Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol: #16

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #16

Monday 02 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

Once again your weekly #histSTM links list is available on computer, tablet and smartphone screens bringing you a comprehensive selection of the histories of science, technology and medicine picked up from the far flung reaches of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Our guiding acronym #histSTM includes both of the disciplines science and technology. These two areas of human endeavour have shared an intricate and complex history over the millennia. Historians and philosophers of both disciplines have often discussed and tried to define the exact relationship between the two throughout their twisted and long history. Did the one lead or drive the other or did they develop totally separately from each other. If so was that development parallel, the one mirroring the other or did each go its own way. The answers to these questions are complex and to some extent still unresolved; the arguments ebbing and flowing from generation to generation.

About a week ago Matt Ridley reopened that debate with an article in The Wall Street Journal, The Myth of Basic Science. In this article he argued that technology was not driven by basic science but developed separately by itself; technologists finding technological solutions for technological problems when required. The conclusion he seemed to draw in his article is that governments should not finance basic scientific research but leave the technological innovation required by society to industry, who will deliver the goods when necessary.

This article provoked a cry of outrage amongst both scientists and STS people. Particularly in view of the fact that both the Conservatives in Britain and the GOP in America are seriously threatening to cut funding for basic scientific research. The first salvo for the defence was fired by Jack Stilgoe in an article in the Guardian, Countering libertarian arguments against science funding. Stilgoe was soon joined on the barricades by historian of technology Anton Howes , who unleashed a double barrelled blast on his blog Capitalism’s Cradle, Innovation vs Science and Is Innovation Autonomous?

Nature got into the fray with an article entitled Does Innovation always come from science?, in which Matt Ridley was seen to backpedal, claiming per email that he had not suggested cutting science research grants.

The final attack to date came from Derek Lowe writing on his blog In The Pipeline, Technology and Funding: Myths and Alternate Worlds. Lines have been drawn, positions have been taken and in all probability the argument will remain as inconclusive as it always has done.

Quotes of the week:

“Creationist commenter: ‘I never saw a monkey turn into a man’. Presumably, however, they were there to see Eve fashioned from Adam’s rib”. – Richard Carter (@friendsofdarwin)

“The scientific literature should exist to communicate ideas and results, not to inflate egos with impact factors and citations”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“A brilliant German word: “verschlimmbessern,” which means ‘to make something worse by trying to improve it’. Happens everyday everywhere”. – Richard Smith (@Richard56)

“Stephen’s 1st law of typographical errors: typos can be neither created or destroyed; autocorrection serves only to move them around”. – Stephen Curry (@Stephen_Curry)

“UK: where fake medicine is legal under health laws, while tea is an exempted substance under drug laws”. – Frank Swain (@SciencePunk)

“Emeritus professors never die. They just lose their faculties”. – Shit Academics Say (@AcademicsSay)

“I bet when cuneiform was invented everyone was like, look at how no one talks anymore and just stares at their tablets”. Ekaterina Sedia (@esedia)

#histSTM Halloween

 95237

The H-Word: Babbage’s brain and Galileo’s finger: six macabre scientific relics

Concocting History: Peter Peter Pumpkin Eater

Ashmolean Halloween:

Early Modern Medicine: Pumpkin Power

CHF: Science and the Supernatural in the 17th Century

The Public Domain Review: The Poet, the Physician and the Birth of the Modern Vampire

Harvard Divinity School: Who are the Dead and What do They Want?

Scientific American: Cemetery Science: The Geology of Mausoleums

Smithsonian.com: The Gruesome History of Eating Corpses as Medicine

Motherboard: From Zombies to Telepathy: When Science Takes on the Supernatural

Strange Remains: The morbid history of Harvard Medical School

1446271417954231

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 26 – Far Side of the Moon

AIP: Henrietta Swope

AHF: Isotope Separation Methods

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Paula and Ludwig Bruggemann’s Interview

JHI Blog: Goodnight Moon: Kepler’s ‘Somnium’

Kepler’s ‘Somnium’ and other writings, published posthumously in 1634

Kepler’s ‘Somnium’ and other writings, published posthumously in 1634

The Somnium Project: Exploring Johannes Kepler’s ‘Somnium’ – the first science fiction story

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 27 – Lise Meitner

Yovisto: The Peltier Effect

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ted Taylor’s Interview

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: “Mortuary Services in Civil Defense” (1956)

OUP Blog: Thinking of Kepler on the Beach

Johannes Kepler, 1610. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Johannes Kepler, 1610. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The Guardian: The astronomer who saved his mother from being burned as a witch

lorentz.leidenuniv.ni: Four centuries of physics dissertations from Leiden University

