Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #31

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Whewell's Masthead

Volume #31

Monday 19 January 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome to Volume #31 of the world’s numero uno #histSTM weekly links list, Whewell’s Gazette. Yesterday, 18 January, was the 107 anniversary of the birth of Polish-British polymath Jacob Bronowski. As I said on more than one occasion I became interested in the history of mathematics when I read a copy of Eric Temple Bell’s Men of Mathematics, at the age of sixteen. Two books did more than anything else to cause me to widen my horizons to a more general history of science, one was Arthur Koestler’s The Sleepwalkers and the other was Jacob Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man.

Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man was originally a much praised television series but in my case it was the book to the series that had a major impact. Later I would go on to read two books by Bronowski on the philosophy/sociology of science, The Common Sense of Science and Science and Human Values, both of which influenced my interest in science studies. When I discovered that Bronowski had also written books on William Blake, then and now my favourite poet, my fate was sealed, I was definitely a fan. I don’t do heroes but if I did Bronowski would be a serious candidate.

In many discussions over the years both on blog comment columns and on Twitter I have become aware that The Ascent of Man played an important role in the career decision of quite a few historians of science and so I have decide to dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to the memory of Jacob Bronowski (18 January 1907 – 22 August 1974)

Jacob Bronowski Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jacob Bronowski
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

The Sloane Letters Blog: Storms, Sounds and Authorship

Ptak Science Blog: Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, 1961

National Geographic: A Half Century of Martian Invasions

Corpus Newtonicium: All was light – but was it?

Uncertain Principles: Science Stories: Letters to Famous Physicists

Medium.com: When Einstein met H.G. Wells

Conciatore: Torricelli and Glass

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Hugh Taylor’s Interview

Making Waves: Oliver Lodge and the Cultures of Science, 1875-1940: The Alternative Path: Lodge, Lightning, and Electromagnetic Waves

Irish Philosophy: Small and Far Away: Thomas Kingsmill Abbott

New York Review of Books: Los Alamos Declassified

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Hanford, WA

Medieval Books: Medieval Apps

British Library, Egerton MS 848 (15th century)  Source: British Library

British Library, Egerton MS 848 (15th century)
Source: British Library

Greenwich.co.uk:blogs: The Grave of John Flamsteed

The Institute: A History of the Magnetic Compass

O Say Can You See?: What emerging science got the public excited in the 1860s? Spectroscopy!

The Indian Express: In the word “sine”, we see interconnection of three mathematical traditions – Indian, Arabic and European

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

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Richard Who?: Editing Hakluyt’s The Principal Navigations: A 8nearly) 10-year Progress Report

SvD Kultur: Se de okända bilderna från Andrées polarfärd

Livescience: Treasured 16th-Century ‘Lenox Globe’ Gets a Digital Makeover

Slate Vault: Pitching a Potential Donor, Shackleton Sketched This Expedition Map

Channel Asia News: NLB launches its first festival on maps

MEDICINE:

Physician Gerolamo Mercuriale holding Vesalius's De Humani Corporis Fabrica c 1600 Painter: Lavinia Fontana (1552-1614)

Physician Gerolamo Mercuriale holding Vesalius’s De Humani Corporis Fabrica c 1600
Painter: Lavinia Fontana (1552-1614)

Mental Floss: Five Medical Innovations of the Civil War

MBS Birmingham: Saving teeth, removing inequalities: Fluoridation in Birmingham, 1964–2014

From the Hands of Quacks: Actina: A Wonder of the 19th Century

Discover: The Tragic History of Surgery for Schizophrenia

Fiction Reboot: MedHum Monday Presents: A Little Drop of Poison

The Recipes Project: Flower power: Cato’s medicinal recipes

AWH: Fe del Mundo, first female student at Harvard Medical School

The Recipes Project: Wild Thyme, Bitter Almonds, and Extract of Beavers – The Medicinal Recipes of Scribonius Largus

Wired: Strange Antique Medical Devices That Promised to Cure Everything with Electricity

 

 

Multi-purpose electrotherapy machine (Italy, 1922). This device could be used to treat muscle conditions, alleviate pain, or cauterize wounds.

Multi-purpose electrotherapy machine (Italy, 1922). This device could be used to treat muscle conditions, alleviate pain, or cauterize wounds.

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry Hall: Discovery and Synthesis of LSD

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Rosetta Stones: Wallace’s Woeful Wager: How a Founder of Modern Biology Got Suckered by Flat-Earthers

Darin Hayton: A. R. Wallace and “preter-human intelligences”

Notches: Umutoni: Why Histories of African Homosexualities Matter

The Embryo Project: Ross Granville Harrison

Ptak Science Books: A Cloud Map (1873)

Image from Arnold Guyot, Physical Geography, Scrinber's, New York, 1873

Image from Arnold Guyot, Physical Geography, Scrinber’s, New York, 1873

Evolution Institute: Yes, Darwinian Feminism Is Real. And It’s Growing

Dr Alun: ‘Rhythmical Essays on the Beard Question’: Beard haters in the 1860s!

