Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #48

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #48

Monday 18 May 2015

EDITORIAL:

Another seven days have sped by and we’re back again with the forty-eighth edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you all the best of the last week’s histories of science, medicine and technology from around the Internet.

Beginning with our next edition the ‘we’ will no longer be the royal we as we have gained a new recruit to our editorial staff to help keep the owls in order. I am very pleased to welcome Anna Gielas, as our new Editor in Chief for History of Science and Entertainment. Anna is a doctoral student at the University of St. Andrews, who describes herself as a Wissenschaftsgeschichtshungrige! For those of you who don’t speak German that translate as a person who hungers for the history of science. I bet you didn’t know that German has a word for that!

Anna’s fine example of applying for and becoming an important post in our editorial team inspires us to say that if any other Wissenschaftsgeschichtshungrige would like to help in producing Whewell’s Gazette every week they would be more than welcome to join the team. I promise you don’t have to eat the same snacks as the owls.

I’m sorry to say that the next edition of Whewell’s Gazette will be in two weeks and somewhat shorter than usual, as at the beginning of next week I shall be in England burying my elder brother who died last Friday.

Under the circumstances I would like to dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to my brother John Christie (22 May 1945 – 15 May 2015) one of the first nine people to graduate in Britain with a degree in computer science.

This week saw an op-ed in The New York Times, It Is, in Fact, Rocket Science, written by Leonard Mlodinow on the use of mythical anecdotes in the history of science, his main point being neatly summed up in the paragraph below:

The mythical stories we tell about our heroes are always more romantic and often more palatable than the truth. But in science, at least, they are destructive, in that they promote false conceptions of the evolution of scientific thought.

This piece provoked quite a few comments and exchanges on Twitter, which I have collected without comment. If you wish to add comments on the article or these comments you are welcome to do so.

Cartoon How Scientist THink

———————————————–

I’m less offended than many by the general phenomenon of inspiring science stories, though, because narrative is powerful. If you want to communicate science to a broad audience, you’d be a fool not to try to tap into our fascination with great stories. The problem isn’t the use of stories and inspirational figures in promoting science; it’s the LAZY use of oversimplified stories. It’s perfectly possible to use stories about famous scientists in a responsible way, inspiring without deceiving– encourage that. – Chad Orzel

————————————————–

The way to advance science is not to find a series of Einsteins & worship their brilliance. Science is collaborative & takes hard work. Yes, Einstein was smart. He was also in a physics PhD program at ETH Zurich, working with world experts. He didn’t spring from nothing. – Katie Mack

———————————————————-

The damage done by oversimplified narratives in pop histories of science. Argument works for other histories too, IMHO. – Rebecca Onion

———————————————————–

“Telling that this ‪@nytimes piece on oversimplified #histSTM narratives is written by a physicist not a historian”. – Ben Gross

“Why telling? What would a historian provide that a physicist cannot?” – Hank Campbell

Telling because it reinforces assumption that anyone can be a historian w/o formal training in the discipline. – Ben Gross

“A good point.“ – Hank Campbell

————————————————————–

“NYT op-ed on #histSTM simplifies to “history is complicated”” – Patrick McCray

“History is complicated. But science is also complicated. So complicated, in fact, that its history is best left to scientists!” – Ben Gross

“#WeinberStrikesAgain” – Patrick McCray

“Complications are complicated”. – Patrick McCray

“Not quite. Scientists didn’t correct the story about Darwin’s finches. Sulloway did”. – Gabriel Finkelstein

If only more scientists were aware of such examples when they set out to write/speak re: #histSTM. – Ben Gross

——————————————————————-

“For some reason the media never asks historian of science to write about the history of science!!!“ – Thony Christie

“With a few exceptions (e.g.@HPS_Vanessa, @rebeccaonion, etc.) you’re right. Hopefully that will change. #histSTM – Ben Gross

“Maybe historians of science worry about (fear?) writing such op-ed pieces”. – Darren Hayton

“Do historians of science offer their expertise to media outlets? Physicists don’t shy away from it. Is their something about the culture in history of science that discourages media outreach?” – Darren Hayton

Quotes of the week:

“History is not written by the winners, it is written by the articulate.” – Ben Espen

“The first rule of anarchy club is that there is no first rule of anarchy club.” – @Swansontea

“If you marry a water nymph, she will acquire a soul. Otherwise she will die like a beast”. – Paracelsus h/t @senseshaper

For every mansplaining there’s an equal and opposite manshaming. – Liam Heneghan

“We are drawn to pyrotechnics, but history is made in the inner recesses of the mundane. We would do well to remember this. And to teach it”. – Michael Egan

“Stars are like animals in the wild. We may see the young but never the actual birth, which is a veiled and secret event” – Heinz R. Pagels

“If you torture data sufficiently, it will confess to almost anything” – Fred Menger

“Stupidity has a knack of getting its way.” – Albert Camus”

Okay to encourage others to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. But if you do, just remember, some people have no boots. – Neil deGasse Tyson

A philosopher who is not taking part in discussions is like a boxer who never goes into the ring. – Wittgenstein

“If you don’t make mistakes, you’re not working on hard enough problems. And that is a big mistake.” – Frank Wilczek

I’m increasingly thinking that I want to write my publications with my ‘blog voice’. I like it better and I think readers do, too. – Joanne Bailey

Suspicions amongst thoughts are like bats amongst birds, they ever fly by twilight. –Francis Bacon

“Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.” – Terry Pratchett

“They forced this invention of the devil upon me. Fortunately the thing has a knack of getting out of order” – Andrew Thomas Gage on the telephone 1910

“What a typewriter will do to a novice, the ribbon has gone on strike & has wound itself around the bowels of the machine in a most vicious manner” – E. Ray Lankester 1927

Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind. – Albert Einstein

Hofstadter’s Law: “It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter’s Law.”

Birthdays of the Week:

Johann Friedrich Blumenbach born 11 May 1752

Johann Friedrich Blumenbach Source: Wikimedia Commons

Johann Friedrich Blumenbach
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Embryo Project: Johann Friedrich Blumenbach (1752–1840)

Yovisto: Johann Friedrich Blumenbach and the Human Race

Blumenbach's five races. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Blumenbach’s five races.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wonders & Marvels: Why Caucasian is a Dirty Word

Inge Lehmann born 13 May 1888

Inge Lehmann in 1932 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Inge Lehmann in 1932
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Trowelblazers: Inge Lehmann

Time: New Google Doodle Honors Pioneering Seismologist Inge Lehmann

Letters from Gondwana: Inge Lehmann

AMNH: Inge Lehman: Discoverer of the Earth’s Inner Core

True Anomalies: A Journey to the Center of the Earth

Figures from Inge Lehmann’s 1936 paper, P’, showing seismic wave signatures at many Danish stations. Source: True Anomalies

Figures from Inge Lehmann’s 1936 paper, P’, showing seismic wave signatures at many Danish stations.
Source: True Anomalies

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Philly.com: Testing Galileo’s artistic chops 400 years later

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: What did Bohr do at Los Alomos?

Ptak Sciene Books: Albert Einstein: Part Time Civil Servant

The Guardian: Alexei Leonov, the first man to walk in space

Occam’s Corner: The birth of soft matter physics, the physics of the everyday

Ansamed: Hittits-Egyptians, scientific cooperation 2000 years ago

Forbes: What Einstein Should Have Known

1001 Invention: 1001 Inventions and the World of Ibn Al-Haytham

haythamcom_02a

Teyler’s Museum: Rebound Trajectory

Skywatchers: Rose O’Halloran

AEON: In the beginning

teleskopos: Eighteenth-century eclipse maps by Halley and Whiston

Airspace Blog: Finding Pluto With the Blink Comparator

The National Museum of American History: Painting – Measurement of the Earth (Eratosthenes)

Perimeter Institute: General Relativity From A to Z

Tehran Times: Khayyam statue looking for apt location in United States

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Tennessee State Library and Archive: Free Exhibit Highlights State Library and Archives’ Vast Collection of Maps

British Library: Endangered archives blog: New online collections – May 2015

Public Domain Review: Maps from Geographicus

Eiland Ormus, of Jerun, engraved by Jacob Van der Schley under the supervision of J. Bellin for the c. 1750 edition of Provost's L`Histoire Generale des Voyages

Eiland Ormus, of Jerun, engraved by Jacob Van der Schley under the supervision of J. Bellin for the c. 1750 edition of Provost’s L`Histoire Generale des Voyages

Ptak Science Books: A Nearly-Blank Outline Map of the World

Ptak Science Books: World Map of the Geography of Homer

University of Southern Maine: Osher Map Library

Public Domain Review: Highlights from the 20,000+ maps made freely available online by New York Public Library

New York Public Library: The Great War and Modern Mapping: WWI in the Map Division

The battle fronts of Europe - Stanford's Geographical Establishment [1917]

The battle fronts of Europe – Stanford’s Geographical Establishment [1917]

 MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Medievalist.net: Abortions in Byzantine times (325–1453 AD)

Social History of Medicine: ‘A virtue beyond all medicine’: The Hanged Man’s Hand, Gallows Tradition and Healing in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century England

Dr Alun Withey: Unhealthy Beards? Denouncing Facial Hair in History

The Recipes Project: How to grow your beard, Roman style

Wellcome Library: Digitisation at the Royal College of Surgeons England

The Cullen Project: The Medical Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen

The Recipes Project: Wigging Out: Mrs Corlyon’s Method for extracting Earwigs From The Ear

Unidentified species of Earwig, order Dermaptera, possibly Forficulidae, by JonRichfield,Wikimedia Commons

Unidentified species of Earwig, order Dermaptera, possibly Forficulidae, by JonRichfield,Wikimedia Commons

Books Combined: Obsessions and olfaction: scent and the seduction of books

The New York Times: A Grisly Find Under a Supermarket Illuminates France’s Medieval Past

Medievalist.net: Why All the Fuss about the Body? A Medievalist’s Perspective

The Quack Doctor: The mysterious Doctor Du Brange

academia.edu: Health, Medicine and the Family in Wales c. 1600 – c. 1750 PhD Thesis Alun Withey

Genotopia: An early use of the term “precision medicine”

Slate Vault: A Depression-Era Medicinal Plant Map of the United States

“Medicinal Plant Map of the United States of America.” Edwin Newcomb and the National Wholesale Druggists’ Association, 1932.
David Rumsey Map Collection

The Guardian: Man who died 1,500 years ago may have brought leprosy strain to UK

Wonders & Marvels: Feeling Swinish: Or the Origins of “Pandemic”

Hektoen International: The arsenic eaters of Styria

History of Vaccines: History of Smallpox

Brought to Light: Country Joe McDonald’s Florence Nightingale collection will be preserved in UCSF Archives

My Wonderland.Mental Health Blog: The Rise of Psychiatry has Augmented the Rise of Madness through Medication

Dorset Echo: Help historians find stories from the asylum

Throb: There Was No Viagra in 1918. But There Was This Penis Splint

1252333264945351599

Forbes: Julius Caesar’s Health Debate Reignited: Stroke or Epilepsy

Deathplaining: The Attritional Mortality Myth

TECHNOLOGY:

The New York Times: Ghostly Voices From Thomas Edison’s Dolls Can Now Be Heard

Conciatore: The Neri Godparents II

Conciatore: The Neri Godparents III

Conciatore: The Neri Chapel

Vir History: Navy Radio Traffic Handling, Circuits, and Messages

Rhode Island Radio: Dedicated to the history of radio in Rhode Island

Smithsonian Libraries: Unbound: Durable Pianos

Ivers & Pond Piano Co., Boston, MA. Ivers & Pond Pianos, circa 1890, pages 32-33, Style 13, Ivers & Pond Small Parlor Grand Piano.

Ivers & Pond Piano Co., Boston, MA. Ivers & Pond Pianos, circa 1890, pages 32-33, Style 13, Ivers & Pond Small Parlor Grand Piano.

io9: The Illustrated History of Jet Packs

The New York Times: Moore’s Law Turns 50

Smithsonian.com: How 75 Years Ago Nylon Stockings Changed the World

CHF: Nylon A revolution in Textiles

Cornell University: Dawn’s Early Light: The First 50 Years of American Photography

O Say Can You See: The oldest microscope in the museum

Ptak Science Books: Bombing Subs with Exploding Birds, 1918

Tylers Museum: Bourdon type barometer

Barometer, Bourdon type or aneroid + case, F.W. Funckler Source: Teylers Museum

Barometer, Bourdon type or aneroid + case, F.W. Funckler
Source: Teylers Museum

Ptak Science Books: Hot Bunks and Cool Air in (All White?) Community Fallout Shelter

Auckland Meccano Guild: The Cambridge Meccano Differential Analyser

150 Great Things About The Underground: 37. The world clock at Piccadilly Circus

Engineering and Technology Wiki: Theordore Maiman and the Laser

Ptak Science Books: Unusual Questions 1: Are the London Bridges Too Far Apart? 1904

Linda Hall Library: Plates from Jacquard machine analysed and explained, by E.A. Posselt, 1892

tumblr_noensiH85K1ry3nado5_500

Inside the Science Museum: The Pegasus Computer

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Patheos: 11 recurring mistakes in the debate over the “historical Adam”

AIP:Expanding NBL&A resources to include meteorology

An Awfully Big Blog Adventure: “Mamma’s Kindness to Me”

The West Wales Chronicle: Special party treat for Garden Members

The Atlas of Living Australia: Over 10 million collections-based records on the Atlas

PBS: Alfred Wegener

The Junto: Natural Histories

BHL: Notes & News: Mars Invaders: The Wonderful World of Microfungi

Fig. 2. Symptoms and spore diversity of rust fungi from Rust, smut, mildew and mould: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi. By M.C. Cooke and illustrated by J.E. Sowerby. London, 1898.

Fig. 2. Symptoms and spore diversity of rust fungi from Rust, smut, mildew and mould: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi. By M.C. Cooke and illustrated by J.E. Sowerby. London, 1898.

Oxford Today: Award for 200 unbroken years of Oxford weather records

The Secret Library: Little Chunks of History

Sandwalk: James Hutton and John Playfair and a genealogical connection

University of Glasgow Library: An artistic reinterpretation of William Hunter

The New York Times: The Greatest Generation of Scientists

The Friends of Charles Darwin: John Stevens Henslow

Yovisto: Ilya Mechnikov and the Macrophages

Élie Metchnikoff (1845-1916)

Élie Metchnikoff (1845-1916)

microBEnet: Where does the term microbiome mean? And where did it come from? A bit of a surprise…

CHEMISTRY:

CHF: Justus von Liebig and Friedrich Wöhler

CHF: Where’s the Beef?

About Education: Who was the first chemist?

