Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #26

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #26

Monday 11 January 2016

EDITORIAL:

 Moving on into 2016 it’s time once again for Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that we could find in the infinite depths of cyberspace.

Science Show

This is the twenty-sixth edition of the second year of Whewell’s Gazette meaning the year is half full or half empty depending on your point of view. We view ourselves as part of the on going infinite science show.

Science Show 2

Quotes of the week:

“I would like 2016 to be the year in which people stop asserting that there is “a method” of science”. – Oliver Usher (@ojusher)

“Science is indeed merely a method of investigation. But it is the best one for answering many important questions”. – Christopher Chabris (@cfchabris)

“Repeat after me: pharma being shit does not mean magic beans cure cancer.” – Ben Goldacre (@bengoldacre)

“Man is a genius when he is dreaming”. — Akira Kurosawa h/t @berfois

“It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop”. – Confucius

“Plato is my friend—Aristotle is my friend—but my greatest friend is truth.” – Isaac Newton h/t @wordnik

“Someone who wants to learn logic from language is like an adult who wants to learn how to think from a child.”— Frege h/t @GuyLongworth

“On this day in 1961, Erwin Schrödinger may or may not have died. We’ll only know if we open his coffin and collapse the wave function”. – John J. McKay (@archymck)

“History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce.” – Karl Marx h/t @ferwen

“…it really pisses me off when people say “medieval” = synonym for crude, uncivilised, primitive. Use your eyes, people”. – Caroline Shenton (@dustshoveller)

“As Twitter awoke one morning from uneasy dreams, it found itself transformed into a gigantic Facebook”. – Elena Epaneshnik (@ElenaEpaneshnik)

“Alexander Pope thought that bad writing was a ‘morbid secretion from the brain’ … he might be right – at least on some writing days”. Andrea Wulf (@Andrea_Wulf)

“Historians don’t have the luxury to decide certain people out of existence.” – Paul Halliday h/t @jotis

“I don’t believe in the Malaria theory and doubt very much if there is any such thing a Malaria” – Henderson 1872 h/t @KewDC

“Hear hear. Philosophy of science has traditionally been too dominated by physicists”. – Philip Ball (@philipcball)

“Though better known for his work on philosophy, Karl Popper also pioneered the recreational use of Amyl Nitrate TrueFacts – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“Synonym has no synonym. Anagram has no anagram. Onomatopoeia doesn’t sound like what it means. But portmanteau is a portmanteau. Phew”. – @WardQNormal

“The most important thing a University has to teach you is that no matter how much you know, it’s never enough”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

Ne’r marry one with a wey Beard,

He is of the fumbling Crew;

Of such I’ve oft times heard,

they little or nothing can do – 1685 h/t @DrAlun

Birthday of the Week:

Alfred Russel Wallace born 8 January 1823

Alfred Russel Wallace ca. 1895 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alfred Russel Wallace ca. 1895
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 Yovisto: Alfred Russel Wallace and the Naturel Selection

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Biography of Wallace

BHL: Wallace, Darwin, and Evolution: The Real Story

Death of the Week:

Ernest Shackleton died 5 January 1922

 Enduring-Eye-RGS-5

UFunk: Enduring Eye – Exploring Antarctica in 1914 through fascinating photos

Royal Museums Greenwich: Sir Ernest Shackleton

The Public Domain Review: Ernest Shackleton on his south polar expedition (1910)

Enduring-Eye-RGS-6

Demonstration of the Week:

 Leon Foucault first demonstrated the turning earth 6 January 1851

Foucault's Pendulum in the Panthéon, Paris Source: Wikimedia Commons

Foucault’s Pendulum in the Panthéon, Paris
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 David Ellyard Discoveries: Leon Foucault and The Turning Earth

Space Watchtower: 165th Anniversary: Foucault Pendulum

Discovery of the Week:

The four largest moons of Jupiter were discovered 7 January (Galileo) 8 January (Simon Marius)

 

Jupiter and the Galilean Moons Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jupiter and the Galilean Moons
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Jupiter and the Galilean Moons

esa: space science: 7 January

Library University of Michigan: The Galileo Manuscript

The Renaissance Mathematicus: One day later

Simon Marius

Simon Marius

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Encyclopædia Britannica: Wilhelm Beer

