Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #40

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Strutting Owl

Volume #40

Monday 23 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

The fortieth edition of your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Weekly, comes strutting out of the darkness at noon (it was actually a bit earlier but poetic licence and all that) of a solar eclipse. It was only a partial eclipse in Europe but that didn’t stop the masses going out onto the streets in hordes to stare into the heavens, their faces hidden but cardboard spectacles like something out of a third rate horror movie.

Eclipses have of course played an important role in the history of astronomy. The Babylonians developed an algebraic algorithm to successfully predict lunar eclipses. They had a similar algorithm for solar eclipses, which however was not quite as good. It could only predict when solar eclipse might occur according to celestial geometry but could not compute a further factor that prevented the occurrence of some of those potential eclipses. This was not so good given the role that eclipses played in Babylonian omen astrology, the principle motivation for Babylonian astronomical investigations.

According to Greek legend, although probably more mythological than legendary, Thales of Meletius was the first Greek to accurately predict an eclipse of the sun in the sixth century BCE.

Christopher Columbus famously used the prediction of a lunar eclipse, calculated with the help of the ephemerides of Regiomontanus, to impress some bolshie natives in the Caribbean. (see History Matters post below)

As Rebekah “Becky” Higgitt reminded us on Twitter, “Comparing times at which eclipses occurred was the first way that differences of longitude could be established”.

Medieval eclipse

Also on Twitter A Clerk of Oxford offered us this medieval explanation of solar eclipses

Ælfric explains eclipses: ‘Hit getimað hwiltidum, þonne se mona beyrnþ on ðam ylcan strican þe seo sunne yrnð, þæt his trendel underscyt ðære sunnan to ðan swiðe þæt heo eall aðeostrað, 7 steorran æteowiað swylce on nihte. Ðis gelimpð seldon, 7 næfre buton on niwum monan.’

‘It happens sometimes, when the moon is running in the same course as the sun, that its orb passes under the sun’s in such a way that it is completely darkened, and the stars appear just as at night. This happens rarely, and never except at the new moon.’ (De Temporibus Anni)

 

Sacrobosco

Sacrobosco

 

 Trinity College Library, Cambridge: Eclipses

A plain description of the Sun's appearance in the Eclipse on Fryday (in the morning) April, 1715

A plain description of the Sun’s appearance in the Eclipse on Fryday (in the morning) April, 1715

Solar Eclipses in History

Ottoman astronomer İbrahim Tiflisi in 1479

Ottoman astronomer İbrahim Tiflisi in 1479

MHS Oxford: Eclipseometer

Eclipseometer

 

Royal Society Publishing: Observations of the Late Total Eclipse of the Sun on the 22nd April Past …

Lunar and SolarEclipse described by Ottoman philosopher İbrahim Müteferrika about 300 years ago

Lunar and SolarEclipse described by Ottoman philosopher İbrahim Müteferrika about 300 years ago

The Independent: Solar eclipse: humans have been frightened and fascinated by the moon hiding the sun since beginning of time

This morning we hope to see a partial eclipse of the Sun, just like these Londoners in 1748

This morning we hope to see a partial eclipse of the Sun, just like these Londoners in 1748

History Matters: THE DARKER SIDE OF KNOWLEDGE: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE SOLAR ECLIPSE

Solar eclipse from a 16th century cosmography of Qazwini

Solar eclipse from a 16th century cosmography of Qazwini

Quotes of the week:

“Dammit there are so many idiots whose asses I have to kick.” Edward Elric, Fullmetal Alchemist h/t @JoshRosenau

I’ve been a freelance writer & I’ve been a sex worker and sex work was not the career that made me feel exploited and disposable. – @avflox

“The sciences don’t try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models.” J. v. Neumann! h/t @GeorgeShiber

The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled – Plutarch

The man who cannot speak both eloquently and wisely should speak wisely without eloquence, rather than eloquently without wisdom. – Augustine

Not believing in force is the same as not believing in gravitation – Thomas Hobbes

That which is now called natural philosophy, embracing the whole circle of science, of which astronomy occupies the chief place, is the study of the works of God, and of the power and wisdom of God in his works, and is true theology – Thomas Paine

Astronomy is not only pleasant but also very useful…this art unfolds the admirable wisdom of God – John Calvin 1554

Does anyone suppose that any woman in all the ages has had a fair chance to show what she could do in science?… The laws of nature are not discovered by accidents; theories do not come by chance, even to the greatest minds; they are not born of the hurry and worry of daily toil; they are diligently sought, they are patiently waited for, they are received with cautious reserve, they are accepted with reverence and awe. And until able women have given their lives to investigation, it is idle to discuss the question of their capacity for original work. – Maria Mitchell

 

Birthdays of the Week:

Anna Atkins born 16 March 1799

Anna Atkins 1861 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Anna Atkins 1861
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The H-Word: Anna Atkins: Google’s tribute to a pioneer of botany and photography

Anna Atkins Google Doodle

Anna Atkins Google Doodle

The Independent: Anna Atkins: This is why British scientist who produced first photographic book has been given a Google Doodle

A cyanotype photogram made by Atkins which was part of her 1843 book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions Source: Wikimedia Commons

A cyanotype photogram made by Atkins which was part of her 1843 book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post: Anna Atkins: Google Doodle artfully celebrates a true-blue photographic pioneer

Motherboard: The Hauntingly Beautiful Photos of Anna Atkins, Creator of Botanical Photography

Caroline Herschel born 16 March 1750:

Caroline Lucretia Herschel 1829  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Caroline Lucretia Herschel 1829
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: Herschel, Caroline Lucretia

Royal Museums Greenwich: Caroline HerschelC Herschel poster

Poetry Foundation: Planetarium by Adrienne Rich: Thinking of Caroline Herschel

History Today: Birth of Caroline Herschel

Caroline Herschel Letter

Caroline Herschel Letter

Starchild: Caroline Herschel

History Physics Today: Caroline Herschel’s birthday

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science: Résumé of Observations Concerning the Solar Eclipse of May 29, 1919, and the Einstein Effect

Ptak Science Books: A Million Violinists Playing Everything at the Same Time

Yovisto: Frederick Reines and the Neutrino

Irish Philosophy: John Stewart Bell: The Nature of Reality

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Richard Yalman’s Interview

A Clerk of Oxford: The Days of Creation

God creating the world (BL Royal 1 E VII, f. 1v, 11th century, Canterbury)

God creating the world (BL Royal 1 E VII, f. 1v, 11th century, Canterbury)

Space Watchtower: Historic Brashear Telescope Factory Wall Collapses

Pittsburgh Post Gazette.com Historic Pittsburgh factory being levelled after wall collapse

Yovisto: The Life and Work of Philippe de La Hire

tekepart: A Legacy of Discovery Going Strong for More Than 150 Years

St John’s College: The Way to the Stars: Build Your Own Astrolabe

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The continuing saga of io9’s history of science inanities

 

Science Museum Group Journal: Curating the collider: using place to engage museum visitors with particle physics

AHF: Emilio Segrè

BBC News: Isaac Newton royal medal design discovery

Queen Anne Medal Source: BBC News

Queen Anne Medal
Source: BBC News

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Calendrical confusion or just when did Newton die?

The Seattle Times: Vision quest: Curator catalogs the world’s oldest telescopes

Tech Times: Corning Museum Curator Documenting Oldest Telescopes In The World

APS: This Month in Physics History: March 20, 1800: Volta describes the Electric Battery

Gigal Research: The Menkaura Stellar Observatory

AMNH Shelf Life: How to Time travel to a Star

Oxford Journals: An astronomical murder?

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Letters from Gondwana: The Challenger Expedition and the Beginning of Oceanography

Atlas Obscura: The Most Remarkable Globe in the World is in a Brooklyn Office Building

The Public Domain Review: Elizabeth Bisland’s Race Around the World

The 18th-Century Common: What the Abyssinian Liar Can Tell us about True Stories: Knowledge, Skepticism, and James Bruce’s Travels to Discover the Source of the Nile

James Bruce by E. Topham. Etching, published 1775. NPG D13789. National Portrait Gallery, UK. Used under Creative Commons Limited Non-Commercial License.

James Bruce by E. Topham. Etching, published 1775.
NPG D13789. National Portrait Gallery, UK. Used under Creative Commons Limited Non-Commercial License.

Ptak Science Books: A Fine and Interesting Map of Air Routes, 1956

homunculus: The Saga of the Sunstones

The Viking Sunstone Compass made by researchers at the University of Rennes. Note the double bright spots in the cavity.  Source: Phillip Ball

The Viking Sunstone Compass made by researchers at the University of Rennes. Note the double bright spots in the cavity.
Source: Phillip Ball

Board of Longitude Project: Harrison Decoded: Towards a perfect pendulum clock

MEDICINE:

The Quack Doctor: The bogus lady doctor

British Library: Science blog: Shell shocked

Dr Alun Withey: Crooked or Straight: Creating the ideal posture in 18th-century Britain

The neck swing, from Timothy Sheldrake’s ‘Essay on the Various Causes and Effects of the Distorted Spine’, 1783

The neck swing, from Timothy Sheldrake’s ‘Essay on the Various Causes and Effects of the Distorted Spine’, 1783

NYAM: What Things are Good and Holesome for the Braine

academia.edu: “From Practice to Print: Women Crafting Authority at the Margins of Orthodox Medicine”

Slate: Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

London Evening Standard: Florence Nightingale’s medical books put online for free viewing

Yale News: Creating a malaria test for ancient human remains

Early Modern Medicine: Maternity Wear: To Conceal or Reveal?

NYAM: Brain Awareness Week

Niche: Vaccines and the Environmental History of Medicine

The Recipes Project: Spa Culture, Recipes, and Eighteenth-Century Elite Healthcare

The Comforts of Bath, 1798. Thomas Rowlandson. Image Credit: Wikigallery.org

The Comforts of Bath, 1798. Thomas Rowlandson. Image Credit: Wikigallery.org

Joanne Bailey Muses on History: Foetus: From the Sensory to the Scan

Time-Life: How Sword Swallowing Contributed to Modern Medicine

We’re History: Before Ebola, there was Yellow Fever

Explore the incredible Bethlem records

Groovy Historian: What Were Believed to be the Causes of and Treatments for Melancholy & Madness During the Renaissance and Early Modern Period?

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Sara Vincx

Tycho’s nose: There’s something in the water

Engineering and Technology History Wiki

Sage Journals: Institution of Mechanical Engineers Proceedings June 1847

History Matters: Heritage, History and Community: Engaging with the past in a former industrial village

My medieval foundry: Maybe a sighting of a double action bellows?

Conciatore: Dyed In The Grain

Dyeing wool cloth, from "Des Proprietez des Choses" Bartholomaeus Anglicus, 1482 British Library Royal MS 15.E.iii, folio 269

Dyeing wool cloth, from “Des Proprietez des Choses”
Bartholomaeus Anglicus, 1482
British Library Royal MS 15.E.iii, folio 269

io9: 50 Years Ago, The First Spacewalk Nearly Ended in Tragedy

IEEE Spectrum: Moore’s Curse

Conciatore: Cristallo

Ptak Science Books: Babbage Obituary and Other Babbage Bits

Wired: Prop-Driven ‘Rail Zeppelin’ Is Many Kinds of Awesome

Schienenzeppelin

Schienenzeppelin

Slate Vault: A Telephone Map of the United States Shows Where You Could Call Using Ma Bell in 1910

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Notches: Sex and the American Quest for a Relatable Past

Embryo Project: Cornelia Clapp

Notches: Organized Labor, Gay Liberation and the Battle Against the Religious Right, 1977–1994

Natural History Apostilles: Matthew (1831) spliced Steuart’s (1828) quote of Loudon (1806)

NYAM: Roget Beyond the Thesaurus

History of Geology: Celebrating the Irish-Geological Heritage

The first published image of the Giant’s Causeway by local artist Christopher Cole Foley was used to illustrate an account by Samuel Foley, Bishop of Down and Connor, in 1694. However both the drawing and the engraving from it were considered inadequate depictions of this peculiar Irish landscape.

The first published image of the Giant’s Causeway by local artist Christopher Cole Foley was used to illustrate an account by Samuel Foley, Bishop of Down and Connor, in 1694. However both the drawing and the engraving from it were considered inadequate depictions of this peculiar Irish landscape.

Philosophical Transactions B: The unseen world: reflections on Leeuwenhoek (1677) ‘Concerning little animals’

Science Gossip: Piecing Together the Story of a Female Naturalist through Victorian Journals

The Rest Project: A 19th-century Naturalist’s Daily Schedule: Alfred Russel Wallace in Singapore

 

Thinking Like a Mountain: Enlightenment Ghosts and Ecological Utopianism in the Scottish Highlands

Londonist: How Would You Describe a Kangaroo?

