Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #17

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #17

Monday 09 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

Assuming you didn’t blow yourself up on Guy Fawkes Night you are now reading the latest edition of the weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette going off in all directions with all the histories of science, technology and medicine ignited in cyberspace over the last seven days.

The second of November saw a very noteworthy anniversary with the bicentenary of the birth of the mathematician and logician George Boole. Boole’s life is a real rags to mathematical riches story. Born the son of a shoemaker and a housemaid his formal education reached an end at the age of fourteen. A bright lad he became an assistant schoolmaster at the age of sixteen and set up his own small private school whilst only just nineteen. However his true passion was mathematics. Having learnt Latin and Greek as a child he taught himself modern French, Italian and German in order to be able to read the latest continental mathematics; England lagging far behind the continent in mathematics in the early nineteenth century. Already at the age of twenty-four he began publishing papers on cutting edge subjects with the active assistance Of the Cambridge University fellow, Duncan Gregory, a great-great-grandson of Newton’s contemporary James Gregory.

In the late 1840s the British Government decide to set up new universities in Ireland, the Queen’s Colleges of Belfast, Cork and Galway. Boole by now an acknowledged mathematician with a solid reputation decided, with the support of his friends, to apply for a teaching position. One must remember that he had no formal qualifications but with an application that was supported by testimonials from the elite of the then British scientific establishment he was appointed to the professorship of mathematics at Queen’s College Cork in 1849.

Boole was a successful and respected university teacher and would go on to write and publish important textbooks on differential equations and the calculus of finite differences as well as about fifty papers on diverse topic, winning several important awards. If he had never written anything on logic he would still be counted as one of the leading nineteenth-century British mathematicians but is for his work in logic that he mainly remembered today.

In two works, The Mathematical Analysis of Logic from 1847 and An Investigation of The Laws of Thought from 1854, Boole set out his logical algebra, a two-valued logic of classes. Receiving scant attention before his untimely death in 1864 Boolean logic or Boolean algebra, as it is now known went on, in the hands of others, such as C. S. Peirce and Ernst Schröder, to become a powerful analytical tool before being superceded in the 1920s by the mathematical logic of Whitehead and Russell’s Principia.

Just as it seem destined to fade into obscurity it was rediscovered as a perfect medium for the design of electric switching circuits thus going on to become the design tool for the circuitry of the electronic computer on which I’m typing this editorial. As the circuitry of the hardware was two valued it followed that the programmes that run on that circuitry should also contain Boole’s logic at their core.

The self educated son of a cobbler unknowingly delivered the heart of the computer age, as he turned his attention to symbolic logic almost 170 years ago and so it was that the bicentenary of his birth was acknowledge and celebrated last Monday not only in his birthplace Lincoln and in Cork but all over the world.

 George Boole born 2 November 1815

 George_Boole_color

Google: George Boole’s 200th Birthday

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George Boole 200: Celebrating George Boole’s Bicentenary

Yovisto: George Boole – The Founder of Modern Logic

Time: New Google Doodle Honors Prolific Mathematician George Boole’s 200th Birthday

Sydney Padua: Happy 200th Birthday George Boole!

Irish Philosophy: Ones and Zeros

The River-side: George Boole blog posts

Scientific American: The Bicentennial of George Boole, the Man Who Laid the Foundations of the Digital Age

UCC Library: Boole Papers

Dan Cohen: George Boole at 200: The Emotion Behind the Logic

BBC: Magazine Monitor: George Boole and the AND OR NOT gates

BBC: World at One: Marcus on Boole

Silicon Republic: 6 Disciplines Georg Boole revolutionised

Open Plaques: George Boole (1815–1864)

facebook: Capturing George Boole Day at UCC

Stephen Wolfram Blog: George Boole: A 200-Year View

Nature: Smooth operator

RTE Player: Film: The Genius of George Boole

Irish Philosophy: George Boole Day – Bicentenary Links [an even longer links list than the one here!]

