Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #38

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

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Volume #38

Monday 09 March 2015

EDITORIAL:

Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list has been around for just thirty-eight issues counting this one but 6 March saw the three hundred and fiftieth birthday of the world’s first (maybe) and oldest (definitely) science journal the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, which has been celebrating its birthday in real style. There are free open access birthday editions of both the A edition (mathematical and physical sciences) and the B edition (the life sciences) with lots of history of science content so get stuck in and download all of those goodies.

The Royal Society: Publishing Blog: Free access to 350 years of science publishing

University of Toronto: Exhibit – 350 Years of Scientific Discovery: The Royal Society’ Philosophical Transactions 6–31 March

The Guardian: 350 years of the scientific journal: celebrating the anniversary of Philosophical Transactions

Youtube: Science Stories: Publishing 350

Yovisto: The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society

Quotes of the week:

“Describe your methodology” – Well, I read things and then think about them. That good enough? @LeapingRobot

“Judging by how hard it is to get some people to do either of those things, it sounds pretty rigorous.” @TryingBiology

Women’s History Month – International Women’s Day

Google Doodle IWD

Google Doodle IWD

Sunday was International Women’s Day and March is also Women’s History Month so this edition of Whewell’s Gazette starts with a special women’s section.

A Don’s Life: International Women’s Day for historians

PLOS Blogs: Pentimento: Revealing the Women Obscured in Science History

Trowelblazers: Women in archaeology, geology, and palaeontology

Wikipedia: WikiProject Women’s History/NIH Women’s History Month Edit-a-Thon 2015

Cemistry lab at Bedford College in 1874. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Cemistry lab at Bedford College in 1874.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

Conciatore: Women in Alchemy

The Recipes Project: “The Alchemist’s Desire”: Recipes for Health and Beauty from Caterina Sforza

Rosetta Stones: Women of the Geoblogosphere: Follow Them! For They are Awesome

News ALL Day: Mapping history’s ‘invisible’ women

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Nancy Bartlit’s Interview

Trowelblazers: Tina Negus: An eye for the Ediacaran

Royal Holloway College botany class in 1937. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Royal Holloway College botany class in 1937.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

The Conversation: You probably haven’t heard of these five amazing women scientists – so pay attention

How We Get To Next: The Forgotten Story of the Women Who Built One of London’s Most Iconic Bridges

Advances in the History of Psychology: Women’s History Month @ Psychology’s Feminist Voices

The Sloane Letters Blog: Choosing the Countryside: Women Health and Power in the Eighteenth Century

The Guardian: International Women’s Day 2015: history of women in science – in pictures

Bedford College chemistry lab in 1920. Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London Source: The Guardian

Bedford College chemistry lab in 1920.
Photograph: Archives, Royal Holloway, University of London
Source: The Guardian

AMNH: Women’s History Month at the Museum

TrowelBlazers: 5 TrowelBlazers You Should Have Heard of

Brain Pickings: Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science

io9: These 17 Women Changed The Face of Physics

flickr: Women in Science

"NOTHING IN LIFE IS TO BE FEARED. IT IS ONLY TO BE UNDERSTOOD" – Marie Curie

“NOTHING IN LIFE IS TO BE FEARED. IT IS ONLY TO BE UNDERSTOOD” – Marie Curie

Birthday of the week:

Gerardus Mercator born 5 March 1512

Gerardus Mercator's 503rd Birthday Google Doodle

Gerardus Mercator’s 503rd Birthday
Google Doodle

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The “first” Atlas

The Renaissance Mathematicus: It’s not the Mercator projection; it’s the Mercator-Wright projection!

History Today: The Birth of Gerardus Mercator

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Astrology and the novatores, part 3

AHF: John R. Dunning

BSHS Travel Guide: Harvard College Observatory

Photograph of the Harvard Computers, a group of women who worked under Edward Charles Pickering at the Harvard College Observatory. The photograph was taken on 13 May 1913 in front of Building C, which was then the newest building at the Observatory. The image was discovered in an album which had once belonged to Annie Jump Cannon. Image courtesy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Back row (L to R): Margaret Harwood (far left), Mollie O’Reilly, Edward C. Pickering, Edith Gill, Annie Jump Cannon, Evelyn Leland (behind Cannon), Florence Cushman, Marion Whyte (behind Cushman), Grace Brooks. Front row: Arville Walker, unknown (possibly Johanna Mackie), Alta Carpenter, Mabel Gill, Ida Woods (Source: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. This media file is in the public domain because its copyright has expired).