Husbandry Book Blog: Marches Husbandry: Beware of birds!

Natural History Apostilles: The Naval Timber Controversies: poor Billington

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Amadeus William Grabau

 

Embryo Project: The Human Genome Project (1990–2003)

Embryo Project: The inductive capacity of oral mesenchyme and its role in tooth development (1969-1970), by Edward J. Kollar and Grace R. Baird

Earth Touch news: These Beautiful 19th-centuary Illustrations capture Dinosaur ‘Death Poses’

Image: The Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences

Image: The Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences

 

UCMP Berkeley: Adam Sedgwick (1785–1873)

Famous Scientists: Agnes Arber

 

CHEMISTRY:

Othermalia: Photo essay of female lab workers 1946

1946 volume of the corporate publication Research Today by Lily Research Laboratories

1946 volume of the corporate publication Research Today by Lily Research Laboratories

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Against the division of the library of the López Piñero Institute

Clio@King’s: The History Department Blog: Who Should We Write History For?

ChoM News: From the MHL: “Seeing With a Better Eye”

 

Open Quaternary: Launching Open Quaternary

Open Quaternary: Submitting an Article Online

The Edinburgh Reporter: Writing women of science back into history

Hedy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr

ChoM News: From the MHL: Why Digital Collections, Why Now?

The Atlantic: The Problem With History Classes

THE: Female science writers celebrated

Historiens de la santé: Medical History Volume 59, Issue 02, April 2015

Quanta Magazine: Science’s Path From Myth to Multiverse

The Conversation: Why do we need the humanities?

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: MedHum Mondays: Why Medical Humanities?

Society for the History of Astronomy

The Incluseum: Museums and the Reproduction of Disadvantage

The National Archives: England’s immigration records 1330–1550 now online

Love Imperial War Museum Library: Outraged about research room charges

 

Gaudy Night: Women’s History Month 2015: Science and Medicine

Concocting History: Pythagoreans, lore, science… and sadness

Ether Wave Propaganda: “I am a sadist; you are a masochist; so let us have some fun together”: Agassi on Feyerabend, Feyerabend on Agassi

 

Cross-Check: Everyone, Even Jenny McCarthy, Has the Right to Challenge “Scientific Experts”

Historians.org: AHR Exchange On The History Manifesto

JHI Blog: The Republic of Intellectual History

Darin Hayton: HistorySTM March Madness Round 1

Making Science Public: The Co-production Confusion

The #EnvHist Weekly

Chemical Connections: A quantitative analysis of how often Nature gives a fuck

ESOTERIC:

Philly.com: Delving into a 400-year-old puzzle book, through song

JHL: Science, Mysticism, and Dreams in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

distillatio: There is a lot more to research in medieval alchemical manuscripts than people know of

 

Illustation similar in intent to those in the Ripley Scrolls, which are a late 15th/ early 16th invention. (Stolen from the British Library website, they seem to be copyright free)

Illustation similar in intent to those in the Ripley Scrolls, which are a late 15th/ early 16th invention. (Stolen from the British Library website, they seem to be copyright free)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: The Anatomist: A True Story of Gray’s Anatomy

THE: How to Write a Thesis, by Umberto Eco

Science Book a Day: Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen

Wellcome Library: Women, plumbers and doctors: sanitation in the home

Contaminated drinking water. Wellcome Library reference: b20424863.

Contaminated drinking water. Wellcome Library reference: b20424863.

Brain Pickings: The Illustrated Story of Persian Polymath Ibn Sina and How He Shaped the Course of Medicine

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Empty Sleeves: Amputation in the Civil War South

 

Basic Books: Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger’s Cats

9780465075713

Profile Books: Scientific Babel: The language of science from the fall of Latin to the rise of English

Vanderbilt University Press: Medicine and Nation Building in the Americas, 1890–1940

THEATRE:

FILM:

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Science Dump: There’s a reason for all the madness in Alice in Wonderland, it’s maths!

Youtube: Nick Lane discusses Leeuwenhoek’s observations of “little animals” under a microscope

New York Times: Animated Life: Pangea

Youtube: Under The Knife, Episode 7 – Medieval Urine Wheels

Irish Philosophy: Why Study…James Ussher

Youtube: Using Maxwell’s Equations Before the Electron

RADIO:

BBC Radio Ulster: The Lady Computer of Strabane: Annie Maunder

PODCASTS:

Nature Podcast: Why is English the language of science?

AHF: Podcast: Manhattan Project National Historical Park

The Leonard Lopate Show: The Painter and the Philosopher Who Taught Us How to See

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

CfP: The Forum for the History of Chemical Sciences (FoHCS) and the Commission for the History of Modern Chemistry (CHMC) are setting up a panel After Ypres: the integration of science into war for the next HSS meeting in San Francisco, November 2015.

Call for Publications: Tales from the Crypt: Museum Storage and Meaning

Yale University: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 27-28 March 2015

NYAM: Lecture: Dr Vivian Nutton Vesalius Correcting Vesalius 31 March 2015

ChoM News: Lecture: Pregnancy and Personhood – The Maternal-Fetal Relationship in America, 1850 to the Present Harvard Medical School 2 April 2015

Maritime @ Greenwich: New Researchers in Maritime History Conference 10 April 2015

University of Durham: CfP: Hume and Naturalism 16-17 July 2015

University of Sydney: Rethinking Intellectual History 2015 7-9 April

King’s College London: CfP: Working Across Species: Comparative Practices in Modern Medical, Biological and Behavioural Sciences 7-8 January 2016

 

Durham University: The 10th UK Integrated History and Philosophy of Science Workshop 16-17 April 2015

Philos-L: Call for Papers The Journal of Philosophy and Medicine

CHF: Make Your Own Books of Secrets: A Workshop 13 June 2015

CHoM News: Gettysburg to Boylston Street – The Legacy of Civil War Medicine in the 21st Century Harvard Center for the History of Medicine 13 April 2015

 

UCL: STS seminar: “How Does Science Blind Itself – and Then Society Too? A Brief History of Scientific Knowledge of Radiocaesium Behaviour in Soils, and the post-Chernobyl Sheep-Contamination Prediction Fiasco” 25 March 2015

 

The Ninth Conference on The Inspiration of Astronomical Phenomena 23-28 August 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Oxford: AHRC Doctoral Studentship in collaboration with the Imperial War Museum: Contemporary Art and Conflict at IWM

Museums and the Web: Visiting Assistant/Associate Professor, Museum & Digital Culture

Society and the History of Chemistry and Alchemy: The SHAC Award Scheme

University of Kent: 50th Anniversary Research Scholarship in the History of Science

Science Museum Group: Associate Curator, Infrastructure and Built Environment

H-Net: The History Makers seek a full time Oral History Researcher

University of Warwick: Assistant Professor in the History of Medicine

Simmons: School of Library and Information Science: The James A. Lindner Digital Archive Summer Fellowship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #39

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Owl in Flight

Volume #39

Monday 16 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome to the thirty-ninth edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list brought to you on the wings of an owl. All the blog posts and Internet articles on the histories of science, technology and medicine that our hard working editorial team could round up for your pleasure in a week that saw the 136th anniversary of the birth of Albert Einstein in the year which sees the centenary of the publication of his General Theory of Relativity. This week also saw the Internet go more than a little loopy about an American form of writing the date so-called once in a century Pi day, a phenomenon that doesn’t occur in any other countries form of writing the date.

All of this raises the question, why do we consider anniversaries of all sorts to be so significant in history? Is a theory more important when it’s some multiple of 365 days old than on any other day? Should we give more thought to a scientist on her or his birthday than on other days of the year? Does our obsession with marking #histSTM anniversaries somehow trivialise the study of history. We here at Whewell’s Gazette offer no answers to these questions, but merely suggest that all STM historians should give them some thought should they feel so inclined.

Quotes of the week:

Don’t worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats ~ Howard Aiken h/t @OnThisDayinMath

One Science only will one Genius fit;

So vast is Art, so narrow Human Wit – Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism

Vladimir Nabokov had a ‘genitalia cabinet’ in which he kept his collection of male blue butterfly genitalia. It’s now housed at Harvard. – @InterestingLit

Heuristic: never nitpick a heuristic – @nntaleb

If the misery of our poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin – Charles Darwin

Birthday of the Week:

Albert Einstein born 14 March

Albert Einstein in 1921 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein in 1921
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

AHF: Albert Einstein

AIP Center for History of Physics: A. Einstein Image and Impact

AIP: 2015 The Centennial of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity

NJ.com: Albert Einstein’s birthday, deep connection to Princeton celebrated on special 3-14-15 Pi Day

The New York Times: Einstein Flees Berlin to Avoid Being Feted

Symmetry: Einstein’s most famous equation

The Age: Genius found inspiration in silent spaces

Yahoo News: Beyond Reletivity: Albert Einstein’s Lesser-Known Work

Fossilist of the week:

Mary Anning Died 9 March 1847

Mary Anning  Google Doodle

Mary Anning
Google Doodle

Letters from Gondwana: Remembering Mary Anning

Mary Anning

Regency History; Mary Anning (1799-1847)

Mary Anning's Ichtyosaurus communis skull, by Elizabeth Philpot, 1814

Mary Anning’s Ichtyosaurus communis skull, by Elizabeth Philpot, 1814

Evolve or Die: Mary Anning

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Berfois: Tempo Shifts:

BBC Earth: Why does time always run forwards and never backwards?

Medievalist.net: Early medieval science: the evidence of Bede

AHF: The Hydrogen Bomb – 1950

AIP: “Gravitational collapse” by Hong-Yee Chiu, May 1964

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Seth Wheatley’s Interview

Espace.net: Szilard’s Patent 12 March 1934: Improvements in or relating to the transmutation of chemical elements

Voices of the Manhattan Project: George Kistiakowsky’s Interview

APS: This Month in Physics History: March 13, 1781: Herschel Discovers Uranus

Frederick William Herschel

Frederick William Herschel

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Eugene Wigner’s Interview

Darin Hayton: Where Did De Revolutionibus Go?

Chart showing where copies of De Revolutionibus went. Created by Darin Hayton

Chart showing where copies of De Revolutionibus went.
Created by Darin Hayton

Medievalist.net: Ironing Out the Myth of the Flat Earth

Science Notes: What Is a Jiffy?

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: London through the artist’s eye

Wenceslaus Hollar, On the North Side of London , 1664  Maps K. Top. 28.9-e. - Source: British Library

Wenceslaus Hollar, On the North Side of London , 1664 Maps K. Top. 28.9-e. – Source: British Library

British Library: Maps and views blog: A Rum Lot of Maps

Yovisto: Richard E. Byrd, Jr. – Aviator and Polar Explorer

The Public Domain Review: The Maps of Piri Reis

MEDICINE:

Conciatore: The Béguines of Mechelen

A Béguine of Antwerp, from Pierre Hélyot, L'Histoire des ordres monastiques… 1719 (v.8)

A Béguine of Antwerp,
from Pierre Hélyot,
L’Histoire des ordres monastiques… 1719 (v.8)

BBC: Medieval monastic bones in Ipswich could aid arthritis research

British Library: Beautiful Minds: Alexander Fleming (1881–1951): A noble life in science

The National Archives: Death of Sir Alexander Fleming, discoverer of penicillin, 11 March 1955

Scientific American: Neurobiology of the Placebo Effect

 

academia.edu: Augmentative, Alternative, and Assistive: Reimagining the History of Mobile Computing and Disability

CBC:ca: A History of Chimps in Medical Research

Longreads: A Very Naughty Little Girl

Blood transfusion bottle. Photo via Wellcome Trust, Wikimedia Commons.

Blood transfusion bottle. Photo via Wellcome Trust, Wikimedia Commons.

Royal College of Physicians: ‘From her truly affectionate friend’

Duke University Libraries: Digital Collections: Anatomical Fugitive Sheets

BBC: Five research papers that revolutionised health

academia.edu: “Obstetrical and Gynecological Texts in Middle English” (1992), with an edition of “The Nature of Womman”

Medievalist.net: Is There a Doctor in the Castle?

TECHNOLOGY:

Lapham’s Quarterly: People Will Look: The tricycle has come to stay

Wome's Trike

History Today: Time Pieces: Working Men and Watches

City Lab: Now More Than Ever, London Needs a ‘Death Pyramid’

Yovisto: Howard H. Aiken and the Harvard Mark I

The Public Domain Review: Kodak No.1 Circular Snapshots

Cram Swansea: CRAM staff explain their research…

The Guardian: Berenice Abbott: the photography trailblazer who had supersight

Culture 24: Before the Apple Watch: Six of the best timepieces used through the centuries

Balance spring pocket watch in silver case (1675-1679)

Balance spring pocket watch in silver case (1675-1679)

Wellcome Collection blog: Death in a Nutshell

AEON: American petro-topia

Conciatore: Reticello

Smithsonian.com: Would You Pass Thomas Edison’s Employment Test?