Science Museum: Sputnik – engineering a world first

Sputnik Source: Science Museum

Sputnik
Source: Science Museum

Voices of the Manhattan Project: James C. Hobb’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lee DuBridge’s Interview

CNN Style: Astronomical watches: The whole of the night sky, strapped to your wrist

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Roger Rasmussen’s Interview

Society for the History of Astronomy: SHA e-News: Volume 8, no.1, January 2016

AHF: Manhattan Project Spotlight: The Chrysler Corporation

aavso.org: Women in the History of Variable Star Astronomy (pdf)

Early photo of ‘Pickering's Harem’, as the group of women computers assembled by Harvard astronomer Edward Charles Pickering was dubbed. The group included Leavitt, Annie Jump Cannon, Williamina Fleming and Antonia Maury Source: Wikimedia Commons

Early photo of ‘Pickering’s Harem’, as the group of women computers assembled by Harvard astronomer Edward Charles Pickering was dubbed. The group included Leavitt, Annie Jump Cannon, Williamina Fleming and Antonia Maury
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Siegfried Hecker’s Interview

Astronotes: Ancient Astronomy (part 1)

AIP: Bryce DeWitt and Cecile DeWitt-Morette

AHF: Computing and the Manhattan Project

Cooper Hewitt: Book, Atlas of the Celestial Heavens, 19th Century

Project Diana: The Men Who Shot The Moon

Postcard commemorating Project Diana. Image: US Army

Postcard commemorating Project Diana. Image: US Army

Motherboard: Seventy Years Ago, We Bounced Signals Off the Moon for the First Time

The New York Review of Books: Einstein: Right or Wrong

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

dsl.richmond.edu: American Panorama: An Atlas of United States History

Yovisto: William of Rubruck and his Adventurous Journey to Karakorum

Voyage of William of Rubruck in 1253 – 1255

Voyage of William of Rubruck in 1253 – 1255

The New York Times: Harvard’s Find of a Colonial Map of New Jersey Is a Reminder of Border Wars

Atlas Obscura: Captain Cook Monument

Center for Islamic Studies: Maps and Diagram

publicdomain.nypl.org: Navigating The Green Book

Bryars & Bryars: Kerry Lee Revisited: cartographer, commercial artist, socialist

Attractions of London, for Carr’s of Carlisle

Attractions of London, for Carr’s of Carlisle

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Dr Alun Withey: Detoxing in History: the morning after the night before

History Today: Shameful Secrets: Male Sexual Health

Thomas Morris: Don’t mess with an electric eel

Atlas Obscura: Need a Chill Pill? Here’s a Recipe from the 19th Century

Vesalius Census: Warren, Vesalius and the Fine Arts

Vesalius Census: New Fabricas Found

NYAM: Counterfeiting Bodies:Examining the Work of Walther Ryff

Plate 1 of Ryff’s Des aller furtrefflichsten, hoechsten und adelichsten Gschoepffs aller Creaturen (1541).

Plate 1 of Ryff’s Des aller furtrefflichsten, hoechsten und adelichsten Gschoepffs aller Creaturen (1541).

Yovisto: Louis Braille and the Braille System

UW-Milwaukee Special Collections: The Braille World Book Encyclopedia

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Scots abroad: medical influences in the 18th century

Thomas Morris: Unfortunate injury of the decade

The H-Word: The junior doctor’s strike – what really new about it?

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Gruesome Tale of Self-Surgery

General Claude Martin by Renaldi, 1794

General Claude Martin by Renaldi, 1794

Smithsonian Libraries: Unbound: Dr G.Zander’s Medico-Mechanical Gymnastics

Yovisto: Sir Percivall Pott and his Cancer Research

Zócalo Public Square: When California Sterilized 20,000 of Its Citizens

Darin Hayton: Death in the Archive

The Last Word on Nothing: The Wonderful World of Period Patents

US5158535-1-768x523

Joihn Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: History of Midwifery

Thomas Morris: The seven-foot tumour

Thomas Morris: Wine, the great healer

Smithsonian.com: Dr. Gustav Sander’s Victorian-Era Exercise Machines Makes the Bowflex Look Like Child’s Play