The Irish Times: Fred Hoyle: The brilliant man who lost the Big Bang debate

AHF: Hydrogen Bomb – 1950

Academia: Priority claims and public disputes in astronomy: E.M. Antoniadi, J. Comas I Solà and the search for authority and social prestige in the early twentieth century Pedro Ruiz-Castell (pdf)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Marshall Rosenbluth’s Interview

Yovisto: The “King of Bombs” and the Craze of Cold War Nuclear Armament

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: The improbable William Laurence

Ptak Science Books: Glorious Gearworks, Extended­ – Models of the Solar System, 1817–1821

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

Robinince’s Blog: Psychoastronomy – a morning of awe with Brian Cox

Science Notes: Today in Science History – November 1 – Operation Ivy Mike

AIP: Hermann Bondi

Fusion: Einstein’s life was in turmoil while he developed general relativity

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Untold lives blog: Captain Cook – Endeavour and Resolution

Just Bod: The Isles: Monsters, Mariners and Old Maps of Exploration

Anglesey by John Speed 1610 Public Domain Wikimedia

Anglesey by John Speed 1610 Public Domain Wikimedia

Sarah E. Bond: Mapping the Underworld: Space, Text, and Imaginary Landscapes in Antiquity

The Afternoon Map: The Most Beautiful 19th Century Arabic Map of Syria and Palestine

World Digital Library: World Map, 1566

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Smithsonian.com: How Contact Lenses Were Made in 1948

British Pathé

British Pathé

Thomas Morris: A case for Dr Coffin

Royal College of Physicians: A physician’s cane and the secrets it contained

Remedia: Butchers & Surgeons: Rethinking the 17th-Century English Surgeon

Atlas Obscura: The Tarantula-Possessed Woman Who Could Only be Cured by Dance

Independent: Obituary: Anne Spoerry

Advances in the History of Psychology: BPS’s The Psychologist: Psychology and the Great War, 1914–1918

The Guardian: Can you stomach it? The grim, grisly world of historical surgery – in pictures

Source: The Guardian

Source: The Guardian

Origins of Science as a Visual Pursuit: Networking with the Fabrica

BHL: Eerie Anatomy: Vesalius’ De humani corporis fabrica

Medium: Ancient Medicine and Fetal Personhood

Thomas Morris: Glass half-empty

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 28 – Jonas Salk

Discover: A Mouldy Cantaloupe & The Dawn of Penicillin

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 29 – Baruj Benacerraf

Thomas Morris: Saliva and crow’s vomit

Wales Online: Welsh History Month: Some kind of Recorde…polymath, physician, mathematician and inventor of the equals sign

robert2

Harvard Gazette: Lessons on the brain: The Phineas Gage story

TECHNOLOGY:

The modern world in old Ladybird, pt 54.

The modern world in old Ladybird, pt 54. “The computer is like a gigantic cash register”
(1972)

Conciatore: Solid Water

Plus Magazine: Happy Birthday, George Boole!

Popular Mechanics: 11 Calculators That Show How Far Computing Has Come in the Past 2,000 Years

Quanta Magazine: The Physical Origin of Universal Computing

George Boole 200: Georg Boole: Timeline of Life Events

Wellcome Library Blog: An epoch in the history of typography

Simple City: Obituary Barry Cooper, 1943–2015

O Say Can You See: 6 surprising objects in the history of the Internet

Prisoner ankle bracelet and control box, about 1990

Prisoner ankle bracelet and control box, about 1990

Ptak Science Books: America Attacked, 1937 – and the Unusual Architectural Response to poison Gas and the Homeless

Yovisto: Hans Grade – German Aviation Pioneer

Motherboard: Heroic Junkyard Owner Says He Saved Priceless Moon Rover From Scrap Heap

Conciatore: Witch’s Brew of Glass

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 30 – Joseph Wilson Swan

Joseph Wilson Swan

Joseph Wilson Swan

Alex Wellenstein: RIP Joan Lisa Bromberg, historian who wrote on lasers, fusion, and many things.

Georgian Gent: Hester Bateman – an extraordinary woman: a brilliant silversmith, clever in business

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

AMNH: The Horseshoe Crab

flickr: Biodiversity Heritage Library’s photos: Birds

Fistful of Cinctans: Sea Fables Explained

barnacles-web

Embryo Project: “The Potency of the First Two Cleavage Cells in Echinoderm Development. Experiment Production of Partial and Double Formations” (1891–1892), by Hans Driesch

No Roads Barred: Tracing the footsteps of A. R. Wallace in Singapore

Forbes: In the Alps Myths about dragons may be Rooted in Geology

Yovisto: Othniel Charles Marsh and the Great Bone Wars

TrowelBlazers: Maria Antonina Czaplicka

Portrait of Marie Czaplicka and Henry Usher Hall standing with some of the objects which they collected on the Yenisei Expedition to Siberia (1914-15). Images courtesy of the Pitt-Rivers Photo Collection.