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Dating the Past: Dating is Important for Understanding Past (and Future) Climate Change

Embryo Project: Wilhelm Friedrich Phillip Pfeffer (1845–1920)

International Science Times: Wooly Mammoth Poop Analysis May Solve Extinction Mystery; Beast May Have Relied Too Much On Flowers In Their Diet

Scientists still don't know what killed off the woolly mammoth. But the latest theory suggests it had to do with their diet of little yellow flowers. (Photo: Shutterstock)

Scientists still don’t know what killed off the woolly mammoth. But the latest theory suggests it had to do with their diet of little yellow flowers. (Photo: Shutterstock)

 

Tucson.com: UA researchers use tree rings to rewrite history

Niche: The Cold that Binds: Ice, Climate History, and a Hobbit Hole

The Public Domain Review: Sex and Science in Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora

Illustration showing “Cupid Inspiring Plants with Love”, in this case specifically the Strelitzia reginae or Queen Plant, a plate from Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora (1807) – Source: Wellcome Library.

Illustration showing “Cupid Inspiring Plants with Love”, in this case specifically the Strelitzia reginae or Queen Plant, a plate from Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora (1807) – Source: Wellcome Library.

NPR: Tea Tuesdays: The Scottish Spy Who Stole China’s Tea Empire

The Shells tell the Truth: Molluscs, some Stratigraphic Order and early Evolution

 

BBC: Anthropocene: New dates proposed for the ‘Age of Man’

The New York Times: Did Earth’s ‘Anthropocene’ Age of Man Begin With the Globalization of Disease in 1610?

Nature: Anthropocene: The human age

Notches: Globalizing the History of Sexology

Fossil History: Buckland’s Red Lady

The Guardian: Italian scientists ‘recreate DNA’ of fascist warrior-poet from semen stains

The Artful Amoeba: Ever Wish You Could Put Ernst Haeckel on Your Lamp Shade? Now You Can

Brown University Library: Curio: The Unicorn of the Sea Comes to Brown

The Recipes Project: Locating traditional plant knowledge in household recipes

io9: These Scientific Names Were Chosen Purely to Insult Certain People

BBC: JBS Haldane: Blue plaque for genetics pioneer

History of Geology: The Geology of the Mountains of Madness

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: Dial chem for murder

Chemical evidence helped convict Marie Lafarge of poisoning her husband © Mary Evans Picture Library / Alamy

Chemical evidence helped convict Marie Lafarge of poisoning her husband © Mary Evans Picture Library / Alamy

Yovisto: Jeremias Richter and the Law of Definite Proportions

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The many-headed monster: We the People, 1535–1787: Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part III

Public History Commons: The AHA on the path to public history

American Science: Links for 9 March 2015

Distillation Blog

MPIFTHS: Engineering, Cartography, and the Culture of Knowledge in Late-Sixteenth-Century Rome

Gresham College: The Gresham College App

UCL: STS Observatory: UK archives of post-war science – notes towards a list

Bodleian History Faculty Library: Social Media for Historians (pdf)

Bonhams: Turing, Alan Mathison. 1912-1954 Composition notebook

Now Appearing: Hit by a Newton bomb

The #EnvHist Weekly

 

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Discovery is a process not an act

Ether Wave Propaganda: “The Rational Life”: Issues in Quote Truncation

Rational Action: What did Warren Weaver mean when he spoke of “the rational life”?

Hyperjeff: Visual timelines to accompany Peter Adamson’s History of Philosophy without any gaps

 

Ether Wave Propaganda: Why Joseph Agassi Is No Longer Read as Much, An Introduction

HNN: Why Historians Should Use Twitter: An Interview with Katrina Gulliver

ESOTERIC:

History of Alchemy: Faust

Laham’s Quarterly: Animal Magnetism

Franz Anton Mesmer Source: Wikimedia Commons

Franz Anton Mesmer
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Collation: Early modern eyebrow interpretations, or what it means to have a unibrow

BOOK REVIEWS:

academia.edu: Emil du Bois-Reymond and the tradition of German physiological science

academic.edu: Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self and Society in Nineteenth Century Germany

Science Book a Day: Haeckel’s Embryos: Images, Evolution, and Fraud

New Scientist: How fudged embryo illustrations led to drawn-out lies

haeckels-embryos

History to the Public: Humdinger in the everyday: Greg Jenner’s A Million Years in a Day

Popular Science: Professor Stewart’s Incredible Numbers

Centre for Medical Humanities: The Severed Head Capital Visions

Science Book a Day: Drugged: The Science and Culture Behind Psychotropic Drugs

The Guardian: Half Life: The Divided Life of Bruno Pontecorvo, Physicist or Spy by Frank Close – review

Biodetectives: Life science books everyone should read

The Guardian: John Aubrey: My Own Life review – the taxidermist of a dying England

Project Muse: The Princess and the Philosopher: Letters of Elisabeth of the Palatine to Rene Descartes

BSHS Dingle Prize Short List:

University of Chicago Press: Earth’s Deep History

Yale University Press: Voyaging in Strange Seas

Harper Collins Publishers: Finding Longitude

University of Chicago Press: Visions of Science

 

9780226203287

WellCome Book Prize Shortlist 2015:

The Guardian: Wellcome Trust 2015 Book Prize shortlist announced

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: More Than Medicine: A History of the Feminist Women’s Health Movement

Taylor & Francis: Reimagining (Bio)Medicalization, Pharmaceuticals and Genetics

Ashgate: Boyle Studies

Routledge: Spaces for Feelings: Emotion and Sociabilities in Britain 1650-1850

9781138828179

University of Washington Press: Feminist Technosciences

Salon: Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing” – An Excerpt

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Why the Imitation Game is a disaster for historians

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Bertrand Russell – Face to Face Interview (BBC, 1959)

Youtube: Be curious… about AIR QUALITY

 

Youtube: Fifty billion chips and counting

Youtube: The Genius of Einstein: The Science, the Brain, the Man

Laughing Squid: A Look at Four Lesser-Known Scientific Discoveries and the Women Behind Them

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Native American Medicine: The Sequah Limited: Commoditising the Native

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Bucharest: Workshop: Natural History, Mathematics and Metaphysics in the Seventeenth Century 26-27 April 2015

Museum Boerhaave and Naturalis Biodiversity Centre: Materia medica on the move. Collecting, trading studying and using medicinal plants in the early modern period 15-17 April 2015

ChoM News: Lecture: Pregnancy and Personhood: The Maternal-Fetal Relationship in America, 1850 to the Present Harvard Medical School 2 April 2015

 

John Innes Centre: Cultivation Innovations 14 April 2015

University of Oxford: CfP: Space, place, and landscape in the history of communications 16 June 2015

University of Durham: The History of Thermodynamics and Scientific Realism 12 May 2015

University of Manchester: Stories about Science 4-5 June 2015

 

Open Quaternary: Call for Papers

IHPST: Announcements

Computer History Museum: Book Prize 2015: Call for submissions

London Medieval Society: Medieval London and the World 2015 1-4 May 2015

 

Parasynchronies: CfP: Divergent Bodies and the Making of the Middle Ages

CRASSH: Graphical Displays: Challenges for Humanists 18 May 2015

History of Education Society (UK): Conference: CfP: Science, Technologies, and Material Culture in the History of Education Liverpool Hope University 20-22 November 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Food as Medicine: Historical Perspectives 9-10 October 2015 Dublin

Dittrick Medical History Centre: Upcoming Events

University of York: CfP: Epistolary cultures – letters and letter-writing in early modern Europe

 

BSHS: Conference: Leibniz-scientist, Leibniz-philosopher University of Wales Lampeter 3-5 July 2015

 

BSHS: Conference: Ruling Climate The Theory and practice of environmental governmentality 1500-1800 University of Warwick 16 May 2015

Morbid Anatomy: The Lost Museum Symposium: Providence Rhode Island 6-8 May 2015

10th International Conference on the History of Chemistry: CfP: Chemical Biography Aveiro Portugal 9-12 September 2015

 

H–Environment: CfP: Workshop: Experiencing the Global Environment MPIFTHOS Berlin 4-6 February 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Chester: Lecturer in Early Modern Global History 1650–1800

University of Sydney: Associate Lecturer History of Science

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarships

University of Chester: Lecturer in Historic Landscapes and Environments

How We Get to Next: Editor and Staff Writer

King’s College London: Lecturer in the History of Science and Technology

University of Kent: Postgraduate Funding

University of Leeds: Studentship: Object Journeys: Community co-production of collections knowledge and displays at a national museum

CHF: Public History Fellow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #38

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

aceo___owl_grandma_by_ashanti_whitefur-d3clqjb

Volume #38

Monday 09 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list has been around for just thirty-eight issues counting this one but 6 March saw the three hundred and fiftieth birthday of the world’s first (maybe) and oldest (definitely) science journal the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, which has been celebrating its birthday in real style. There are free open access birthday editions of both the A edition (mathematical and physical sciences) and the B edition (the life sciences) with lots of history of science content so get stuck in and download all of those goodies.

The Royal Society: Publishing Blog: Free access to 350 years of science publishing

University of Toronto: Exhibit – 350 Years of Scientific Discovery: The Royal Society’ Philosophical Transactions 6–31 March

The Guardian: 350 years of the scientific journal: celebrating the anniversary of Philosophical Transactions

Youtube: Science Stories: Publishing 350

Yovisto: The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society

Quotes of the week:

“Describe your methodology” – Well, I read things and then think about them. That good enough? @LeapingRobot

“Judging by how hard it is to get some people to do either of those things, it sounds pretty rigorous.” @TryingBiology

Women’s History Month – International Women’s Day

Google Doodle IWD

Google Doodle IWD

Sunday was International Women’s Day and March is also Women’s History Month so this edition of Whewell’s Gazette starts with a special women’s section.

A Don’s Life: International Women’s Day for historians

PLOS Blogs: Pentimento: Revealing the Women Obscured in Science History

Trowelblazers: Women in archaeology, geology, and palaeontology

Wikipedia: WikiProject Women’s History/NIH Women’s History Month Edit-a-Thon 2015

Cemistry lab at Bedford College in 1874. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Cemistry lab at Bedford College in 1874.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

Conciatore: Women in Alchemy

The Recipes Project: “The Alchemist’s Desire”: Recipes for Health and Beauty from Caterina Sforza

Rosetta Stones: Women of the Geoblogosphere: Follow Them! For They are Awesome

News ALL Day: Mapping history’s ‘invisible’ women

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Nancy Bartlit’s Interview

Trowelblazers: Tina Negus: An eye for the Ediacaran

Royal Holloway College botany class in 1937. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Royal Holloway College botany class in 1937.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

The Conversation: You probably haven’t heard of these five amazing women scientists – so pay attention

How We Get To Next: The Forgotten Story of the Women Who Built One of London’s Most Iconic Bridges

Advances in the History of Psychology: Women’s History Month @ Psychology’s Feminist Voices

The Sloane Letters Blog: Choosing the Countryside: Women Health and Power in the Eighteenth Century

The Guardian: International Women’s Day 2015: history of women in science – in pictures

Bedford College chemistry lab in 1920. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Bedford College chemistry lab in 1920.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

AMNH: Women’s History Month at the Museum

TrowelBlazers: 5 TrowelBlazers You Should Have Heard of

Brain Pickings: Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science

io9: These 17 Women Changed The Face of Physics

flickr: Women in Science

"NOTHING IN LIFE IS TO BE FEARED. IT IS ONLY TO BE UNDERSTOOD" – Marie Curie

“NOTHING IN LIFE IS TO BE FEARED. IT IS ONLY TO BE UNDERSTOOD” – Marie Curie

Birthday of the week:

Gerardus Mercator born 5 March 1512

Gerardus Mercator's 503rd Birthday Google Doodle

Gerardus Mercator’s 503rd Birthday
Google Doodle

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The “first” Atlas

The Renaissance Mathematicus: It’s not the Mercator projection; it’s the Mercator-Wright projection!

History Today: The Birth of Gerardus Mercator

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Astrology and the novatores, part 3

AHF: John R. Dunning

BSHS Travel Guide: Harvard College Observatory

Photograph of the Harvard Computers, a group of women who worked under Edward Charles Pickering at the Harvard College Observatory. The photograph was taken on 13 May 1913 in front of Building C, which was then the newest building at the Observatory. The image was discovered in an album which had once belonged to Annie Jump Cannon. Image courtesy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Back row (L to R): Margaret Harwood (far left), Mollie O’Reilly, Edward C. Pickering, Edith Gill, Annie Jump Cannon, Evelyn Leland (behind Cannon), Florence Cushman, Marion Whyte (behind Cushman), Grace Brooks. Front row: Arville Walker, unknown (possibly Johanna Mackie), Alta Carpenter, Mabel Gill, Ida Woods (Source: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. This media file is in the public domain because its copyright has expired).

