Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #28

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #28

Monday 29 December 2014

 

EDITORIAL:

As 2014 winds to a halt, the Christmas excesses have settled on the hips and the first snows of winter have fallen on large parts of Europe causing traffic chaos and train delays, as if it were the first time that mankind has been confronted by this hexagonal form of frozen water, we bring you the final edition of your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette for this year. But fear not gentle readers if there be histories of science, medicine and technology posted on the Internet in 2015 there will be a Whewell’s Gazette to collect, collate, conserve and present those posts for your delectation every seven days.

In Germany in the days leading up to New Year’s Eve people greet each other with ‘Guten Rutsch’, which means slide well into the New Year. I hope all of the readers of Whewell’s Gazette slide smoothly into 2015 and continue to hold the #histSTM high in the next twelve months.

Quotes of the Week:

« A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence. » – David Hume

“I don’t know why people say writing is like pulling teeth.

Pulling teeth is way faster *and* no one judges you for using drugs.” @mulegirl

Uncertain Principles: Advent Calendar of Science Stories

  1. Hazing
  2.  Parity
  3. You

#histSTM Christmas Special The Twelve Days of Taxonomy

American Museum of Natural History: Twelve Days of Taxonomy

Birthdays of the Week:

Isaac Newton born 25 December 1642 (os)

Godfrey Kneller's 1689 portrait of Isaac Newton (age 46).

Godfrey Kneller’s 1689 portrait of Isaac Newton (age 46).

Happy birthday to Sir Isaac Newton! Did everyone get a personal alchemy kit for Christmas in his honor? – @DrMRFrancis

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Christmas Trilogy Part 1: Was he or wasn’t he and does it matter?

History of Geology: The Philosopher’s Stone

Ether Wave Propaganda: A Birthday Present for Newton

Royal Museums Greenwich: Collections: Isaac Newton

AMNH: Meet the Universe’s Main Attraction – Gravity

Charles Babbage born 27 December 1791

The Illustrated London News (4 November 1871)

The Illustrated London News (4 November 1871)

Renaissance Mathematicus: Christmas Trilogy Part 2: Computing mathematical miracles

Science Museum: Babbage’s Analytical Engine, 1834–1871. (Trial model)

James Ungureanu: Vision of Science: Charles Babbage

Johannes Kepler born 27 December 1571

Portraits of Kepler and his first wife in oval medallions

Portraits of Kepler and his first wife in oval medallions

NASA: Ames Research Center: Johannes Kepler: His Life, His Laws and Times

Renaissance Mathematicus: Christmas Trilogy Part 3: Choosing a wife

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

First Astronomy Class at Vassar College 1866

First Astronomy Class at Vassar College 1866

Professor Maria Mitchell and fifteen female students wearing long dresses, seated or standing behind a telescope. Some are holding hats or an open book.

Kuriositas: The Einstein Tower

Graham Farmelo: A Dirac Returns to Caltech

Yovisto: John Michell and the Effect of Gravity on Light

Ptak Science Books: First Light to Good Night––Putting a Telescope to Sleep

AIP: Oral History Transcripts – Dr Maarten Schmidt

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

National Maritime Museum: Longitude Legends – Edmond Halley

Halley compass variations 1702

Halley compass variations 1702

MEDICINE:

Social History of Medicine: ‘They are called Imperfect men’: Male Infertility and Sexual Health in Early Modern England

Darrin Hayton: Two early pamphlets on the French Pox

NYAM: “FEAR Narcotic Drugs!” The Passage of the Harrison Act

Ad published in American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record, volume 36, number 6, March 25, 1900.

Ad published in American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record, volume 36, number 6, March 25, 1900.

Ptak Science Books: A Little Version of the Big Giant Head

ABO Public: To make maccarons of valentia Almonds

Mayo Clinic News Network: Christmas Eve Discovery 100 Years Ago is Still Helping Millions

Museum of Health Care Blog: Christmas Seals and Advertising for Health

 

BetaBoston: 60 years ago today, a Brigham surgeon kickstarted the field of organ transplantation

 

Harvard Library Oasis: Murray, Joseph E., Papers, 1919-2011

Academia.edu: Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Germany

The Guardian: From the archive, 25 December 1824: typhus fever rages in Manchester

 

Science Chamber of Horrors: This Weird Side Effect Nearly Torpedoed the Practice of Anesthesia

 

The Sloane Letters Blog: On Asses’ Milk

Bëhance: The Hypodermic Syringe

CHEMISTRY:

The Recipes Project: A Perfumed Recipe on the Early Modern Stage (Part 1)

Rachel Laudan: Tiny Bubbles: Where Food Met Science, Medicine, and Religion

Hales’ apparatus for pumping air into liquids. The bottom was placed in the liquid, then bellows were inserted inserted into the top right hole and pumped to blow the air through.