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Quotes of the week:

Joseph Needham

Joseph Needham

“Thomas D’Urfey d.1723, poet, wit, author (e.g. of a book titled ‘The Fart’) who said that “the principle business of life is to enjoy it”!” – Alun Withey (@DrAlun)

“My computer is actually based on Babbage’s lesser known creation; “The Indifference Engine.”

Or maybe it isn’t. I don’t really care”. – Sarcastic Rover (@SarcasticRover)

“Don’t worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats.” – Howard Aiken h/t @JohnDCook

Last letter of Capt Charles Clerke to Joseph Banks always gets to me. Clerke died in the Bering Sea while commanding the last Cook Exped. His concerns are duty to country, getting specimens to Banks, and asking that Banks take on patronage for Clerke’s men. ‘Now my dear & honoured friend I must bid you a final adieu; may you enjoy many happy years in this world, & in the end ‘attain that fame your indefatigable industry so richly deserves.’ *sheds a tear* – Cathryn Pearce (@CathrynPearce)

“Though I love chemistry much – very much, I love botany more!” – John Torrey h/t

@KewDC

“Botany I assure you, my dear Sir, is with me a far more pleasant subject to write on, than Cholera” – Charles Short h/t @KewDC

A telegraph company's answer to Bell's offer to sell them the telephone patent

A telegraph company’s answer to Bell’s offer to sell them the telephone patent

“On this day in history, people who have since been forgotten created things that will never be found nor understood” – Night Vale Podcast

“The limits to my, and all historians’, knowledge and expertise. Lest we forget” – Tina Adcock (@TinaAdcock)

“Today I learned about chicken phrenology. This was a thing. It predicted chicken productivity. I don’t know what to do with this info”. – Michael Egan (@EganHistory)

“I said that the only thing to be learned from history is that there is nothing to learn”. – Emil du Bois-Reymond

“For the astronomer and the physicist may both prove the same conclusion — that the earth, for instance, is round.” – Thomas Aquinas h/t @JohnDCook

“There is TOO MUCH STUFF. Of all kinds. Please stop making/discovering it”. – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

“The outer circles of hell are slightly softer, while the centre remains quite firm to the bite” – Al Dente’s Inferno. – @NickMotown

Maria Mitchell Quote

Birthdays of the Week:

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 Lise Meitner born 7 November 1878

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Unsung! I hardly think so.

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AHF: Lise Meitner

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CHF: Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, and Fritz Strassmann

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Marie Curie born 7 November 1867

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CHF: We’re History: Marie Curie Led Science – and Women Scientists – to a New Age

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AHF: Marie Curie

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Brain Pickings: Radioactive: The Incredible Story of Marie Curie Told in Cyanotype

Pierre and Marie Curie Source: Wikimedia Commons

Pierre and Marie Curie
Source: Wikimedia Commons

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: The Arecibo Radio Telescope – Looking for Extraterrestrial Signals

Cosmology: Carnegie Science: 1920: Harlow Shapley Finds Our Place in the Milky Way

Physics Today: Arch and scaffold: How Einstein found his field equations

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Robert Nobles and William Sturm’s Interview – Part 2

NASA: 15 Years of Station Told in 15 Gifs

Source: The Guardian

Source: The Guardian

The Guardian: 15 years of the International Space Station – in pictures

Yovisto: Howard Shapley and the Milky Way

FQXi Blogs: Losing Neil Armstrong

AHF: Plutonium

AIP: Nick Holonyak

Motherboard: Why We Still Want Laika the Space Dog to Come Home

Laika in her final resting place. Image: National Space Science Data Center

Laika in her final resting place. Image: National Space Science Data Center

NEWS! From the Naval Observatory: New Research Explains Moving Meridian Mystery

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Leslie Groves’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Paula and Ludwig Bruggemann’s Interview

Telegraph & Argos: Celebrating the life of Fred Hoyle, who coined the term Big Bang Theory

The New Yorker: Tangled Up In Entanglement

Quanta Magazine: Einstein’s Parable of Quantum Insanity

Institute of Advanced Studies: The Advent and Fallout of EPR

AHF: Norman Ramsey

Restricted Data. The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The doubts of J. Robert Oppenheimer