Portrait of Marie Czaplicka and Henry Usher Hall standing with some of the objects which they collected on the Yenisei Expedition to Siberia (1914-15).
Images courtesy of the Pitt-Rivers Photo Collection.

Daily Kos: Daily Bucket: Herbaria Ode and Obituary

Embryo Project: Gavin Rylands de Beer (1899–1972)

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: Neptunism and Transformism: Robert Jameson and other Evolutionary Theorists in Early Nineteenth-Century Scotland

Science League of America: Evolution for John Doe , Part 1

AL.com: Alabama’s hidden role in Darwin’s theory of Evolution

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: Speaking of chemistry

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 30 – Hermann Franz Moritz Kopp

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Academia: The rising of chemical kinds through epistemic iteration Hasok Chang (pdf)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Wikipedia: WikiProject Women Scientists

Barts Health NHS: Archives catalogue

EMROC: The Transcribathon in Numbers… and Names

The Recipes Project: Transcription Communities: Experiencing a Transcribathon in a Class Setting

Medical Museion: Exhibiting Epistemic Objects

BSHS: Ayrton Prize Shortlist

AEON: Paradigms Lost

BBC News: Historical items ‘being destroyed’ by mould in Carmarthen

Book Mould Source: National Library of Wales

Book Mould
Source: National Library of Wales

History Matters: Historical Fiction and Fictional History

Conciatore: Neri and the Inquisition

HSS: October 2015 Newsletter

HSS: Interview—Joan Vandegrift: On the Occasion of Her 30th Anniversary as Manuscript Editor to Isis

HSS: Is Membership an Anachronism?

Cilo@King’s: The Enlightenment bull market and its decolonial future

AHF: October Newsletter

The Getty Iris: A Beginner’s Guide to the Renaissance Book

A 16th-century print shop. A “puller” removes a printed sheet from the press, while a “beater” inks type. - Source Wikimedia Commons

A 16th-century print shop. A “puller” removes a printed sheet from the press, while a “beater” inks type. –
Source Wikimedia Commons

Absolutely Maybe: Curiosity to Scrutiny: the Early Days of Science Journalism

Wellcome Library: A month of pogonography on the blog

CNN: The historical analogs of brilliant women

ESOTERIC:

The Recipes Project: A Remedy for Witchcraft and Demonic Possession in Seventeenth-Century Ireland

An early eighteenth-century depiction of a witch conjuring up demons to do her evil work. From: Richard Boulton, A Compleat History of Magick, Sorcery and Witchcraft … (London, 2 vols, 1715-1722), vol. 1, frontispiece.

An early eighteenth-century depiction of a witch conjuring up demons to do her evil work. From: Richard Boulton, A Compleat History of Magick, Sorcery and Witchcraft … (London, 2 vols, 1715-1722), vol. 1, frontispiece.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science League of America: A New Book to Introduce Evolution to Preschoolers: Grandmother Fish

Nature: Books in Brief

British Library: Maps and views blog: British Town Maps

6a00d8341c464853ef01bb0887ffde970d-800wi

TLS: Truth, beauty, science and art

The Lancet: Soul medicine

Mirror: 13 fascinating and obscure science questions – complete with answers

Popular Science: Light: A Very Short Introduction – Ian Walmsley

LSE: Review of Books: A Historical Atlas of Tibet by Karl E. Ryavec

A-Historical-Atlas-of-Tibet

NEW BOOKS:

Schweizerbart Science Publishers: The Climates of the Geological Past/Die Klimate der geologischen Vorzeit

Palgrave: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England: Ravenous Natures

Ashgate: Spaces of Global Knowledge: Exhibition, Encounter and Exchange in an Age of Empire

9781472444363.PPC.qxd:Withers

The Dispersal of Darwin: Making “Nature”: The History of a Scientific Journal

Ashgate: Geography, Technology and Instruments of Exploration

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Lincoln Cathedral Chapter House: The Life and Legacy of George Boole 14 September–3 November 2015

George Boole Source: Wikimedia Commons

George Boole
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Boston Public Library: Women in Cartography: Five Centuries of Accomplishment 31 October 2015–27 March 2016

Before Newton: Indigenous Knowledge & the Scientific Revolution

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs until 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo) 1772 by George Stubbs. ZBA5754 National Maritime Museum

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo) 1772 by George Stubbs. ZBA5754
National Maritime Museum

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs until 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Saturday

CLOSING SOON: Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope

CLOSING SOON: Maudsley Hospital: The Maudsley at War: the story of the hospital during the Great War

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The Blue Orange Theatre: Frankenstein Runs until 8 November 2015