Chemistry World: All set for chemistry

Some of the earliest sets came in mahogany cases and were very expensive © Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

Some of the earliest sets came in mahogany cases and were very expensive © Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Szilard Commandments

The New York Times: Peter Gay, Historian Who Explored Social History of Ideas, Dies at 91

Living Anthropologically: Real History versus Guns Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond

CHF: Heritage Day Awards

Forbes: The Role of Philosophy in Physics

AHA Today: AHA Announces New Taxonomy of Historical Fields

Shady Characters: Pilcrows in the service of science: a Shady Characters field trip

Science Museum Group Journal: Issue 3 Spring 2015

The Mary Sue: Everyone, We Need to Talk About 17th-Century Badass Writer Margaret Cavendish

Wellcome Collection: The Catalogue for the Public Library of Private Acts

University of Glasgow Library: Glasgow Incunabula Project and exhibition update

The H–Word: Do snails have eyes? Seventeenth century ‘mythbuster’ and science communicator, Sir Thomas Browne, investigates

Sir Thomas Browne, taken from a copy of “Religio Medici” (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images), Photograph: UniversalImagesGroup/Getty Images

Sir Thomas Browne, taken from a copy of “Religio Medici” (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images), Photograph: UniversalImagesGroup/Getty Images

Vox: Science is often flawed. It’s time we embraced it.

Wellcome Collection: Open Platform

Constructing Science Communities: People Powered Science

Open Culture: 6,000 Years of History Visualised in a 23-Foot-Long Timeline of World History, Created in 1871

Nautilus: The Trouble With Scientists

Girl, Interrupting: We’ve all got troubles (including Open Science Network)

The #EnvHist Weekly

University of Cambridge Museums: Innovation: The Emperor’s New Clothes?

The H-Word: Beware Eurosceptic versions of history and science

The Renaissance Mathematicus: History or political propaganda?

Notches: Inaugural Monthly Digest

The Guardian: 150 years of mathematics in the UK – in pictures

NY Book Editors: Inside an Edit: Non-Fiction Structural Changes

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: My alchemical demonstrations at re-enactment events

Ultraculture: 3 Ways to Become a ‘Magician’, by a 16th Century Alchemist

Natural Magick, by Giambattista della Porta

Natural Magick, by Giambattista della Porta

SV Educational Services: Medieval Alchemy – The Art and Science of Transmutation

BOOK REVIEWS:

Brain Pickings: Richard Feynman on Science vs. Religion and Why Uncertainty is Central to Morality

JHI: Practical Past, Runaway Future

Brain Pickings: Richard Feynman on the Universal Responsibility of Scientists

Science Book a Day: The Journals of Lewis and Clark

journal-of-lewis-clark

Financial Times: ‘Scientific Babel: The Language of Science’ by Michael Godin

HNN: Why I wrote a Book About the Wright Brothers

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society: Galileo’s Idol: Gianfrancesco Sagredo and the Politics of Knowledge

Nature: The man who bared the brain

History Today: Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England

Nature: In search of self and science

The Guardian: The Water Book by Alok Jha review – this remarkable substance

The Economist: A man for all seasons: Universal Man: The Lives of John Maynard Keynes

Popular Science: How UFOs Conquered the World: The History of a Modern Myth

academia.edu: Review – McLeish’s Faith and Wisdom in Science

Science Book a Day: The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Age

age-of-radiance

Popular Science: Einstein’s Masterwork: 1915 and the General Theory of Relativity

The Washington Post: John Hemming follows three British scientists who made significant discoveries in the Amazon

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Hippocrate et les hippocratismes: médicine, religion, société

University of Pennsylvania Press: Medieval Robots: Mechanism, Magic, Nature and Art

Historiens de la santé: La santé en guerre 1914–1918. Une Politique pionnière en univers incertain

University of Pittsburgh Press: The Crown and the Cosmos: Astrology and the Politics of Maximilian I

CFDPfFIVEAI-BFW.jpg-large

THEATRE:

YouTube: The Royal Society: A dramatic experiment: science on stage

FILM:

The Guardian: Jane Hawking: “There were four of us in our marriage”

Facebook: John Farrell: Sungenis Admits His Movie Was a Flop, Promises More

TELEVISION:

BBC: Cosmonauts: How Russia Won the Space Race

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Classical Confidential: Caesar’s Strokes and the Fate of an Empire

Science Dump: 10 of Tesla’s best ideas that prove he was the ultimate science bad ass!

Medievalist.net: Vegetables in the Middle Ages

Bohemcan Youtube Channel: Alchemy (Show One & Two)

YouTube: The Pegasus Computer

YouTube: Leading interdisciplinary research, Professor Tom McLeish

YouTube: Darwin on the evolution trail

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Dr Alvin: The Most Trusted Name in Wisdom: Einstein’s Dice & Schrödinger’s Cats by Paul Halpern chats with Dr Alvin

Advances in the History of Psychology: New Books in STS Interview: Matthew Heaton’s Black Skin, White Coats

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Cambridge: Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry Meeting 15 June 2015

Museum for the History of Science Oxford: Exhibition: Dear Harry: Henry Moseley – A Scientist Lost to War 14 May–18 October 2015

Royal Society: People-powered science: Symposium: citizen science in the 19th and 21st centuries

University of Manchester: Symposium: Stories About Science: Exploring Science Communication and Entertainment Media 4–5 June 2015

Morbid Anatomy: Daniel Rushkoff and the Narrative Lab! Alchemy Lecture and Workshop Series! History of the Sacred Heart of Jesus! Arcane Media! Upcoming Events

University of Warwick: Gems in Transit: Materials, Techniques and Trade, 1400–1800 18-19 May 2015

Seton Hall University: The 2015 Biennial Conference of the Aphra Behn Society for Women in the Arts, 1660-1830: CfP: Women in the Global Eighteenth Century 5-6 November 2015

University of Northampton: Masculinity and the Body in retain, 1500–1800 18 June 2015

Colloque de la SFHSH – Histoire des sciences humaines et sociales Paris, 5-6 novembre 2015

UCL: STS Research Day 2015 Programme

University of Manchester: CHSTM: Workshop: Medicines, Histories and Translations 11-12 June 2015

World Health Organization Global Health Histories: Online webinar: ‘Chemical and Biological Weapons’ 21 May 2015

University of Notre Dame: Locating Forensic Science and Medicine 24-25 June 2015

Caltech: Lecture: Andrew Hodges: “Alan Turing: An Individual of the Twentieth Century” 21 May 2015

University of Warsaw: The Tree of Knowledge: Theories of Science and Art in Central Europe, 1400–1700 28 May 2015

Maastricht University: CfP. Theorizing the Body in Health and Medicine 26–27 November 2015

H-Histsex: Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexualities In Africa

The Northern Network for Medical Humanities: Workshop: University of Sheffield 10 June 2015

University of Durham: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2015 6–7 July

IET: Newcastle Discovery Museum: Conference: The history of power generation, distribution, utilisation and other engineering specialisms 6–7 June

Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London: Biennial London Chaucer Conference: Science, Magic and Technology 10-11 July 2015

University of Wales Trinity Saint David: Astrology as Art: Representation and Practice 27-28 June 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Zurich: Two Postdocs in History of Medicine

University of Strathclyde: Lectureship in the History of Medicine

University of Pennsylvania: Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities 2016-2017

MOSI: Fully-funded AHRC PhD studentship: The Rise and Fall of The Manchester Motor Industry, 1896–1939

University of Sussex: Sussex Humanities Lab Doctoral Research Scholarships (2015)

Museum of the History of Science, Oxford: Part-time twelve-week Collections intern

University of Edinburgh: Postdoctoral Teaching and Research Fellowship in the History of Medicine

Smithsonian Institute: Museum Curator (Aeronautics)

University of York: Teaching Fellow in the History of Science and Medicine

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #47

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #47

Monday 11 May 2015

EDITORIAL:

You are feasting your eyes on the forty-seventh edition of your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette, bringing you all of the best of the histories of science, medicine and technology scooped up by our every hungry editorial crew for you delectation.

 

The Whewell's Gazette Editorial Staff at Feeding Time

The Whewell’s Gazette Editorial Staff at Feeding Time

Following the debacle that was the British general election a group of historians has published a sort of manifesto in History Today under the name ‘Historians For Britain’, claiming that Britain’s exit from the EU would be justified on the basis of the fact that Britain’s history was unique when compared to its European neighbours.

As a British historian I personally object to this manifesto on several grounds. With what right does this group claim to speak for Britain? They speak for themselves with some extremely dodgy and largely incorrect arguments and not for Britain. For any group of historians to claim to speak on behalf of an entire nation is hubris of the highest order.

As a historian of science, who also dabbles in the histories of medicine, technology and mathematics, I must firmly state that also within Britain the histories of these disciplines have a complex intertwined international history that is in no way uniquely British and to try to claim otherwise would be to pervert history.

The Whewell's Gazette Editorial Policy

The Whewell’s Gazette Editorial Policy

Quotes of the week:

“To remain ignorant of history is to remain forever a child” – Cicero

“The best teachers are those who show you where to look, but don’t tell you what to see” – Alexandra K. Trenfor

“Ancient history has an air of antiquity—it should be more modern. It’s written as if the spectator should be thinking of the backside of the picture on the wall, as if the author expected that the dead would be his readers” – Thoreau 1849

‘Life for us is not just the absence of death’. – Mary Midgley

“To err is human. To err repeatedly is research”. – @AcademicsSay

“It is an hypothesis that the sun will rise tomorrow: and this means that we do not know whether it will rise”. Wittgenstein

“Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies” – Groucho Marx

“But although all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it arises from experience”. – Kant

The last man on earth walks into a bar. He looks into his beer and says, “Drink, I’d like another bartender.” – @fadesingh

“If you think you’re enlightened go spend a week with your family”. – Ram Dass

“Some peoples idea of free speech is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone says anything back that is an outrage” – Winston Churchill

“Science = search for Truth; Art = search for Beauty; Engineering = search for Good Enough” – @LeapingRobot

Birthday of the Week:

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin born 10 May 1900

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin at work

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin at work

True Anomalies: “So You Want to Do Research”

Yovisto: Cecelia Payne-Gaposchkin and the Composition of Stars

 

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

arXiv.org: Editing Cavendish: Maxwell and the Electrical Researches of Henry Cavendish

Drew ex machina: The Mission of Zond 2

Ptak Science Books: Napkins of the Apocalypse

Flamsteed Astronomy Society: William Christie and the Demise of the Royal Greenwich Observatory – History of Astronomy Group Meeting

Sir William Christie (no relation!) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sir William Christie (no relation!)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Huygens and Newton: 

Ptak Science Books: Dr. Lise Meitner, Fission, and Comic Books (1946)

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

academia.edu: The Birth of the Mexican National Astronomical Observatory

Ptak Science Books: The Four Seasons in Beautiful Astronomical Detail, 1851

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Ohm Sweet Ohm

The Ohm House in Erlangen Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Ohm House in Erlangen
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Pinterest: Section of the Earth on the Plane of the Equator

NPR: Dissolve My Nobel Prize Fast (A True Story)

Nautilus: The Data That Threatened to Break Physics

Planetarium Friesland

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

The Guardian: Better than GPS: a history of cartography in 12 amazing maps

Bird's Eye View of New York Photograph: Public domain

Bird’s Eye View of New York
Photograph: Public domain

Wired: It Just Got Easier to see a Cool Historical Maps Collection

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Nautilus: The Man Who Beat HIV at its Own Game for 30 Years

NYAM: The Strange Case of Father Damien (Part 1 of 3)

Thick Objects: Between text and object: psychological tests as scientific artefacts

The Recipes Project: Bottoms up: beer as medicine

Front page of Van Lis’s 1747 Pharmacopea

Front page of Van Lis’s 1747 Pharmacopea

Atlas Obscura: Roosevelt Island Octagon Tower

The Chirugeon’s Apprentice: Robert Hooke and the Dog’s Lung: Animal Experimentation in History

Early Modern Medicine: Dead Useful

NYAM: Sigmund Freud on War and Death

 

The Public Domain Review: Scurvy and the Terra Incognita

Page from the journal of Henry Walsh Mahon showing the effects of scurvy, from his time aboard HM Convict Ship Barrosa (1841-2)  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Page from the journal of Henry Walsh Mahon showing the effects of scurvy, from his time aboard HM Convict Ship Barrosa (1841-2)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Concocting history: Nursing dolly

Remedia: On the Trail of Medicines at Cambridge University Botanic Garden

Providentia: The Addicted Surgeon

 

NYAM: The Good Man of Religion (Part 2 of 3)

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Anatomist, The Alienist, The Artist & changing expressions of madness in Victorian Britain

Concocting History: Ode to Laudanum

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Glass from Tinsel

Magic Transistor: Louis Poyet, Abbé Rousselot’s Apparat für Aufzeichnung der Sprache, 1890

Louis Poyet, Abbé Rousselot’s Apparat zur Aufzeichnung der Sprache, 1890.

Louis Poyet, Abbé Rousselot’s Apparat zur Aufzeichnung der Sprache, 1890.

Blog.Castac.org: Nothing Special: Standards, Infrastructure, and Maintenance in the Great Age of American Innovation

Yovisto: You Press the Button and We Do the Rest – George Eastman revolutionized Photography

Ptak Science Books: Pig Iron vs. the Eiffel Tower

Brain Pickings: Berenice Abbott’s Minimalist Black-and-White Science Imagery, 1958–1960

Bloomberg: Ancient Greek Technology Tests Musk Batteries on Storage

 

Yovisto: Oskar von Miller and the Deutsches Museum

Oskar von Miller (1855-1934)

Oskar von Miller (1855-1934)

 

Atlas Obscura: Coltsville, USA: Inside America’s Gun-Funded Utopia

The Last Word: Compute! No, Mr Bond, I Expect You to Die!

Sate: The Eye: The Locksmith Who Picked Two “Unbeatable” Locks and Ended the Era of “Perfect Security”

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Slate: Audubon’s Animals of 19th-Century North America, Newly Available for Hi-Res Download

The Atlantic: The Scientist Who Told Congress He Could (Literally) Make It Rain

Embryo Project: Nettie Maria Stevens (1861–1912)

Ptak Science Books: A Beautiful Regression (1877)

Gizmodo: The Second Life of America’s Only Rare Earth Mine

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Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Elkanah Billings

Forbes: Thoughts on a Pebble and an Introduction

Conciatore: Pebbles from Pavia

Stamen Design: Diving into ecosystem data with Berkeley’s Ecoengine and interfaces from Stamen

 

Orthmeralia: These pepper plants sure look good!