Hales’ apparatus for pumping air into liquids. The bottom was placed in the liquid, then bellows were inserted inserted into the top right hole and pumped to blow the air through.

Chemical Heritage Foundation: The DDT Collector

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Culture 24: Parchment dating and sheep gene could allow archaeologists to trace centuries of agricultural history

Yovisto: Jean-Henri Fabre – The Virgil of Insects

The Conversation: The rabbits of Christmas past: a present that backfired for Australia

Notches: Three Wise Men in a Bed: Bedsharing and Sexuality in Medieval Europe

Letters From Gondwana: A Christmas Carol: Dickens and the Little Ice Age

Scrooge’s third visitor, by John Leech, 1843. (From Wikimedia Commons)

Scrooge’s third visitor, by John Leech, 1843. (From Wikimedia Commons)

The Embryo Project: Paul Kammerer (1880–1926)

The Guardian: Charles Darwin’s voyage on Beagle unfolds online in works by ship’s artist

Nautilus: T. Rex Might be the Thing with Feathers

Yovisto: Gorillas in the Mist

 

Yovisto: William H. Masters – Master of Sex

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Glass Salt Reprise

Conciatore: Fall from Grace

Conciatore: Readers Choice

The H-Word: The many inventions of photography

 An early photograph, possibly of Talbot’s daughter. Reproduced courtesy of the Bodleian Library. Photograph: William Henry Fox Talbot Archive/Bodleian Library.

An early photograph, possibly of Talbot’s daughter. Reproduced courtesy of the Bodleian Library. Photograph: William Henry Fox Talbot Archive/Bodleian Library.

History of Art at Oxford University: William Fox Talbot and the Variety of the Photographic Archive: Exploring Oxford’s Photography Collections

Ptak Science Books: A Peek Behind the Curtain at the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey (1945)

Wonders & Marvels: From Papyrus to Parchment

Science Museum: Online Science: Section of a CB1 manual telephone exchange switchboard, 1925–1960

Ether Wave Propaganda: The 1941 “Butt Report” (on RAF bombing accuracy). Transcription

The New York Times: Miles of Steam Pipes Snake Beneath New York

Yovisto: John von Neumann – Game Theory and the Digital Computer

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Jefferson Bailey: Speak to the Eyes: The History and Practice of Information Visualisation

Figure 3. Charles Joseph Minard, Tableaux Graphiques et Cartes Figuratives de M. Minard, 1845–1869. 1869. Public domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons, via Internet Archive, https://web.archive.org/web/20140301150547/ https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Minard.png.

Figure 3. Charles Joseph Minard, Tableaux Graphiques et Cartes Figuratives de M. Minard, 1845–1869. 1869. Public domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons, via Internet Archive, https://web.archive.org/web/20140301150547/ https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Minard.png.

The Royal Institution: Henry Perigal, the Respected Crank

Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences: Virtual Special Issue: Mendel, Mendelism, and the Mendelian

Historiens de la santé: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences Vol. 70 Issue 1 Jan 2015

The New England Journal of Medicine: Rethinking the Social History

The Royal Society: The Repository: Chimes at midnight

Correspondences: Online Journal for the Academic Study of Western Esotericism Issue 2.2 (2014) Released

British Library: Medieval manuscript blog: Between Manuscript and Print: Greek Manuscripts from the Circle of Aldus Manutius

Yovisto: The Nuremberg Chronicle and the History of the World

Faith and Wisdom in Science: Medieval Lessons for the Modern Science/Religion Debate

Compass Wallah: Research Notes: India, Scientific Revolution Etc.

Blink: The square root of evil

NYAM: The Christmas Lectures

American Science: What is the Regional History of American Science?