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA Source: Wikimedia Commons

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Florence Nightingale Museum: How To Die Like a Victorian 2 December 2015

1887 Victorian Mourning

1887 Victorian Mourning

Royal Museum Greenwich: Pepys Show Late: Party like it’s 1669

Motherboard: The ‘Steve Jobs’ Movie Bombed at the Box Office

Preserved Films: Fifty Million Years Ago (1925)

Framing the Face: Programme 28 November 2015

George Boole 200: Happy 200th Birthday George Boole 2 November 2015

Wellcome Collection: Recycling: London’s dirty past 5 November 2015

Wellcome Collection: Home Remedies (British Sign Language Discussion) 6 November 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Painting by Samuel Scott. Comet Halley over the river Thames near London, England in 1759.

Painting by Samuel Scott.
Comet Halley over the river Thames near London, England in 1759.

TELEVISION:

AHF: “Manhattan” Season 2, Episode 2: Mind Games

AHF: “Manhattan” Season 2, Episode 2: The Queen of Los Alamos

A View From the Bridge: Electrifying: Tesla on television

teslaseries_poster_medt

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Museo Galileo: Systems of celestial coordinates

AEON Video: The art of data visualisation

Youtube: The George Boole Song

Aljazeera: Pioneers of Engineering: Al Jazari and the Banu Masa

Youtube: 3.5* ‘til infinity

Vimeo: Lord Rutherford – Goettingen Lecture 14 December 1931

Harvard University Department of Physics: Recollections of Los Alamos and the Nuclear Era

Vimeo:Horrible Histories: Charles Darwin Evolution Song

Youtube: PBS Nova S33E06 Newton’s Dark Secret

RADIO:

BBC Radio 3: Free Thinking – Feature: Health Care in 18th Century Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle Source: Wikimedia Commons

Bamburgh Castle
Source: Wikimedia Commons

PODCASTS:

Mixcloud: The Genealogy Radio Show – Episode 8 Series 3 – George Boole *200 Genealogy project

To the best of our Knowledge: In the Newton Archives

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Calgary, Alberta: CfP: Canadian Society for the history and Philosophy of Science Annual Conference 28–30 May 2016

UCL: CfP: 10th London Ancient Science Conference 15–17 February 2016

École Normale Supérieure: Salle du Centre Cavaillès: Colloque de la Société Française d’Histoire des Sciences Humaines 5 et 6 Novembre 2015

University of Trieste: CfP: International Society for Cultural History Annual Conference 2016 18–22 July

Society for Philosophy and Technology: Call for Nominations for Society for Philosophy and Technology Board and President

University of Lancaster: CfP: Social History Society 40th Anniversary Conference 21-23 March 2016

Origins of Science as a Visual Pursuit: Notes and Records – Essay Prize – deadline 31–01-16

University of Lancaster: Symposium: Literature, Science and Medicine 30–31 March 2016

Maritime at Greenwich: ‘Britain and the Sea’ – Free to attend seminar series at Greenwich

boat

University of Hull: Maritime Trade, Travel, and Cultural Encounter in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century 13–14 November 2015

University of Prague: CfP: 7th International Conference for the European Society for the History of Science 22–24 September 2016

Forum for Inter-American Studies: CfP: Special Issue Bodies in the Americas

The Warburg Institute: Ptolemy’s Science of the Stars in the Middle Ages 5–7 November 2015

4af2ac60d6

National Maritime Museum Greenwich: CfP: From Sea to Sky: the Evolution of Air Navigation from the Ocean and Beyond 9–10 June 2016

Notches: History of Sexuality at the 2016 American Historical Association Conference

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow History of Medicine Group – Autumn Meetings 2015

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Conference: Practical Knowledge and Medical Practice in Ancient Mediterranean Cultures Berlin 2–3 November 2015

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy Conference 3–6 June 2016

Florence Nightingale 2020: Nightingale 2020: General Discussion Meeting on 7th December

USF Tampa Florida: CfP: Philosophy of Science Roundtable 11–13 March 2016

Birkbeck College: CfP: Birkbeck EMS’S 9th Annual Student Conference Sensing the Early Modern 20 February 2016

Birkbeck & Kings Colleges London: CfP: Conference: Life and death in early modern philosophy 14–16 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Amsterdam: Professor of Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage

University of Leeds: Faculty of Arts: New Postdoctoral Position: Cultures of the Book

University of Exeter: Over 100 PhD studentships available for 2016 entry

Council on Library and Information Resources: Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

avhumboldt.de: Stellenausschreibung: Wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in im Akademienvorhaben „Alexander von Humboldt auf Reisen – Wissenschaft aus der Bewegung“

Nazarbayev University: Assistant Professor – History of Medicine, Public Health, and/or Environmental History

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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