All Things Georgian: Gilbert Pidcock’s travelling menagerie

Courtesy of the British Museum, 1799

Courtesy of the British Museum, 1799

The History of the Earth Sciences: Volume 34 Issue 1 2015 Table of Contents

AEON: Still seeking omega: The Vatican still refuses to endorse evolutionary theory – setting a billion believers at odds with modern science

Slate Vault: An Early-19th-Century Scientist’s Close-Up Portraits of Pollen

Linda Hall Library: John Collins Warren – Scientist of the Day

British Library: Online Gallery: Diagram of seasons, In Isidore, De natura reum

CHEMISTRY:

Reality Sandwich: Francis Crick, DNA &LSD

John William Draper – Chemist and Photo Pioneer

John William Draper (1811-1882)

John William Draper (1811-1882)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Chronologia Universalis: A Ramist Postscript

Graftoniana: A Visual Chronology

The Getty Iris: Getty Union List of Artist Names (ULAN) Released as Linked Open Data

The New York Times: The Conference Manifesto

The Atlantic: The Questions People Asked Advice Columnists in the 1690s

Google Books

Google Books

The Guardian: Alan Hall: a leading light in cell biology goes out

Geological Journal: Special Issue: Pleistocene on the Hoof: Table of Contents

The New York Times: Alexander Rich Dies at 90; Confirmed DNA’s Double Helix

UiO: Design history provides clues about the future

Bustle: 7 Horribly Sexist Moments in STEM History, Because Old Habits Die Hard

504ffd30-d619-0132-ceaa-0e01949ad350

Science Museum Group Journal: 03 Current Issue Spring 2015 Contents

Edge: Popper Versus Bacon

The #EnvHist Weekly

Caroline’s Miscellany: Stationers’ Hall

Stanford.edu: Athanasius Kircher at Stanford

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Wallace Talks: Audio and Video

Athene Donald’s Blog: On the Loss of a Giant

Conciatore: The Neri Godparents

Scientific American: Physicists Are Philosophers, Too

academia.edu: Book Lists and Their Meaning – Malcolm Walsby

Greg Jenner: A Million Years in a Day – Bibliography

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: Alchemy and Astrology – something I read

BOOK REVIEWS:

Notches: The Modern Period: Menstruation and the History of Sexuality

Brain Pickings: The Antarctic Book of Cooking and Cleaning: The Extraordinary Edible Record of Two Women Explorers’ Journey to the End of the World

Notches: A History of Family Planning in Twentieth Century Peru

Oxford Journals: Diplomatic History: Space History: The Final Frontier?

Brain Pickings: Einstein, Gödel, and Our Strange Experience of Time: Rebecca Goldstein on How Relativity Rattled the Flow of Existence

Dissertation Reviews: Japanese Nanban World Map Screens

josephloh-e1379440655593-550x300

Herald Scotland: Laura J Snyder Eye of the Beholder

Brain Pickings: Legendary Lands: Umberto Eco on the Greatest Maps of Imaginary Places and Why they Appeal to Us

Brain Pickings: When Einstein Met Tragore: A Remarkable Meeting of Minds on the Edge of Science and Spirituality

Morbid Anatomy: Morbid Anatomy Library New Arrival: “The Dead” Jack Burman

The Baptist Times: Faith and Wisdom in Science

NEW BOOKS:

Amazon.com: Moore’s Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley’s Quiet Revolutionary

Wellcome Collection: Adventures in Human Being

Adventures in human being

 

Historiens de la santé: Préface des Tabulae anatomicae sex

THEATRE:

FILM:

iO9: Isaac Newton’s War With a 17th Century Counterfeiter Should Be A Movie

Isaac Newton Source: Wikimedia Commons

Isaac Newton
Source: Wikimedia Commons

TELEVISION:

CUNY Television: One to One: Laura J. Snyder: Author, “Eye of the Beholder”

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

YouTube: Revelations: New Vision with Ben Burbridge

YouTube: Prague Alchemy (Episode 1&2)

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

History of Philosophy without any gaps: Rediscovery Channel: Translations into Latin

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Bodleian Libraries, Oxford: Symposium: Space, place and landscape in the history of communications 16 June 2015

University of Durham: Workshop: Climate Science, Values & Politics 28 May 2015

University of Durham: How to do Things with Fur: Medieval Art and the Matter of ‘the Animal’ 19 May 2015

Occult Minds: CfP: Aries Special Issue on Esotericism and the Cognitive Science of Religion

Intoxicants & Early Modernity: CfP: RSA Boston 2016 Intoxicants and Early Modernity

Royal Historical Society: CfP: Teaching History in Higher Education

Natural History Museum at Tring: Temporary Exhibitions at Tring: Myths & Monsters 6 May–6 September 2015

myths-monsters-banner-490_134334_2

University of Oxford: Émilie du Châtelet Study Day 14 May 2015

Émilie du Châtelet Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour Source: Wikimedia Commons

Émilie du Châtelet Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour
Source: Wikimedia Commons

CASSH: Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition 18 June–20 June 2015

Royal Society: People-powered science: citizen science in the 19th and 21st centuries 21 May 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: MET Science Communication Officer

Science Museum: Two-Year Postdoc in History of Nuclear Industry

University of Strathclyde: PhD Studentship in Naval/Technological History

UCL: STS: PhD Studentship “Charles Blagden and Banksian Science, 1770–1820”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| 2 Comments

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #46

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #46

Monday 04 May 2015

EDITORIAL:

You are feasting your eyes on the forty-sixth edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you all the best in the histories of science technology and medicine out of the Internet over the last seven days.

We all have a vague idea that technology is somehow socio-politically neutral. Machine, tools etc. have no feelings and so are free from all forms of prejudice but is the really true? Think how many tools and appliances are designed to be used by right-handed people causing left-handed people all sorts of problems and stress. The most visual example being Jimi Hendrix, possibly the greatest rock guitarist ever, playing a right-handed guitar upside down. These days any reasonably sized town has a left-handed shop supplying all sorts of everyday tools and gadgets for the left-handed minority.

But racism, is it possible for technology to be racist. There is a famous episode known to jazz fans concerning the electronic instrument the Theremin. For reasons that I forget the Theremin doesn’t work for some people and unfortunately one of those people was the black jazz keyboarder, and eccentric, Sun Ra, who was a big fan of the early electronic instruments. After seeing and hearing it demonstrated and then being frustrated by his own failure to produce a sound out of the Theremin, Sun Ra declared the instrument to be racist!

It’s almost impossible to suppress a wry smile at the image of the great Sun Ra condemning a machine as racist but it turns out to be no laughing matter that colour photography is really racist. Colour film and colour cameras are optimised from white skin tones with the result that it is very difficult with colour film systems to depict black people properly. To learn more read the following articles. For me this opens up the question, are there other forms of prejudiced technology?

Priceonomics: How Photography Was Optimized for White Skin Colour

Youtube: Ha ha ha HP Computer’s face tracking camera doesn’t recognize black people

NPR: Light and Dark: The Racial Biases That Remains in Photography

Colossal: Dreamlike Autochrome Portraits of an Engineer’s Daughter From 1913 Are Among the Earliest Color Photos

 Christina O'Gorman 1913 Photo: Mervyn O’Gorman (1871-1958)

Christina O’Gorman 1913
Photo: Mervyn O’Gorman (1871-1958)

Quotes of the week:

“Be the person your dog thinks you are.” – Bill Murray

“The second most important job in the world, second only to being a good parent, is being a good teacher.” – S.G. Ellis

“To Thales the primary question was not what do we know, but how do we know it.” – Aristotle

“You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.” – Jack London

‘…a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it’s not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance’ – Terry Pratchet

“We live in a culture where we don’t embrace failure.” How will you know your strengths w/o exploration – Deborah Berebichez

“Writing and reading is to me synonymous with existing. ”― Gertrude Stein

“If Galileo had said in verse that the world moved, the inquisition might have let him alone.” – Thomas Hardy

“The problem with straining at gnats is that it increases the chances of swallowing camels”. – John D. Cook

“I hate travelling & explorers…adventure has no place in the anthropologists profession.” – Claude Lévi-Strauss

“Only a man who sees giants can ever stand upon their shoulders.” – @fadesingh

“People will mock religion as a fantasy for those who won’t face reality, but think building warp drive is just a matter of can-do spirit”. – Sean M Carroll

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Corpus Newtonicum: Why? You endeavoured to embroil me with women

Brain Pickings: Einstein on the Common Language of Science in a Rare 1941 Recording

NPR: Hubble’s Other Telescope and the Day it Rocked Our World

The Hooker 100-inch reflecting telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, just outside Los Angeles. Edwin Hubble's chair, on an elevating platform, is visible at left. A view from this scope first told Hubble our galaxy isn't the only one. Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

The Hooker 100-inch reflecting telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, just outside Los Angeles. Edwin Hubble’s chair, on an elevating platform, is visible at left. A view from this scope first told Hubble our galaxy isn’t the only one.
Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

This Day in History: 4977 Universe is created, according to Kepler

Forbes: Einstein: A Radical, But Not A Rebel

PDF Books for Free: Great Astronomers: Galileo Galilei by Sir Robert S. Ball (1907)

Ri-Science: Erwin Schrödinger coined the term ‘wave mechanics’ (or Wellenmechanik) on this day in 1926 in a letter to Albert Einstein.

MIT News: 3 Questions: Marcia Bartusiak on black holes and the history of science

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Unsung? I hardly think so.

Lise Meitner und Otto Hahn im Labor, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Chemie, 1913 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Lise Meitner und Otto Hahn im Labor, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Chemie, 1913
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Optics & Photonics: Charles Hard Townes: The Second Half-Century

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Myfanwy Pritchard-Roberts’ Interview

UC San Diego: Digital Collections: Leo Szilard and Aaron Novick Research Files

UC San Diego: Digital Collections: Leo Szilard Papers

The H-Word: Halley’s Eclipse: a coup for Newtonian prediction and the selling of science

Astrogeo.oxfordjournals.org: Halley and his maps of the total eclipses of 1915 and 1724

Ptak Science Books: Gorgeous Gearworks – a Model of the Solar System, 1817

“Planetary Machines, the New Planetarium for Equated Motions by Dr. Pearson”. London, for Rees’ Cyclopedia, 1817; 8×10″.
Source: Ptak Science Books

Ars Technica: Scanning meteorites in 3D may flesh out solar systems origin story

AIP: Oral History Transcript – Dr. Steven Weinberg

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Board of Longitude Project Blog: Thomas Earnshaw’s troublesome chronometer

Marine chronometer no. 512, by Thomas Earnshaw, about 1800 (National Maritime Museum ZAA0006)

Marine chronometer no. 512, by Thomas Earnshaw, about 1800 (National Maritime Museum ZAA0006)

Viatimage: Image database of expeditions into the Alps.

The Guardian Maps: The Guardian view on reading maps: so much more than navigation

National Library of Scotland: Map images

Cambridge Digital Library: Longitude Essays: Artificial Horizon

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: MedHum Mondays Presents: The Application of a Surgeon’s Operating Case

Nautilus: The Man Who Drank Cholera and Launched the Yogurt Craze

Duke Today: Medicine Cabinet of Curiosities: Can you guess how these medical devices were used?

Lancet Psychiatry: Cutting the body to cure the mind

Doctor performing ovariotomy (London, 1882) The National Library Of Medicine

Doctor performing ovariotomy (London, 1882)
The National Library Of Medicine

Diseases of Modern Life: Introducing the India Office Medical Archives Project

Medievalist.net: Project to compare health of Londoners from medieval and industrial eras

Wellcome Library: Thalidomide: an oral history

CHoSTM: One Hundred Years of Health: Changing Expectations for Ageing Well in 20th Century America

Inside the Science Museum: Richard Liebreich’s Atlas of Ophthalmoscopy

V0010407EL The eye, as seem through a microscope

RCP: Swiney Cups

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Eyes of the Lynx

Yovisto: Wallace Hume Carothers and the Invention of Nylon

Ptak Science Books: The Understated Announcement of Bell’s Telephone Patent, 1876

Ptak Science Books: Establishing the (Royal) Aeronautical Society, 1866

Spaceflight Insider: Women in Space: In The Beginning

Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in space during the Vostok 6 mission, which lifted off in June 1963. Photo Credit: Commons / Ria Novosti

Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in space during the Vostok 6 mission, which lifted off in June 1963. Photo Credit: Commons / Ria Novosti

The Royal Society: Interface: Invention as a combinatorial process: evidence from US patents

IEEE Spectrum: Mildred Dresselhaus: The Queen of Carbon

Ptak Science Books: Feeling and Touching Calculated Numbers in the 18th Century: Palpable Mathematical Devices

Conciatore: Washing Molten Glass

Washing, sorting and carrying cullet Denis Diderot 1772

Washing, sorting and carrying cullet
Denis Diderot 1772

IEEE Spectrum: The Murky Origins of “Moore’s Law”

IEEE Spectrum: Moore’s Law Milestones

XPMethod: Unidentified Found Object (UFO)

Ptak Science Books: Quite Images of Great Loses and Heroism – British Navy Losses, 1945

Gizmodo: Why is the Paper Clip Shaped Like It Is?

The 1640’s Picture Book: Anima’dversions of Warre

Ptak Science Books: Episodes in the History of Dropping Things – Baby Bombs, Bomb Babies and Dropping Women on Manhattan

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Ptak Science Books: A One-Line Entry into the Computer Revolution: the Transistor, 1949

Conciatore: Scraping the Barrel

Teylers Museum: Horse Mill

Ptak Science Books: An Extremely Early Computer Program for the BINAC, 1949

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Strange Science: Earth Sciences

The Independent: The science of weather forecasting: The pioneer who founded the Met Office

Yovisto: Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon-Tiki

Wallace Letters: The A. R. Wallace Correspondence Project’s Transcription Protocol

The Unz Review: Vignettes of Famous Evolutionary Biologists, Large and Small

Facebook: On 27 April 1806 Moehanga Discovered Britain

Letters from Gondwana: Alcide D’Orbigny and the Beginnings of Foraminiferal Studies

Alcide Dessalines d’Orbigny , 1802.  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alcide Dessalines d’Orbigny , 1802.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Arcadia: The Great Fear: The Polesine Flood of 1951

Embryo Project: The Pasteur Institute (1887– )

Yovistro: The Works of Lord Avebury

Embryo Project: Wilhelm His, Snr. (1831–1904)

Yovisto: Santiago Ramón y Cajal and the Neurons

NCSE: Darwin’s Pallbearers, Part 2

Embryo Project: Sir D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (1860–1948)

Geschichte der Geologie: Strukturgeologie und Mittelalterlicher Bergbau

Die Schiener bei der Arbeit, Miniatur aus einer Grubenkarte aus dem 18. Jahrhundert. Zu seinen Arbeitsgeräten gehörten Schnüre, Stäbe, Hängekompaß, Setzkompaß, Klinometer, Abstechen (Winkelgerät) und Quadrant.

Die Schiener bei der Arbeit, Miniatur aus einer Grubenkarte aus dem 18. Jahrhundert. Zu seinen Arbeitsgeräten gehörten Schnüre, Stäbe, Hängekompaß, Setzkompaß, Klinometer, Abstechen (Winkelgerät) und Quadrant.

Yovisto: Vito Voterra and Functional Analysis

CHEMISTRY:

Chemical Heritage Magazine: Harold C. Urey: Science, Religion, and Cold War Chemistry

After helping create the atom bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, Harold Urey focused on uncovering the age and origins of Earth and the solar system. In this 1951 photo Urey inspects a 'fossilized thermometer' of belemnite (a prehistoric squid-shaped creature). Urey used information from these fossils to estimate the temperature of oceans from as far back as 100 million years. (USC Digital Library)

After helping create the atom bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, Harold Urey focused on uncovering the age and origins of Earth and the solar system. In this 1951 photo Urey inspects a ‘fossilized thermometer’ of belemnite (a prehistoric squid-shaped creature). Urey used information from these fossils to estimate the temperature of oceans from as far back as 100 million years. (USC Digital Library)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Hooke’s Books

CELL: Hooke Folio Online

The Stute: Was I Wrong about “The End of Science”?

The Atlantic: What Was the Worst Prediction of all Time?