Photograph of the Harvard Computers, a group of women who worked under Edward Charles Pickering at the Harvard College Observatory. The photograph was taken on 13 May 1913 in front of Building C, which was then the newest building at the Observatory. The image was discovered in an album which had once belonged to Annie Jump Cannon. Image courtesy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Back row (L to R): Margaret Harwood (far left), Mollie O’Reilly, Edward C. Pickering, Edith Gill, Annie Jump Cannon, Evelyn Leland (behind Cannon), Florence Cushman, Marion Whyte (behind Cushman), Grace Brooks. Front row: Arville Walker, unknown (possibly Johanna Mackie), Alta Carpenter, Mabel Gill, Ida Woods (Source: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. This media file is in the public domain because its copyright has expired).

AHF: Manhattan Project Spotlight: The Groves Family

Brown University Library: Capturing the Transit of Venus

AHF: Innovation Through Teamwork

Nature Physics: Physics, physicists and the bomb

Phys.org Aboriginal legends an untapped record of natural history written in the stars

University of Cambridge Museums: Sedwick Museum meteorite helps unravel mysteries of Solar System

Cosmos: The physicist who inflated the universe

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: Robert Adam and the King’s Topographical Collection

Robert Adam [Elevation and plan of a proposed arch at Hyde Park Corner, November 1778]  Maps K Top 27.26-c-2.  Source: British Library

Robert Adam [Elevation and plan of a proposed arch at Hyde Park Corner, November 1778] Maps K Top 27.26-c-2.
Source: British Library

MEDICINE:

Archives Hub: Continuity of Care – The Royal Scottish National Hospital

h-madness: “The Making and Travelling of Knowledge. A Biography of a Medical Case History in Nineteenth-Century Europe”

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Big–Data Project on 1918 Flu Reflects Key Role Of Humanists

Early Modern Medicine: The Stinging of a Wasp

MHL: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Lapham’s Quarterly: Contagion: A brief history of malaria, leprosy, and smallpox
08_medicine

 

The Recipes Project: Scratching “The Itch Infalable”: Johanna St. John’s Anti-Itch Cure

ChoM News: From the MHL: What Can We Learn from Hospital Reports?

The Lancet: Exhibition review: Celebrating the remarkable life of John Radcliffe

Yovisto: John Fothergill – Physician and Gardener

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Source: Unknown

Source: Unknown

The Guardian: How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

Earth Observatory: Svante Arrhenius (1859-1927)

The Crestone Eagle: Gray & Hooker’s Blanca Peak Expedition: The Asian connection

NYAM: Proposed 1920s Orphanage Study Just One Example in History of Scientific Racism

Notches: Eugenics and Intersex: The consequences of defining “normal” bodies

Yovisto: John Murray and the Oceanography

John Murray (1841 – 1914)

John Murray
(1841 – 1914)

The Royal Institution: John Tyndall discovered the basis of global warming. Why has history forgotten him?

The Guardian: Sexing up the human pheromone story: How a corporation started a scientific myth

Source: Unknown

Source: Unknown

Dorking and Leatherhead Advertiser: Call for plaque to recognize Dorking home of evolution scientist

Diseases of Modern Life: Inside Passengers: The Girl’s Own Paper looks inside the body

Luke and Belinda explore the stomach.

Luke and Belinda explore the stomach.

Natural History Apostilles: Predator-prey selection between dogs and goats observed in 1758

Natural History Apostilles: More observations on dogs and goats from the 16th century

Skulls in the Stars: Michael Faraday and the waterspouts (1814)

Coincidence?

Coincidence?