The New York Times: How Politics Shaped General Relativity

Motherboard: The Online Afterlife of Manhattan Project Physicist Philip Morrison

AHF: Phillip Morrison

Phys Org: On the 120th anniversary of the X-ray, a look at how it changed our view of the world

Hand mit Ringen (Hand with Rings): print of Wilhelm Röntgen's first "medical" X-ray, of his wife's hand, taken on 22 December 1895 and presented to Ludwig Zehnder of the Physik Institut, University of Freiburg, on 1 January 1896 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hand mit Ringen (Hand with Rings): print of Wilhelm Röntgen’s first “medical” X-ray, of his wife’s hand, taken on 22 December 1895 and presented to Ludwig Zehnder of the Physik Institut, University of Freiburg, on 1 January 1896
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Universe Today: Who Was Galileo Galilei?

Universe Today: Who Was Christiaan Huygens?

Popular Science: When We First Saw The Far Side of the Moon

Princeton University Press Blog: Feynman on the historic debate between Einstein & Bohr

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

 

Herbert G. Ponting (British, 1870 - 1935) "Vida", one of the best of the dogs used by Capt. Smith on his South Pole Expedition (1910 - 1913)., about 1912, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Herbert G. Ponting (British, 1870 – 1935)
“Vida”, one of the best of the dogs used by Capt. Smith on his South Pole Expedition (1910 – 1913)., about 1912,
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

 

 British Library: Maps and views blog: Magnificent Maps of New York

Ptak Science Books: The End is Near for You: Germany, May, 1945

Slate Vault: These 18th– and 19th-Century “Dissected Maps” Were the First Jigsaw Puzzles

Worlds Revealed Geography and Maps at The Library of Congress: Of Maps and Data

BBC News: National Library shares 2nd Century Ptolemy map image

_86547920_prima_europe_tabula

UVA Today: McGregor Library Offers Rare Digital History of the Americas

Christie’s The Art People: CAO, JUNYI (FL. 1644). TIANXIA JIUBIAN FENYIE RENJI LUCHENG QUANTU. [A COMPREHENSIVE MAP OF THE KINGDOM OF CHINA AND NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES.] NANJING: BEGINNING OF SUMMER IN THE 17TH YEAR OF THE REIGN OF EMPEROR CHONGZHEN [I.E. 1644].

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Hyperallergic: 15 Million Pages of Medical History Are Going Online

Dr Alun Withey: BBC Free Thinking Feature: Bamburgh Castle Surgery, c. 1770–1800

Remedia: Amateur Surgeon of Dutiful Citizen? The First Aid Movement in the Nineteenth Century

Cartoon from Punch , 1914. Doctor (at Ambulance Class) ‘My dear lady, do you realise that his lad’s ankle was supposed to be broken before you bandaged it?’ © Wellcome Images, Wellcome Library, London.

Cartoon from Punch , 1914. Doctor (at Ambulance Class) ‘My dear lady, do you realise that his lad’s ankle was supposed to be broken before you bandaged it?’ © Wellcome Images, Wellcome Library, London.

Fugitive Leaves: Louis Pasteur, Joseph Lister, and the Mystery of the Smudged Date

Atlas Obscura: Object of Intrigue: The Prosthetic Iron Hand of a 16th-Century Knight

Historic UK: The Reputed Plague Pits of London

Medical Library: The Bamberg Surgery: An early European surgical text

A Covent Garden Gilflirt’s Guide to Life: For the Patient Who Has Everything…

Hopes & Fears: From lemon rinds to knitting needles: A visual history of abortion and birth control

MOTHER SHOWER SYRINGES

MOTHER SHOWER SYRINGES

Medievalists.net: Nursing and Caring: An Historical Overview from Anciet Greek Tradition to Modern Times

Harvard School of Dental Medicine: History

Dangerous Minds: The Literal Origins of the Phrase ‘Don’t Blow Smoke Up My Ass’

Thomas Morris: The rocket man

BT: Ingenious: Remembering the Post Office’s role in creating the first NHS hearing aid

Royal Museums Greenwich: ‘God preserve us all!’: Samuel Pepys and the Great Plague

Technological Stories: What If Beddoes & Davy Had Attempted Surgical Anesthesia in 1799?