Social History of Medicine: Vol. 28 Issue 2 May 2015: Table of Contents

Edge Effects: Why Our Students Should Debate Climate Change

Huff Post: Debunking the Myths of Leonardo da Vinci

FaceBook: Isis Journal: Imogen Clarke interview

ISIS: Table of Contents: Vol. 106 Issue 1 March 2015

Vox: Why Oliver Sacks was so ambivalent about becoming a bestselling author

Neurologist and best-selling author Dr. Oliver Sacks. His new memoir, On The Move, grapples with the tension between being a media personality and a physician. Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Neurologist and best-selling author Dr. Oliver Sacks. His new memoir, On The Move, grapples with the tension between being a media personality and a physician.
Chris McGrath/Getty Images

The Washington Post: Philosophy’s gender bias: For too long, scholars say, women have been ignored

The Conversation: Reducing science to sensational headlines too often misses the bigger picture

JHI: Dispatches From the Republic of Letters

Oxford MHS: Newsletter May 2015

teleskopos: Real, replica, fake or fiction?

Nature: A view from the bridge: Metaphor and message

The #EnvHist Weekly

Slate: Science Needs a New Ritual

Nautilus: The Big Bang is Hard Science: It is also a Creation Story

The Chronicle of Higher Education: The Object as Subject

Faith and Wisdom in Science: Can Science be more like Music? An Experiment with Light and Song

Leonardo: Codex Madrid

ESOTERIC:

BOOK REVIEWS:

Sun News Miami: Newton and Empiricism

Maclean’s: Einstein’s beef with Schrödinger

Notches: Classroom Wars and Sexual Politics: An Interview with Natalia Mehlman Petrzela

Kestrels and Cerevisiae: Book Thoughts: Pauly’s Controlling Life

The New York Times: ‘Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cat’, by Paul Halpern

The Wall Street Journal: The Half-Life of Physicists

British Journal for the History of Science: Outsider Scientists: Routes to Innovation in Biology

New Scientist: The Least Likely Man celebrates a genetic-code-breaking genius

mg22630193.300-2_945

The New York Review of Books: Revelations from Outer Space

New Scientist: Scientific Babel: Why English Rules

NEW BOOKS:

THEATRE:

The Royal Society: A dramatic experiment: science on stage 11 May 2015

Oppenheimer production photos 2014: Photo by Keith Pattison c RSCRsC

Oppenheimer production photos 2014: Photo by Keith Pattison c RSCRsC

FILM:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Under the Knife: Episode 8 – Corpse Medicine

The Public Domain Review: The Westinghouse Works (1904)

Youtube: Collider: JJ Thomson’s Cathode-ray tube

‘Fighting for the Vote: Science and Suffrage in World War I’ – Dr Patricia Fara

Vine: Science Museum: Difference Engine No. 2

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Archive on 4: The Language of Pain

PODCASTS:

Chemistry World: Acetylene

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Cambridge: HPS Dept: Workshop: Science and Technology in the Context of International Exhibitions 6 May 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Maritime Lectures Series: WW1: Three Sisters 7 May – 11 June 2015

Oriel College Oxford: 2015 Thomas Harriot Lecture: Dr Stephen Clucas 28 May

Monash University: CfP: Translating Pain: An International Forum on Language, Text and Suffering 10-12 August 2015

University of the West of England, Bristol: Science in Public: research, practice, impact” 9-10 July 2015

Archives for London: Seminar: Science in the city: the archival life of Robert Hooke 7 May 2015

Freud Museum London: Exhibition: Early Scientific Discoveries: Freud the Physician 30 April–7 June 2015

The Royal Society: Conference: Archival afterlives 2 June 2015

LSE: Summer Workshop of HPPE: Economists from 1780 to 1980: Observing and configuring the economy 12 May 2015

University of Durham: The History of Thermodynamics and Scientific Realism Provisional Programme 12 May 2015

University of Regensburg: Conference: Will our journals go extinct? Further perspectives in scholarly publishing 9 June 2015

BSHS: Useful information about Swansea ahead of #BHSH15

The Recipes Project: Notches CfP: Sex, Food and History Round Table

University of South Carolina: CfP: Art, Anatomy, and Medicine since 1700

Courtauld Institute of Art: Leonardo da Vinci Society Annual Lecture: ‘Leonardo, Luca Pacioli and the Venetian Optic c. 1480-1510’ 8 May 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

The Mercurians, a Special Interest Group of the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT): Pam Laird Research Grant

The School of Philosophy, Religion, and History of Science at the University of Leeds: Offers a variety of funding opportunities to support taught postgraduate study.

Society for Renaissance Studies: Postdoctoral and Study Fellowships

UCL:STS: PhD Programmes

University of London: Chair in the Understanding of the Humanities

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #45

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #45

Monday 27 April 2015

EDITORIAL:

Bringing you all the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine found in the Internet over the last seven days it’s your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Weekly #45. This week our editorial takes a look at a piece of very recent history celebrating the twenty-fifth birthday of the Hubble Space Telescope.

 

The Hubble Space Telescope Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Hubble Space Telescope
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The telescope first emerged in Holland in the last third of the year 1608. Within a year Thomas Harriot in England, Simon Marius in Germany and Galileo Galilei had all started to use it as a scientific instrument to observe the heavens and ushered in a completely new era in the history of astronomy. Throughout the seventeenth century telescopes got bigger and better and changed humanity’s knowledge and perception of the solar system. At the end of the century Isaac Newton succeeded in producing the first functioning reflecting telescope and changed the game once again.

Late in the eighteenth century William Herschel discovered Uranus, the first new planet to be observed in the solar system in the history of humanity, using his own handmade Newtonian reflecting telescope.

In the nineteenth century William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse introduced the era of the giant reflectors. His Leviathan of Parsonstown , a 72 inch reflector, built in 1845 was the largest aperture telescope in the world until the twentieth century. The twentieth century saw telescopes getting larger and larger and humanity finally learnt that our solar system was only part of one of many galaxies and not the whole of the cosmos as had been thought since antiquity.

The twentieth century also saw the advent of the radio telescope in the nineteen thirties giving us a new way of ‘seeing’ out into space. Throughout the four centuries since the invention of the telescope, optics improved, lenses and mirrors were perfected and telescopes got bigger and bigger as well as technically more and more sophisticated. However observational astronomy was always limited by the problems caused by the earth’s atmosphere and so as the space age dawned astronomers dreamed of putting up a telescope, as a satellite, outside of that bothersome atmosphere.

Finally twenty-five years ago, the Hubble Space Telescope was launched into space on 24 April 1990 and became the biggest flop in space and telescope history. The telescope mirror was defective and the picture it produced so out of focus as to be almost useless. In 1993 in a spectacular operation astronauts ‘repaired’ the faults and Hubble finally began to deliver and deliver it did. The era Hubble has totally and radically changed the popular perception of space, turning an initial disaster into an indescribable scientific and technological triumph.

Whewell’s Gazette wishes Hubble a very happy twenty-fifth birthday

 

Grinding of Hubble's primary mirror at Perkin-Elmer, March 1979 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Grinding of Hubble’s primary mirror at Perkin-Elmer, March 1979
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gulf News Thinkers: Hubble telescope’s double achievement

Air & Space: 10 Hubble Images That Changed Astronomy

Uranus Rings (NASA/ESA/SETI Institute)

Uranus Rings
(NASA/ESA/SETI Institute)

Motherboard: The Hubble Space Telescope’s 25 Most Mind-Boggling Photos

Image: NASA, ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

Image: NASA, ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

Pacific Standard: How the Hubble Space Telescope’s Iconic Photos Changed the Way Everybody Saw Space

Image of Jupiter showing impact sites from Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, taken July 18, 1994. (Photo: H. Hammel, MIT and NASA)

Image of Jupiter showing impact sites from Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, taken July 18, 1994. (Photo: H. Hammel, MIT and NASA)

Leaping Robot: Observing the Astronomical Sublime

Screen-Shot-2015-04-24-at-12.24.33-PM

Slate: Happy 25th, Hubble!

Space Watchtower: Hubble Space Telescope at 25

This photograph, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, was recently released by NASA, for the 25th anniversary of the telescope's years in orbit of the Earth. The bright lights in the center of the photo is actually a cluster of about 3,000 stars that was discovered by Bengt Westerlund, a Swedish astronomer, in the 1960s. That cluster is now known as Wusterlund 2 and is located about 20,000 light years away from Earth and measures between six and 13 light years from end to end. The 2-million year old cluster is part of the constellation Carina and located in a section of space called Gum 29. Aside from the stars, which are relatively young in terms of space, the blue/green hues are oxygen and the red is hydrogen. (Image Sources: NASA, ecnmag.com )

This photograph, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, was recently released by NASA, for the 25th anniversary of the telescope’s years in orbit of the Earth. The bright lights in the center of the photo is actually a cluster of about 3,000 stars that was discovered by Bengt Westerlund, a Swedish astronomer, in the 1960s. That cluster is now known as Wusterlund 2 and is located about 20,000 light years away from Earth and measures between six and 13 light years from end to end. The 2-million year old cluster is part of the constellation Carina and located in a section of space called Gum 29. Aside from the stars, which are relatively young in terms of space, the blue/green hues are oxygen and the red is hydrogen. (Image Sources: NASA, ecnmag.com )

The New York Times: 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond Troubled Start

Quotes of the week:

“Picking the lint out of Darwin’s navel” – Steve Jones regarding the re-re-re-re-discovery of Patrick Matthew (this is not news). h/t @matthewcobb

“Very interesting, but how many new “darks” before we accept we’re pretty clueless here?” – Philip Ball

“Can’t we just call being clueless “dark knowledge” and be done with it?” – Peter Broks

“This really feels like a time to call them “occult forces” again” – Becky Higgitt

“It’s when you prove something you thought of yourself that you become a mathematician.” – George Hart”

“I have tried lately to read Shakespeare, and found it so intolerably dull that it nauseated me. – Charles Darwin h/t @friendsofdarwin

One man excels in eloquence, another in arms. – Virgil

“Failure is an option here. If things are not failing, you are not innovation enough” – Elon Musk

“The greatest mistake any man ever made is to suppose that the good things of the world are not worth the winning.” ― Anthony Trollope

“At the core of all well-founded belief, lies belief that is unfounded”. – Ludwig Wittgenstein

“The limits of my language means the limits of my world.” ― Ludwig Wittgenstein

“Der Philosoph behandelt eine Frage; wie eine Krankheit.” – Ludwig Wittgenstein

“Thinking: the talking of the soul with itself”. – Plato

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

History Physics: Lights in the Sky, in history

The Evening Sun: Another View: Einstein waged battle for right to a private life

CHF: Blast from the Past: Atomic Age Jewelry and the Feminine Ideal

A Vogue model poses before the Atomium, the symbol of the 1958 Brussels World’s Fair. By that time the atom had become part of popular culture.

A Vogue model poses before the Atomium, the symbol of the 1958 Brussels World’s Fair. By that time the atom had become part of popular culture.

Haaretz: This Day in Jewish History: The medieval rabbi who put Aristotle before God passes on

Journal-Democrat: Astronomy 101 leaves attendees to ponder Lewis and Clark, universe

MinnPost: Checking out Carleton’s Goodsell Observatory – and its fascinating history

Salon: “Albert is an old fool”: Einstein vs Schrödinger in battle of the Nobel Laureates

Quodlibeta: The earliest reference to a telescope: England 1551?

Ptak Science Books: On Question Marks in 19th C Meteor Spectra

AHF: Frédéric Joliot-Curie

Leaping Robot: Conversion Experiences

MHS Oxford: ‘Dear Harry…’ – Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost To War

Physics Today: A good name rather than great riches

Yovisto: Wolfgang Pauli and the Pauli Principle

Falling Rocks: Meteorite: L’Aigle

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

The Washington Post: 30 fake maps that explain the world

Slate: The Invisible Tribute to the Paris Meridian

teleskopos: On longitude in BBC History Magazine

Mogan High History Academy: Calculating Longitude

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Abraham Ortelius and the 16th century information age

Abraham Ortelius by Peter Paul Rubens Source: Wikimedia Commons

Abraham Ortelius by Peter Paul Rubens
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Friends of Darwin: Three old maps

British Library: Maps and views blog: Maps lie in a new online course

University of Glasgow Library: Mapping in the Fifteenth Century

Public Domain Review: Forgotten Failures of African Exploration

Harvard University Library Open Collections Program: Expeditions and Discovery

The H-Word: Happy birthday Robinson Crusoe: the fictional author of a “History of Fact”

Ptak Science Books: Maps of Things Not There: Eden

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Scientific American: Mad Science: The Treatment of Mental Illness Fails to Progress [Excerpt]

Early Modern Practitioners: ‘John Houghton and Medical Practice in William Rose’s London’

Yovisto: Gustav Fechner and Psychophysics

Perceptions of Pregnancy: Using the “poisons of sterility”: Women and contraception during the Middle Ages

Slate Vault: Lists of Types of Mania and Melancholy, Compiled for Early-19th-Centuy Doctors

Early Modern Medicine: Prayers for Cures at the Baths

John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester Credit: Wikipedia

John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester Credit: Wikipedia

British Library: Medieval manuscript blog: Ointments and Potions

The Chirugeon’s Apprentice: Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Telescope

A Prairie Populist: The History of the “Black Dog” as Metaphor

The Recipes Project: Gout and the Golden Fleece: Experimentation on Recipes through Chymical Correspondence

History Today: The Importance of a Good Nights Sleep

Mental Floss: Women in Medicine: Five Firsts in Their Nations

ELIZABETH GARRETT ANDERSON

ELIZABETH GARRETT ANDERSON

The History of Vaccines: Timelines

National Humanities Center: Vaccinate for Smallpox?

Yovisto: Sigmund Freud’s Structural Model of the Human Psyche

Wellcome Collection: Nymphomania

Telegraph: Ancient Egyptian cure for a hangover…a garland of laurel leaves

Blink: Horrors of the East

Conciatore: Archiater

TECHNOLOGY:

Ptak Science Books: The Family Tree of Computer Development, Part II

Culture 24: Guinness World Record for pendulum clock vindicates John Harrison 250 years on

Yovisto: Marc Seguin and the Wire-Cable Suspension Bridge

IEEE Spectrum: New Theory Leads to Gigahertz Antenna on a Chip

Mlive: History of space travel the subject of a new show at Muskegon Community College’s planetarium

The Recipes Project: The Colour ConText Database

Invisible Themepark: Camper Built Inside a Car, 1952

Campers built inside 1949 Nash 1952 The illustrator for this drawing is unknown.

Campers built inside 1949 Nash 1952
The illustrator for this drawing is unknown.

Now Appearing: Mechanical computation

The New York Times: Auctioning the Relics of Technology Pioneers

Atlas Obscura: Ghosts of the Past: 5 Places to view your iPhone’s Ancestors

Gizmodo: Why Is It Called “Rebooting”?

Library of Congress: The Typewriter – “that almost sentient mechanism”

IFL Science: Mystery of How The Egyptians Moved Pyramid Stones Solved

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Race Card: How does a university deal with its legacy of eugenics?

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Sir William Logan

Friends of Darwin: Metaphorical sight-seeing

Embryo Project: Paul Kammerer’s Experiments on Sea-squirts in the Early Twentieth Century

Live Science: Did Neanderthals Die Off Because They Couldn’t Harness Fire?