Thomas Morris: Dead or alive at will

binet.hypothesis.org: James McKeen Cattell

Gizmodo: Columbia Just Digitalized a Bestselling Anatomy Flipbook From the 1610s

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Thomas Hobbes on Glass

Conciatore: Torricelli and Glass

The Conversation: Mathematical Winters: Ada Lovelace 200 years on

George Boole 200: Timeline of Life Events

The New York Times: Untangling an Accounting Tool and an Ancient Incan Mystery

Patricia Landa, an archaeological conservator, painstakingly cleans and untangles the khipus at her house in Lima. Credit William Neuman/The New York Times

Patricia Landa, an archaeological conservator, painstakingly cleans and untangles the khipus at her house in Lima. Credit William Neuman/The New York Times

CHF: Up, Up and Away: The day a lead balloon flew

BBC: How Germany’s love of silence led to the first earplug

Yovisto: James Watt and the Steam Age Revolution

Academia: Hertha Marks Ayrton: An electric woman (pdf)

The Public Domain Review: Arabic Machine Manuscript

Yovisto: Ulman Stromer and the First Paper Mill North of the Alps

The Renaissance Mathematicus: How papermaking crossed the Alps

Ulman Stromer’s Paper-mill. (From Schedel’s Buch der Chroniken of 1493.)

Ulman Stromer’s Paper-mill. (From Schedel’s Buch der Chroniken of 1493.)

Distillations Blog: Schematic Wiring Diagram of the Basic Integrating Circuit

Open Culture: Meet the “Telharmonium,” the First Synthesizer (and Predecessor to Muzak), Invented in 1897

Hyperallergenic: An Arrow-Shooting Goddess from a Time When Clocks Were Entertainment

quiteirregular: “the use of the post-office is in her own hands” –Anthony Trollope, Pillar Boxes, and Love Letters

Royal Museums Greenwich: A colourful history of the Queen’s House

 

Two Nerdy History Girls: Hackney Cab vs. Hackney Coach

Sotherby’s: A Medieval Revolving Bookmark, manuscript on vellum

Ptak Science Books: Dialing Remote Live Music – a Trip into the Future, 1892

History ASM: Why is the Flying Scotsman so Famous?

Yovisto: Jean-Pierre Blanchard crossed the English Channel in a Balloon

Smithsonian Air & Space: Across the Channel by Balloon

Crossing of the English Channel  by Blanchard and Jeffries

Crossing of the English Channel
by Blanchard and Jeffries

Open Culture: The Fascinating Story of How Delia Derbyshire Created the Original Doctor Who Theme

My medieval foundry: Making medieval bells – part 1 (A never ending series)

Yovisto: Joseph Weizenbaum and his famous Eliza

Icons of Progress: The Punched Card Tabulator

Computer History Museum: Making Sense of the Census: Hollerith’s Punched Card Solution

Two Nerdy History Girls: An 18thc Automaton Watch

The New Yorker: Through the Looking Glass

Medievalists.net: The Early Medieval Cutting Edge of Technology

Heroes of History: Margaret Hamilton – One Giant Leap for Womankind

The Atlantic: The Gift of the Daguerreotype

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

National Geographic: The Time 19th Century Paleontologists Punched it Out

Science: Solving the mystery of dog domestication

Niche: The Otter-La Loutre: Top Five Articles of 2015

Notches: Truly Ugandan: Martyrs, Pope Francis, and the Question of Sexuality

RCPI Heritage Centre Blog: Meteorology, Medicine and Moore

John William Moore in 1887 (VM/1/2/M/19)

John William Moore in 1887 (VM/1/2/M/19)

AMNH: Trilobites and Horseshoe Crabs

Yovisto: Alfred Wegener and the Continental Drift

flickr: BHL: British beetles

Medievalists.net: The Kraken: when myth encounters science

Science League of America: Whence Hopeful Monsters?