Photograph of the Harvard Computers, a group of women who worked under Edward Charles Pickering at the Harvard College Observatory. The photograph was taken on 13 May 1913 in front of Building C, which was then the newest building at the Observatory. The image was discovered in an album which had once belonged to Annie Jump Cannon. Image courtesy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Back row (L to R): Margaret Harwood (far left), Mollie O’Reilly, Edward C. Pickering, Edith Gill, Annie Jump Cannon, Evelyn Leland (behind Cannon), Florence Cushman, Marion Whyte (behind Cushman), Grace Brooks. Front row: Arville Walker, unknown (possibly Johanna Mackie), Alta Carpenter, Mabel Gill, Ida Woods (Source: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. This media file is in the public domain because its copyright has expired).

AHF: Manhattan Project Spotlight: The Groves Family

Brown University Library: Capturing the Transit of Venus

AHF: Innovation Through Teamwork

Nature Physics: Physics, physicists and the bomb

Phys.org Aboriginal legends an untapped record of natural history written in the stars

University of Cambridge Museums: Sedwick Museum meteorite helps unravel mysteries of Solar System

Cosmos: The physicist who inflated the universe

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: Robert Adam and the King’s Topographical Collection

Robert Adam [Elevation and plan of a proposed arch at Hyde Park Corner, November 1778]  Maps K Top 27.26-c-2.  Source: British Library

Robert Adam [Elevation and plan of a proposed arch at Hyde Park Corner, November 1778] Maps K Top 27.26-c-2.
Source: British Library

MEDICINE:

Archives Hub: Continuity of Care – The Royal Scottish National Hospital

h-madness: “The Making and Travelling of Knowledge. A Biography of a Medical Case History in Nineteenth-Century Europe”

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Big–Data Project on 1918 Flu Reflects Key Role Of Humanists

Early Modern Medicine: The Stinging of a Wasp

MHL: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Lapham’s Quarterly: Contagion: A brief history of malaria, leprosy, and smallpox
08_medicine

 

The Recipes Project: Scratching “The Itch Infalable”: Johanna St. John’s Anti-Itch Cure

ChoM News: From the MHL: What Can We Learn from Hospital Reports?

The Lancet: Exhibition review: Celebrating the remarkable life of John Radcliffe

Yovisto: John Fothergill – Physician and Gardener

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Source: Unknown

Source: Unknown

The Guardian: How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

Earth Observatory: Svante Arrhenius (1859-1927)

The Crestone Eagle: Gray & Hooker’s Blanca Peak Expedition: The Asian connection

NYAM: Proposed 1920s Orphanage Study Just One Example in History of Scientific Racism

Notches: Eugenics and Intersex: The consequences of defining “normal” bodies

Yovisto: John Murray and the Oceanography

John Murray (1841 – 1914)

John Murray
(1841 – 1914)

The Royal Institution: John Tyndall discovered the basis of global warming. Why has history forgotten him?

The Guardian: Sexing up the human pheromone story: How a corporation started a scientific myth

Source: Unknown

Source: Unknown

Dorking and Leatherhead Advertiser: Call for plaque to recognize Dorking home of evolution scientist

Diseases of Modern Life: Inside Passengers: The Girl’s Own Paper looks inside the body

Luke and Belinda explore the stomach.

Luke and Belinda explore the stomach.

Natural History Apostilles: Predator-prey selection between dogs and goats observed in 1758

Natural History Apostilles: More observations on dogs and goats from the 16th century

Skulls in the Stars: Michael Faraday and the waterspouts (1814)

Coincidence?

Coincidence?

Greg Jenner: Animals on the Wall: Cave Art & Stone Age Pets

Canadian Geographic: HMS Erebus exploration set to continue

CHEMISTRY:

Medium: A short-but-gruesome history of the match

image by flickr user Jim Chambers CC BY-NC-SA

image by flickr user Jim Chambers CC BY-NC-SA

TECHNOLOGY:

Medievalist.net: Top 10 Strange Weapons of the Middle Ages

Dr Alun Withey: Zounds how you scape! Being shaved in Georgian Britain

Yovisto: Walter Bruch and the PAL Color Television System

Ptak Science Books: Tiny Sky Nets for Attacking Aircraft, 1925

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

IEEE Spectrum: Eben Upton: The Raspberry Pi Pioneer

Ptak Scientific Books: Visual Display of Data: German Military Weakness, 1929

Conciatore: Filigrana

Ptak Science Books: Cut-Away Schematic: British Vickers Medium Tank, 1925

Yovisto: William Oughtred and the Slide Rule

The Atlantic: The Failed Attempt to Destroy GPS

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

WCM 1: Open Notebook History

The many-headed monster: Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part II: Some evidence from manuscripts

New Statesman: No one was “gay” in the 18th century: why we must not rewrite history with today’s terms

Metamorphoses in Art & Science

Giving to Princeton: Gift Establishes the Thomas M. Siebel History of Science Professorship

OUP Blog: Creating a constructive cultural narrative for science

Islam & Science: Lessons learned from the ‘Earth does not rotate’ debate

New Statesman: Wellcome Collection: raising the cultural profile of science

Storify: Hans Sloane and His Books

LabLit.com: A bitter pill to swallow Obituary Carl Djerassi

Chemistry World: Are you sitting comfortably?

PRI: How JFK made NASA his secret weapon in the fight for civil rights in America

Clyde Foster processes telemetry at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1965 in a photo that appeared in Ebony magazine. As a NASA employee, Foster was a leader in getting jobs and advancing engineering education for African Americans. Credit: Courtesy of Don Rutledge ©

Clyde Foster processes telemetry at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1965 in a photo that appeared in Ebony magazine. As a NASA employee, Foster was a leader in getting jobs and advancing engineering education for African Americans. Credit: Courtesy of Don Rutledge ©

Wellcome Library: UK Medical Heritage Library

Zooniverse: Science Gossip: an investigation into the making and communication of science in both the Victorian period and today.

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists: Inside the exhibition

CHoM News: New Exhibit: Foundations for the History of Women in Medical Oral History

Royal College of Physicians: Exhibition: Chemistry in the garden: paintings by Nina Krauzewicz 3 March–31 July 2015

The #EnvHist Weekly

My medieval foundry: Books, blogs and communicating knowledge to the public

Ration Action: New Blog: Historical perspectives on scientific method, technology and policy design, bureaucracy, economic and behavioral analysis, optimization, theories of choice, and philosophies of mind

Ether Wave Propaganda: Rational Action: The Blog

Forbes: Ideas That Deserve to Die … But Probably Won’t

ESOTERIC:

io9: 10 Famous Scientists Who Held Surprising Supernatural Beliefs

Ptak Science Books: A Dominance of Observations from our Future Skeleton (1635)

6a00d83542d51e69e201b8d0e37121970c-500wi

History Matters: Happy 200th Deathday Franz Anton Mesmer

Chemistry World: Alchemy on the page

homunculus: Alchemy on the page (extended version)

D News: Edison’ ‘lost’ Idea: A Device to Hear to the Dead [sic]

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Interviews Gabriel Finkelstein

Popular Science: Science in Wonderland – Melanie Keene

History Today: Infinitesimal

Book List Online: Eye of the Beholder

National Geographic: Is Islam Hostile to Science?

Somatosphere: Book Forum – Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay’s “Intolerant Bodies”

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on Medicine

Reviews in History: The Politics of Hospital Provision in Early Twentieth-Century Britain

TLS: Enter John Aubrey

Science Book a Day: The Chimp and the River: How AIDS Emerged from an African Forest

Some Beans: Engineering Empires

engineering-empires_thumb

The Artic Book Review: Unravelling the Franklin Mystery: Inuit Testimony

BSHS Dingle Prize Short List:

University of Chicago Press: Earth’s Deep History

Yale University Press: Voyaging in Strange Seas

9780300173796

Harper Collins Publishers: Finding Longitude

OUP: The Man in the Monkeynut Coat

One World Publishing: The History of Medicine: A Beginners Guide

NEW BOOKS:

Johns Hopkins University Press: Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars

Pikaia: Eternal Ephemera: Adaption and the Origin of Species…

9780231153164

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Science and Entertainment Lab: Rise of Women? Screening Female Scientists

Promotional shots of Cornelia (Judy Greer) and Ellie (Keri Russell) show ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ only named female characters comforting a baby

Promotional shots of Cornelia (Judy Greer) and Ellie (Keri Russell) show ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ only named female characters comforting a baby

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences: George Beccaloni & Ruth Benny – Wallace Treasures fro…

Youtube: Why do medical students have to study the history of medicine

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

The Guardian: Steven Weinberg on the history of science

Naked Scientists: Eureka! Experiments that Changed the World

15 Minute History: Episode 65: Darwinism and the Scopes “Monkey Trial”

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow History of Medicine Group – Spring Meetings 2015

CRASSH: The Total Archive: Dreams of Universal Knowledge from the Encyclopaedia to Big Data 19-20 March

Discovery Museum Newcastle: CfP: IET Conference on the History of Engineering 6 June 2015

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Katherine Parker (Department of History, University of Pittsburgh). ‘A Tricky Passage: Navigating, Mapping, and Publishing Representations of Tierra del Fuego in the Long Eighteenth Century’. 12 March

University of London: Women’s Studies Group 1558–1837: Annual Workshop: ‘What is the Place of Aphra Behn in Restoration Culture?’ 9 May 2015

IU Bloomington Newsroom: Historian of science Naomi Oreskes to present Patten Lectures at IU Bloomington

Cambridge University: Biological Discourses: the Language of Science & Literature around 1900 10-11 April 2015

Institute of Historical Research: Empty Spaces Conference Program for April 10, 2015

Canvas Network: Free Online Course: Warfare and Weapons in Ancient Egypt 6 April–5 May 2015

XVI UNIVERSEUM NETWORK MEETING University Heritage and Cultural Engagement of European Universities National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, 11‐13 June 2015

Aarhus University Centre for Science Studies: CfP: Workshop “1970s: Turn of an era in the history of science?” 14–15 September 2015

AIP: MOOC: Reimagining Einstein for Students and Teachers: The Einstein Revolution

Museum of the History of Science: Hooked on Invention: 14 March 2015

Yale University: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 27-28 March 2015

The Linnean Society: From Cabinet to Internet: Digitising Natural History and Medical Manuscripts 27-28 April 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Against Captain’s Orders: After Hours Exclusives (members’ event) 2 April–27 August 2015

Notches: Meet Me in St. Louis: History of Sexuality at the 1015 Organisation of American Historians Conference 16-19 April 2015

Advances in the History of Psychology: CfP: 4S Open Panel on STS, Technology & Psychology 11-14 November 2015 Denver Co.

Royal Geographical Society and Bournemouth University: The Hero’s Journey of Alfred Russel Wallace in Southeast Asia 10 March 2015 Poole

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Huddersfield: Location, Location, Location: The Gott Collection, Yorkshire landscapes and Connected Communities PhD studentship at the University of Huddersfield

University of Wuppertal: At the „Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies: Normative and historical foundations“ (IZWT) of the University of Wuppertal at the earliest date possible the position of an Assistant Professor

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarship

The School of Philosophy, Religion, and History of Science at University of Leeds invites applications to its Non-Stipendiary Visiting Fellowships scheme for the academic year 2015-16.

University of Cambridge: Two Postdoctoral Research Associates in the Early Modern Period (History of Art and History of Science)

Science Museum Group: ACD-SCM-MAR15 – Assistant Content Developers x2, Contemporary Science

IHR: Scouloudi Historical Awards: Research Awards

University of Cambridge: Research Associate in History of Modern Science (Fixed Term)

Flight Global Jobs: Historian – RAF Northolt, London

University of Leeds: AHRC Postdoctoral Researcher Project: ‘Electrifying the country house: taking stories of innovation to new audiences’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol: #37

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Row of Owls

Volume #37

Monday 02 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

It’s that time of the week again and your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette #37 is back bring you all the histories of science, technology and medicine that the Internet had on offer in the last even days.