Embryo Project: Edwin Stephen Goodrich (1868–1946)

 

Trowelblazers: Zonia Baber

Zonia Baber University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf1-00303], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Zonia Baber
University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf1-00303], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Notches: The King’s Favourite: Sex, Money and Power in Medieval England

 

History of Geology: “What a confusion for Geologists” – Geologizing with Darwin

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The Mummy That Wasn’t There

Yovisto: Lewis Terman and the Intelligence Quotient

Embryo Project: August Friedrich Leopold Weismann (1834-1914)

Cartooning Evolution Home 1861–1925

Harper's Weekly, August 19, 1871

Harper’s Weekly, August 19, 1871

TECHNOLOGY:

The Appendix: The Aviator’s Heart

Conciatore: Enamel Reprise

Ptak Science Books: Intel vs. Obelisk: The Renaissance Beauty of the Single-Chip Microprocessor

My medieval foundry: Real and possible misrepresentations about medieval copper alloy castings

Science Comma: Industrial Gas Museum, Athens – Creating and sharing knowledge about society

Mental Floss: Toilet Paper History: How America Convinced the World to Wipe

Ancient Origins: Ten amazing inventions from ancient times

Brain pickings: The Mirror and the Meme: A 600 Year History of the Selfie

Ptak Science Book: The Coming of Broadcast Television (1929)

Ptak Science Books: Killing London with the Future: City Planning with the Bressey Report, 1937

 

Ptak Science Books: Bicycle Story Without Words, 1869

6a00d83542d51e69e201bb07dcaa0c970d-500wi

Yovisto: Thomas Augustus Watson – Recipient of the Very First Phone Call

 

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The many-headed monster: Thinking about doing a PhD: who, where and how?

Live Mint: Mythology, history & science

Wonders & Marvels: Agnodice: Down and Dirty?

Chronologia Universalis: A Warning, part 1, or: Read the catalogues!

The Atlas of Early Printing

OUP Blog: Making the case for history in medical education

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Scientists as celebrities: Bad for science or good for society?

dhq: Beyond Gutenberg: Transcending the Document Paradigm in Digital Humanities

Today I found out: The Mysterious Fate of the Library of Alexandria

Discover: The 5 Retro Science Kits That Inspired a Generation of Tinkerers

Bridges, derricks and robots were common early Erector set projects. Even newer Meccano sets have spawned impressive projects, like the airplane below. Yale medical student William Sewell really thought outside the box when he used Erector parts to build the first artificial heart pump. Erector U.S./Meccano

Bridges, derricks and robots were common early Erector set projects. Even newer Meccano sets have spawned impressive projects, like the airplane below. Yale medical student William Sewell really thought outside the box when he used Erector parts to build the first artificial heart pump.
Erector U.S./Meccano

The New York Times: ‘Izzy, Did You Ask a Good Question Today?’

Irish Philosophy: Berkeley’s Foray into Experimental Philosophy

Ptak Science Books: A Half-Alphabet of Color by Isaac Newton and What the Colors “Naked” and “Dead” Are (1659)

The #EnvHist Weekly

Conciatore: Michel Montaigne

The New York Times: Dorothy Thomas, the ‘Mother’ of Bone Marrow Transplants, Dies at 92

Dorothy Thomas and her husband, Dr. E. Donnall Thomas. The couple worked together on research into transplants that could cure dying patients of leukemia.  Credit Jim Linna

Dorothy Thomas and her husband, Dr. E. Donnall Thomas. The couple worked together on research into transplants that could cure dying patients of leukemia.
Credit Jim Linna

 

HSS: Saton Medal Speech: Steven Shapin: “Praising Famous Men”

The Frailest Thing: Do Artifacts Have Ethics?

The Finch & Pea: Sunday Science Poem: Lord Byron’s Post-Apocalyptic Vision

Leaping Robot: Lasers, Pot Smoke, and the “Visual Art of the Future”

Athene Donald’s Blog: Science Policy and Impact: Lessons from History

ESOTERIC:

History of Alchemy: Cornelius Drebbel

academia.edu: Intermediary Beings (ch. 64, The Occult World) pdf

Heterodoxology: Esotericism in Antiquity: An Aries Special Issue

 

 

Tauroctony

Tauroctony

BOOK REVIEWS:

Remedia: Unassigned Reading

 

The Lancet: A history of chronic diseases

Science Book a Day: Downs: The history of a disability

Chemical Heritage Magazine: The Electric Wizard

Nikola Tesla lived a life of contradictions. Tesla was equal parts showman and inventor, and these qualities underpinned his success and contributed to his downfall. A multiple-exposure photograph shows Tesla in his Colorado Springs laboratory, where he explored wireless telegraphy and produced artificial lightning.  (The Tesla Collection)