Greg Jenner: Animals on the Wall: Cave Art & Stone Age Pets

Canadian Geographic: HMS Erebus exploration set to continue

CHEMISTRY:

Medium: A short-but-gruesome history of the match

image by flickr user Jim Chambers CC BY-NC-SA

image by flickr user Jim Chambers CC BY-NC-SA

TECHNOLOGY:

Medievalist.net: Top 10 Strange Weapons of the Middle Ages

Dr Alun Withey: Zounds how you scape! Being shaved in Georgian Britain

Yovisto: Walter Bruch and the PAL Color Television System

Ptak Science Books: Tiny Sky Nets for Attacking Aircraft, 1925

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

IEEE Spectrum: Eben Upton: The Raspberry Pi Pioneer

Ptak Scientific Books: Visual Display of Data: German Military Weakness, 1929

Conciatore: Filigrana

Ptak Science Books: Cut-Away Schematic: British Vickers Medium Tank, 1925

Yovisto: William Oughtred and the Slide Rule

The Atlantic: The Failed Attempt to Destroy GPS

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

WCM 1: Open Notebook History

The many-headed monster: Who were ‘the people’ in early modern England? Part II: Some evidence from manuscripts

New Statesman: No one was “gay” in the 18th century: why we must not rewrite history with today’s terms

Metamorphoses in Art & Science

Giving to Princeton: Gift Establishes the Thomas M. Siebel History of Science Professorship

OUP Blog: Creating a constructive cultural narrative for science

Islam & Science: Lessons learned from the ‘Earth does not rotate’ debate

New Statesman: Wellcome Collection: raising the cultural profile of science

Storify: Hans Sloane and His Books

LabLit.com: A bitter pill to swallow Obituary Carl Djerassi

Chemistry World: Are you sitting comfortably?

PRI: How JFK made NASA his secret weapon in the fight for civil rights in America

Clyde Foster processes telemetry at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1965 in a photo that appeared in Ebony magazine. As a NASA employee, Foster was a leader in getting jobs and advancing engineering education for African Americans. Credit: Courtesy of Don Rutledge ©

Clyde Foster processes telemetry at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1965 in a photo that appeared in Ebony magazine. As a NASA employee, Foster was a leader in getting jobs and advancing engineering education for African Americans. Credit: Courtesy of Don Rutledge ©

Wellcome Library: UK Medical Heritage Library

Zooniverse: Science Gossip: an investigation into the making and communication of science in both the Victorian period and today.

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists: Inside the exhibition

CHoM News: New Exhibit: Foundations for the History of Women in Medical Oral History

Royal College of Physicians: Exhibition: Chemistry in the garden: paintings by Nina Krauzewicz 3 March–31 July 2015

The #EnvHist Weekly

My medieval foundry: Books, blogs and communicating knowledge to the public

Ration Action: New Blog: Historical perspectives on scientific method, technology and policy design, bureaucracy, economic and behavioral analysis, optimization, theories of choice, and philosophies of mind

Ether Wave Propaganda: Rational Action: The Blog

Forbes: Ideas That Deserve to Die … But Probably Won’t

ESOTERIC:

io9: 10 Famous Scientists Who Held Surprising Supernatural Beliefs

Ptak Science Books: A Dominance of Observations from our Future Skeleton (1635)

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History Matters: Happy 200th Deathday Franz Anton Mesmer

Chemistry World: Alchemy on the page

homunculus: Alchemy on the page (extended version)

D News: Edison’ ‘lost’ Idea: A Device to Hear to the Dead [sic]

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: Interviews Gabriel Finkelstein

Popular Science: Science in Wonderland – Melanie Keene

History Today: Infinitesimal

Book List Online: Eye of the Beholder

National Geographic: Is Islam Hostile to Science?

Somatosphere: Book Forum – Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay’s “Intolerant Bodies”

Science Book a Day: 10 Great Books on Medicine

Reviews in History: The Politics of Hospital Provision in Early Twentieth-Century Britain

TLS: Enter John Aubrey

Science Book a Day: The Chimp and the River: How AIDS Emerged from an African Forest

Some Beans: Engineering Empires

engineering-empires_thumb

The Artic Book Review: Unravelling the Franklin Mystery: Inuit Testimony

BSHS Dingle Prize Short List:

University of Chicago Press: Earth’s Deep History

Yale University Press: Voyaging in Strange Seas

9780300173796

Harper Collins Publishers: Finding Longitude

OUP: The Man in the Monkeynut Coat

One World Publishing: The History of Medicine: A Beginners Guide

NEW BOOKS:

Johns Hopkins University Press: Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars

Pikaia: Eternal Ephemera: Adaption and the Origin of Species…

9780231153164

THEATRE:

FILM:

The Science and Entertainment Lab: Rise of Women? Screening Female Scientists

Promotional shots of Cornelia (Judy Greer) and Ellie (Keri Russell) show ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ only named female characters comforting a baby

Promotional shots of Cornelia (Judy Greer) and Ellie (Keri Russell) show ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ only named female characters comforting a baby

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHARE:

VIDEOS:

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences: George Beccaloni & Ruth Benny – Wallace Treasures fro…

Youtube: Why do medical students have to study the history of medicine

RADIO:

PODCASTS:

The Guardian: Steven Weinberg on the history of science

Naked Scientists: Eureka! Experiments that Changed the World

15 Minute History: Episode 65: Darwinism and the Scopes “Monkey Trial”

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Glasgow History of Medicine Group – Spring Meetings 2015

CRASSH: The Total Archive: Dreams of Universal Knowledge from the Encyclopaedia to Big Data 19-20 March

Discovery Museum Newcastle: CfP: IET Conference on the History of Engineering 6 June 2015

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Katherine Parker (Department of History, University of Pittsburgh). ‘A Tricky Passage: Navigating, Mapping, and Publishing Representations of Tierra del Fuego in the Long Eighteenth Century’. 12 March

University of London: Women’s Studies Group 1558–1837: Annual Workshop: ‘What is the Place of Aphra Behn in Restoration Culture?’ 9 May 2015

IU Bloomington Newsroom: Historian of science Naomi Oreskes to present Patten Lectures at IU Bloomington

Cambridge University: Biological Discourses: the Language of Science & Literature around 1900 10-11 April 2015

Institute of Historical Research: Empty Spaces Conference Program for April 10, 2015

Canvas Network: Free Online Course: Warfare and Weapons in Ancient Egypt 6 April–5 May 2015

XVI UNIVERSEUM NETWORK MEETING University Heritage and Cultural Engagement of European Universities National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, 11‐13 June 2015

Aarhus University Centre for Science Studies: CfP: Workshop “1970s: Turn of an era in the history of science?” 14–15 September 2015

AIP: MOOC: Reimagining Einstein for Students and Teachers: The Einstein Revolution

Museum of the History of Science: Hooked on Invention: 14 March 2015

Yale University: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 27-28 March 2015

The Linnean Society: From Cabinet to Internet: Digitising Natural History and Medical Manuscripts 27-28 April 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Against Captain’s Orders: After Hours Exclusives (members’ event) 2 April–27 August 2015

Notches: Meet Me in St. Louis: History of Sexuality at the 1015 Organisation of American Historians Conference 16-19 April 2015

Advances in the History of Psychology: CfP: 4S Open Panel on STS, Technology & Psychology 11-14 November 2015 Denver Co.

Royal Geographical Society and Bournemouth University: The Hero’s Journey of Alfred Russel Wallace in Southeast Asia 10 March 2015 Poole

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Huddersfield: Location, Location, Location: The Gott Collection, Yorkshire landscapes and Connected Communities PhD studentship at the University of Huddersfield

University of Wuppertal: At the „Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies: Normative and historical foundations“ (IZWT) of the University of Wuppertal at the earliest date possible the position of an Assistant Professor

University of Glasgow: The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarship

The School of Philosophy, Religion, and History of Science at University of Leeds invites applications to its Non-Stipendiary Visiting Fellowships scheme for the academic year 2015-16.

University of Cambridge: Two Postdoctoral Research Associates in the Early Modern Period (History of Art and History of Science)

Science Museum Group: ACD-SCM-MAR15 – Assistant Content Developers x2, Contemporary Science

IHR: Scouloudi Historical Awards: Research Awards

University of Cambridge: Research Associate in History of Modern Science (Fixed Term)

Flight Global Jobs: Historian – RAF Northolt, London

University of Leeds: AHRC Postdoctoral Researcher Project: ‘Electrifying the country house: taking stories of innovation to new audiences’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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