This week saw a history of medicine story on the possible origins of the Black Death presented by the BBC thus:

BBC News: ‘Gerbils replace rats’ as main cause of Black Death

As was to be expected the popular science media fell into a feeding frenzy as to who could produce the most sensational and inaccurate headline for an equally inaccurate account of the research and its discovery. All the journalist had to do was to read the original paper or the popular account published on the Conversation by the reports authors,

The Conversation: Plague outbreaks that ravaged Europe for centuries were driven by climate changes in Asia

to get their facts right! Archaeologist and plague specialist Alison Atkin (@alisonatkin) has written two excellent posts analysing the whole sorry mess thus saving us the trouble.

Deathplanation: Avoid Gerbil Headlines like a cliche…

Gerbil

Deathplanation: Blame The Gerbils? Blame the Journalists?

As you can see above in our masthead there was a meeting of the editorial board this week.

Quotes of the week:

Sir Jonas Moore’s remedy for Sciatica, as reported by John Aubrey: “he cured it by boiling his buttock” – @borisjardine

Huizinga – “Task of history is to make past come to life. To do so it has to go beyond fact, create an image. History is not the sum of facts”. – @erik_kwakkel

“I had very good discourse with Mr. Ashmole, wherein he did assure me that frogs and many insects do often fall from the sky, ready formed.“ –Samuel Pepys

“They’re not anecdotes, that’s small batch artisanal data” – @pikelet

“The ‘scientific method’? Not a rigid sterile recipe to be taught, but an emotional and creative Art form to be nurtured.” – @Stelygs

“The finest historians will not be those who succumb to the dehumanizing methods of social sciences, whatever their uses and values, which I hasten to acknowledge. Nor will the historian worship at the shrine of that Bitch-goddess, QUANTIFICATION. History offers radically different values and methods.” -Carl Bridenbaugh, AHA presidential address, 1962 h/t @scott_bot

“History without the history of science…resembles a statue of Polyphemus without his eye.” I. Bernard Cohen h/t @embryoproject

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

AHF: Glen Seaborg

io9: The Complete History of Ceres, The Planet (?) Between Mars and Jupiter

Toledo Museum: Astronomical Compendium

Astrolabe-200x300

Energy.gov: Turning the Manhattan Project into a National Park

AHF: Reincarnation of the K-25 Plant

Science News: Islamic Science paved the way for a millennial celebration of light

APS: History of Physics Newsletter

Data is nature: Laplacian Sigils – William George Armstrong’s Electrical Discharge Experiments [1899]

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Richard Malenfant’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Freeman Dyson’s Interview

NYAM: The Private Lives of Galileo

AHF: Gregory Breit

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A Swiss Clockmaker

Bürgi Rock Crystal Clock Source: Wikimedia Commons

Bürgi Rock Crystal Clock
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Guardian: 25 years of the Hubble telescope – in pictures

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

The Public Domain Review: Journey from Venice to Palestine, Mount Sinai and Egypt (ca. 1467)

16626533085_b7ff1e8bbe_o

Bonhams: Mnemonic Globe

Board of Longitude Project: (Re)Displaying longitude

 

MEDICINE:

Hektoen International: Elizabeth Fleischman-Aschheim

Mosaic: The troubled history of the foreskin

First Things: An Anti-Vaxx Pope?

Recipes Project: Recipes and Experiment: A Poison Trial on Dogs

Yovisto: Giovanni Battista Morgagni and the Science of Anatomy

The IHR Blog: Witchcraft and Medicine in Modern France

A Nurse at the Front: Edith Elizabeth Appleton O.B.E. R.R.C.

Edith Appleton O.B.E. R.R.C.

Edith Appleton O.B.E. R.R.C.

Freakonometrics: John Snow and Openstreetmap

Brainpickings: Geometrical Psychology: Benjamin Betts’s 19th-Century Mathematical Illustrations of Consciousness

betts16

Panacea: From Orient to Occident Part I: Acupuncture in Victorian England

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Making science public: Basic science and climate politics: A flashback to 1989

The Conversation: Proposed 1920s orphanage study just one example in history of scientific racism

Embryo Project: “Viable Offspring Derived from Fetal and Adult Mammalian Cell” (1977), by Ian Wilmut et al.

The Independent: Dolly the sheep to be honoured with a blue plaque in Edinburgh

Soure: The Independent

Soure: The Independent

Tetrapod Zoology: Spots, Stripes and Spreading Hooves in the Horse of the Ice Age

Yovisto: Andrea Cesalpino and the Classification of Plants

Dr Len Fisher: 42. Carl Djerassi on the acts of creation and procreation

Digital Stories: The curious gardener

Wonders & Marvels: Slaves Identify Elephant Fossils in America

Embryo Project: Robert Lanza (1956– )

BBC News: Sir Richard Owen: The man who invented the dinosaur

The New York Times: Eugenie Clark, Scholar of the Life Aquatic, Dies at 92

Eugenie Clark examines deep water sharks from Suruga Bay, Japan, in 1980. David Doubilet

Eugenie Clark examines deep water sharks from Suruga Bay, Japan, in 1980.
David Doubilet

National Geographic News: ‘Shark Lady’ Eugenie Clark, Famed Marine Biologist, Has Died

Storify: Malthus, West, Torrens, Ricardo –– February 1815

Fossil History: The Weird History of Oviraptors

 

Reuters: Stone Age Britons imported wheat in shock sign of sophistication

The New York Times: Libraries of Life

National Geographic: The Plate: Selling Spring Dreams: The Evolution of Seed Catalogs

 

History of Geology: A History of the Use Of Illustrations in the Geosciences I: Seeing is Believing…

Natural History Apostilles: If Darwin plagiarized Matthew, by Whiggish standards, then Matthew plagiarized Loudon

Nautilus: The Seeds That Sowed a Revolution

Darwin flowers

Scrol.in: Two decades after his death, Gerald Durrell is still making the world a better place

academia.edu: Hope Johnson LLD (1916–2010): An extraordinary Albertan amateur vertebrate palaeontologist

 

CHEMISTRY:

C&EN: Timeline: Chemical Weapons Then and Now

600 BC The Athenians besiege the city of Kirrha. They poison the besieged city’s water supply with heart-toxic extracts of hellebore plants.

600 BC The Athenians besiege the city of Kirrha. They poison the besieged city’s water supply with heart-toxic extracts of hellebore plants.

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Gold Ruby Redux

Cranberry glass or Gold Ruby  treasury chamber of the Wittelsbacher , Munich Residenz.

Cranberry glass or Gold Ruby
treasury chamber of the Wittelsbacher , Munich Residenz.

 

Conciatore: Alberico Barbini

Daytonian in Manhattan: Forensic History – No. 35 West 10th Street

My medieval foundry: Being a blog, I can ask questions that professionals won’t go near due to lack of evidence

Inside the Science Museum: Robert Watson-Watt and The Triumph of Radar

BBC Future: Why the fax machine isn’t quite dead yet

O Say Can You See?: Finding modern meaning in 130-year old sound

 

ORAU.org: Chang and Eng Neutron Detector (1940s)

Tycho’s Nose: Academics won’t be typecast no more

AnOther: The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death

Frances Glessner Lee© Glessner House Museum, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Frances Glessner Lee © Glessner House Museum, Chicago, Illinois, USA

IWM: How Alan Turing Cracked the Enigma Code

 

National Geographic: A History of Skis

Ptak Science Books: Graphic Display of U.S. Patents, 1836–1915

The Public Domain Review: Catalogue of the 68 competetive designs for the great tower for London (1890)

7583076562_72f2b1cf5c_o

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

THE: Is philosophy dead?

Imperial & Global Forum: What is Global Intellectual History – If It Should Exist At All?

The many-headed monster: Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part I

EMLO: The Correspondence of Joseph Justus Scaliger (1669 letters)

Josephus Justus Scaliger, painted by Paullus Merula, 3rd librarian of Leiden University, 1597

Josephus Justus Scaliger, painted by Paullus Merula, 3rd librarian of Leiden University, 1597 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hostelworld.com: Reiseblog: London für Fortgeschrittene: 3 weniger bekannte Museen und ihre großartigen Blogs

The Royal Society: Notes & Records: March 2015: Vol. 69 Issue 1 “Women and Science” Table of Contents

George Campbell Gosling: Flattening History

Science: AAAS: The Science Hall of Fame

NYAM: Recommended Resources

Wellcome Library: Announce several new collections on the theme of genomics

Double Refraction: Why historians shouldn’t write off scientists: on Steven Shapin’s review of Steven Weinberg’s Explain the World

 

The Royal Society: Your students past the Royal Society door

Discover Magazine: Infinity is a Beautiful Concept – And It’s Ruining Physics

infinity-band

CHoSTaM: News and Notes: Engineers as Servant-Leaders of the Old South

Society for the Social History of Medicine: New Website

The Boston Globe: Russian science is amazing. So why hasn’t it taken over the world?

In The Dark: What is the Scientific Method?

ANZSECS: The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies New website

Motherboard: Saving Human Knowledge at 800 Pages an Hour

The Point: The Soviet Science System

Nautilus: The Thrill of Defeat

Aeon: Can God lie? Until the Scientific Revolution, God’s power included a licence to deceive. How did science make an honest man of Him?

Blink: The Compass Chronicles: Infinity versus Ramchundra

Compass Wallah: The War on History

Inside the Science Museum: Photography and the Science Museum Group

Somerville Historian: Research & Anthropology

Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on ‘How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary U.S. Science Teaching?

 

Wallifaction: reflections on teaching the history of science and religion: part 1

ESOTERIC:

Forbidden Histories: Temple Medicine, Oracles and the Making of Modernity: The Ancient Greek Occult in Anthropology and Psychology

Verso: Newton’s Lost Copy of Mead, Revealed

Detail showing the future Millennium from the apocalyptic time chart found in Newton’s copy of Mede’s Works (1672). Mede’s chart likely helped inspire Newton’s own apocalyptic beliefs. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Detail showing the future Millennium from the apocalyptic time chart found in Newton’s copy of Mede’s Works (1672). Mede’s chart likely helped inspire Newton’s own apocalyptic beliefs. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Distillatio: Mountains and alchemy

 

Yovisto: Camille Flammarion and his Balancing Act between Popular Science and Science Fiction

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: The Lunar Men: The Friends who made the Future

From the Hands of Quacks: Institutionalizing the Insane in Nineteenth-Century England

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on Life Sciences

The Renaissance Mathematicus: From astronomy to literature – Bridging the gap

Tennyson

Thinking Like a Mountain: Knowing Nature in Early Modern Europe

Science Book a Day: Maria Sibylla Merian: The New Book of Flowers

News Works: A look at the development of vitamins and our unabated obsession with them

Reciprocal Space: Being mortal and being Crick

NEW BOOKS:

Catherine Price: Vitamania

SCQ: Advanced Quantum Thermodynamics (is a subject I know very little about)

Ashgate: Anatomy and Anatomists in Early Modern SpainStein

THEATRE:

Theatre Rhinoceros: Breaking the Code 4-21 March 2015

FILM:

The Science and Entertainment Laboratory: The Playing God Film Series: Science & Religion on Screen

Annex-Karloff-Boris-Bride-of-Frankenstein-The_02-300x291

Scientific American: Observations: Best Actor Eddie Redmayne on Portraying Stephen Hawking

Medium.com The Devastating Stereotype of the Artless Scientist

Slate.com: How Accurate Is The Imitation Game?

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Bloomberg: Alan Turing’s Hidden Manuscript Set to Reap Millions

Youtube: Castle Bravo Nuclear Test

RADIO:

BBC: A History of Ideas: The Antikythera Mechanism

LFR 24: God’s Philosophers

 

PODCASTS:

ODNB: Lunar Society

BookLab 005: The Human Age; The Moral Landscape; Eureka!

AHF: Health and Safety Monitoring

CHF: Distillations Podcast: Episode 196: Innovation & Obsolescence: The Life, Death, and Occasional Rebirth of Technologies

NPR: Episode 606: Spreadsheets!

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Making Waves: Lecture: Why Did Scientists Come to Write Autobiographies? 6 March 2015 Leeds Art Gallery

The British Library: The Eccles Centre for American Studies: Alaska, The Artic and the US Imagination 16 March 2015

CRASSH: CfP: Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition Cambridge University 18-20 June 2015

The Edwin Worth Library Dublin: CfP: Food as Medicine: Historical perspectives 9-10 October 2015

AAHM: New Haven 2015: Program, Registration, etc.

