Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #27

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #27

Monday 18 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

Despite sub-zero temperatures and Twitter disturbances Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM link list is here once again bring you all of the histories of science, medicine and technology that we could find for your delectation in cyberspace over the last seven days.

Two famous repositories of information, The British Museum and Wikipedia share a birthday although the former is considerably older than the latter. All branches of knowledge require such repositories if they are to function properly and the history of encyclopaedias, libraries and museums is an important part of the histories of science, medicine and technology.

In his concepts of a third world of human knowledge Karl Popper asks his readers to imagine a world devastated by some form of disaster then poses the question, which society would recover fastest one in which all libraries and books had been lost or one in which this repositories of human knowledge had survived and were accessible to the recovering society. The answer should be obvious.

A free online encyclopaedia such as Wikipedia and public libraries and museums are immeasurably valuable resources for everybody that we often take for granted but without them life would be much poorer and often much more difficult.

Whewell’s Gazette a small repository of knowledge says support your local repositories wherever they are, you never know when you might need them.

Wikipedia shares its birthday with British Museum. How apt. – Andy Mabbett (@pigsonthe wing)

The British Museum Opened 15 January 1759

Montague House site of the original British Museum Source: Wikimedia Commons

Montague House site of the original British Museum
Source: Wikimedia Commons

History Today: The British Museum Opened January 15th, 1759

Wikipedia was born 15 January 2000

Wikipedia logo Source: Wikipedia

Wikipedia logo
Source: Wikipedia

The Guardian: Wikipedia’s strength is in collaboration – as we’ve proved over 15 years

ars technica: On Wikipedia’s 15th Birthday, Ars shares the entries that most fascinate us

Yovisto: All the World’s Knowledge – Wikipedia

Wikipedia 15

Quotes of the week:

 “There’s a special place in Hull reserved for the inventor of autocorrect.” h/t @Amanda_Vickery

“In arboretum, trees are domesticated, or at least tame, but in adjacent meadow same trees are feral as escapee seeds from arboretum”. – Dolly Jørgensen (@DollyJørgensen)

“Many bizarre grammar “rules” stem from 18th-19th century grammarians trying to force English to be more like Latin. Ludicrously”. – Justine Larbalestier (@JustineLavaworm)

“Keep reading abt our ancestors “having sex with Neanderthals” = genetic inheritance. Um. Perhaps “our ancestors *included* Neanderthals”?” – Rebekah Higgitt (@beckyfh)

CYZ20GCUwAANJQo

“None of the great discoveries in physics in he 20th C has contributed anything to an understanding of the living world”– Ernst Mayr h/t @philipcball

“Early on, I was taught that coding is the art of introducing bugs into an initially bug-free environment…” – @arclight

“That is, I believe, a fine task for historians: to be a danger to national myths.” – Eric Hobsbawm. h/t @SocialHistoryOx

Tribute to lab research mice-A monument portraying a labmouse knitting a DNAhelix was unveiled in Novosibirsk Russia

Tribute to lab research mice-A monument portraying a labmouse knitting a DNAhelix was unveiled in Novosibirsk Russia

Birthdays of the Week:

Albert Hofmann born 11 January 1906

Albert Hofmann Photo Hofmann.org

Albert Hofmann
Photo Hofmann.org

 

The Vaults of Erowid: Albert Hofmann

Benjamin Franklin born 17 January 1706:

Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky c. 1816 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by Benjamin West

Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky c. 1816 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by Benjamin West

Benjamin Franklin In His Own Words

Discovery of the Week:

11 January 1787 William Herschel discovered Titania and Oberon, moons of Uranus

A montage of Uranus’s moons. Image credit: NASA

A montage of Uranus’s moons. Image credit: NASA

Universe Today: Uranus’ Moon Titania

Universe Today: Uranus’ Moon Oberon

Royal Museums Greenwich: The Herschel Family and the Royal Observatory

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Carl David Anderson and the Positron

AHF: Isidor I. Rabi

The New Yorker: A Hydrogen Bomb by Any Other Name

malinc.se: Heliocentrism and Geocentrism

tumblr_o0k7mkhNSN1uk13a5o1_500

Universe Today: What is the Geocentric Model of the Universe?