Wonders & Marvels: The Unmanly Art of Breastfeeding in the Eighteenth Century

Library Company: The Library Company of Philadelphia Consults Aristotle’s Masterpiece

Origins of Science as a Visual Pursuit: Networking with a Book, or How Vesalius Gave away his Complimentary Copies of the Fabrica

The Public Domain Review: Georg Bartisch’ Ophthalmodouleia (1583)

L0078612 Folio 218 recto, Bartisch, Ophthalmodouleia, 1583. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Coloured woodcut of a woman with an enlarged and protruding eyeball. Coloured Woodcut 1583 Ophthalmodouleia. Das ist Augendienst. Newer vnd wolgegründter Bericht von Ursachen vnd Erkentnüs aller Gebrechen, Schäden vnd Mängel der Augen vnd des Gesichtes, wie man solchen anfenglich mit gebürlichen mitteln begegenen, vorkommen vnd wehren, auch wie man alle solche gebresten künstlich durch Artzney, Instrument vnd Handgrieffe curiren, wircken vnd vertreiben sol ... / George Bartisch Published: 1583. Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

L0078612 Folio 218 recto, Bartisch, Ophthalmodouleia, 1583.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
Coloured woodcut of a woman with an enlarged and protruding eyeball.
Coloured Woodcut
1583 Ophthalmodouleia. Das ist Augendienst. Newer vnd wolgegr√ºndter Bericht von Ursachen vnd Erkentn√ºs aller Gebrechen, Sch√§den vnd M√§ngel der Augen vnd des Gesichtes, wie man solchen anfenglich mit geb√ºrlichen mitteln begegenen, vorkommen vnd wehren, auch wie man alle solche gebresten k√ºnstlich durch Artzney, Instrument vnd Handgrieffe curiren, wircken vnd vertreiben sol … /
George Bartisch
Published: 1583.
Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Mental Floss: 6 Ways Europe’s Best Doctors Tried to Cure Beethoven’s Deafness

BuzzFeed: Morbidly Beautiful Pictures Reveal the Horror of Surgery in the Victorian Era

O Say Can You See: The peace gun

Mental Floss: 11 Weird Old-School Plastic Surgery Techniques

TECHNOLOGY:

Anita Guerrini: The Moving Skeleton

Conciatore: Galileo and Glass

Open Culture: How Film Was Made in 1958: A Kodak Nostalgia Moment

Yovisto: The first Worm hit the Internet 24 Years ago

Yovisto: The Dream of the Largest Aircraft ever built

H-4 Hercules “Spruce Goose”

H-4 Hercules “Spruce Goose”

Yovisto: Alexander Lippisch and the Delta Wing

Letters of Note: New Fangled Writing Machine

The Creators Project: Rediscover Failed Eastern Utopias in Stark Winter Photographs

Diseases of Modern Life: Captivating respiration: the ‘Breathing Napoleon’

Yovisto: Alois Senefelder revolutionized Printing Technology

Yovisto: The Cornier Do X – the World’s Largest Seaplane

Conciatore: Lake of Flowers

University of Washington: University Libraries: Digital Collections: Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collection

Design is Fine History is Mine: Joseph Edmonson Mechanical calculator

B1131-2 Calculator, mechanical, Edmondson's  Patent, for addition and substraction, brass and steel mechansim, in polished wooden case with brass handles, W F Stanley, London, England, 1880

B1131-2 Calculator, mechanical, Edmondson’s
Patent, for addition and substraction, brass
and steel mechansim, in polished wooden
case with brass handles, W F Stanley,
London, England, 1880

Ptak Science Books: Measuring Things with Mountains & the German Big Gun of WWI (1918)

Ptak Science Books: Sound Landscapes of Lost Acoustics

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Niche: When Blue Meets Green: The Intersection of Workers and Environmentalists

Niche: Seeing the Forest (Workers) for the Trees: Environment and Labour History in New Brunswick Forest

Science News: New fascination with Earth’s ‘Boring Billion’