Nikola Tesla lived a life of contradictions. Tesla was equal parts showman and inventor, and these qualities underpinned his success and contributed to his downfall. A multiple-exposure photograph shows Tesla in his Colorado Springs laboratory, where he explored wireless telegraphy and produced artificial lightning.
(The Tesla Collection)

NEW BOOKS:

Juan Biquert’s Blog: Ramon Llull: From the Ars Magna to Artificial Intelligence

Science Book a Day: Women in Science: Then and Now

women-in-science

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Guardian: Jane Hawking: ‘I firmly believed in Stephan and his brilliance’

Jane Hawking, Stephen Hawking’s first wife, at the premiere for The Theory of Everything last month. Photograph: Ian West/PA Wire

Jane Hawking, Stephen Hawking’s first wife, at the premiere for The Theory of Everything last month. Photograph: Ian West/PA Wire

TELEVISION:

The Telegraph: Wolf Hall programme-makers insist on straight, white teeth

SLIDE SHARE:

From Compass to Cellphone: A 4000 Year Journey @fadesingh

VIDEOS:

Manchester 1824: Kathleen Mary Drew (1901–1957) was a phycologist at Manchester

Royal Society: The Volcano Diaries – Objectivity ‘2

Vimeo: 120 years of watching movies together

Scientists You Must Know: Gordon Moore on Moore’s Law

RADIO:

The Guardian: A Selfish turn around CERN

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Chronologia Universalis: Early Modern Chronologies: RSA 2015 Annual Meeting, Berlin 26-28 March 2015

Wellcome Library: Pre-modern medicine seminars: Spring 2015 programme

 

Tokyo Institute of Technology: The International Workshop on the History of Chemistry, “Transformation of Chemistry from the 1920s to the 1960s,” March 2–4, 2015

St Cross College: University of Oxford: Centre for the History and Philosophy of Science: “Voltaire and the Newtonian Revolution” One-Day Conference 28 Feb 2015

SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OF EARLY MODERN STUDIES: CfP: “The Care of the Self in Early Modern Philosophy and Science”

Villa Dohrn, Ischia, Italy: Call for Applications: The Fourteenth Ischia Summer School on the History of the Life Sciences 27 June – 3 July 2015

 

LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender History: 2016 AHA CfP: Queer Migrations

Royal Institute of Navigation: Lecture: The Golden Age of Celestial Navigation, Edinburgh 4 Feb 2015

 

Wellcome Collections: Lecture: Wellcome’s Collectors 22 January 2015

National Library Board Singapore: Exhibition: Geo – Graphic: Celebrating Maps and their Stories 16 Jan–19 Jul 2015

map-festival-2-data

Historiens de la santé: CfP: NYAM: Fifth Annual History of Medicine Night 11 March 2015

Durham University: Final CfP: The History of Thermodynamics and Scientific Realism 12 May 2015

issuu: CfP: Pulse: A History of Sociology, and Philosophy of Science Journal: Open Issue (Vol. 3 2015)

Making Waves: Oliver Lodge and the Cultures of Science, 1875-1940: Workshop 4:  Scientific Lives: Oliver Lodge and the History of Science in the Digital Age 6 March 2015 Leeds Art Gallery

Kent CHOTS: 4th Annual H. G. Wells lecture in Science and Society FIGHTING FOR VOTE: SCIENCE AND SUFFRAGE IN WORLD WAR ONE Dr Patricia Fara 4 March 2015

Historiens de la santé: History of Pre-Modern Medicine Seminar Series: Programme for Spring 2015 Wellcome Library

OU History of Science Collection: Announcing the Galileo’s World exhibition

James Gregory Public Lectures on Science and Christianity: The science-and-religion delusion: towards a theology of science Tom McLeish 16 Feb 2015

Institute Of Historical Research: Lecture: “Captain Cook, Pyrotechnist” 27 Jan 2015

University of Sheffield: CfP: A History of Public Parks 11-12 September 2015

UCL: CfP: Brno Latour and Environmental Governance Workshop 18-19 May 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Bristol: Postdoctoral Research Assistant, History of Medicine (Life of Breath) based in the Department of Philosophy

Centre for the Study of the Book: Bodleian Libraries: Fellowships and Prizes

Harvard Kennedy School: STS Fellows Program

BSHS: Undergraduate Dissertation Archive Grants 2015

H-Environment: University of Alberta: Department of History and Classics: Doctoral Funding Opportunity – Northern Exposure

Conecta: Duke University History of Medicine Travel Grants

BSPS Doctoral Scholarship Competition 2015

Newton International Fellowships

Chemical Heritage Foundation: Digital Collections Archivist

The Heritage Consortium: 12 Fully Funded PhD Studentships In Heritage Studies

University of Oxford: CMRS Career Development Fellowship in Renaissance History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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One Response to Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #31

  1. Thanks for sharing this nice article. and i wish to again on your new blog keep sharing with your article.
    Thanks For Share….

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