AHF: In Memoriam: George Mahfouz

Forbes: The Surprisingly Old Physics of Wireless Charging

Yovisto: Igor Vasilyevich Kurchatov ­ Father of the Soviet Atom Bomb

Sky & Telescope: Solar System Featured on New U.S. Stamps

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Newton Stapleton’s Interview

arXiv.org: Lomonosov’s Discovery of Venus Atmosphere in 1761: English Translation of Original Publication with Commentaries (pdf)

AHF: J. Robert Oppenheimer

Yovisto: Joseph Jackson Lister and the Microscope

Joseph Jackson Lister Source: Wikimedia Commons

Joseph Jackson Lister
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

Skulls in the Stars: 1801: Fraunhofer gets research funding in the worst possible way

Yovisto: Edward Teller and Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove

NASA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory: NASA’s Stardust Sample Return was 10 Years Ago Today

Royal Astronomical Society: 100 years and counting: women in the RAS go from strength to strength

Annie Scott Dill Russell (later Annie Maunder), the solar physicist proposed for RAS Fellowship in 1892, who was finally admitted in 1916. Credit: Courtesy of Dorrie Giles.

Annie Scott Dill Russell (later Annie Maunder), the solar physicist proposed for RAS Fellowship in 1892, who was finally admitted in 1916. Credit: Courtesy of Dorrie Giles.

RAS: Women and the RAS: 100 years of Fellowship

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Royal Museums Greenwich: Conserving copper-green degradation on maps

The Guardian: Polar explorer Ernest Shackleton may have had a hole in his heart, doctors say

Atlas Obscura: 19th-Centuy Atlases Included Hundreds of Fake Islands

An 18th century British map with some made-up islands in Lake Superior Source: Wikimedia Commons

An 18th century British map with some made-up islands in Lake Superior
Source: Wikimedia Commons

British Library: Untold Lives blog: Mud Hovels, Mean Houses and Natural Philosophy

Yovisto: Matthew Fountaine Maury and the Oceanography

Hyperallergenic: Before Google earth: A Rare Cartographic Compendium From Renaissance Europe

The Washington Post: How a karma-seeking Redditor uncovered one of the world’s rarest atlases

The National Library of Norway / Nikolaj Blegvad.

The National Library of Norway / Nikolaj Blegvad.

npr: Norway’s National Library Discovers Rare Atlas – With a Little Help From Reddit

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Killed by a cough

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Auroscope invented by John Brunton

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Daniel Carrion’s experiment: the use of self-infection in the advance of medicine

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Bone box with appendicular bones

Thomas Morris: A medical old wives’ tale

JHI Blog: Wilhelm Reich: A Disappointed Utopian

Atlas Obscura: ‘Mind-Blowing’ Archaeological Find: Wooden Prosthetic for a Medieval Foot

An iron ring, likely used to stabilize a wooden prosthesis, was found in situ. (All Photos: Courtesy Österreichisches Archäologisches Institut (Austrian Archaeological Institute))

An iron ring, likely used to stabilize a wooden prosthesis, was found in situ. (All Photos: Courtesy Österreichisches Archäologisches Institut (Austrian Archaeological Institute))

Live Science: Prosthetic Leg with Hoofed Foot Discovered in Ancient Chinese Tomb

Medievalists.net: A History of Tonsillectomy: Two Millenia of Trauma, Hemorrhage and Controversy

Concocting History: Seeing with new eyes

Surgeon’s Hall Museum: Carcinoma

Public Domain Review: Anatomical Illustrations from 15th-century England

Holy Kaw!: 17th Century Medical Pop-Up Book

Phys.org: A medical pop-up book from the 17th century

Columbia librarians preparing the medical pop-up book for digitization. Credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Columbia librarians preparing the medical pop-up book for digitization. Credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Gymnastics and acrobatics as medical therapeutics

Thomas Morris: The woman who turned to soap

The Atlantic: The First Artificial Insemination Was an Ethical Nightmare

hatfield historical society: In-Flew-Enza: The Deadly Pandemic Strikes Hatfield

The Quack Doctor: The Amateur Anatomist and the Amputated Finger

Hyperallergic: Unraveling the Gendered History of Hypnotism

Advances in the History of Psychology: “Scientometric Trend Analysis of Publications on the History of Psychology”