Library of Congress: Wilbur and Orville Wright Papers at the Library of Congress

The #EnvHist Weekly

Leaping Robot Blog: Art at the Speed of Light

Wallifaction: it’s a great beautiful tomorrow: the vision of science and progress at walt disney world

Ether Wave Propaganda: The Tale of Two Syllabi: The Grad School Origins of Ether Wave Propaganda

Tulsa World: Michael Gerson: Room for nonconformity

James Ungureanu: Visions of Science: John Herschel

LSE: Shorter, better, faster, free: Blogging changes the nature of academic research, not just how it is communicated

 

Sententias: Word of the Week Wednesday: Interrogatio

International History, Philosophy and Science Teaching Group: Recent Newsletters

ESOTERIC:

News at Princeton: Decoding alchemy: Freshman seminar offers recipe for new perspectives

Jennifer Rampling, an assistant professor of history, highlights elements and compounds that were known to alchemists during a class session in Frick Chemistry Laboratory. One of the challenges in studying alchemy is deciphering recipes left by early practitioners. (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

Jennifer Rampling, an assistant professor of history, highlights elements and compounds that were known to alchemists during a class session in Frick Chemistry Laboratory. One of the challenges in studying alchemy is deciphering recipes left by early practitioners. (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

France Culture: De la bosse des maths à la théorie du criminel né: l’histoire de la phrénologie

BOOK REVIEWS:

Some Beans: Maskelyne – Astronomer Royal edited by Rebekah Higgitt

NEW BOOKS:

Science for the People: The Amazons

Historiens de la santé: Muslim Midwives. The Craft of Birthing in the Premodern Middle East

getSocialImage

Pickering & Chatto: New series: Pickering Studies in the History of Philosophy

Historiens de la santé: The Tools of Asclepius: Surgical Instruments in Greek and Roman Times

OUP: The History of Emotions: An Introduction

The Dispersal of Darwin: Huxley’s Church & Maxwell’s Demon: From Theistic Science to Naturalistic Science

9780226164878

Historiens de la santé: The ‘Hippocratic’ Corpus: Content and Context

The Dispersal of Darwin: Darwin the Writer

 

THEATRE:

FILM:

TELEVISION:

The Guardian: The problem of Professor Branestawm

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: 1890 Coin Operated Polyphon Music Box – ‘O Come All Ye Faithful”

Open Culture: Everything I Know: 42 hours of Buckminster Fuller’s Visionary Lectures Free Online (1975)

RADIO:

BBC: Cells and Celluloid: A Science and Cinema Special

 

PODCASTS:

News Works: Happy 500th birthday, Vesalius! Celebrating the founder of modern anatomy, Mutter style

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Historiens de la santé: Histoire de la théorie cellulaire et du concept de cellule Journées d’étude Organisées par Marion Thomas et Laurent Loison dans le cadre du projet POLCELL. les 7 et 8 janvier 2015 Université de Strasbourg

University of Manchester: CfP: Medicine, Translations, and Histories 11-12 June 2015

Cultivating Innovation: CfP: A one-day interdisciplinary conference 14 April 2015 John Innes Centre Norwich

Swansea University: CfP: Technologies of Daily Life (TODL) in Ancient Greece 2-3 July 2015

The British Society for the History of Science: Event: Syon Abbey Herbal – Reception at Society of Antiquaries, London 13 January 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Hygiene, Medicine, and Wellbeing 1-3 May 2015 University of Arizona

University of Helsinki: CfP: Investigating Interdisciplinary Practice: Methodological Challenges 15-17 June 2015

 

Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice (SPSP) CfP: Fifth Biennial Conference 24-26 June 2015 University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark

Historiens de la santé: CfP: Health History in Action University of Strathclyde 26-28 August 2015

http://histoiresante.blogspot.ca/2014/12/lhistoire-de-la-sante-en-action.html

Historiens de la santé: Appel à communications: Littérature et médecine : le cas de Proust Centre de Recherches Proustiennes de la Sorbonne 3-5 Juillet 2015

H-MedAnthro: CfP: ‘Social Sciences and Medical Innovations: Doing Things Together’ 21-23 May Tomsk

University of Notre Dame: CfP: Biennial History of Astronomy Workshops 24-28 June 2015

TORCH: University of Oxford: Faith and Wisdom in Science 11 February 2015

Cambridge University: Lecture: One-seed, two-seed, three-seed? Reassessing ancient theories of generation Rebecca Flemming: 15 January 2015 4:30pm

Roman votives displayed in the Naples Museum. Photo: Rachel Aucott.

Roman votives displayed in the Naples Museum. Photo: Rachel Aucott.

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Leeds Humanities Research Institute: Short-term Post-doctoral Fellowships 2015

PhD Positions in Philosophy at Durham University (Deadline: January 12, 2015)

The British Society for the History of Science: Call for Applications: Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience at Columbia University in the City of New York

Technische Universiteit Eindhoven: 4 year Postdoc: Darwinizing culture: the status of cultural evolution as a science

Technische Universiteit Eindhoven: PhD studentship in philosophy (project see above)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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One Response to Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #28

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