Electronic Scholarly Publishing: Free Online Book: A History of Genetics by A. H. Sturtevent

histgene_f

AGU Blogosphere: Norman Bowen’s Papers

Letters from Gondwana: Darwin and the Flowering Plant Evolution in South America

Gizmodo: This Was the First Murder Solved Using Geology

Concocting History: The birth of roses

us10.campaign.com: Gertrude Bell: Archaeologist, Writer, Explorer

f4d83378-f46c-4b1a-85fb-7b3b374d512b

Science League of America: Evolution for John Doe, Part 2

Embryo Project: August Friedrich Leopold Weismann (1834–1914)

The Guardian: Scientists warned the US president about global warming 50 years ago today

Embryo Project: Oviraptor philoceratops Dinosaurs

York Dispatch News: Scientists discuss ‘What if?’ scenario in Dover intelligent-design case

Palaeoblog: Died This Day: Henry Fairfield Osborn

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Wallace’s megapode mystery…

Active History: What about the people? Place, memory, and Industrial Pollution in Sudbury

Paige Fossil History: Murdering Their Child: Wallace, Darwin, and Human Origins

History of Geology: A.R. Wallace on Geology, Great Glaciers and the Speed of Evolution

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Antoine Lavoisier’s Theory of Combustion

Today in Science History: – November 2 – Thomas Midgely, Jr.

Label for Ethyl Gasoline Additive. Leaded gasoline was one of the major inventions of Thomas Midgley Jr.

Label for Ethyl Gasoline Additive. Leaded gasoline was one of the major inventions of Thomas Midgley Jr.

Academia: The Hidden History of Phlogiston (pdf)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Baconian Induction in the Principia

The People’s Daily Morning Star: World-Leading Mathematician and Activist Barry Cooper Dies

JISCM@il: New digital humanities tools

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: Newberry Library

Project Muse: Bulletin of the History of Medicine: Special Issue Communicating Reproduction Contents Page

The Recipes Project: Introducing… Graduate Student Posts!

BSHS: Reader Project in the History of Science – Survey

Medicine, ancient and modern: A post for the Day of the Dead (All Souls) and Remembrance Day: Galen, Classics and the First World War

Marburg, Issel’s native city, at the turn of the 20th c.

Marburg, Issel’s native city, at the turn of the 20th c.

Conciatore: Bibliomaniac

American Science: Can Contributors Change Journals?

Medievalist.net: The Medieval Magazine: Medicine in the Middle Ages (Issue 40)

Chicago Journals: ISIS: Focus: Bounded Rationality and the History of Science

The Recipe Project: Historical Recipes as Sources: A Special Series

History Today: A German scholar living in 17th-century London revolutionised the way scientists shared news of their latest advances

Publishing pioneer: Henry Oldenburg by Jan van Cleve, 1668.

Publishing pioneer: Henry Oldenburg by Jan van Cleve, 1668.

The H-Word: The best history of science fancy dress costumes

The #EnvHist Weekly

Royal College of Physicians: Wartime damage: evidence from the books

CHSTM: Science in the Jungle: The Missionary Mapping and National Imaging of Western Amazonia

Fistful of Cinctans: Subject Specialist Knowledge

Blink: Keepers of ancient peace

The National: Opinion: Recalling the science of Islam’s Golden Age is not enough

Alun Salt: Does history feel better when it has no connection to the past?

ESOTERIC:

Cambridge University Library Special Collections: A Book of Magic

Discover: The Crux: The Man Who Tried to Weigh The Soul

Robert Blair The Grave The Soul hovering over the Body reluctantly parting with Life

Robert Blair The Grave The Soul hovering over the Body reluctantly parting with Life

Penn Library: Penn in Hand: Selected Manuscripts: Alchemy

Steve Silberman has won the prestigious Samuel Johnson Prize for his book NeuroTribes

Youtube: Samuel Johnson Prize Winner Announcement 2015

Home

BBC Arts: Samuel Johnson Prize 2015: Steve Silberman

The Guardian: ‘Hopeful’ study of autism wins Samuel Johnson prize 2015

The Guardian: Steve Silberman on winning the Samuel Johnson prize: ‘I was broke, broke, broke’