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: The Finger Alphabet

Finger alphabet illustrations from The Invited Alphabet by R.R. published in 1809

Finger alphabet illustrations from The Invited Alphabet by R.R. published in 1809

NYAM: At the Crossroads of Art and Medicine

Thomas Morris: Putting a patient to sleep (without anaesthetic)

Contagions: Human Parasites of the Roman Empire

Thomas Morris: Dear oh dear

Strange Remains: A 13th Century Guide to Forensic Anthropology

Old Book Illustration: Doctor on His Way to Visit His Patient

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: William Hedley and his Puffing Billy

Engineering Timelines: Louis Gustave Mouchel

Conciatore: Alchemical Glassware of 1600

Conciatore: Enamel

Conciatore: Neri’s Aleppo Connection

The Inland Waterways Association: The Father of English Canals – James Brindley

Photo: Packet House, Bridgwater Canal - Christine Smith

Photo: Packet House, Bridgwater Canal – Christine Smith

Innovating in Combat: Signalling at the Battle of Passchendaele, July to November

BBC News: The 19th Century plug that’s still being used

Smithsonian.com: How the Phonograph Changed Music Forever

UW–Milwaukee Special Collections: Typography Tuesday

Smithsonian.com: Radio Activity: The 100th Anniversary of Public Broadcasting

 

Confusions and Connections: Top computing experts join The National Museum of Computing

The British Newspaper Archive: Alexander Graham Bell demonstrates the telephone to Queen Victoria in 1878 – “I’m on the throne!”

Atlas Obscura: The American Textile Industry was Woven from Espionage

A spinning frame at Slater Mill. (Photo: Bestbudbrian/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

A spinning frame at Slater Mill. (Photo: Bestbudbrian/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

The Public Domain Review: Auto Polo (ca. 1911)

Library of Congress: In the Muse: Performing Arts Blog: Unboxing the Buchla Model 100

Open Culture: Rick Wakeman Tells the Story of the Mellotron. The Oddball Proto-Synthesizer Pioneered by the Beatles

The Atlantic: The Travelling Salesmen of the Nuclear-Industrial Complex

Ptak Science Books: Smokestacks and Breweries – Germany, 1930

 

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Yovisto: Nicolas Steno and the Principles of Modern Geology

Atlas Obscura: This 19th-Century Map Shows That Beaver Dams are Built to Last

The Friends of Charles Darwin: 11-Jan-1844: Darwin confesses murder!

Geschichte der Geologie: Carl von Linné und sein schwieriges Verhältnis zu Fossilien

Science Line: A new perspective on old specimens

British Museum: Hans Sloane’s specimen tray

Ptak Science Books: An Odd & Architecturally Symphonic Structure Dedicated to Bats, Malaria, & Guano (1916)

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Todayinsci: Carolus Linnaeus

Five Thirty Eight Science: The Biggest Dinosaur in History May Never Have Existed

The Recipes Project: Hans Sloane: Eighteenth-Century Mixologist

Yovisto: Wilhelm Weinberg and the Genetic Equilibrium

Embryo Project: Ross Granville Harrison (1870–1959)

The Friends of Charles Darwin: 13-Jan-1833: The day HMS Beagle nearly sank

The Guardian: The Danish Girl and the sexologist: a story of sexual pioneers

Notches: Through the Eyes of the Establishment: Student Sexuality and the Dean of Women’s Office at Purdue University

The Recipes Project: Healing Words: Quintus Serenus’ Pharmacological Poem

This View of Life: Social Darwinism, A Case of Designed Ventriloquism

Yovisto: Lewis Terman and the Intelligence Quotient

Smithsonian.com: Life and Rocks May Have Co-Evolved on Earth

European City of Science Manchester 2016: The Peppered Moth Story

© Olei Leillinger

© Olei Leillinger

The New India Express: Wallace: Darwin’s Rival and Admirer

The Dispersal of Darwin: Article: The Impact of Lamarck’s Theory of Evolution Before Darwin’s Theory

Forbes: How the Dissection of a Shark’s Head Revealed the True Nature of Fossils

Wild Reekie: Become a Local Environmental Historian

Ptak Science Books: The Display of Quantitative Data – a Pretty but Wanting Example, British Weather

