-a-Thon 2015

Cemistry lab at Bedford College in 1874. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Cemistry lab at Bedford College in 1874.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

Conciatore: Women in Alchemy

The Recipes Project: “The Alchemist’s Desire”: Recipes for Health and Beauty from Caterina Sforza

Rosetta Stones: Women of the Geoblogosphere: Follow Them! For They are Awesome

News ALL Day: Mapping history’s ‘invisible’ women

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Nancy Bartlit’s Interview

Trowelblazers: Tina Negus: An eye for the Ediacaran

Royal Holloway College botany class in 1937. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Royal Holloway College botany class in 1937.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

The Conversation: You probably haven’t heard of these five amazing women scientists – so pay attention

How We Get To Next: The Forgotten Story of the Women Who Built One of London’s Most Iconic Bridges

Advances in the History of Psychology: Women’s History Month @ Psychology’s Feminist Voices

The Sloane Letters Blog: Choosing the Countryside: Women Health and Power in the Eighteenth Century

The Guardian: International Women’s Day 2015: history of women in science – in pictures

Bedford College chemistry lab in 1920. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Bedford College chemistry lab in 1920.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

AMNH: Women’s History Month at the Museum

TrowelBlazers: 5 TrowelBlazers You Should Have Heard of

Brain Pickings: Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science

io9: These 17 Women Changed The Face of Physics

flickr: Women in Science

"NOTHING IN LIFE IS TO BE FEARED. IT IS ONLY TO BE UNDERSTOOD" – Marie Curie

“NOTHING IN LIFE IS TO BE FEARED. IT IS ONLY TO BE UNDERSTOOD” – Marie Curie

Birthday of the week:

Gerardus Mercator born 5 March 1512

Gerardus Mercator's 503rd Birthday Google Doodle

Gerardus Mercator’s 503rd Birthday
Google Doodle

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The “first” Atlas

The Renaissance Mathematicus: It’s not the Mercator projection; it’s the Mercator-Wright projection!

History Today: The Birth of Gerardus Mercator

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Astrology and the novatores, part 3

AHF: John R. Dunning

BSHS Travel Guide: Harvard College Observatory

Photograph of the Harvard Computers, a group of women who worked under Edward Charles Pickering at the Harvard College Observatory. The photograph was taken on 13 May 1913 in front of Building C, which was then the newest building at the Observatory. The image was discovered in an album which had once belonged to Annie Jump Cannon. Image courtesy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Back row (L to R): Margaret Harwood (far left), Mollie O’Reilly, Edward C. Pickering, Edith Gill, Annie Jump Cannon, Evelyn Leland (behind Cannon), Florence Cushman, Marion Whyte (behind Cushman), Grace Brooks. Front row: Arville Walker, unknown (possibly Johanna Mackie), Alta Carpenter, Mabel Gill, Ida Woods (Source: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. This media file is in the public domain because its copyright has expired).

Photograph of the Harvard Computers, a group of women who worked under Edward Charles Pickering at the Harvard College Observatory. The photograph was taken on 13 May 1913 in front of Building C, which was then the newest building at the Observatory. The image was discovered in an album which had once belonged to Annie Jump Cannon. Image courtesy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Back row (L to R): Margaret Harwood (far left), Mollie O’Reilly, Edward C. Pickering, Edith Gill, Annie Jump Cannon, Evelyn Leland (behind Cannon), Florence Cushman, Marion Whyte (behind Cushman), Grace Brooks. Front row: Arville Walker, unknown (possibly Johanna Mackie), Alta Carpenter, Mabel Gill, Ida Woods (Source: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. This media file is in the public domain because its copyright has expired).

AHF: Manhattan Project Spotlight: The Groves Family

Brown University Library: Capturing the Transit of Venus

AHF: Innovation Through Teamwork

Nature Physics: Physics, physicists and the bomb

Phys.org Aboriginal legends an untapped record of natural history written in the stars

University of Cambridge Museums: Sedwick Museum meteorite helps unravel mysteries of Solar System

Cosmos: The physicist who inflated the universe

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: Robert Adam and the King’s Topographical Collection

Robert Adam [Elevation and plan of a proposed arch at Hyde Park Corner, November 1778]  Maps K Top 27.26-c-2.  Source: British Library

Robert Adam [Elevation and plan of a proposed arch at Hyde Park Corner, November 1778] Maps K Top 27.26-c-2.
Source: British Library

MEDICINE:

Archives Hub: Continuity of Care – The Royal Scottish National Hospital

h-madness: “The Making and Travelling of Knowledge. A Biography of a Medical Case History in Nineteenth-Century Europe”

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Big–Data Project on 1918 Flu Reflects Key Role Of Humanists

Early Modern Medicine: The Stinging of a Wasp

MHL: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Lapham’s Quarterly: Contagion: A brief history of malaria, leprosy, and smallpox
08_medicine

 

The Recipes Project: Scratching “The Itch Infalable”: Johanna St. John’s Anti-Itch Cure

ChoM News: From the MHL: What Can We Learn from Hospital Reports?