Yovisto: Johan Christian Fabricius and his Classification System for Insects

npr: In ‘Heirloom Harvest,’ Old-School Portraits of Vegetable Treasures

Chemistry World: How the leopard got its spots

Data is nature: Thomas Sopwith’s Stratigraphic Models

04 Sopwith Model VII The surface denudation of mineral veins 1841

04 Sopwith Model VII The surface denudation of mineral veins 1841

Tripping from the Fall Line: On the origin of natural history: Steno’s modern, but forgotten philosophy of science

PhilSci Archive: The parallactic recognition of an evolutionary paradox (pdf)

Distillations Blog: Carl Akeley’s Striped Hyenas

Library of Congress: Charting the Gulf Stream

Atlas Obscura: The Exquisite 19th-Century Infographics That Explained the History of the Natural World

TrowelBlazers: Gertrude Caton Thompson

CHEMISTRY:

CHF: The Catalyst Series: Women in Chemistry: Stephanie Kwolek

Photograph of Stephanie Kwolek, taken at Spinning Elements, Chemical Heritage Foundation

Photograph of Stephanie Kwolek, taken at Spinning Elements, Chemical Heritage Foundation

Distillations Blog: The Chemistry of One Coat

Chemistry World: D’Alelio’s resins

The Conversation: The search for new elements on the periodic table started with a blast

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Daily Nous: Philosophers, Physicists, Others Win €2.5m to Study the Large Hadron Collider

The New York Society Library: New York Needs a History of Reading

The Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 13: recipes in Time and Space Part 2 – Between 2

The Recipes Project: Translating Recipes 13: recipes in Time and Space Part 8 – Between 3

Cambridge Journals Online: Medical History: Volume 60 Issue 1 Table of Contents

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: Everything Has a History

Flat Hill: Other Humanities Subjects Lost Majors Too, but History Lost More

Faculty of Life Sciences UoM: Tuesday Feature episode 32: Liz Toon

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Potential Historical Speakers

AEON: Epic Fails: Great theories can spend decades waiting for verification. Failed theories do too. Is there any way to tell them apart?

The Guardian: The problem with science journalism: we’ve forgotten that reality matters most

Conciatore: Michel Montaigne

Science Museum Group Journal: The Cosmonauts challenge

Cover of the associated publication Cosmonauts: birth of space age exhibition, Scala, 2014

Cover of the associated publication Cosmonauts: birth of space age exhibition, Scala, 2014

The New York Times: New York Public Library Invites a Deep Digital Dive

William White Papers: Journal of Inebriety

The Atlantic: A Brief History of Noise: From the big bang to cellphones

John Stewart: Converting Student’s History Essays into Wikipedia Articles

PLOS: one: Text Mining the History of Medicine

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Working Group: Working with Paper: Gender Practices in the History of Knowledge

BHL: BHL Receives 2015 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Award for Field Notes Project

Darin Hayton: Isaac Newton Scientific Revolution Essay

The #EnvHist Weekly

The British Museum: Faith after the pharaohs: Egyptian papyri conservation

William Corbett’s Bookshop: browse the shelves of a seventeenth-century bookshop

University of Exeter: Hidden Florence revealed through new history tour App

ESOTERIC:

Alchemy Website: A modern alchemy hoax exposed

Ptak Science Books: Can You Find the Ancient Death Ray of Death? Symbolism in the Garden of Mathematical Sciences (ca. 1670)

Image: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Image: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Slate: A Short History of Martians

Atlas Obscura: Ritualistic Cat Torture Was Once a Form of Town Fun

distillatio: Sometimes I think people don’t know what Alchemy is, or else they don’t explain why they think there is alchemy in what they see

BOOK REVIEWS:

Andrea Wolf: The Invention of Nature: Winner of Costa Biography Award 2015

Some Beans: A History of the 20th Century in 100 Maps by Tim Bryars and Tom Harper

Notches: Out of the Union: An Interview with Miriam Frank

New Statesman: Magical thinking: the history of science, sorcery and the spiritual

41LhpjSf6JL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_

Science Book a Day: Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons: Medical Photography and Symbolism

Science Book a Day: Untamed: The Wild Life of Jane Goodall

NEW BOOKS:

Liverpool University Press: Manchester: Making a Modern City (incl. James B Sumner on #histSTM)

Boydell & Brewer: Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England

Bloomsbury Publishing: British Nuclear Culture

9781441141330

NCSE: Evolution vs. Creationism: An Introduction, 2nd Edition

UCLA Newsroom: Philosopher Brian Copenhaver publishes two scholarly books on magic