Notches: “The Gay Bulge” or Can We Study Medieval Sexuality Through Puns?

One Irishman kills another, from Gerald of Wales’ The History and Topography of Ireland (Image: BL Royal 13 B VIII)

One Irishman kills another, from Gerald of Wales’ The History and Topography of Ireland (Image: BL Royal 13 B VIII)

AEON: Rethinking Extinction

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Thinking extinction with sci-fi

Palaeoblog: Darwin, Wallace & Patrick Matthew: Who’s Ideas on Evolution Came First?

BBC News: New mass extinction even identified by geologists

Yovisto: John Muir and the U. S. National Park System

Jonathan Saha: Colonial Canicide, Cruel to be Kind?

Ri Science: Happy Earth Day

HNN: Whatever Happened to the Environmental Movement?

NYAM: The Dragons of Aldrovandi

Aldrovandi 7 Headed Hydra

Aldrovandi 7 Headed Hydra

Natural History Apostilles: Lamarck’s analogy/homology of nature with culture

Natural History Apostilles: Naudin’s analogy/homology of natural and artificial selection

Yovisto: Alphonse Bertillon’s Anthropometric Identification System

Atlas Obscura: Shipwrecks, Scurvy and Sea Otters: The Story of Naturalist Georg Wilhelm Steller

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Animals in Medieval Art

The Dispersal Of Darwin: Special Issue of Endeavour journal on Charles Darwin and Scientific Revolutions

Cal Tech Archives: Charles Richter

CHEMISTRY:

Distillations Blog: The Romance of Chemistry

The Royal Institution: New Discoveries in Pneumaticks

Cartoon James Gilray

Cartoon James Gilray

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Isabella Karle’s Interview

Gastropod: Savour Flavour

The Guardian: The first world war scientists who gave their lives to defeat poison gas

CHF: Chemical Warfare: From the European Battlefield to the American Laboratory

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Science Museum: The Kraszna-Krausz and First Book Awards 2015

Conciatore: Cross Pollination

Scroll.in: Christopher Alan Bayly, pre-eminent Western historian of India, dies

The Guardian: Sir Christopher Bayly obituary

Christopher Bayly arrived at St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, in 1970 and became profressor of imperial and naval history in 1992 Source: The Guardian

Christopher Bayly arrived at St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, in 1970 and became profressor of imperial and naval history in 1992
Source: The Guardian

Science League of America: “But It’s Just a Theory”

Chronologia Universalis: An Annotated Postcard

The 2015 Pulitzer Prize Winners: General Nonfiction: “The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History” by Elizabeth Kolbert

AHA: Perspectives on History: “Let’s Put History Everywhere”: A Career Diversity for Historians Interview

History of Medicine.com: An Interactive Annotated Bibliography of the History of Medicine, Biology and Dentistry from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 1980

Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Announcing 2015–2016 Fellowship

Mittelalter: Identifying manuscripts in social media

AHA Today: Draft Guidelines on the Evaluation of Digital Scholarship

Quod.Lib.umich: The Hermeneutics of Data and Historical Writing

Thinking Like a Mountain: Experimental and Speculative Hypotheses in the Seventeenth Century: Integrated History and Philosophy of Science Workshop University of Durham (Part 1 of 2)

The Village Voice Blog: Ask Andrew W. K.: ‘How Do I Show Religious Freaks That Science Wins?’

The Nature of Reality: Why Physics Needs Philosophy

Now Appearing: Writers and social media

JHI Blog: What We’re Reading: Week of April 20

AHA: Career Diversity for Historians

Remedia: High Dilution, Homeopathy, and the Purpose of the Scientific Journal

Open Book Publishing: Mikuláš Teich – The Scientific Revolution Revisited

It’s About Time: 1565 The Seven Liberal Arts by Cornelis Cort

Cornelis Cort 1565 Astrologie

Cornelis Cort 1565 Astrologie

LOVEIMPERIALWARMUSEUMLIBRARY: Imperial War Museum London Is Not “Museum of the Year”

Ether Wave Propaganda: Scientists and the History of Science: An Alternative View

ESOTERIC:

Heavy: Loch Ness Monster Google Doodle: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

History of Alchemy: Johann Rudolf Glauber

Conciatore: Salamander

Nemfrog: Spiritograph in use

Plate I. Spiritograph in use. Experimental investigation of the spirit manifestations : demonstrating the existence of spirits and their communion with mortals. 1855.

Plate I. Spiritograph in use. Experimental investigation of the spirit manifestations : demonstrating the existence of spirits and their communion with mortals. 1855.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing

The Daily Beast: How Two Dutch Geniuses Taught Us to See

Mail Online: A quick autopsy my love, then off to the ball: The eccentric behaviour of Dutch natural scientist Antoni van Leeuwenhoek and painter Johannes Vermeer

Science Book a Day: After Physics

after-physics

New Scientist: The Vital Question: Finding answers about the origins of life

The Guardian: The Vital Question: Why Is Life the Way It Is? Review – back to biological basics

Alec Ryrie: Aphrodisiacs, fertility and medicine

The New York Times: ‘Finding Zero’: A Long Journey for Naught

The New York Times: Lives of the Scientists: We Could Not Fail and More

NEW BOOKS:

University of Notre Dame Press: Setting Aside All Authority: Giovanni Battista Riccioli and the Science against Copernicus in the Age of Galileo

Graney002

Historiens de la santé: Medical Negligence in Victorian Britain: The Crisis of Care under the English Poor Law, c.1834–1900

HSS: ISIS Books Received: January–March, 2015:

Brill: The Technique of Islamic Bookbinding

Harvard University Press: Daughters of Alchemy

THEATRE:

FILM:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Lawrence Principe – Glass of Antimony Reconstruction

YouTube: How to make a Scientific Revolution

YouTube: Battle of the Nobel Laureates: Einstein and Schrödinger’s Clashing Theories

YouTube: Tour of an Alchemy Laboratory

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Aveiro, Portugal: CfP: 10th International Conference on the History of Chemistry 9-12 September 2015

University of Leeds: HPS Seminar, 2014-15 Semester 2

University of Roehampton: CfP. One-Day Colloquium: The Darwins Reconsidered: Evolution. Writing & Inheritance in the Works of Erasmus and Charles Darwin

University of Leeds: The 2015 ‘Mangoletsi Lectures': Freedom of the Will and the Perils of Scientism Professor Helen Beebee, Samuell Hall Professor of Philosophy at the University of Manchester, 5, 6, 12 & 13 May 2015

Gender and Work in Early Modern Europe: New proposals wanted for Ashgate series Women and Gender in Early Modern World

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘unseen’ Symposium 30 May 2015

Niche: CfP: The Environmental Histories of Ports and Ocean Trade Liverpool 18-19 September 2015

University of Oulu, Finland: CfP: Testing Philosophical Theories Against the History of Science 21 September 2015

University of Durham: The History of Thermodynamics and Scientific Realism 12 May 2015

Berlin: CfP: International Workshop: The Establishment of Genetic Counseling in the Second Half of the 20th Century 2–3 February 2016

NYAM: History of Medicine Night: 19th and 20th Century Stories 6 May 2015

University of Aarhus: CfP: Workshop: 1970s: Turn of an era in the history of science? 14-15 September 2015

Warburg Institute: Maps and Society Lectures: ‘Reforming Cartography: John Britton and The Topographical Survey of the Borough of St Marylebone (1834) 30 April 2015

2015 Oxford Seminar in the History of Alchemy and Chemistry: 27 May–17 June 2015 Maison Francaise d’Oxford

Federal Center of Technological Education of Rio de Janeiro: 13th Biennial International IHPST Conference 22-25 July 2015

The British Institute for the Study of Iraq: The Annual Bonham-Carter Lecture Professor Emilie Savage-Smith on ‘Surgeons and Physicians in Medieval Iraq’ 11 June 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

UCL: STS vacancies

University of Liverpool: Lecturer grade 8 in the history of Medicine

New Statesman: Join the New Statesman web team as a science and tech writer

University of York: Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage: Curating Profusion PhD Studentship

University of Vienna: The Doctoral Program “The Science in Historical Philosophical and Cultural Contexts”

National Railway Museum: PhD Studentship

UCL:STS: Research Associate: Economics in the Public Sphere – 2 Posts

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #44

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Super-Sonic Owl

Volume #44

Monday 20 April 2015

EDITORIAL:

Back once again with Whewell’s Gazette #44 your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you as always as much of the histories od science, technology and medicine that our editorial staff could round up in the last seven days in the Internet and brought to you this week by our super-sonic currier owl.

A message for all those blogging or tweeting about #histSTM are you already included in Michael Barton’s (@darwinsbulldog) HistSci list? If not give the doggie a shout out!

Our birthdays of the week this week feature three people that one might not consider to be scientists Thomas Jefferson, Leonardo da Vinci and Hans Sloane. Jefferson and Sloane get, in our opinion too little attention in the history of science and Leonardo too much.

Jefferson represents a class of people in the history of science who get too little mainstream attention, the educators. Although an amateur scientist in his own right his major contribution to the history of science was as a politician ensuring that science got taught in schools and universities. A healthy scientific culture needs teachers of science and in the early days of the USA Jefferson did much to encourage and support the teaching of science, a service that should be acknowledge more often and more loudly.

Leonardo the epitome of the Renaissance man is every science writers darling and anybody writing about the history of science seems to try to find a way to drop his name into whatever they are writing with little thought given to the relevance. However as one of the posts from The Renaissance Mathematicus linked to here points out Leonardo’s actual influence on the evolution of science was almost nil. Maybe it’s time for historians of science to give more attention to the Jeffersons and Sloanes of this world and somewhat less to Leonardo.

Hans Sloane deserves to be mentioned in the history of science for several reasons but it is above all as a collector that he made his greatest contribution to that histories. The collectors of the Early Modern period made a massive contribution to several branches of the science, above all to the life sciences and the greatest of them all was almost certainly Hans Sloane. Just how great he was can be seen that not only was the British Museum founded on his collection but when part of that collection was split off, the Natural History Museum as well.

It pays to some time to stop and consider that the evolution of science is not just driven by ‘geniuses’ making great discoveries but also by people more in the background, such as Jefferson and Sloane doing more mundane things like furthering the teaching of science or building collections of scientific specimens.

Quotes of the week:

“How wonderful. John Evelyn described butterflies as ‘flying flowers’” – Andrea Wulf

A pitfall for the ‘woman scholar': she tries “to insist upon, & to apologize for, her

erudition in the same breath.” Payne-Gaposchkin, 1956

So cute to watch all the sheltered first-world 20-somethings in academia speak about “wisdom”.” @replicakill

Ein Narr der schweigt, geht für einen Weisen durch. – Christiaan Huygens

“In nature nothing exists alone.” – Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

I wish there was a pie chart showing the ratio of Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, Darwin and Einstein scholars to all historians of science. – Harun Küçük

“A purpose, an intention, a design, strikes everywhere even the careless, the most stupid thinker”. David Hume

“But science & everyday life cannot & should not be separated. Science, for me, gives a partial explanation for life.”- R. Franklin

“If any good came out of a) WWI, and b) astrology, it would have to be Holst’s The Planets suite.” – @smiffy

History is a race between education and catastrophe – HG Wells ”

Perfect numbers like perfect men are very rare. – Descartes

“A fool, Mr, Edgeworth, is one who has never made an experiment.” – Erasmus Darwin

Final (paper draft)≠(final paper) draft. Language is not associative. – Evelyn J Lamb

Birthdays of the Week:

Thomas Jefferson born 13 April

Miniature Portrait of Jefferson by Robert Field (1800) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Miniature Portrait of Jefferson by Robert Field (1800)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

“Happy Birthday, Thomas Jefferson. Enlightenment slaveowner; captures the American contradiction in one life”. – Tom Levenson

“Nature intended me for the tranquil pursuits of science, by rendering them my supreme delight.” – Thomas Jefferson

Constitution Day: 10 facts about Thomas Jefferson for his 272nd birthday

History of Geology: In Megalonyx We Trust: Jefferson’s patriotic monsters

Leonardo da Vinci born 15 April 1452

Portrait of Leonardo by Francesco Melzi Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Leonardo by Francesco Melzi
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Letters from Gondwana: Da Vinci and the Birth of Ichnology

The Guardian: Leonardo da Vinci’s earth-shattering insights about geology

Brain Pickings: Leonardo da Vinci’s Life and Legacy, in a Vintage Pop-Up Book

Lapham’s Quarterly: Leonardo da Vinci

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Pissing on a Holy Cow

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Is Leonardo da Vinci a great artist or a great scientist? Neither actually.

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Leonardo artist-engineer redux

Hans Sloane born 16 April 1660

Hans Sloane Source: British Museum

Hans Sloane
Source: British Museum

The British Museum: Sir Hans Sloane

Figaries: The case of five children: who were inoculated in Dublin, on the 26th of August, 1725

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: Sir Hans Sloane, Cocoa Magnate

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Silicon Republic: Ireland’s Greatest Woman Inventor Finalist – Annie Maunder, pioneering astronomer

American Scientist: Huygens’s Clocks Revisited

The Recipes Project: “Take Good Syrup of Violets”: Robert Boyle and Historical Recipes

Wallifaction: The Discovery of Titan: Huygens’s Cipher and Wallis’s Trick

John Wallis

John Wallis

Royal Observatory Greenwich Blog: Astro Art: cosmic bodies and our solar system

Margaret Maskelyne’s Orrery, by William Jones, ZBA4664. Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Margaret Maskelyne’s Orrery, by William Jones, ZBA4664.
Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Nature: Biography of a space telescope: Voices of Hubble

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Wakefield Wright’s Interview

Rejected Princess: Annie Jump Cannon

The Calculator Site: How To Convert Between Fahrenheit and Celsius

Irish Philosophy: Further Elucidations on Newton’s Thoughts

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Asterisms and Constellations and how not to confuse them with Tropical Signs

The constellation Virgo Source: Wikimedia Commons

The constellation Virgo
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto Blog: Giovanni Riccioli – a man of Encyclopedic Knowledge

Backreaction: A wonderful 100th anniversary gift for Einstein

Medium.com: Einstein, Schrödinger, and the story you never heard

Smithsonian.com: Why Albert Einstein, the Genius Behind the Theory of Relativity, Loved His Pipe

Slate: Einstein’s Brain Heist

BBC News: The strange afterlife of Einstein’s brain

The Mütter Museum: Exhibitions: Albert Einstein’s Brain

Philly.com: Science icon who struggled with fame

Scientias.nl: Archeologen ontdekken oudste horloge van Noord-Europa in Zutphen

quadrans

 

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Lines in the Ice: top five highlights

Robert Thorne, Orbis Universalis Descriptio [London : T. Dawson for T. Woodcocke, 1582]. British Library C.24.b.35  Untitled

Robert Thorne, Orbis Universalis Descriptio [London : T. Dawson for T. Woodcocke, 1582]. British Library C.24.b.35 Untitled

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Remedia: Peanut Panic

The Public Domain Review: An account of the late improvements in galvanism (1803)

Hiden City Philadelphia: The Curious Case of Body Snatching at Lebanon Cemetery

Niche: Animal Matter: The Making of ‘Pure’ Bovine Vaccine at the Connaught Laboratories and Farm at the Turn of the Century

The New York Times: Sheila Kitzinger, Childbirth Revolutionary, Dies at 86

Sheila Kitzinger complained that “our culture of birth is heavily medicalized,” with women submitting passively. Credit Rex Features, via Associated Press

Sheila Kitzinger complained that “our culture of birth is heavily medicalized,” with women submitting passively. Credit Rex Features, via Associated Press

Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry: Vol. 39 Issue 1 March 2015 – Medicalizing Heroin

Wellcome History: Dysfunctional diasporas?