‘Science is under attack’ … Silberman, whose book Neurotribes has won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

‘Science is under attack’ … Silberman, whose book Neurotribes has won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

The Independent: The publication of Steve Silberman’s Neurotribes will change how we understand autism

The Guardian: My hero: Allen Ginsberg by Steve Silberman

BBC News: Science author Steve Silberman on his book on autism

The Independent: Samuel Johnson Prize 2015: History of autism is first popular science winner of non-fiction book award

BOOK REVIEWS:

THE: Making Nature: The History of a Scientific Journal, by Melinda Baldwin

Science Book a Day: Chilled: How Refrigeration Changed the World and Might Do So Again

Brain Pickings: Nature Anatomy: A Glorious Illustrated Love Letter to Curiosity and the Magic of Our World

Science Book a Day: Genius at Play: The Curious Mind of John Horton Conway

genius-at-play

Centre for Medical Humanities: The Making of Modern Anthrax, 1875–1920 reviewed by Dr Anne Hanley

Science Book a Day: The Joy of X: A Guided Tour of Math, From One to Infinity

NEW BOOKS:

Rubedo Press: William Lilly’s History of his Life and Times 300 Anniversary Edition

University of Chicago Press: Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform

Gizmodo: How Ta-Nehisis Coates Inspired a Book About the Hunt for Vulcan

MIT News: 3Q: Thomas Levenson on the hunt for Vulcan, the missing planet

Soundcloud: The Hunt for Vulcan by Thomas Levenson, Narrated by Kevin Pariseau

National Geographic: Book Talk: The Hunt for Vulcan, the Planet That Wasn’t There

Harvard University Press: Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

9780674967984

Princeton University Press: An Einstein Encyclopedia

Wiley Online Library: A Companion to the History of American Science

Palgrave: Domesticity in the Making of Modern Science

Historiens de la santé: Les sources du funéraire en France à l’époque contemporaine

New Books in Science; Technology, and Society: The Courtiers’ Anatomists: Animals and Humans in Louis XIV’s Paris

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs until 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

CLOSING SOON: Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope

Hooke's microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia. Source Wikimedia Commons

Hooke’s microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia.
Source Wikimedia Commons

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs until 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Saturday

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA Source: Wikimedia Commons

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Gresham College: Lecture: Hamilton, Boole and their Algebras 17 November 2015

HSS: Free Showing: Merchants of Doubt Colonial Ballroom, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA 21 November 2015

Social Media Knowledge Exchange: Event: Can social media work for me? Cambridge 19 November

medhumlabmanchester: Launch Event 19 November 2015

ChoM News: Lecture: Studying Traumatic Wounds and Infectious Diseases in the Civil War Hospital Harvard Medical School 19 November 2015

UCL: STS: Talk: Professor Psillos Induction and Natural Necessities Gordon House 17 November 2015

University of London: School of Advanced Studies: Debate: Opening the book: reading and the evolving technology(ies) of the book 10 November 2015

Bodleian Library & Radclife Camera: John Aubrey and the idea of fame 10 November 2015

John Aubrey Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Aubrey
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Linnean Society: Explore Your Archive: Natural History on Record 16–20 November 2015

CHF: Rohm and Haas Fellow in Focus Lecture: William Newman, “New Light on Isaac Newton’s Alchemy”

UCLA Department of History: Lecture: Lorraine Daston: The Immortal Archives: Nineteenth-Century Science Imagines the Future 17 November 2015

Wellcom Library: Seminar: Executing magic: the healing power of criminal corpses in European popular culture 10 November 2015

The Indian Express: Film on Ramanujan to open IFFI this year, Spain is focus country

CHoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine “Madness and Mayhem in Maine: The Parkman-Portland Parley and a Mass. Murder” 12 November 2015

The Geological Society: The William Smith Map Bicentenary (1815–2015) Events

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Charles Lyell: Principles of Geology: Being an Attempt to Explain the Former Changes of the Earth's Surface, by Reference to Causes Now in Operation London, 1830–1833