University of Durham: 10th Integrated History and Philosophy of Science Workshop 16-17 April 2015

UCL: STS Haldane Lecture 12 March 2015

York Minster: Faith and Wisdom in Science 8, 15 & 22 July 2015

Ischia Summer School: Fourteenth Ischia Summer School on the History of the Life Sciences Call for applications — Ischia 2015: Geographies of Life 27 June – 3 July 2015

Rijks Museum: CfP: Arts and Science in Early Modern Low Countries Amsterdam 17-18 September 2015

Wellcome Collection: Exhibition: Forensics: The anatomy of crime 26February–21 June 2015

CRASSH: What’s on at CRASSH 17-February–6 March

Resilience: Special Issue: CfP: Global Environmental Histories From Below

Committee on the Study of the Reformation: CfP. The Tree of Knowledge 28–29 May 2015 University of Warsaw

 

The Grolier Club: Exhibition: Aldus Manutius A Legacy More Lasting Than Bronze 25 February–25 April 2015

getImage.gif

The New York Times: A Tribute to the Printer Aldus Manutius, and the Roots of the Paperback

CRASSH: The Places of Early Modern Criticism 23-24 March 2015

HSS: CfP: HSS 2015 Annual Meeting 19-22 November 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Kings College London: AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Awards: Rethinking technical change in modern British agriculture, c1920–1970

University of Leicester: AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships: 3 new fully-funded PhD studentships

Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Curatorial Fellowship

University of Bristol: Postdoctoral Research Assistant. History of Medicine (Life of Breath)

 

NMBU: Two Postdoctoral Fellowships in philosophy – Causation, Complexity and Evidence in Health Science

University of Leiden: Call for Proposals: Van de Sande fellowship 2015, Brill fellowships 2015, Elsevier fellowship 2015

University of Edinburgh: Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

CRASSH: Two Research Associates: Limits of the Numerical

University of Cambridge: Isaac Newton – Ann Johnston Research Fellowship in The Humanities 2015

University of Cambridge: Research Associate (HoS) (Fixed Term)

CRASSH: two Research Associates in the Early Modern Period (History of Art and History of Science) Making Visible

UCL: 340 £10,000 bursaries available for Master’s study at UCL

Johns Hopkins University: Postdoctoral Fellowship in the History of Medicine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A History of the Use of Illustrations in the Geosciences: I. Seeing is Believing…

GESNER_1565_fossilsThe progress made in understanding realistic landscape-views and the rediscovery of ancient encyclopedias (like the works by Pliny the Elder) inspired Renaissance naturalists to adopt an exact and systematic approach to describe the curiosities found in the natural world. As most information as possible should be associated to every studied object – compiled from the works of ancient authors, own observations, may also supposed medical and magical properties, a good description should also include a detailed figure showing the described specimen (at the time a very expensive approach, as artists and engravers had to be hired).
Posted in Geology | Leave a comment

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol: #36

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

James Collins

Volume #36

Monday 23 February 2015

EDITORIAL:

Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list comes around again for the thirty-sixth time; a packed full gateway to the best in the histories of science, technology and medicine in the Internet.

This week somebody drew our attention to a video, in the Huffington Post, of a Saudi Arabian Cleric explaining why we live in a geocentric cosmos and not a heliocentric one. Naturally our first reaction was to mock and poke fun, which we preceded to do with various friends on Twitter offering further arguments to support the our Saudi friend.

This caused us to briefly stop and take stock. The arguments bandied about, including the one used by the cleric (Ptolemaeus uses birds not planes!) can all be found in Ptolemaeus’ Syntaxis Mathematiké written in the second century CE. Moving on from there is the awareness that the history of seventeenth-century physics is acquisition of the knowledge necessary to refute those arguments. Maybe one shouldn’t be so quick to mock and instead take this video as an opportunity to teach people why it was scientifically so difficult for people in the Early Modern Period to accept the heliocentric hypothesis.

Quotes of the week:

“Books are Uniquely Portable Magic” ― Stephen King

Writing under deadline. (Courtesy of @john_overholt)

Writing under deadline. (Courtesy of @john_overholt)

Birthdays of the week:

Ernst Haeckel born 16 February 1834

Haeckel (left) with Nicholai Miklukho-Maklai, his assistant, in the Canaries, 1866

Haeckel (left) with Nicholai Miklukho-Maklai, his assistant, in the Canaries, 1866

Letters from Gondwana: Ernst Haeckel, The Scientist As An Artist

Haeckel

Video: Proteus 2004 (The Life and Work of Ernst Haeckel)

Kunstformen der Natur (1900) 100 Tafeln mit Text Ernst Haeckel

Letters from Gondwana: Haeckel and the Legacy of Early Radiolarian Taxonomists

Embryo Project: Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel

Embryo Project: Ernst Haeckel’s Biogenetic Law

Haeckel Tree

Alessandro Volta born 18 February 1745

Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Guardian: Alessandro Volta: Google lights up for inventor of the battery

Volta Google doodle

The Royal Institution: Alessandro Volta’s voltaic pile

The H-Word: Alessandro Volta. A welcome but misleading Google doodle

Science Museum: Galvani’s voltaic pile

Alessandro Volta demonstrating his battery (called the “Voltaic Pile”) to Napoleon, 1801 by Giuseppe Bertini

Alessandro Volta demonstrating his battery (called the “Voltaic Pile”) to Napoleon, 1801 by Giuseppe Bertini

 

Nicolaus Copernicus born 19 February 1473

1580 portrait (artist unknown) in the Old Town City Hall, Toruń Source: Wikimedia Commons

1580 portrait (artist unknown)
in the Old Town City Hall, Toruń
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Renaissance mathematicus: Nicky was an Ermländer

About Education: Copernicus the Geologist

The Copernicus Room in the Krakow Academy, where Copernicus studied between 1491 and 1495

The Copernicus Room in the Krakow Academy, where Copernicus studied between 1491 and 1495

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Nature.com: In Retrospect: Book of Optics

Science 2.0: Neutrinos from an Atomic Bomb

Atomic Heritage Society: Trinity Site

National Academy of Science: Biographical Memoir of Albert Abraham Michelson 1852-1931

Lucid Thoughts: Romantic science’s electric moment: the speculative physics of Ørsted, Ampère and Faraday

Ørsted: Artist and Source unknown

Ørsted: Artist and Source unknown

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Patricia Hansard’s Interview:

Live science.com: The 11 most beautiful equations in mathematics [physics!]

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Richard H. Groves’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: K-25 Plant

AIP: African Americans in Physics and Allied Sciences in ESVA

AHF: Maria Goeppert-Mayer

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Adrienne Lowry’s Interview

International Year of Light 2015 – Blog: Optics in Ancient China

Illustration of the reflection of light by multiple mirrors (the world’s first surveillance periscope!). Credits: Ling-An Wu, Gui-Gu Long, Quihuang Gong and Guang-Can Guo.

Illustration of the reflection of light by multiple mirrors (the world’s first surveillance periscope!). Credits: Ling-An Wu, Gui-Gu Long, Quihuang Gong and Guang-Can Guo.

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Bodleian Libraries: Scientific analysis helps team to explore mysteries of medieval Gough Map

Gough Map Close Scanning

Gough Map Close Scanning

British Library: Maps and views blog: Intelligence Mapping of British East Africa – digitisation begins

British Library; European Studies Blog: Overwintering: the Dutch search for the Northwest Passage

Volcanic Degassing: William Dampier and the Burning Islands of Melanesia

National Geographic: 100 Years of National Geographic Maps: The Art and Science of Where

 

Yovisto: Robert E. Peary’s Artic Expedition

MEDICINE:

Gorffennol: Swansea: To what extent has the concept of ‘deformity’ affected Richard III’s image and character

All Things Georgian: Sir Peter Lalonette and His Fumigation Machine

newmethodofcurin00lalo_0158

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: MedHum Monday: Vaccines and History

Remedia: Lost Places

Rejected Princesses: The Women Who Conquered Whooping Cough

Early Modern Medicine: Horrible Halitosis

Digital Stories: The Death Collector

U.S. National Library of Medicine: Gallery Dream Anatomy

From the Hands of Quacks: Galvanism & Deafness

L0011438 Use of Galvanism in deafness

The British Newspaper Archive: 19th-century medical fraudsters who got caught out

The Guardian: Beyond Bedlam: infamous mental hospital’s new museum opens

Asylum and Post-Asylum Spaces: Mental Health Geography?

British Library: Untold lives blog: Sage advice regarding snakes

The National Archives: First World War hearing aids

 

Royal College of Physicians: Irascible Radcliffe

John Radcliffe (1652–1714) Oil on canvas by Godfrey Kneller, early 18th century

John Radcliffe (1652–1714)
Oil on canvas by Godfrey Kneller, early 18th century

 

Men’s Journal: Lessons from the World’s Largest Contraception Collection

BBC News: Cambridgeshire church graffiti reveals ‘heartbreaking’ find

Wellcome Library: Prevent and survive: medical activism in 1980s Britain

Smithsonian.com: The Frightening Legacy of Typhoid Mary

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Strata Smith: Lecture by Hugh Torrens

 

Wellcome Library: Sex tourism in 18th century London

Embryo Project: The Discovery of the Dikika Baby Fossil as Evidence for Australopithecine Growth and Development

Embryo Project: Francis Galton (1822–1911)

Embryo Project: Ovirator philoceratops Dinosaurs

Notches: “In My Bed”: Sexual Violence Over Fifty Years on One College Campus

The New York Times: ‘Animated Life: Pangea’

University of Minnesota HSTM: The Objective Evaluation of Pig Breeds in the Netherlands

BBC News: Forgotten fossil found to be new species of ichthyosaur

 

The H-Word: Nature and sex redefined – we have never been binary

Origins: The West without Water: What Can Past Droughts Tell Us About Tomorrow?

Brit Geo People: The historic role of women scientists at BGS and a look at what is happening today

Dr Emily Dix of the University of Wales and her assistant Miss Elsie White.  Pioneering women geologists: a rarity of their time.

Dr Emily Dix of the University of Wales and her assistant Miss Elsie White.
Pioneering women geologists: a rarity of their time.

 

Strange Science: Rodney Impey Murchison

Fossil History: Lyell & the First Neanderthal

 

The Friends of Charles Darwin: 20-Feb-1835: Darwin witnesses an earthquake

The Atlantic: Solving a Museum’s Bug Problem With Lego

Dangerous Minds: Keep it Prim and Proper in the Bedroom with this Victorian Era Sex Guide

bookofnature33333333JPG

The Guardian: Piltdown Man, Beringer’s lying stones, dinosaurs… are they all hoaxes 

CHEMISTRY:

Nobelprize.org: Frederick Soddy – Biographical

180px-Frederick_Soddy

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: The Letters of Giambattista Bodoni

Homunculus: Holding Rome Together

Mashable: 1920s–1930s “War Tubas”

1930s Three Japanese acoustic locators, colloquially known as "war tubas," mounted on four-wheel carriages, being inspected by Japanese Emperor Shōwa. IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN

1930s
Three Japanese acoustic locators, colloquially known as “war tubas,” mounted on four-wheel carriages, being inspected by Japanese Emperor Shōwa.
IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN

Yovisto: Frederick Eugene Ives and the Halftone Printing Process

HNN: Welcome to Infinity, Limited

Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP: Ada the Amplifier

My Medieval Foundry: The rather important use of lathes by foundrymen

distillatio: Touchstones and streak testing

Yovisto: Ovtave Chanute – One of the Fathers of Aviation

IEEE Spectrum: When the Past Is Not a Preview

Conciatore: Incalmo

Tycho’s Nose: The Shiny Bits of Science: Were these Victorian train lines just a load of hot air?

Air pressure train

Air pressure train

The New York Times: Photoshop at 25: A Thriving Chameleon Adapts to an Instagram World

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Wellcome Trust: How the Wellcome Trust Spends its Money

screen-shot-2015-02-11-at-14-12-37

 

Business Insider: The First 500 Books From The Vatican Library’s Massive Digitisation Project Are Now Online

Conciatore: Saint Philip Neri

 

Genoptopia: Tweeting the life of the mind

Oxford Brookes University: Paula Kennelly MA History of Medicine 2014

Sideways Look at Science: Using Acting to Convince People You’re Better at Speaking

University of Glasgow Library: Glasgow Incunabula Project and Exhibition Update

Storify: Long Literary Centuries to Poets and Plowmen

Wellcome Collections Blog: Why the World Needs Collectors

The Sloane Letters Blog: A Peculiar Postscript

Two mothers with crying babies and one in a walking frame; comparing the human infant’s helplessness with the self-sufficiency of newborn animals. Engraving by P. Galle, c. 1563. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Two mothers with crying babies and one in a walking frame; comparing the human infant’s helplessness with the self-sufficiency of newborn animals. Engraving by P. Galle, c. 1563. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Nature: Museums: The endangered dead

The Jenks Society Presents The Lost Museum: Lost Museum at Brown University Gets Second Life

Rebecca Onion: Defining the History Beat

The Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 9: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 3 ­– IF

 

History of Psychiatry: Table of Contents March 2015 Vol. 26 (1)

Othmeralia: Gloves and rare-books?