The Lancet: Exhibition review: Celebrating the remarkable life of John Radcliffe

Yovisto: John Fothergill – Physician and Gardener

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Source: Unknown

Source: Unknown

The Guardian: How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

Earth Observatory: Svante Arrhenius (1859-1927)

The Crestone Eagle: Gray & Hooker’s Blanca Peak Expedition: The Asian connection

NYAM: Proposed 1920s Orphanage Study Just One Example in History of Scientific Racism

Notches: Eugenics and Intersex: The consequences of defining “normal” bodies

Yovisto: John Murray and the Oceanography

John Murray (1841 – 1914)

John Murray
(1841 – 1914)

The Royal Institution: John Tyndall discovered the basis of global warming. Why has history forgotten him?

The Guardian: Sexing up the human pheromone story: How a corporation started a scientific myth

Source: Unknown

Source: Unknown

Dorking and Leatherhead Advertiser: Call for plaque to recognize Dorking home of evolution scientist

Diseases of Modern Life: Inside Passengers: The Girl’s Own Paper looks inside the body

Luke and Belinda explore the stomach.

Luke and Belinda explore the stomach.

Natural History Apostilles: Predator-prey selection between dogs and goats observed in 1758

Natural History Apostilles: More observations on dogs and goats from the 16th century

Skulls in the Stars: Michael Faraday and the waterspouts (1814)

Coincidence?

Coincidence?

Greg Jenner: Animals on the Wall: Cave Art & Stone Age Pets

Canadian Geographic: HMS Erebus exploration set to continue

CHEMISTRY:

Medium: A short-but-gruesome history of the match

image by flickr user Jim Chambers CC BY-NC-SA

image by flickr user Jim Chambers CC BY-NC-SA

TECHNOLOGY:

Medievalist.net: Top 10 Strange Weapons of the Middle Ages

Dr Alun Withey: Zounds how you scape! Being shaved in Georgian Britain

Yovisto: Walter Bruch and the PAL Color Television System

Ptak Science Books: Tiny Sky Nets for Attacking Aircraft, 1925

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

IEEE Spectrum: Eben Upton: The Raspberry Pi Pioneer

Ptak Scientific Books: Visual Display of Data: German Military Weakness, 1929

Conciatore: Filigrana

Ptak Science Books: Cut-Away Schematic: British Vickers Medium Tank, 1925

Yovisto: William Oughtred and the Slide Rule

The Atlantic: The Failed Attempt to Destroy GPS

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

WCM 1: Open Notebook History

The many-headed monster: Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part II: Some evidence from manuscripts

New Statesman: No one was “gay” in the 18th century: why we must not rewrite history with today’s terms

Metamorphoses in Art & Science

Giving to Princeton: Gift Establishes the Thomas M. Siebel History of Science Professorship

OUP Blog: Creating a constructive cultural narrative for science

Islam & Science: Lessons learned from the ‘Earth does not rotate’ debate

New Statesman: Wellcome Collection: raising the cultural profile of science

Storify: Hans Sloane and His Books

LabLit.com: A bitter pill to swallow Obituary Carl Djerassi

Chemistry World: Are you sitting comfortably?

PRI: How JFK made NASA his secret weapon in the fight for civil rights in America

Clyde Foster processes telemetry at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1965 in a photo that appeared in Ebony magazine. As a NASA employee, Foster was a leader in getting jobs and advancing engineering education for African Americans. Credit: Courtesy of Don Rutledge ©

Clyde Foster processes telemetry at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1965 in a photo that appeared in Ebony magazine. As a NASA employee, Foster was a leader in getting jobs and advancing engineering education for African Americans. Credit: Courtesy of Don Rutledge ©

Wellcome Library: UK Medical Heritage Library

Zooniverse: Science Gossip: an investigation into the making and communication of science in both the Victorian period and today.

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists: Inside the exhibition

CHoM News: New Exhibit: Foundations for the History of Women in Medical Oral History

Royal College of Physicians: Exhibition: Chemistry in the garden: paintings by Nina Krauzewicz 3 March–31 July 2015

The #EnvHist Weekly

My medieval foundry: Books, blogs and communicating knowledge to the public

Ration Action: New Blog: Historical perspectives on scientific method, technology and policy design, bureaucracy, economic and behavioral analysis, optimization, theories of choice, and philosophies of mind

Ether Wave Propaganda: Rational Action: The Blog

Forbes: Ideas That Deserve to Die … But Probably Won’t

ESOTERIC:

io9: 10 Famous Scientists Who Held Surprising Supernatural Beliefs

Ptak Science Books: A Dominance of Observations from our Future Skeleton (1635)

6a00d83542d51e69e201b8d0e37121970c-500wi

History Matters: Happy 200th Deathday Franz Anton Mesmer

Chemistry World: Alchemy on the page

homunculus: Alchemy on the page (extended version)

D News: Edison’ ‘lost’ Idea: A Device to Hear to the Dead [sic]

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Interviews Gabriel Finkelstein

Popular Science: Science in Wonderland – Melanie Keene

History Today: Infinitesimal

Book List Online: Eye of the Beholder

National Geographic: Is Islam Hostile to Science?