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Horniman Museum & Gardens: London’s Urban Jungle Run until 21 February 2016

History Extra: In pictures: John Dee, the ‘Elizabethan 007’

Dulwich Picture Gallery: The Amazing World of M.C. Escher

Wellcome Trust: Wellcome Trust windows – featuring ‘Tools of the Trade’

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January–29 July 2016

British Museum: The Asahi Shimbun Displays: Scanning Sobek: mummy of the crocodile god Room 3 10 December 2015–21 February 2016

CT scans of a mummified crocodile with mummified infant crocodiles on its back. From Kom Ombo, Egypt, 650–550 BC.

CT scans of a mummified crocodile with mummified infant crocodiles on its back. From Kom Ombo, Egypt, 650–550 BC.

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Closing Soon: Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Royal Geographical Society: Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015–28 February 2016

Enduring-Eye-RGS-14

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Exotic Creatures 14 November 2015–28 February 2016

National Maritime Museum: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Runs till 28 March 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The art of Bedlam: Richard Dadd Runs till 6 February 2016

Closing Soon: Oxford University Museum of Natural History: Handwritten in Stone: How William Smith and his maps changed geology Runs to 31 January 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Royal Geographical Society: The Enduring Eye: The Antarctic Legacy of Sir Ernest Shackleton and Frank Hurley 21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Cockpit – Theatre of Ideas: Jekyll and Hyde 13 January–6 February 2016

Group-Edit-Small

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

New Diorama Theatre: Reptember Reloaded 10 January–1 February 2016

EVENTS:

King’s College London: Kass Lecture on the History of Medicine: On the Efficacy of Placebos: An Historian’s Perspective 18 January 2016

Warburg Institute: Maps and Society Lectures: Experiencing Early Lunar Maps through an Eighteenth-Century Collection 14 January 2016

UWTSD London Campus: The Study Day: Introduction to Egyptian Astronomy 6 February 2016

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Edge of Disaster – Vaccines and Epidemics 21 January 2016

UCL: Lecture: Henry Nicholls: The Galapagos. A Natural History 27 January 2016

The Washington Post: These are the most exciting museum happenings in 2016

Gresham College: Lecture: Babbage and Lovelace 19 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Symposium: Death and the Afterlife 22 January 2016

CRASSH: Cambridge: Workshop: Orientalism and its Institutions in the Nineteenth Century 18 February 2016

EconoTimes: Historymiami Museum to Host Largest Map Fair in the Western Hemisphere for 23rd Year 5–7 February 2016

Dittrick Museum: Book Signing, Death’s Summer Coat 20 January 2016

11th Cambridge Wellcome Lecture in the History of Medicine: Michael Stolberg: Curing Diseases and Exchanging Knowledge: Sixteenth-Century Physicians and Their Female Patients 14 January 2016

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Chelsea Physic Garden: Round Table Discussion: Dark brilliance: Agatha Christie, poisonous plants and murder mysteries 2 February 2016

Science Museum: Symposium: Revealing the Cosmonaut 5 February 2016

British Library: Medieval manuscripts blog: Postgraduate Open Day on our Pre-1600 Collections 1 February 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Jan Brueghel the Elder repeatedly depicted telescopes: The Five Senses, 1617 – 1618, by two Flemish masters Jan Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rubens.

Jan Brueghel the Elder repeatedly depicted telescopes:
The Five Senses, 1617 – 1618, by two Flemish masters Jan Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rubens.

TELEVISION:

Notches: The Rejected: Homophile Activists in the Spotlight

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Sci Fri: Things of Beauty: Scientific Instruments of Yore

Youtube: Big Old Lenses – Objectivity #51

Youtube: Numberphile: The iPhone of Slide Rules

Youtube: Natural History of Dinosaurs

Museo Galileo: Celestial Globe

Youtube: Bob Newhart – Herman Hollerith.wmv

Youtube: Fighting Firedamp – The Lamp that Saved 1,000 Lives

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories: Submarine for a Stuart King

BBC Radio 4: Front Row: Includes Andrea Wulf talking about her Alexander von Humboldt biography

PODCASTS:

The Telegraph: The best history podcasts

Advances in the History of Psychology: New Books in STS Podcast: Erik Linstrum on Ruling Minds

The Linnean Society: The Video Podcasts: James Sowerby: The Enlightenment’s natural historian

New Books in East Asian Studies: Tea in China: A Religious and Cultural History

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: Objects in Motion

CHF: Distillations: Episode 206: Is Space the Place? Trying to Save Humanity by Mining Asteroids

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Notches: CfP: The History of Venereal Disease Deadline 15 January 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: CfP: Writing Reformation Lives Wolfson College Oxford 27–28 June 2016

Canadian Society for the History of Medicine: CfP: A Palpable Thrill: An Introduction to Medical Humanities McMaster University 6–7 May 2016 Deadline 15 January 2016

Bryn Mawr College: CfP: Re:Humanities ’16: Bleeding Edge to Cutting Edge national digital humanities conference of, for, and by undergraduates 31 April–1 April 2016

Bruges: CfP: SCSC Conference: Jesuit Studies 18–20 August 2016

Queen Mary University, London: CfP: The Life of Testimony/Testimony of Lives – a life writing conference 5–6 May 2016

Cornell University: Inviting Historians of Science/Med/Tech to attend a “Boot Camp” for the History of Capitalism, July 10-23 2016 Deadline 15 January 2016

Medical History Society of New Jersey: Symposium: The Eugenics Movement in New Jersey: A Cautionary Tale 2 February 2016

University of Arizona, Tucson: CfP: Magic and Magicians in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Age 28 April–1 May 2016

University of St Andrews: CfP: Re//Generate Conference Materiality and the Afterlife of Things in the Middle Ages, 500–1500

MIHOS: CfP: Torricelli’s Opera Geometrica (1644)

University of Tartu: CfP: Nordic Network for Philosophy of Science: Fourth Annual Meeting

Dana Centre, Science Museum: CfP: Women Engineers in the Great War and after 23 April 2016

Annapolis: AIP Center for the History of Physics: CfP: The Third Biennial Early-Career Conference for Historians of the Physical Sciences 6–10 April 2016

ICOHTEC Congress Porto: CfP: Nuclear Fun? Banalization of Nuclear Technologies Through Displays 26–30 July 2016

University of Bucharest: An Interdisciplinary Master Class on the Nature of Principles in Western Thought 15–18 March 2016

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series, Spring 2016

University of Groningen: Conference: Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Religion and Science 21-23 March 2016

University of Strasbourg: Training Workshop: Revealing University Objects: From the Attic to the Public 23–27 May 2016

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: CfP: From Knowledge to Profit? Scientific Institutions and the Commercialisation of Science 10–12 October 2016

Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy: Call for Submissions: Method, Science and Mathematics: Neo-Kantianism and Early Analytical Philosophy

University of Flensburg: The International History Philosophy and Science Teaching [IHPST]: 1st European Regional Conference 22-25 August 2016

University of Cardiff: BSPS Annual Conference 7–8 July 2016

University of Brussels: CfP: Appropriation of Isaac Newton’s thought ca. 1700–1750

Center for Philosophy of Science at Pittsburgh: Events

University of Birmingham: CfP: Teaching and Learning in the Middle Ages

New York University: Experimental Philosophy Through History 20 February 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

King’s College London: Georgian Papers Programme Fellowships

Wellcome Trust: Medical Humanities Advisor

UCL: CELL: Research Assistant

Queen Mary University London: Three Funded PhD Studentships: ‘Living With Feeling: Emotional Health in History, Philosophy, and Experience’. Deadline 31 January 2016

Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel: Research Fellowships 2017

CHF: Fellowship Applications 2016–2017 Deadline 15 January 2016

University of Liverpool: ESRC CASE Doctoral Award: Liverpool’s medical community since 1930: shaping knowledge and business networks

The Royal Society: Newton Mobility Grants

New England Regional Fellowship Consortium: Deadline 1 February 2016

New York Public Library: Head of Special Collections Cataloging

University of Strasbourg: Training Workshop: Revealing University Objects: From the Attics to the Public 23–27 May 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Neuro History Grants @ Osler Library

University of Leeds: Postgrad Leeds

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s