Scroll.in: A seminar on Ancient Indian knowledge that didn’t involve jingoism and flights of fantasy

Lady Science: Issue 5. Rethinking the Makers of the Manhattan Project

CHF: Introducing Distillations Magazine

Digital Stories: The Collectors

The New York Review of Books: Scrawled Insults and Epiphanies

Ether Wave Propaganda: The Culture of Mechanism: Margaret Jacob versus “Proto-Industrialization”.

 

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Viridarium Mathematicorum, 1563

Viridarium Mathematicorum, 1563

The Scholarly Kitchen: Loaded Dice – The New Research Conundrums Posed by Mechanical Turk

Nuncius: Vol. 30 Issue 1 Table of Contents

The New York Times Books: The Creation of the Modern World: The Untold Story of thee British Enlightenment by Roy Porter Excerpt

Bluestreak Science: Episode 0.9: The Arts and Sciences

ESOTERIC:

Corpus Newtonicum: It’s magic!

The Recipes Project: The recipes of an eighteenth-century Amsterdam alchemist(?)

Conciatore: The Duke’s Oil

The Public Domain Review: A Mongolian Manual of Astrology and Divination

“Basics of Mongolian Astrology”

“Basics of Mongolian Astrology”

Boing boing: John Dee was the 16th century’s real-life Gandalf

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Pandora’s Breeches: Women, Science and Power in the Enlightenment

Many Headed Monster: Marooned on an Island Monographs: an Early modern Medical History Reading List:

Science Codex: Galileo’s Middle Finger

The New York Times: Disorder Rules the Universe

Science Book a Day: The 4 Per Cent Universe

Social History of Medicine: Pain and Emotion in Modern History

THE: Plucked: A History of Hair Removal

27885_book-review-plucked-a-history-of-hair-removal-by-rebecca-m-herzig

Science Book a Day: Banned: A History of Pesticides and the Science of Toxicology

 

Brain Pickings: How 17 Equations Changed the World

Science Book a Day: Lab Coats in Hollywood: Science, Scientists, and Cinema

NEW BOOKS:

Brill: The Correspondence of Dr. Martin Lister (1639–1712) Volume One: 1662–1677

Historiens e la santé: Healthcare in Early Medieval Northern Italy: More to Life than Leeches

index

Amazon: Four Works On Llull: On the Compendious Architecture of Ramon Lull, Lullian Lamps, Scrutiny of the Subjects, Animadversions (Collected Works of Giordano Bruno) (Volume 3)

Plagrave Macmillan: Pain and Emotion in Modern History

Historiens de la santé: Patients and Healers in the High Roman Empire

THEATRE:

La Opera: Anatomy Theater

FILM:

Motherboard: More Scientists Who Deserve Their Own Biopics

How We Get To Next: Ten Stories of Science and Tech Hollywood Should Tell Next

The Nature of Reality: Presenting the Physics Oscars!

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Is the Vinland Map a Fake?

The Vinland Map Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Vinland Map
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

New Books in Science, Technology and Society: Adam S. Shapiro Trying Biology

Youtube: Historical Reader Podcast Ep. 02: “The Galileo Affair”

 

Evolution Talk: The Case of Patrick Matthew

Remedia: The Tablet: Tom Koch on Ebola and Disease Maps

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Manchester 1824: Exhibition: Merchants of Print From Venice to Manchester 29 January – 21 June 2015 John Rylands Library Manchester

 

University of Worcester: CfP: The Infirmary Conferences: History of Nursing Research Colloquium 9 July 2015

Medical Humanities Summer Course: Italian Perspectives Padua & Venice 6-11 September 2015

Making Waves: Workshop 4: Scientific Lives: Oliver Lodge and the History of Science in the Digital Age Leeds Art Gallery 6 March 2015

American Museum of Natural History: Lecture Opulent Oceans 11 March 2015

The Renaissance Diary: CfP: The Making of Measurement CRASSH University of Cambridge 23-24 July 2015

Science Comma: H G Wells Annual Lecture on WWI science and suffrage Universty of Kent 4 March 2015

Wells photographed by George Charles Beresford in 1920

Wells photographed by George Charles Beresford in 1920

ChoM News: Reconstructing Medieval Medical Libraries: Between the Codex and the Computer 24-26 February 2015

AAR: CfP: Western Esotericism Group Atlanta 21-24 November 2015

Commodities History: CfP: Environmental Histories of Commodities: University of London 11 September 2015

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Knowing Things: Circulations and Transitions of Objects in Natural History 23-24 March 2015

 

York University & Toronto University: CfP: Binocular Conference 5-6 June 2015

The Warburg Institute: Director’s Seminar on Work in Progress 2014–2015

The Warburg Institute: Seminar: Notebooks as Handwritten Library 25 February 2015

 

University of Stavanger: CfP: Animals in the Anthropocene: Human-animal relations in a changing semiosphere 17-19 September 2015

 

Bodleian Libraries: Exhibition: Remembering Radcliffe: 300 years of science and philanthropy 28 November–20 March 2015

 

The Royal Society: Women Writing Science 10 March 2015

Portrait of Caroline Lucretia Herschel

Portrait of Caroline Lucretia Herschel

The Geological Society: Call for Abstracts: William Smith Meeting 2015 – 200 Years and Beyond: The Future of Geological Mapping

Dittrick Medical History Center: Upcoming Events

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Lancaster University: Lectureship in History (Digital Humanities)

CHoM News: 2015–2016 Women in Medicine Fellowships: Application Period Open

Johns Hopkins University: History of Medicine – Postdoctoral Fellowship

University of Edinburgh – National Maritime Museum: Collaborative PhD Research Studentship: Chronometry and Chronometers on British Voyages of Exploration c. 21815– c.1872

Scientific Instrument Society: Small Grants for research on scientific instruments

Swansea University: Lecturer in Medical History

Royal College of Physicians of Ireland: PhD Fellowships in the history of medicine in Ireland

Bodleian Library: Byrne-Bussy Marconi Fellowships

Glasgow University: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarships

Centre for the Study of the Book Bodleian Libraries: Fellowships & Prizes

Preserve Net: State of Vermont: Historical Resources Specialist

Five funded Collaborative Doctorates with the Science Museum Group

University of Oxford: Professorship of the History of Science

NMBU: Two Postdoctoral Fellowships in philosophy (Health Sciences)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #35

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

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Volume #35

Monday 16 February 2015

EDITORIAL:

It seems like only yesterday that we posted the thirty fourth edition of Whewell’s Gazette the preeminent weekly #histSTM links list and here we are back again with Volume #35.

Last weeks editorial touched upon the theme of the lone genius myth in the history of science and it has raised its head again in the last seven days with the celebration of Darwin Day on 12 February, the anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin. The international devoting of a day to one nineteenth century natural historian does rather smack of a lone genius cult, which thought provoke Rebekah “Becky” Higgitt (@beckyfh) to suggest that there should be a #histSTM #NOLONEGENIUSESDAY.

Now I do understand that this day was created as part of the promotion of the scientific theory of evolution against the encroachment of creationism and intelligent design, particularly in the US. However by placing it on Darwin’s birthday and naming the day after him does rather make it look as if he created the theory all on his ownsome.

There was already a rather sweet comment from the Alfred Russel Wallace Twitter account (@ARWallace):

Wallace Day

International Business Times: Darwin Day 2015: Alfred Russel Wallace, the forgotten evolutionist overshadowed by Charles Darwin

There are however many others who deserve more than a mention if talking about the evolution of the theory of evolution starting with James Burnett, Lord Monboddo, Pierre-Louis Moreau de Maupertuis, and Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon moving forward over Jean-Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet, Chevalier de Lamarck and Darwin’s own grandfather Erasmus, the geologists Adam Sedgwick and Charles Lyell and the evolutionists Robert Chambers and Patrick Matthew and other less prominent figures. To this list we could add Captain Robert Fitzroy and other members of the crew of the Beagle.

Beagle Crew

Darwin was anything but a lone genius.

My suggestion, which will undoubtedly be totally ignored, is that we replace Darwin Day with an Evolution Day on the anniversary of the reading of the joint Darwin-Wallace paper at the Linnean Society in London, 1 July 1858, and on that day celebrate all of those who contributed to the evolution of this great theory.

As you can see our masthead owl is still on his skating holiday and this week has sent us a colour photo of himself and his partner.

Birthdays of the week:

Charles Darwin born 12 February 1809

Charles Darwin, six years old — February 12 1815

Charles Darwin, six years old — February 12 1815

“The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life and has determined my whole career”. Charles Darwin

“Scarcely anything in my life made so deep an impression on me. I sometimes think general & popular treatises are almost as important for the progress of science as original work” Darwin on reading John Herschel’s book on scientific method.

“What Lyell did for the inorganic world, Darwin did for the organic.” — Emil du Bois-Reymond “Exposition of the Darwinian Theory,” 1877

“I cannot understand why you scientific people make such a fuss about Darwin. Why, it’s all in Lucretius!” — Matthew Arnold, 1871

The Royal Society: Notes and Records: The many lives of Charles Darwin: early biographies and the definitive evolutionist

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Darwin Day celebration focuses on islands, isolation

Peddling and Scaling God and Darwin: Charles Darwin through Christian spectacles

Darwin Correspondence Project: Darwin and Religion: an introduction

Darwin Correspondence Project: Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa

 

Darwin Correspondence Project: Earthworm activity

Irish Philosophy: The Evolution of Evolution: Darwin’s philosophical forebears

Yovisto: Charles Darwin and the Natural Selection

Letters from Gondwana: Darwin and the Strangest Animal Ever Discovered

Twilight Beast: The bizarre elongated llama

University of Reading: Happy Birthday, Charles Darwin

 

Until Darwin: Darwin, Slavery, the HMS Black Joke, and Seaman Morgan

History of Geology: Charles Darwin – the Monster Slayer

Science Friday: A Year of Darwin

Life Traces of the Georgia Coast: Of Darwin, Earthworms, and Backyard Science

Origins a history of beginnings: When Darwin Met a Neandertal

Brain Pickings: A Graphic Biography of Darwin

darwingraphicbiography1The Mountain Mystery: Charles Darwin, the Geologist

The Public Domain Review: The Naturalist and the Neurologist: On Charles Darwin and James Crichton-Brown

Letters from Gondwana: Darwin, Owen and the ‘London Specimen’.

Krulwich Wonders: Charles Darwin and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Ocean Portal: Charles Darwin’s Ocean Upwelling

 

Emil du Bois_reymond, “Darwin and Copernicus”

American Museum of Natural History: Darwin’s Kids Doodled All Over His “Origins of Species” Manuscript

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Geological Society of London Blog: Happy Darwin Day!

The Irish Times: Unthinkable: Why Charles Darwin is a threat to religion

Herald media: Science and Society: Darwin’s sacred cause – and Lincoln’s also.

The Friends of Charles Darwin: The Darwin bicentennial oak, 6 years on

Join the Friends of Charles Darwin

The twelfth of February is also the birthday of other prominent figures in the history of biology, Jan Swammerdam for example. Whereas my Twitter stream was flooded with tweets about Darwin, my own were the solitary tweets celebrating Swammerdam.

Jan Swammerdam born 12 February

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A Biological Birthday

Jan Swammerdam (1637–1680)

Quotes of the week:

“There’s a story told about a distinguished cardiac surgeon who, about to retire, decided he’d like to take up the history of medicine. He sought out a historian friend and asked her if she had any tips for him. The historian said she’d be happy to help but first asked the surgeon a reciprocal favor: “As it happens, I’m about to retire too, and I’m thinking of taking up heart surgery. Do you have any tips for me?”” – Steven Shapin in his WSJ review of Steven Weinberg’s “To Explain the World”

“Mr. Weinberg identifies his account as a personal view, and there’s no reason why people shouldn’t want to know how an eminent modern scientist (and public intellectual) thinks about all sorts of things. What is interesting is that these different stories about the historical development of science persist, with no prospect that professional historians of science will ever own their subject as, say, art historians own the history of art. Science remains almost unique in that respect. It’s modernity’s reality-defining enterprise, a pattern of proper knowledge and of right thinking, in the same way that—though Mr. Weinberg will hate the allusion—Christian religion once defined what the world was like and what proper knowledge should be. The same circumstance that gives science its immense modern cultural prestige also ensures that there will be an audience for its idealization and celebration. “To Explain the World” is for that audience.“ – Steven Shapin in his WSJ review of Steven Weinberg’s “To Explain the World”

Valentine’s Day

STM historians are not heatless and delivered up some Valentine’s day contributions

The Heart, plate from 'Anatomy of the Visceras,' by Arnaud Eloi Gautier D'Agoty, 1745

The Heart, plate from ‘Anatomy of the Visceras,’ by Arnaud Eloi Gautier D’Agoty, 1745

1746 years ago today, St Valentine was beaten with clubs and beheaded outside the Flaminian Gate in Rome. Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! @BarnabyEdwards

Dr Jennifer Evans: Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine

 

The Recipes Project: Lizards and lettuces: Greek and Roman recipes for Valentines Day

Darwin Correspondence Project: Darwin’s notes on marriage

Valentine's Day

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Donald & Martha Ross

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: The Chimps & The Surgeon: A history of Heart Transplants

Lapham’s Quarterly: Mutual Interest: The courting of Marie Curie

The H-Word: Marriage and the making of scientific careers

O Say Can You See: How do you mend a broken heart?