Somatosphere: Book Forum – Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay’s “Intolerant Bodies”

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on Medicine

Reviews in History: The Politics of Hospital Provision in Early Twentieth-Century Britain

TLS: Enter John Aubrey

Science Book a Day: The Chimp and the River: How AIDS Emerged from an African Forest

Some Beans: Engineering Empires

engineering-empires_thumb

The Artic Book Review: Unravelling the Franklin Mystery: Inuit Testimony

BSHS Dingle Prize Short List:

University of Chicago Press: Earth’s Deep History

Yale University Press: Voyaging in Strange Seas

9780300173796

Harper Collins Publishers: Finding Longitude

OUP: The Man in the Monkeynut Coat

One World Publishing: The History of Medicine: A Beginners Guide

NEW BOOKS:

Johns Hopkins University Press: Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars

Pikaia: Eternal Ephemera: Adaption and the Origin of Species…

9780231153164

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Science and Entertainment Lab: Rise of Women? Screening Female Scientists

Promotional shots of Cornelia (Judy Greer) and Ellie (Keri Russell) show ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ only named female characters comforting a baby

Promotional shots of Cornelia (Judy Greer) and Ellie (Keri Russell) show ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ only named female characters comforting a baby

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences: George Beccaloni & Ruth Benny – Wallace Treasures fro…

Youtube: Why do medical students have to study the history of medicine

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

The Guardian: Steven Weinberg on the history of science

Naked Scientists: Eureka! Experiments that Changed the World

15 Minute History: Episode 65: Darwinism and the Scopes “Monkey Trial”

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow History of Medicine Group – Spring Meetings 2015

CRASSH: The Total Archive: Dreams of Universal Knowledge from the Encyclopaedia to Big Data 19-20 March

Discovery Museum Newcastle: CfP: IET Conference on the History of Engineering 6 June 2015

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Katherine Parker (Department of History, University of Pittsburgh). ‘A Tricky Passage: Navigating, Mapping, and Publishing Representations of Tierra del Fuego in the Long Eighteenth Century’. 12 March

University of London: Women’s Studies Group 1558–1837: Annual Workshop: ‘What is the Place of Aphra Behn in Restoration Culture?’ 9 May 2015

IU Bloomington Newsroom: Historian of science Naomi Oreskes to present Patten Lectures at IU Bloomington

Cambridge University: Biological Discourses: the Language of Science & Literature around 1900 10-11 April 2015

Institute of Historical Research: Empty Spaces Conference Program for April 10, 2015

Canvas Network: Free Online Course: Warfare and Weapons in Ancient Egypt 6 April–5 May 2015

XVI UNIVERSEUM NETWORK MEETING University Heritage and Cultural Engagement of European Universities National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, 11‐13 June 2015

Aarhus University Centre for Science Studies: CfP: Workshop “1970s: Turn of an era in the history of science?” 14–15 September 2015

AIP: MOOC: Reimagining Einstein for Students and Teachers: The Einstein Revolution

Museum of the History of Science: Hooked on Invention: 14 March 2015

Yale University: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 27-28 March 2015

The Linnean Society: From Cabinet to Internet: Digitising Natural History and Medical Manuscripts 27-28 April 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Against Captain’s Orders: After Hours Exclusives (members’ event) 2 April–27 August 2015

Notches: Meet Me in St. Louis: History of Sexuality at the 1015 Organisation of American Historians Conference 16-19 April 2015

Advances in the History of Psychology: CfP: 4S Open Panel on STS, Technology & Psychology 11-14 November 2015 Denver Co.

Royal Geographical Society and Bournemouth University: The Hero’s Journey of Alfred Russel Wallace in Southeast Asia 10 March 2015 Poole

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Huddersfield: Location, Location, Location: The Gott Collection, Yorkshire landscapes and Connected Communities PhD studentship at the University of Huddersfield

University of Wuppertal: At the „Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies: Normative and historical foundations“ (IZWT) of the University of Wuppertal at the earliest date possible the position of an Assistant Professor

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarship

The School of Philosophy, Religion, and History of Science at University of Leeds invites applications to its Non-Stipendiary Visiting Fellowships scheme for the academic year 2015-16.

University of Cambridge: Two Postdoctoral Research Associates in the Early Modern Period (History of Art and History of Science)

Science Museum Group: ACD-SCM-MAR15 – Assistant Content Developers x2, Contemporary Science

IHR: Scouloudi Historical Awards: Research Awards

University of Cambridge: Research Associate in History of Modern Science (Fixed Term)

Flight Global Jobs: Historian – RAF Northolt, London

University of Leeds: AHRC Postdoctoral Researcher Project: ‘Electrifying the country house: taking stories of innovation to new audiences’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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