CHEMISTRY:

homunculus: The place of the periodic table

Yovisto: Jan Baptiste Helmont and the Gases

Jan Baptiste Helmont

Jan Baptiste Helmont

Chemical Heritage Magazine: A Strange and Formidable Weapon

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

homunculus: The myth of the Enlightenment (again)

Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science: Communiqué No. 92 Winter 2016 (see interview with Jai Virdi-Dhesi pp. 9–12)

DW Made for Minds: Bavaria returns stolen books worth millions to Naples

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Bowdoin College Library

Collectors Weekly: Physica Sacra

Public Domain Review: NYPL Release 187k Public Domain Images in Hi-Res

storify: BSHS Postgraduate Conference 2016

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Voltaire: Experimental Philosopher

François-Marie Arouet (1694–1778), known as Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (1694–1778), known as Voltaire

Registrar Trek: The Next Generation: How NOT to number objects

BHL: Download How To

Society for the History of Natural History: Professor Jim Secord – awarded SHNH Founders’ Medal

The #EnvHist Weekly

Brill Online: Early Science and Medicine: Volume 20, Early Modern Colour Worlds, 2015 Contents

homunculus: More on the beauty question

Lady Science: No. 16: Gender and Forensic Science on Television

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Founders of Science?

Jonathan Saha: The Health of the History of Medicine in Southeast Asia

The Guardian: We need to talk about TED

ESOTERIC:

Atlas Obscura: The History and Uses of Magical Mandrake, According to Modern Witches

A woodcut of two mandrake plants. (Photo: Wellcome Images, London/CC BY 4.0)

A woodcut of two mandrake plants. (Photo: Wellcome Images, London/CC BY 4.0)

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

Inside Higher Ed: Physics Envy

Notches: “Arresting Dress”: A Student Interview with Clare Sears

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Vial and Error

Science Museum: What to think about machines that think

University of Hartford: Associate Professor Michael Robinson’s New Book Explores Cultural Bias Among Explorers

51-DsC+IJEL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_

Geographical: The Mountain

Science League of America: Bitten by the Insect Bug

The Guardian: Menagerie by Caroline Grigson – a lively history of strange animals and stranger people

Watershed Moments: Thoughts from the Hydrosphere: The Invention of Nature: Serendipity, Early Scientists, and Modern Ideas

Nature: Entomology: A life of insects and ire

History News Network: Women Who Advanced Science and Changed History: An interview with Rachel Swaby

Prospect: Where medieval magicians experimental scientists?

Ricochet: Saturday Night Science: The Hunt for Vulcan

Star Tribune: The Stargazer’s Sister by Carrie Brown

Worlds Revealed: Geography and Maps at the Library of Congress: American Geography and Geographers: Towards Geographic Science

NEW BOOKS:

Manchester University Press: The Senses in Early Modern England, 1558–1660

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Last Volcano: A Man, a Romance, and the Quest to Understand Nature’s Most Magnificent Fury

9781605989211

The Dispersal of Darwin: A Brief History of Creation: Science and the Search for the Origin of Life

Brill: Virtuoso by Nature: The Scientific Worlds of Francis Willughby FRS (1635–1672)

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

The Telegraph: The best art exhibitions of 2016 (some #histSTM connections!)

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

Dulwich Picture Gallery: The Amazing World of M.C. Escher

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

The Spectator: John Dee though he could talk to angels using medieval computer technology

History Extra: In pictures: John Dee, the ‘Elizabethan 007’

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

The Guardian: John Dee painting originally had circle of human skulls, x-ray imaging reveals

John Dee performing an experiment before Elizabeth I, by Henry Gillard Glindoni. Photograph: Wellcome Library

John Dee performing an experiment before Elizabeth I, by Henry Gillard Glindoni. Photograph: Wellcome Library

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The Art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Closing Soon: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Denver Post: “Vera Rubin” performance a collaboration of the BETC and Fiske Planetarium

Benjamin, Director of Education, runs the visuals during a rehearsal for Vera Rubin: Bringing the Dark to Light at Fiske Planetarium in Boulder, Colorado January 13, 2015. Boulder Daily Camera/ Mark Leffingwell

Benjamin, Director of Education, runs the visuals during a rehearsal for Vera Rubin: Bringing the Dark to Light at Fiske Planetarium in Boulder, Colorado January 13, 2015. Boulder Daily Camera/ Mark Leffingwell