A double cordiform (heart-shaped) world map made by Mercator in 1550

A double cordiform (heart-shaped) world map made by Mercator in 1550

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

The Washington Post: Val Logsdon Fitch, physics pioneer and Nobel laureate, dies at 91

Val Logsdson Fitch, who won the Nobel Prize for physics, at Princeton University in 1980. (Kanthal/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Val Logsdson Fitch, who won the Nobel Prize for physics, at Princeton University in 1980. (Kanthal/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

 

The New York Times: Val Fitch, Who Discovered Universe to Be Out of Balance, Is Dead at 91

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Val Fitch’s Interview

Scientific American: How a Wire Was Used to Measure a Tiny Force of Gravity

The Nature of Reality: The Big Bang’s Identity Crisis

Philly:com: Year of Light marks a turning point

Starts with a Bang: The Tragic Fate of Physicist Paul Ehrenfest

APS Physics: J Willard Gibbs

 

Uncertain Principles: Science Story: Not a Bath House

Emmy Noether on a boat in 1930.

Emmy Noether on a boat in 1930.

 

Yovisto: Leo Szilard and the Atomic Bomb

 

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Louis Turner’s Interview

http://manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories/louis-turners-interview

Scientific American: How 2 Pro-Nazi Nobelists Attacked Einstein’s “Jewish Science” [Excerpt]

Yovisto: Fritz Zwicky and the Dark Matter

Math Buffalo: Physicists of the African Diaspora

Atomic Heritage Foundation: The Science Behind the Atom Bomb

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Medievalists.net: The Universal Atlas of Fernão Vaz Dourado

Medievalists.net: Medieval Maps of Britain

British Library: American studies blog: Forgotten histories of the Passage: the whalers

Above: frontispiece from vol. 2 of Scoresby's, 'An Account of the Arctic Regions' [copy on display in Lines in the Ice, G.2602 & G.2603]. Image from Archive.org - See more at: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/americas/2015/02/forgotten-histories-of-the-passage-the-whalers.html#sthash.BQkLShUI.dpuf

Above: frontispiece from vol. 2 of Scoresby’s, ‘An Account of the Arctic Regions’ [copy on display in Lines in the Ice, G.2602 & G.2603]. Image from Archive.org – See more at: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/americas/2015/02/forgotten-histories-of-the-passage-the-whalers.html#sthash.BQkLShUI.dpuf

 Medievalists.net: Top 10 Medieval Places That Don’t exist

MEDICINE:

The Sloane Letters Blog: On Tooth Worms

George Campbell Gosling: Perceptions of Pregnancy

Royal College of Physicians: A physicians cane and the secrets it contained

Consultation of physicians or the arms of the undertaker, engraving by William Hogarth, 1736.

Consultation of physicians or the arms of the undertaker, engraving by William Hogarth, 1736.

Huffpost Science: Shifting the Old Debate over Vaccines

Renaissance Utterances: ‘Poky pigges and stynkynge makerels’: Food standards and urban health in medieval England

NYAM: Tattoo Removal: Method or Madness?

University of Minnesota: HSTM: Eating through the Archives: Milk Pancakes (1820)

Ancient Origins: Ancient skull was drilled and harvested for medicine in the 18th century

The Recipes Project: The Torture of Therapeutics in Rome: Galen on Pigeon Dung

 

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Conciatore: Botanical Gardens Reprise

iiTVidya: Henry Walter Bates

Notches: Sexual Politics in the Era of Reagan and Thatcher: Marc Stein in Conversation with Jeffrey Weeks

Niche: One Flew Over The City: Sensorial Experiences of Urban Space

Wonders & Marvels: Humanness in the Age of Discovery: Dog-Headed Men

cynocephali

The Public Domain Review: Neandethals in 3D: L’Homme de La Chapelle

Nautilus: Safecracking the Brain: What neuroscience is learning from code-breakers and thieves

American Museum of Natural History: Barnum Brown: The Man Who Discovered Tyrannosaurus rex

Yovisto: Barnum Brown and the Tyrannosaurus Rex

Palaeo-Wanderer: A blog about the past, living in the present: Introduction

CHEMISTRY

The Royal Society: Philosophical Transactions A: The periodic table: icon and inspiration

The periodic table of ‘endangered elements’. Adapted from the original version created by Mike Pitts of the UK’s Chemistry Innovation Knowledge Transfer Network [6]; apart from uranium, the abundances of all radioactive elements have been ignored. (Online version in colour.)

The periodic table of ‘endangered elements’. Adapted from the original version created by Mike Pitts of the UK’s Chemistry Innovation Knowledge Transfer Network [6]; apart from uranium, the abundances of all radioactive elements have been ignored. (Online version in colour.)

TECHNOLOGY:

Gizmodo: A Secret Stash of Moon Artefacts Has Been Found in Neil Armstrong’s Wardrobe

NYAM: Recipes for Cooking by Electricity (Item of the Month)

IEEE Global History Network: Walter H Brattain

 

AIP: Oral History Transcript – Dr Walter Brattain

Inside the Science Museum: Winston Churchill: Up In The Air

Winston Churchill after his arrival by air at Portsmouth, from Upavon, Wiltshire, 1914. Image credit: Science Museum / SSPL

Winston Churchill after his arrival by air at Portsmouth, from Upavon, Wiltshire, 1914. Image credit: Science Museum / SSPL

Science Museum: Online Science: Wall telephone with Blake transmitter, 1880–1900

Grantland: The Difference Machine: Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper, and Women in Tech

Grist: Meet Lewis Latimer, the African American who enlightened Thomas Edison

Nautilus: The Future of the Web Is 100 Years Old

Endgadget: Annie Easley helped make modern spaceflight possible

To celebrate Black History Month, Engadget is running a series of profiles honoring African-American pioneers in the world of science and technology. Today we take a look at the life and work of Annie Easley.

To celebrate Black History Month, Engadget is running a series of profiles honoring African-American pioneers in the world of science and technology. Today we take a look at the life and work of Annie Easley.

Yovisto: Henry Steinway and the Grand Pianos

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Niche: Landscapes of Science: the first in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and the histories of science, technology, and medicine.

Tincture of Museum: 1. Natural History Museum Library and Archives – Tinc in Museum Library Land

MBS Birmingham: “How are we meant to educate ourselves?” What Libraries did for us

 

Early English Books Online:

Darin Hayton: Explaining A Good Question

King’s College London: Current Maughan Library exhibition: The great leveller: humanity’s struggle against infectious disease

Histscifi.com: Seeing From Afar

BSHS: BSHS Travel Guide

Storify: The research culture is not ready for signed peer review.

THE: World’s oldest scientific journal is focus of new exhibition

scientific-journal-011214-ful_450

The Scientist: Scientific Publishing, 1665

The Guardian: 350 years of publishing from the world’s oldest science journal – in pictures

Early Modern Letters Online: The Correspondence of Athanasius Kircher

American Science: A Very Recent History of Histories of the Future

iai news: Beauty is Truth?

Gothamist: Two-Faced Kitten & Cigar-Smoking Squirrels On View At Morbid Anatomy Museum

Two-headed kitten in a Belljar, photo courtesy of Chris Bradley

Two-headed kitten in a Belljar, photo courtesy of Chris Bradley

The Atlantic: A Failed Metaphor for Intelligent Design

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Career Development Service

Brill History of Modern Science Series: Call for Book Proposals

Making Science Public: Science, politics and science communication

Science & Religion @ Edinburgh: Science, Religion and the Changing Conceptions of Nature – John Hedley Brooke lectures

ESOTERIC:

Bottle Rocket Science: Giordano Bruno on Prudence

Conciatore: Caterina Sforza

Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi (now in the Museum of Forlì.)

Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi
(now in the Museum of Forlì.)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Do you believe in magic?

Conciatore: Iron into Copper

BOOK REVIEWS

JHI Blog: Annotations and Generations John Winthrop’s interactions with the marginalia of John Dee

PopMatters: God’s Planet: In Conversational Orbit of ‘God’s Planet’ With Owen Gingerich

Gonit Sora: Seduced by Logic: Emilie du Chatelet, Mary Somerville and the Newtonian Revolution

Seduced-by-Logic-Emilie-du-Chatelet-Mary-Somerville-and-the-Newtonian-Revolution

Science Book a Day: Severed: A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found

Marx and Philosophy: Review of Books: Ted Benton, Alfred Russel Wallace: Explorer Evolutionist, Public Intellectual – a thinker for Our Own Times?

What’s in John’s Feezer?: Owning Owen

Ether Wave Propaganda: Patrick McCray’s The Visioneers

Brain Pickings: A Radical Journey of Art, Science, and Entrepreneurship: A Self-Taught Victorian Woman’s Visionary Ornithological Illustrations

PLATE XXVIII. Progne Purpurea – Purple Martin

PLATE XXVIII.
Progne Purpurea – Purple Martin

 

The Independent: To Explain the World by Steven Weinberg, book review: A bracing and necessary guide to the discoveries of the 17th century

The Wall Street Journal: Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History

(If you run into a pay wall google the title, Why Scientists Shouldn’t Write History, and click on the first link!)

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Healthcare in Ireland and Britain from 1850: Voluntary, regional and comparative perspectives

Enfilade: Commercial Vision in the Dutch Golden Age

9780226117744

THEATRE:

Wellcome Collections Blog: Tammy Wants You

FILM:

Nature: And the winner is: not science

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Vimeo: Ruth Bourne Turing and Bletchley Park

Youtube: BBC – My Father the Bomb and Me

Youtube: Thomas Edison interviewed at the age of 84

VOX: The origins of the anti-vaccine movement, in 3 Minutes

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

H-Net: CfP: Perspectives for the history of the life sciences: New themes, new sources, new approaches Munich 30 October–1 November 2015

AAHM: CfP: Working Across Species: Comparative Practice in Modern Medical, Biological and Behavioural Sciences

University of Cambridge: Science Festival: Longitude Found 21 March 2015

University of Cambridge: Science Festival: Infectious knowledge: science in popular culture 22 March 2015

Warwick: Humanities Research Centre: Ruling Climate: The theory and practice of environmental governmentality, 1500–1800 16 May 2015

York University Toronto Canada: Science Technology, and the Modern Canada 24-25 April 2015

NI Science Festival: Lecture: How To Make a Dwarf Mammoth 20 February 2015

Perspectives of Science: Special Issue: CfP: The Second Metaphysical Club and its Impact on the Development of American Science and Philosophy

 

University of Oulu Finland: Testing Philosophical Theories Against the History of Science Workshop 21 September 2015

University of Lisbon: CfP: 2nd Portuguese-Brazilian Meeting on the History of Tropical Medicine 14-16 October 2015

CHF: Alien Abduction and Psychic Spies: Lecture: On the Edges of Cold War Science 26 February 2015

Making Waves: Workshop 4: Scientific Lives: Oliver Lodge and the History of Science in the Digital Age

 

Senate House Library: CFP: Marginal presences: unorthodox belief and practice, 1837–2014 23 April 2015

Denver: Victorian Self-Fashioning 22-24 October 2015 Gabriel Finkelstein (@gabridli) is looking for partners for a #histsci session

UCL: Professor Sheila Jsanoff: The Constitutional Place of Science – the 2015 UCL STS Haldane Lecture 12 March 2015

Institute of Historical Research: Lecture: History and Biography – Professor Lawrence Goldman 19 March 2015

Penn State University: Polar Day 2015 27 March

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Royal Holloway: University of London: Eighteenth Century British History and Gender History Teaching Fellow

Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and Apothecaries Hall of Ireland launch PhD Fellowship in the history of medicine in Ireland

Royal Museums Greenwich: Intern Programme: History of Science & Technology

Birkbeck: University of London: History of Science and Medicine (MA)

CHF: Director, Center for Applied History

British School at Rome: Giles Worsley Rome Fellowship

University of Swansea: Lecturer in Medical History

Metropolitan New York Library Council: Reference Archivist, Manuscript Department – The Patricia D. Klingenstein Library

Science Museum: Library and Research Administrator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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