Telegraph & Argus: How project uses history and technology to help tackle disease

George Campbell Gosling: Teaching Medical History

Dr Alun Withey: Edging the Competition: Surgical Instruments in the 18th-Century

It’s About Time: Early Herbals & Pharmacies

Neuron Culture: A rowdy, harrowing, vital book: My Times review of ‘Galileo’s Middle Finger,’ by Alice Dreger

It’s About Time: Making a Herbal with Leonhart Fuchs (1502–1566)

Leonhart Fuchs, De Historia Stirpium, Basel 1542, Sp Coll Hunterian L.1.13, Glasgow University Library Detail of illustrators at work from page 897

Leonhart Fuchs, De Historia Stirpium, Basel 1542, Sp Coll Hunterian L.1.13, Glasgow University Library Detail of illustrators at work from page 897

Nursing Clio: Sunday Morning Medicine

Ore. Exeter: The Birth of Psychedelic Literature: Drug Writing and the rise of LSD Therapy 1954–1964

TECHNOLOGY:

Distillations Blog: Moore’s Law: A Silicon Story

Distillations Blog: Moore and the Microprocessor

Distillations Blog: Three Reasons Why Moore’s Law Might Be Doomed

Gordon Moore Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gordon Moore
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Medium.com: Back Channel: How Gordon Moore Made “Moore’s Law”

CNET: Moore’s Law is the reason your iPhone is so thin and cheap

Wired: 50 Years On, Moore’s Law Still Pushes Tech to Double Down

 

The New York Times: The Enola Gay: A Minor Mystery, Solved!

BBC: Future: Why the fax machine isn’t quite dead yet

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The worst history of technology headline of the year?

Ptak Science Books: Tools of a Scientist, ca. 1700

Ptak Science Books: A Cutaway Infographic of the RAF Wellington, 1941

Atlas Obscura: Steampunk… or just Punk’d?

Conciatore: Glass or Rock?

Board of Longitude Project Blog: Decoding Harrison

The Guardian: Clockmaker John Harrison vindicated 250 years after ‘absurd’ claims

 

The Burgess B clock trial revealed the truth of the claim by John Harrison that he could build a land timepiece to keep time to within a second over 100 days.  Photograph: National Maritime Museum /.

The Burgess B clock trial revealed the truth of the claim by John Harrison that he could build a land timepiece to keep time to within a second over 100 days.  Photograph: National Maritime Museum /.

The Independent: John Harrison’s ‘longitude’ clock sets new record – 300 years on

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Amanz Gressly

Notches: Doing It With Food: Cooking and the History of Sexuality

History of Geology: Clash of the Titans: The Science behind the Iceberg that sank the Titanic

Irish Examiner: Who was John Tyndall?

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Patrick Russell

Yovisto: Augustus Lane-Fox Pitt Rivers – the Father of British Archaeology

Augustus Pitt Rivers

Augustus Pitt Rivers

Embryo Project: Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772–1844)

Embryo Project: Essay: The Cuvier-Geoffroy Debate

Yovisto: Nikolaas Tinbergen and the Study of the Instinct

academia.edu: How the Great Chain of Being Fell Apart: Diversity in natural history 1758– 1859

Embryo Project: Hans Adolf Eduard Driesch (1867–1941)

Thinking Like a Mountain: The History of the Plant: Cultivating Innovation at the John Innes Centre

Independent: Secret file reveals scandal of the eel expert, the archbishop and the Loch Ness Monster ‘sighting’ that sent Whitehall into a spin

Nessie Source: Getty

Nessie
Source: Getty

OUP Blog: Darwin’s “gastric flatus”

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: William Arkell

Dan Merkur: Freud’s Mushroom Hunting

Brain Pickings: Thinking with Animals: From Aesop to Darwin to YouTube

The Friends of Charles Darwin: 19th April, 1882: The Death of a hero

Embryo Project: “Evolution and Tinkering” (1977) by Francois Jacob

 

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus and the White Gold

Conciatore: Zaffer

Chemical Heritage Museum: That Beautiful Theory

Joseph Black.  CHF Collections.

Joseph Black.
CHF Collections.

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

China.org.cn: Preserving Tibetan medicine, astronomy & astrology systems

New APPS: Art, Politics, Philosophy, Science: Why is this philosophy?

The Renaissance Mathematicus: There is no such thing as Greek science

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: University of Glasgow Library

Inscape unimaginable: The Challenges of Beginning a Scholarly Debate in the 21st Century

Ellie Miles: Curator of the Future Conference

CHF: E-newsletter April 2015

JHI Blog: The Early History of Arabic Printing in Europe

Ether Wave Propaganda: Scientists and the History of Science: The Shapin View

Cambridge MA 7//08 Harvard University Professor Steven Shapin (cq) photographed for Ideas Section. Wiggs/Globe Staff Section:Metro; Reporter; slug:06shapin        Library Tag  07062008   Ideas

Cambridge MA 7//08 Harvard University Professor Steven Shapin (cq) photographed for Ideas Section. Wiggs/Globe Staff Section:Metro; Reporter; slug:06shapin Library Tag 07062008 Ideas

The New York Times: Starving for Wisdom

The Recipes Project: Of recipes, collectors, compilers and contributors

 

The #EncHist Weekly

HSS: Newsletter Vol. 44 No. 2 April 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich Collections Blog: Royal Museums Greenwich Photographic Studio

Wonders & Marvels: Cabinet of Curiosities: xviii

SciLogs: A Dissertation on Science Blogging

Madison.com: Siegfried, Robert

ESOTERIC:

Occult Minds: How does new age literature cherry-pick its science? A cognitive approach

Conciatore: Primordial Matter

Mining practices,  from Agricola, De Re Metallica

Mining practices,
from Agricola, De Re Metallica

 

Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet XIV

Prospect: Science gives power to the supernatural

Ptak Science Books: When a Non-Prediction Was and Wasn’t a Prediction (1651–1666)

distillatio: Making the oil of vitriol and why I’ve been using the wrong distillations equipment

BOOK REVIEWS:

Nature: Women at the edge of science

Thinking Like a Mountain: Scientists’ Expertise as Performance: Between State and Society, 1860-1960

Brain Pickings: Creative Courage for Young Hearts: 15 Emboldening Picture Books Celebrating the Lives of Great Artists, Writers, and Scientists

The Guardian: Stories that shape: What are the best novels about the politics of technology

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on Scientific Illustration

Society for Social Studies of Science: Rachel Carson Prize: Refining Expertise

Popular Science: The Vital Question – Nick Lane

Read Cube: Books in Brief: Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cats (and more)

Reviews in History: The History of Emotions: An Introduction

plamper

The New York Times: ‘Galileo’s Middle Finger,’ by Alice Dreger

The New York Review of Books: Einstein as a Jew and a Philosopher

NEW BOOKS:

Google Books: Rational Action: The sciences of Policy in Britain and America, 1940-1960 Preview

Historiens de la santé: Les Antipsychiatries: Une Histoire

Amazon.com: Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline

Amazon.com: Moore’s Law: The Life of Gordon Moore, Silicon Valley’s Quiet Revolutionary

Harvard University Press: Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

THEATRE:

FILM:

Scientific American: Darwin: the Movie

TELEVISION:

The New York Times: General Electric Planning Television Series Covering Science and Tech

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Finding the Speed of Light with Peeps

 

Irtiqa Blog: Three excellent lectures by John Hedley Brooke on Galileo, Darwin and Einstein

Youtube: Kepler’s First Law of Motion – Elliptical Orbits (Astronomy)

Moreana: Thomas Moore and the Art of Publishing

Vimeo: Moore’s Law at 50

Vimeo: Charles Darwin: A Genius in the Heart of London, Part 2 A Final Journey to the Abbey

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Birkbeck: University of London: Thomas Harriot Seminar 2015 6-7 July

The Warburg Institute: Pseudo-Galenic Texts and the Formation of the Galenic Corpus 14-15 May 2015

University of Manchester (CHSTM): The Dog in 20th Century Science – Science in the 20th Century Dog 26 June 2015

University of Swansea: Technologies of Daily Life in Ancient Greece 2-3 July 2015

University of Manchester (CHSTM): Medicines, Translations and Histories 11-12 Jun 2015

University of Manchester (CHSTM): Stories about science: exploring science communication and entertainment media 4-5 June 2015

National University of Ireland – Maynooth: CfP: History of Science, technology and Medicine Network Ireland Annual Conference 13-14 November 2015

University of Pennsylvania: JAS 2015: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 16-17 October 2015

University of Cambridge: Department of History and Philosophy of Science: Easter Term 2015: Twentieth Century Think Tank

 

University of Cambridge: Department of History and Philosophy of Science: Easter Term 2015: Department Seminars

LOOKING FOR WORK:

National Museums Scotland: Keeper, Science and Technology

University of Konstanz: PhD: Simulation and Counterfactual Reasoning in Neuroscience

University of Bristol: Centre for Medical Humanities: Lecturer in Medical Humanities

 

Universitat Pompeu Fabra – Barcelona: 2 Marie Curie Grants – History of Nuclear Energy in Europe

Royal College of Surgeons: Curator Museums & Archives

University of Vienna: Studentship in HPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #43

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #43

Monday 13 April 2015

EDITORIAL: Welcome to the forty third edition of you weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all that we could find about the histories of science, technology and medicine presented in the Internet during the last seven days. As I type outside my window the reviving spring sun is shining in a blue sky tempting the green shoots and blossoms out of the trees and bushes bring an end to the long grey winter. Two hundred years ago nature demonstrated to the human race what can happen when spring doesn’t come and the cycle of growth is interrupted by an unexpected occurrence. On 10 April 1815 the volcano Tambora erupted on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa ejecting vast quantities of dust and ash into the atmosphere causing massive interruptions in the weather patterns of the whole world. The year 1816 became known at the year without summer and led to the worst famine in the nineteenth century causing the deaths of tens of thousands throughout the world. Since the beginning of the modern period humanity has lived with the dream, or should that be the illusion, that science will give us total dominion over world and all that it contains. So-called natural disasters such as the Tambora demonstrate to us just how fragile our grip on our lump of rock hurtling through space really is.

Aerial view of the caldera of Mount Tambora, formed during the colossal 1815 eruption. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Aerial view of the caldera of Mount Tambora, formed during the colossal 1815 eruption.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal Society: The Repository: ‘the world had turned to ash’

Letters From Gondwana: A Christmas Carol: Dickens and the Little Ice Age

Georgian Gentleman: 10th April 1815 – one of the most explosive days in recorded history

Quotes of the week:

“The Ultimate Answer to Life, The Universe and Everything is…42!” – Deep Thought

“We thought the future would be flying cars but it’s actually arguing with a motion sensor about whether or not your hands are in the sink”. – @MildlyAmused

The minority opinion that “they” isn’t a singular as well as a plural gender-neutral pronoun doesn’t change the fact that it is both. – @SnoozeinBrief

“At least 1 British uni. has restricted the number of bookshelves professors may have in their offices to discourage ‘personal libraries.’” – @joncgoodwin

Afraid I bridle at generalising “did THE GREEKS think?” M Finley always said “which Greeks? when?” Not unitary culture – @wmarybeard

“Wer die Vergangenheit nicht kennt, wird die Zukunft nicht in den Griff bekommen.” – Golo Mann (1909-1994)

“I think astronomy is a bad study for you. It makes you feel human insignificance too plainly” – Thomas Hardy

“Nature is like an oracle that points to one of various alternatives we suggest rather than answering us directly in a language of its own”. – @cratylus

“I would rather be a meteor every atom in me in magnificent glow than a sleepy permanent planet” – Jack London

“To know what people really think, pay regard to what they do, rather than what they say”. – Descartes

“When a man says he approves of something in principle, it means he hasn’t the slightest intention of putting it into practice.” – Bismarck h/t @jondresner

“To think is easy. To act is hard. But the hardest thing in the world is to act in accordance with your thinking”. – J. W. v. Goethe

“It is vain to do with more what can be done with less.” – William of Ockham

“Sometimes, the most brilliant and intelligent students do not shine in standardized tests because they do not have standardized minds” – Dianne Ravitch CCDUmdtWYAA695H.jpg-large “Many discoveries are reserved for ages still to come… Our universe is a sorry little affair unless it has in it something for every age to investigate…” – Seneca

“On philosophical grounds too I cannot see any good reason for preferring the Big Bang idea. Indeed it seems to me in the philosophical sense to be a distinctly unsatisfactory notion, since it puts the basic assumption out of sight where it can never be challenged by a direct appeal to observation” – Fred Hoyle (1915–2001) Proponent of the “steady-state” universe. Coined the term “Big Bang” while at the same time rejecting it on BBC radio (1949). h/t @hist_astro

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

New York Times: 70 Years On, Crowd Gets Close to the Birthplace of the Atomic Bomb

Medium.com: Battle of the Nobel Laureates

National Geographic: Time Line: A History of Telescopes

The New York Times: Our Cosmic Selves

Symmetry: Our flat universe

Qatar Digital Library: AL-BĪRŪNĪ: A high point in the development of Islamic Astronomy

Diagram of phases of the moon in al-Bīrūnī’s Kitāb al-tafhīm. Or. 8349, f. 31v

Diagram of phases of the moon in al-Bīrūnī’s Kitāb al-tafhīm. Or. 8349, f. 31v

Yovisto Blog: Kamerlingh Onnes and Superconductivity

Dataisnature: The Hindu Temple as a Model of Fractal Cosmology – Forecasting Architecture with Recursive Instruction

Yellamma Temple [Karnataka] – Paul Prudence

Yellamma Temple [Karnataka] – Paul Prudence

arXiv.org: The contribution of Giordano Bruno to the special principle of relativity

The Royal Society: Publishing Blog: Mary Somerville: A lesson in creativity and determination

Fine Books & Collections: Out of this World

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Meta Newson’s Interview

Christie’s The Art People: Jacques Bassantin, Astronomique Discours

The Irish Times: Annie Russell: A trailblazing Irish astronomer whose work eclipsed her husband’s

The Washington Post: Behind the scenes of the final mission to service the Hubble telescope

Christie’s The Art People: Decoding the stars: An expert introduction to Astrolabes, the beautiful objects that were the ‘medieval iPhones’

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Betsy Stuart’s Interview

2015 International Year of Light: Einstein Centenary

2015 International Year of Light: Discoverers of Light

Real Clear Science: The Real History of the Planet Vulcan: How a Planet’s Death Birth Relativity

The Guardian: Starwatch: Happy 25th birthday, Hubble

Science News: Celebrating 25 years of the Hubble Space Telescope

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Inside the most amazing map library you’ve never heard of

Medievalist.net: The Atlas Miller rsz_moleiro_article1_3-650x463 History Today: Fantasy Worlds: A Gallery of Mythical Maps

National Library of Scotland: Map Images: Coasts of Scotland on marine charts, 1580–1850

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Medievalist.net: Medieval Viagra

ChoM News: Tour an “ultramodern” hospital in the year 1900

NYAM: Treating Mad Men: Harry Levinson’s Men Management, and Mental Health

CHF: The Strange, Gruesome Search for Substance X

Our understanding of endorphins can be traced back to the head of a pig. (Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection)

Our understanding of endorphins can be traced back to the head of a pig. (Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection)

Perceptions of Pregnancy: Infertility and Infidelity in Early Modern England

The Recipes Project: The Politics of Chocolate: Cosimo III’s Secret Jasmine Chocolate Recipe

Medievalist.net: Medieval Medicine and Modern Science: An Interview with Freya Harrison

Brought to Light: 1920’s Nursing Uniforms from the “Aristocrat of Uniforms” mss20134_1_bobevansuniform1-589x1024 Embryo Project: Fetal Surgery

The Conversation: Why I wasn’t excited about the medieval remedy that works against MRSA

Social History of Medicine: Inhaling Democracy: Cigarette Advertising and Health Education in Post-war West Germany 150s–1975

Jennifer Sherman Roberts: Laughing at History

Greg Jenner: A Brief History of Menstruation

TECHNOLOGY:

Ptak Science Books: Human Computer Art, 1949 

Yovisto: Harold Eugene Edgerton and the High Speed Photography

IEEE Spectrum: What Kind of Thing Is Moore’s Law?