Charles Lyell: Principles of Geology: Being an Attempt to Explain the Former
Changes of the Earth’s Surface, by Reference to Causes Now in Operation
London, 1830–1833

TELEVISION:

Forbes: The History Channel Delves Into Einstein’s Brain

BBC Arts: Samuel Johnson Prize 2015: Steve Silberman

io9: It’s a Fine Line Between Historical Fact and Fiction on Manhattan

AHF: “Manhattan” Series 2, Episode 4: The Indispensable Man

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: The Carbon Arc Lamp

Youtube: CRASSH: Simon Schaffer – Imitation Games: Conspiratorial Sciences and Intelligent Machines

Youtube: The Geological Society: Apollo and the Geology of the Moon

Youtube: Ralph Baer and Bill Harrison Play Ping-Pong Video Game, 1969

Bridgeman Footage: Clip of the Week: ‘[There is] nowhere I would rather be than in my lab, staining my clothes and getting paid to play’ – Marie Curie

Youtube: Einstein’s Miracle Year: The Road to Relativity

Youtube: Diary of a Snakebite Death

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Missed in History: Isaac Newton

Comparative Media Studies: MIT: Tom Levenson, Einstein, Mercury, and the Hunt for Vulcan

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Roy Porter Student Essay Prize

The Mindlin Foundation: Mindlin Science Communication Prize Deadline 15 November 2015

SocPhilSciPract: CfP: Graduate Journal in Hist/Phil/Soc of Science: Pulse

University of Leeds: Workshop 2016: Telecommunications expertise and technologies developed during the First World War

Johns Hopkins University: CfP: The Making of the Humanities V 5–7 October 2016

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: The Mater of Mimesis. Studies on mimesis and materials in nature, art and science 17–18 December 2015

LSE: The UK and European Conference on Foundations of Physics will take place this year on 16-18 July 2016

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology Halle/Saale Germany: CfP: Dispersion and Impact in the Indian Ocean World: 23–24 September 2016

BSHS: Call for Nominations: The BSHS John Pickstone Prize

John V Pickstone  Source: Wikimedia Commons

John V Pickstone
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Prague: Pariah sciences. Episteme, Power and Legitimization of Knowledge, from Animal Electricity to Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions. Symposium at the 7th International Conference of the European Society for the History of Science 22-24 September 2016

City University of New York: Earth and Environmental Scienvces: Fall 2015 Colloquium Schedule

Calgary Alberta: CfP: Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science (CSHPS) annual conference part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences meeting 28–30 May 2016

ESRC: CfP: Dietary Innovation and Disease in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries Venice 8–10 June 2016

University of Wuppertal: Workshop: Jesuit early modern science in a digital perspective 26–27 November 2016

Birkbeck College: CfP: After the End of Disease 26–27 May 2016

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences: Workshop: History of Scientific Publication 3–4 December 2015

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy Conference 3–6 June 2016

Salle des Actes de la faculté de Pharmacie, Paris: Journée d’études: Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715), un savant en son siècle 18 Novembre 2015

L’Université de Sherbrooke: Appel à communications: L’histoire extra-muros : des frontières qui s’élargissent. Regards croisés sur les approches émergentes et l’interdisciplinarité dans la pratique historique 25–26 Février 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Exeter: Associate Research Fellow The Medical World of Early Modern England, Ireland and Wales c. 1500–1750

Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia: Three-Year Post-doc fellowship on Vernacular Astronomy and Meteorology in Renaissance Italy

LMU Munich: The Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP) invites applications for Visiting Fellowships and Research Group Fellowships

London School of Tropical Hygiene and Medicine: Research Fellow

The Bodleian Library: Visiting Fellowships

University of Leeds: New Postdoctoral Position: Cultures of the Book

University of London: Institute of Historical Research (IHR) Librarian

Wellcome Trust: Special Collections manager X2 Deadline 11 November

University of Leeds: Men, Women and Care: Applications open for 2 ERC funded PhD studentships

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Travel Grants: Duke University’s History of Medicine Collection

Historic Britain: Assistant Science Advisor

Open University: History of Medicine PhD programme 2016

Universal Short Tittle Catalogue: PhD Studentship History of the Book

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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