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

New Diorama Theatre: Reptember Reloaded 10 January–1 February 2016

EVENTS:

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Cardiff University: Lecture: Framing the Face: A History of Facial Hair, 1700–1900 20 January 2016

University of York: Lecture: Not Everyone Can Be A Gandhi: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post-WWII Era 3 March 2016

NCSE: Darwin Day Approaches

University of Leeds Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Lecture: Object 1. Horse and Rider 26 January 2016

London PUS Seminar: Celebrity Science – How Does Ancient DNA Research Inform Science Communication? 27 January 2016

Descartes event

University of Kent: Trial by water, or, seafarers’ perspectives on the quest for longitude, 1700–1830 27 January 2016

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Edge of Disaster – Vaccines and Epidemics 21 January 2016

UCL: Lecture: Henry Nicholls: The Galapagos. A Natural History 27 January 2016

The Washington Post: These are the most exciting museum happenings in 2016

Gresham College: Lecture: Babbage and Lovelace 19 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

Shackelton Event

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Leeuwenhoek with His Microscope by Ernest Board (c) Wellcome Library; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Leeuwenhoek with His Microscope by Ernest Board
(c) Wellcome Library; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Vimeo: Seeing the Invisible

Youtube: Houghton Library: Starry Messengers

Youtube: Project Diana 70th Anniversary Special Event | Moonbounce | EME

Two Nerdy History Girls: Horse-Drawn Carriages in Motion

Ri Channel: How to survive in space

Youtube: Mathematics vs astronomy in early medieval Ireland

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

Soundcloud: Sci Fri: These Outmoded Scientific Instruments Are Also Things of Beauty

Science for the People: Science in Wonderland

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Hagley Museum & Library, Wilmington, Deleware: 2016 Annual Conference – Oral History and Technology 14–15 April 2016

Pulse: CfP: Graduate Journal in History, Philosophy, Sociology of Science

University of Cambridge: Workshop: Defining Effective Digital History Mentorship 15 March 2016

Graz, Austria: STS Conference: CfP: The Role of Webvideos in Science and Research Communication

Bodleian Library: Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Library: Science, Medicine, and Culture Seminar Programme, Hilary

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series, Spring 2016

Science Museum: Research Seminar Series

University of Exeter: CfP: Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference 28–29 July 2016

Amsterdam: CfP: Anton Pannekoek (1873–1960): Ways of Viewing Science and Society 9–10 June 2016

SIGCIS: Computer History Museum Prize: Call for Submissions 2016

University of Chicago: CfP: American Association for the History of Nursing 33rd Annual Conference

Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama: CfP: 2016 Meeting of the Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History (SFAFE) 15-16 April 2016

Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce, Poland: CfP: Borders and Crossings: International and Multidisciplinary Conferences on Travel Writing

Royal Geographical Society: CfP: Annual International Conference 30 August–2 September 2016

Vrije University Brussel, Belgium: CfP: Feeding on the nectar of the gods: Appropriations of Isaac Newton’s thought ca. 1700–1750

University of Barcelona: CfP: Joint ESHHS & Cheiron Meeting 27 June–1 July 2016

Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine” (STEEM): CfP: “Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine” (Russia’s Great War & Revolution, 1914-1922)

University of Amsterdam and Utrecht University: CfP: XVII UNIVERSEUM NETWORK MEETING Connecting Collections 9-11 June 2016

University of Leeds: HPS Seminar Series 2016

University of Bristol: Literature & Medicine Seminars

Notches: CfP: The History of Venereal Disease

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Call for submissions for Computer History Museum Prize

LOOKING FOR WORK:

MHS Oxford: Part-Time Exhibition Curator – ‘Back From the Dead’

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: Collections Scholarships

MHS Oxford: Project Assistant (2 posts) – Move Project

The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Department II (Lorraine Daston): Postdoctoral Fellowship

ChoM News: 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Open

University of Kent: Research Associate: The Abortion Act: a Biography

UCL: CELL: Research Assistant

University of Groningen: Tenure track position in the philosophy, sociology and history of science applied to psychology Deadline 27 January 2016

BSHS: Outreach and Education Committee Grants: Undergraduate Dissertation Archive Grants 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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