IEEE Spectrum: Is This Really the Anniversary of Moore’s Law

Ptak Science Books: Air-Punk: Underwater Cyborg Diving Suit (1797) 6a00d83542d51e69e2017742ffbae9970d-500wi Dhaka Tribune: Bengal Lights

Ptak Science Books: Cross-Section Series: Battleship “Deutschland”, 1931

Conciatore: Laughing in the Fern

Mad Art Lab: Grace Hopper and the Democratization of Computer Progamming (Women in Science 35)

Capitalism’s Cradle: Female Inventors of the Industrial Revolution Part 4: Henrietta Vansittart

Conciatore: Borgo Pinti

Medievalist.net: Shining Light on Medieval Illuminations: Pigments through the Ages

Ptak Science Books: The Old Bridge’s Future Bridge

Ptak Science Books: A Nickel-Plated Low-priced Arithmetical Godsend (1922)

The Telegraph: How Alan Turing’s secret notebook could disappear forever

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Irish Examiner: Who was John Tyndall?

Embryo Project: Amphioxus, and the Mosaic Theory of Development (1893), by Edmund Beecher Wilson

Embryo Project: The Inheritance of Acquired Characteristics (1924), by Paul Kammerer

Natural History Apostilles: The Cider Crisis and the Golden Pippin

Science News: Brontosaurus deserves its name, after all

Inside the Science Museum: The Micrographia Microscope

Microscope 1927-437. A full-size reconstruction of Robert Hooke’s compound microscope. © Science Museum/SSPL

Microscope 1927-437. A full-size reconstruction of Robert Hooke’s compound microscope. © Science Museum/SSPL

Your Thurrock: Thurrock Local History Society receives lottery boost: Raising Awareness of Alfred Russel Wallace in Thurrock

In Circulation: Man’s Interest in His Own Surroundings: Conserving a Collection of Early Modern Topology Books

Cell: Obituary: Ronald J. Konopka (1947–2015)

Advances in the History of Psychology: Special Issue: “Ordering the Social History of the Human Sciences in Modern China”

Notches: Sex and the American Quest for a Relatable Past

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Edward Drinker Cope

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Learning from wild boar

Wild boar on exhibit at the Latvian Museum of Natural History, Riga.

Wild boar on exhibit at the Latvian Museum of Natural History, Riga.

Ptak Science Books: On the Origins of Ripples (1883)

CHEMISTRY:

Skulls in the Stars: Kathleen Lonsdale: Master of Crystallography

Kathleen Yardley with her fellow students at the Royal Institution, via her Biographical Memoir

Kathleen Yardley with her fellow students at the Royal Institution, via her Biographical Memoir

Skulls in the Stars: One more anecdote about Kathleen Lonsdale

The Public Domain Review: The Nitrous Oxide Experiments of Humphry Davy

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Conciatore: Sonnet to a Barber

CHoM News: Warren Museum reaches new audiences

Chicago Journals: ISIS: Vol. 106 No. 1 March 2015

Wlfi.com: Purdue exhibit showcases the history of computer science

The exhibit shows how the field of computer science has changed since the 1950s. (WLFI Photo/Purdue University)

The exhibit shows how the field of computer science has changed since the 1950s. (WLFI Photo/Purdue University)

JOOMAG: The Medievalverse No. 10

Just Publics @ 365: A Guide to Blogging for Academics

The New York Society Library: Erudition and Encyclopedism: Adam Winthrop Reads Conrad Gesner’s “Mithridates”

Lego Ideas: Scientists In History Collection

Only Living Girl NY: Morbid Anatomy Museum: Dioramas

The Nature of Reality: The Myth of the “Next Einstein”

JHI Blog: Inverting the Pyramid: Notes on the Renaissance Society of America Meeting (26-28 March, Berlin)

THE: Why journals should not forget their past

Irish Philosophy: Who sharpened Occam’s Razor?

Notches: The Sex Institute on Euston Road

The Recipes Project: Transcription-as-collaboration

The Linnaean Society: The Linnaean Collection

The University of Chicago Press: Journals: Reflecting on a Century of Scholarship: The Five Most Influential Isis Articles Ever Published

The #EnvHist Weekly

Science News: Top 10 science anniversaries of 2015

Medium.com: The Extraordinary Growing Impact of the History of Science

BBC News: The scientists who escaped the Nazis

Gustav Born is one of the last living links with the refugee scientists Source: BBC News

Gustav Born is one of the last living links with the refugee scientists
Source: BBC News

ESOTERIC:

Heterodoxology: New ESSWE website – and conference program available

New website, new look and feel. Breathing new fire into the field.

New website, new look and feel. Breathing new fire into the field.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry

The Curious Waveform: Top 10 popular chemistry books for the general reader

The New Yorker: Sight Unseen: The hows and whys of invisibility

The Wall Street Journal: The Miracle of the Heavens

Science Book a Day: Interviews Wade Allison

Science Book a Day: Rachel Carson and Her Book That Changed the World

Somatosphere: Nicolas Langlitz’s Neuropsychedelia: The Revival of Hallucinogen Research Since the Decade of the Brain neuropsychedlia-240x360 Brain Pickings: Radioactive: The Incredible Story of Marie Curie Told in Cyanotope

The Spectator: Moving heaven and earth: Galileo’s subversive spyglass

Science Book a Day: Interviews Bill Hayes

The Wall Street Journal: Science Books That Made Modernity Nature: Women at the edge of science

NEW BOOKS:

Amazon: Scientists at War: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research

Historiens de la santé: Wilhelm Reich, Biologist index Amazon: Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science and the World

Historiens de la santé: Paying with Their Bodies: American War and the Problem of the Disabled

THEATRE: FILM:

The Guardian: Batman v Superman writer to tackle Isaac Newton thriller

Open Culture: Frank Capra’s Science Film The Unchained Goddess Warns of Climate Change in 1958

TELEVISION: BBC: Drills, Dentures and Dentistry: An Oral History

SLIDE SHOW: Discover: A History of General Relativity o-GRAVITYPROBEB-facebook VIDEOS:

Youtube: Information Age: The microchip that changed the world

The Guardian: Shelf Life: How to time travel to a star

Youtube: Daphne Oram British composer and electronic musician

Science Dump: Sit back, relax, and let Richard Feynman talk to you about beauty

Wellcome Library: English folding almanac in Latin

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4extra: Dr Jacob Bronowski

PODCASTS:

Siren FM: History of Science – Power Plants

WCAI: How Naomi Oreskes Discovered the Roots of Climate Change Denial

Royal Society: Science on myself: Explore the history of self-experimentation in medicine 04-self-experimentation_310 ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Bucharest: IRH: Masterclass: Space, Time,, and Motion in the Early Modern Period 18-22 May 2015

University of Bucharest: Workshop: Natural History, Mathematics, and Metaphysics in the Seventeenth Century 26-27 May 2015

University of Newcastle: Workshop: The Diseases, Health Risks and Phobias of Modern and Fashionable Living Victorian Perspectives 18 June 2015

University of Newcastle: Workshop: Tuberculosis as a Romantic Disease: Artistic, Historical & Literary Perspectives

IEEE: The Bernard S. Finn IEEE History Prize: The prize is awarded annually to the best paper in the history of electrotechnology—power, electronics, telecommunications, and computer science—published during the preceding year: Deadline 15 April 2015

SIGCIS: The Mahoney Prize recognizes an outstanding article in the history of computing and information technology, broadly conceived. Deadline 15 April 2015

University of Notre Dame: Biennial History of Astronomy Workshops 24-28 June 2015

University of Oklahoma: Exhibition, Galileo’s World Starting August 2015 through 2016

CHF: Moore’s Law @ 50 Computer History Museum Mountain View 17 April 2015

Guardian Masterclasses: Everything you need to know about science communication 25 April 2015

University of Cardiff: CfP: Postgraduate Conference: Magic and the Supernatural in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods

Society for the History of Technology: The Levinson Prize

The Waring Library Society and the Waring Historical Library at the Medical University of South Carolina invite entries for the W. Curtis Worthington, Jr., Undergraduate and Graduate Research Papers Competition.

Maynooth University: CfP: HSTM Network Ireland Inaugural Conference 13-14 November 2015

University of Oxford: Centre for the History and Philosophy of Physics: “Physics and the Great War” One-Day Conference 13 June 2015

National Maritime Museum Greenwich: CfP: Ways of Seeing 17 July 2015

University of Berkeley California: Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society: “Faking It”: Counterfeits, Copies, and Uncertain Truths in Science, Technology, and Medicine 10-11 April 2015

Twin Café Sheffield: Coffee, Culture and Conversation in the Eighteenth Century 21 April 2015

Museum of Natural History Oxford: Lecture: Leviathan and the Air Pump 1 May 2015

University of Wales Trinity Saint David: Thirteenth Annual Conference of the Sophia Centre; Astrology As Art: Representation and Practice

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Manchester: CHSTM: Research preparation bursary

University of Leiden: Centre for the Arts in Society: 2 PhD’s in Ichthyology

University of Cambridge: Research Assistant: HSS-Bio project (Part Time, Fixed Term)

Science Museum: Associate Curator, Infrastructure and Built Environment AIP: Research Assistant

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Whewell’s Gazettte: Vol. #42

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #42

Monday 06 April 2015

EDITORIAL:

Back again after the long Easter weekend, it’s your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette #42, fuller than a basket of Easter eggs with all the best in the histories of science, technology and medicine collected by our busy bunnies from the Internet over the last seven days.

This week saw one of those sensationalist science headlines that journalists love. A medieval recipe for a salve for curing styes appears to be effective against the antibiotic resistant MRSA bacteria. This produced a flurry of activity amongst both medieval and medical historians, as well as those who are both. With Vanessa Heggie from, the by us much loved, H-Word blog leading the pack with a suggestion for “bioprospecting”. Note that word in your computer dictionaries dear readers; it’s a scientific research buzzword of the future. Remember you read it here first.

Taking the lead from Vanessa’s tweet: “Full commentary on the anglosaxon antibiotic coming soon ‪#watchthisspace – @HPS_Vanessa”, we have collected a research lab full of reports on this discovery and its consequences for your delectation to open this weeks edition of Whewell’s Weekly.

The H-Word: Anglo-Saxon antibiotics are just the start – it’s time to start bioprospecting in the past

Leeches were out of favour in Western for about 150 years, before we rediscovered them in the 20th century. Photograph: Reuters Source: The H-Word

Leeches were out of favour in Western for about 150 years, before we rediscovered them in the 20th century. Photograph: Reuters
Source: The H-Word

Panacea: What’s Old Is New Again: Medicine’s Blast From the Past

Medievalist.net: Can medieval drugs help modern patients?

New Scientist: Anglo-Saxon remedy kills hospital superbug MRSA

Medievalist.net: Anglo-Saxon medicine is able to kill modern-day superbug, researchers find

Archaeology: 100-Year-Old Salve Recipe Kills MRSA Culture

CNN: Thousand-year-old Angle-Saxon potion kills MRSA superbug

The Guardian: A medieval remedy for MRSA is just the start of it. Powdered poo, anyone?

Youtube: Antibiotics from the medieval medicine cabinet (1)

Quotes of the week:

C&H For WG

“I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way”. – Mark Twain

“Every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has a right to, but himself”.

John Locke

“If I was independently wealthy I’d be an academic”. – @DublinSoil

“Early in life I had noticed that no event is ever correctly reported in a newspaper.” – George Orwell

“Who does not understand should either learn, or be silent.” ― John Dee

“For I see a man must either resolve to put out nothing new or to become a slave to defend it” – Isaac Newton h/t @KeesJanSchilt

From 1871: ‘Much of history, as usually taught to children, is too much like a bound Police Gazette, a condensed Jack Sheppard.’ h/t @harbottlestores

“Nature makes the organs to suit the work they have to do, not the work to suit the organ.” Aristotle, Parts of Animals.

“The inquisition of Final Causes is barren, and like a virgin consecrated to God, produces nothing.” — Francis Bacon

“A scientific man ought to have no wishes, no affections – a mere heart of stone”. – Charles Darwin (letter to Huxley)

Alchemist insult: “Hollandus had more of the fire-art in his little finger as Helmont in his whole body.” -J. Kunckel h/t Paul Engle @Conciatore_org

“The true alchemists do not change lead into gold; they change the world into words”

W Douglas, 1855.

“Libraries should be open to all – except the censor-“― J,F.K.

“The freedom of putting a book aside is closely allied to that of walking out of performances” – @publichistorian cf.

“I know I generally feel alive and emancipated when I choose to walk out of something” Maggie Nelson h/t @publichistorian

“The multitude of books is making us ignorant.” – Voltaire

“I have a three-day weekend and so many books to read”. – @publichistorian

“The pen is not only mightier than the sword, it is considerably less messy”. – John Laurie

“The pun is mightier than the sword”. – @GustavHolmberg

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Royal Observatory Greenwich Blog: Women’s History Month – Ruth Belville

Ruth’s mother Maria Belville Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Ruth’s mother Maria Belville
Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

Tri-City Herald: Early Hanford worker turns 100

AIP: Historic Sites Initiative

Ptak Science Books: Einstein and Fermi Immigration Papers, National Archive

Dannen.com: Albert Einstein, F.B.I. Interview

Tycho’s Nose: The Nobel Prize winner at the bottom of the garden

Ptak Science Books: Einstein, Frisch, Cockcroft: Atomic Physics Film, 1948

Yovisto: Sin-Itiro Tomonaga and Quantum Electrodynamics

Royal Museums Greenwich: Women’s History Month – 20th Century

Annie Maunder (centre) preparing to observe the 1900 eclipse in Algiers with the British Astronomical Association (from E. Walter Maunder (ed.), The Total Solar Eclipse of May 1900).

Annie
Maunder (centre) preparing to observe the 1900 eclipse in Algiers with the
British Astronomical Association (from E. Walter Maunder (ed.), The Total
Solar Eclipse of May 1900).

AHF: In Memoriam: Evelyne and Larry Litz

academia.edu: “Perhaps irrelevant”: the iconography of Tycho Brahe’s small brass quadrant

Nautilus: The 315-Year-Old Science Experiment

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Emmy the student and Emmy the communist!

Medievalist.net: The Concept of Time in the Medieval World View

Scripta Manent: “Lent approaches with a slow and weary step”

Verso: Einstein and the Astronomers

Classical Astronomy: A Brief History of Lunar Eclipses

Science 2.0: This Year Easter Falls On The Correct Date According To Newton

The Telegraph, Calcutta India: Astronomer without a telescope

Statue of Aryabhata on the grounds of Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune

Statue of Aryabhata on the grounds of Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune

Science 2.0: How Is The Date of Easter Calculated? The Science Answer

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Science Direct: The longitude question

Wonders & Marvels: How I write History…with Chet van Duzer

Slate Vault: A Chart of New Guinea in 1901, When the Island Was Halfway Between Unmapped and Mapped

"New Guinea," from George Franklin Cram's 1901 atlas, Cram's Standard American Railway System Atlas of the World. David Rumsey Map Collection

“New Guinea,” from George Franklin Cram’s 1901 atlas, Cram’s Standard American Railway System Atlas of the World.
David Rumsey Map Collection

Medievalist.net: Sayonara Diorama: Acting Out the World as a Stage in Medieval Cartography and Cyberspace

Longitude Project Blog: Happy Birthday Mr Harrison

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

The Guardian: Australian women in uniform: then and now – in pictures [includes nurses]

Active History.ca: Theme Week: Infectious Disease, Contagion and the History of Vaccines

Active History.ca: “Be Wise – Immunize!” Vaccine Promotion in Canada During the 20th Century

Active History.ca A Brief History of Vaccines in Colonial Africa

MHL: Browse over 3000 digitized volumes of historical medical journals

The Order of the Good Death: Curating a UK Medical Museum: Two Heads Are Better Than One

History of Medicine in Ireland Blog: The historical development of Irish Hospitals and the importance of their records

CHoM News: Staff Finds: L. Vernon Briggs, the Scrapbooker

Contagions: Plasmodium knowesi: A New Ancient Malaria Parasite

Library Queens University: Unrecorded Vesalius first edition discovered at Queen’s University

O Say Can You See?: Midwives on horseback: Saddlebags and science

The nurse-midwife carried two leather saddlebags—one on each side of the horse connected by a strap. She had one pair of saddlebags for general health care, and one for home deliveries. Nearly all babies were delivered at home. These saddlebags are from the 1930s.

The nurse-midwife carried two leather saddlebags—one on each side of the horse connected by a strap. She had one pair of saddlebags for general health care, and one for home deliveries. Nearly all babies were delivered at home. These saddlebags are from the 1930s.

History Today: Breastfeeding, corsets and ageing: the mysterious dangers of womanhood

 

Schuliosh School of Medicine & Dentistry: Top 10 Reasons Why Studying Medical History Will Make you a Better Doctor

The Quack Doctor: Dr Wheeler and the Bacillus of Death

ABC Science: Did arsenic poisoning make gods limp?

History Today: William Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood

Early Modern Medicine: Fumigating for Health

A woman with some flowers; representing the sense of smell. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

A woman with some flowers; representing the sense of smell.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

The Conversation: Floating wombs and fumigation – why Gwyneth Paltrow has ‘steam douching’ all wrong

Identities.Mic: What 6 Ridiculous Old-Timey Diseases All Have in Common

Royal College of Physicians: The eyes have it

The Recipes Project: “Look’d Like Milk”: Breastmilk Substitutes in New England’s Borderlands

BuzzFeed: Johns Hopkins Sued For $1 Billion Over Unethical STD Study

Providentia: The Heroin Miracle (Part one of Three)

TECHNOLOGY:

Medievalist.net: A Comprehensive History of Beer Brewing

Yovisto: The Visions of Emanuel Swedenborg

Conciatore: Isaac Hollandus

AEON: Preternatural Machines

City Lab: This 19th Century ‘Stench Map’ Shows How Smells Reshaped New York City

 

 

IEEE Spectrum: The Multiple Lives of Moore’s Law

Nemfrog: Telephones for every 100 people on January 1, 1947

PRI: Finding the forgotten women who programmed the world’s first electronic computer

 

 

The Belated Nerd: Revell Sells Secrets to the Soviets…For $2.98

revell-uss-george-washington

Conciatore: Carries the Palm

War Is Boring: The ‘Tsar Bomba’ Was a 50-Megaton Monster Nuke: But it was far too big to ever be a practical weapon

How We Get To Next: Happy 150th Birthday Crossness Pumping Station!

Bard Graduate Center: The Interface Experience: Forty Years of Personal Computing

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

History of Geology: The Four Layers of the Earth

TrowelBlazers: Bertha “Birdie” Parker

Bertha c. 1930 at Gypsum Cave, Nevada, with throwing sticks. Source: Acc. 90-105 Science Service Records, Smithsonian Institution Archives via Flickr.

Bertha c. 1930 at Gypsum Cave, Nevada, with throwing sticks. Source: Acc. 90-105 Science Service Records, Smithsonian Institution Archives via Flickr.

Embryo Project: Telomerase in Human Development

Wonders & Marvels: The Secret History of Cheese

Smithsonian: Department of Invertebrate Zoology News –No Bones: The Inspiring Mary Jane Rathbun – Women’s History Month Highlight

Mary Jane Rathbun, 1927, by John Howard Pearce (Acc. 90-105 - Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives)

Mary Jane Rathbun, 1927, by John Howard Pearce (Acc. 90-105 – Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives)

TrowelBlazers: Gudrun Corvinus

Embryo Project: James William Kitching (1922-2003)

Fossil History: A BIG Month for Paleoanthropology: March Roundup

sealevelrise: The Seal Rock

Slide11

Notches: Franca Viola says ‘No’: Gender violence, consent, and the law in 1960s Italy

Letters from Gondwana: The Megafauna Extinction in South America

Science News: Ancient hominids moved into Greece about 206, 000 years ago

Open Spaces: Recognizing Women’s Vital Contribution to Wildlife Conservation

The Public Domain Review: Tractatus de Herbis (ca. 1440)

Miniature of plants and a demon: the herb Ypericon, supposed to repel demons.

Miniature of plants and a demon: the herb Ypericon, supposed to repel demons.

Science News: Bright bird plumage resulted from natural, sexual selection

 

This View of Life: The Spandrels Of San Marco Revisited: An Interview with Richard C. Lewontin

The Return of Native Nordic Fauna: Beaver for Lent

Embryo Project: St. George Jackson Mivart (1827–900)

Embryo Project: Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider and Jack Szostak’s Telomere and Telomerase Experiments (1982-1989)

Science 2.0: Darwin’s ‘*Strangest Animals Ever Discovered’ Solved

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Ralph A. Bagnold

Vox CEPR’s Policy Portal: The myth of Europe’s Little Ice Age

CHEMISTRY:

The Guardian: Robert Bunsen did a whole lot more than invent the Bunsen burner

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Dr Jennifer Evans: RSA15 Berlin

Literacy of the Present: The Ignorant Library

OUP Blog: Cinderella Science

Charles Henry Bennett, ‘Wonderful Plants’, from John Cargill Brough, The Fairy-Tales of Science (1859). Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/03/cinderella-science/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=oupacademic&utm_campaign=oupblog#sthash.7b01S79M.dpuf

Charles Henry Bennett, ‘Wonderful Plants’, from John Cargill Brough, The Fairy-Tales of Science (1859). Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. – See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/03/cinderella-science/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=oupacademic&utm_campaign=oupblog#sthash.7b01S79M.dpuf

Jack Hoy.com: Summary of ‘Computing Machinery and Intelligence’ (1950) by Alan Turing

The many-headed monster: Food for thought: An Introduction to Theory via the History of Food and Drink

Situating Science: Letter from the Director: Situating Science and Beyond

University of Leicester: Former history student awarded scientific instrument prize posthumously

PLOS Blogs: How Articles Get Noticed and Advance the Scientific Conversation

University of Toronto Press: Canadian Journal of History 49.3 – History of Medicine

Wellcome Trust: New Capital Award for the Museum of Science & Industry

Wired: We Need To Stop Ignoring Women Scientists

UCL Department of Economics: The First 100 Years

American Science: Celebrating 50 Years of JAS-BIO

The H-Word: Destroyed Snowden laptop: the curatorial view

The remains of the PC desktop and the Mac laptop that GCHQ came to the Guardian’s offices in King’s Place and destroyed. Only the laptop is displayed in the exhibition. Photograph: Sarah Lee

The remains of the PC desktop and the Mac laptop that GCHQ came to the Guardian’s offices in King’s Place and destroyed. Only the laptop is displayed in the exhibition. Photograph: Sarah Lee

Homunculus: Who are you calling a journalist?

The #EnvHist Weekly

Conciatore: Don Antonio de’ Medici

Advances in the History of Psychology: Call for Participation: Interviews with Archival Researchers

AIP: Telling the Stories of Women and African Americans in the Physical Sciences

ISIS gets a makeover

Wo’s Weblog: Please, don’t put your papers on academia.edu

The Guardian: Why scientific truth may hurt

bonæ litteræ: What’s the purpose of a conference? Reflections on RSA 2015 Part I & Part II

ESOTERIC:

Inside MHS Oxford: Alchemy and the Laboratory

The Recipes Project: Animal Charms in the Later Middle Ages

Detail of a marginal drawing of a horse. British Library, Harley 1585 f. 68v

Detail of a marginal drawing of a horse. British Library, Harley 1585 f. 68v

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

From the Hands of Quacks: Sounds of Modern History: Auditory Culture in 19th and 20th Century Europe

Popular Science: A Scientist in Wonderland

Science Book a Day: Interviews David Wright author of Downs: The history of a disability

academia.edu: The Newton Papers: The Strange and True Odyssey of Isaac Newton’s Manuscripts

Ashgate Publishing Blog: The history of intelligence and ‘intellectual disability’

Forbes: ‘sapiens’: An All Too Brief History of Humanity

Science Book a Day: What is Life? How Chemistry Became Biology

Popular Science: Einstein Relatively Simple

Unknown

New Scientist: Eye of the Beholder: Life through a camera obscura

Literary Review: Three of a Kind: Naturalists in Paradise: Wallace, Bates and Spruce in the Amazon

The Steven Weinberg Controversy:

Physicist Steven Weinberg has written a book about the history of science that is not only very strongly Whiggish in its historical approach but also castigates historians of science for not being Whiggish. He repeated this point of view in an article this week for the Guardian in which he also recommends thirteen best science books for the general reader. We have collected together some relevant blog posts on the resulting controversy provoked by Weinberg’s attitude.

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The Guardian: To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science by Steven Weinberg

The Guardian: Science and nature: Point of view: Steven Weinberg: the 13 best science books for the general reader

The Wall Street Journal: Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History

(If you run into a pay wall google the title, Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History, and click on the first link!)

Double Refraction: Why historians shouldn’t write off scientists: On Steven Shapin’s review of Steven Weinberg’s Explain the World

Physics Today: To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science; In the Light of Science: Our Ancient Quest for Knowledge and the Measure of Modern Physics

Galileo’s Pendulum: Science by authority is a poor model for communication

Homunculus: This explains everything

The H-Word: An alternative 13 best books about science?

Forbes: Recommended science books for non-scientists

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Beastly encounters of the Raj: Livelihoods, livestock and veterinary health in India, 1790-1920

University of Chicago Press: Wicked Intelligence: Visual Art and the Science of Experiment in Restoration London

9780226017297

Wiley: The Clever Object

Historiens de la santé: The Fate of Anatomical Collections

Historiens de la santé: The Development of Brain Banks in the UK c.1970–c.2010

Ashgate: Geography, Technology and Instruments of Exploration

 

Historiens de la santé: Anatomy and Anatomist in Early Modern Spain

Wellcome Trust: Bookshelf: Latest Releases

THEATRE:

FILM:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

Scientific American: Saturn: A History [Slide Show]

VIDEOS:

iai tv: This is Our Church: Science as religion

Youtube: Gimlet: The history of the Gimlet, and its connections to early medicine, colonialism, and the rise of the multinational corporation.

Ri Channel: The Nature of Things – Crystals and Gems

Youtube: Scientists of the National Trust: Isaac Newton

CSH: Oral History: Ernst Mayr on Historian Michael Ruse

 

Vimeo: Laura J. Snyder Eye of the Beholder Reviewed by John w. Wilbanks

It’s OK to be Smart: Richard Feynman The Experimenters

Youtube: Revelations: Experiments in Photography trailer

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Far Side of the Moore

PODCASTS:

The Take Away: State Secretes Revealed? Hydrogen Bomb Architect Moves Forward with Memoir

CHF: Fads and Faith: Belief vs. Fact in the Struggle for Health

Here & Now: ‘Becoming Steve Jobs’ Attempts to Dispel Myths Chart an Evolution

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Wikimedia UK: Wikipedia Science Conference, Wellcome Collection Conference Centre, London, 2-3 September 2015

CHF: The Museum at CHF – Starting 4 April extended weekend hours

University of Chicago: CHSS: Lecture: “The Unfit Darwinist: Disability, Slander and the Evolution Trial Before Scopes.” Adam Shapiro, 10 April 2015

University of Chicago: CIS: Colloquium: Repurposing Magic 10 April 2015

The Philosophy of Science Association: Announcements

Folger Shakespeare Library: Exhibition: Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude 19 March–23 August 2015

Sussex Humanities Lab: Showcasing the Digital 8 April 2015

 

Royal College of Physicians: Exhibition: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee January–July 2016

dee_john_pr739_200

Pembokeshire Coast National Park: Exhibition: Wallace: The Forgotten Evolutionist? will be on display at Oriel y Parc until 25 November 2015.

NIH: U.S. National Library of Medicine: History of Medicine Lectures for 2015

University of Oxford: Lecture: Naturalists in paradise 24 April 2015

National Maritime Museum: Harrison Decoded: Towards a perfect pendulum clock 18 April 2015

The Royal Society: Archival afterlives 2 June 2015

NYAM: Presentations for History of Medicine Night: 19th and 20th Century Stories 6 May 2015

NIH: U.S. National Library of Medicine: NLM to Host “Images and Texts in Medical History: An Introduction to Methods, Tools, and Data from the Digital Humanities” 11-13 April 2015

University of Reading: The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology: Exhibition: The Antikythera Mechanism February–April 2015

HWO: History Workshop Online: Call for Contributor

Institute of English Studies: School of Advanced Studies London: Biennial London Chaucer Conference: Science, Magic and Technology 10-11 July 2015: Registration & Programme

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Royal Astronomical Society: Library Assistant (part time)

University of Exeter: Exeter REACT Collaborative Studentship: Playing with heritage: a historical and practical investigation of gamification in the heritage museum

Kosciuszko Foundation Visiting Professorship at the Faculty of “Artes Liberales”, University of Warsaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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