Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #33

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #33

Monday 29 February 2016

EDITORIAL:

 The year rolls on and we roll with it. It’s time once again for your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing you all the histories of science, medicine and technology that we could scoop up in the far reaches of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Over the weekend there was a minor flurry in the Internet #histSTM and #scicomm communities cause by an opinion piece from the new President of the Royal Society, Vanki Ramakrishnan on The Guardian Website with the seemingly harmless title More than ever, science must be central to our lives. Like many of my Internet friends I felt my self thrown back in time to C. P. Snow’s legendary Two Cultures lecture from 1959, in which the chemist and novelist Charles Snow complained about the gulf between the arts and the sciences as he saw it and the fact that it was socially acceptable to admit ignorance of the science, but not of the (highbrow) arts.

Ramakrishnan’s Guardian piece reads like a cheap copy of Snow’s legendary Reith Lecture and was made all the worse by his extraordinary claim that the arts are privileged today in our society vis-à-vis the sciences. A claim that appears to be more than ridiculous in a time when politicians throughout the so-called developed world are calling the existence of humanities departments in universities into question whilst promoting spending on the sciences.

#histSTM is of course the seam where the humanities and the sciences meet and I am not alone in thinking that it is ridiculous for anybody involved in research or education to try and drive a wedge between them, as Ramakrishnan appears to be doing in his opinion piece. A cultured society needs all of the academic disciplines, which should compliment and not rival each other and I find it depressing when somebody in as influential a position as Ramakrishnan tries to pit the sciences and the humanities against each other. Whewell’s Gazette is a symbol of the unity that can and should exist between them and we hope that all our readers will continue to fight to support that unity.

Two Cultures

 Quotes of the week:

“Wait. If autism-spectrum people are over-represented in the sciences… wouldn’t that imply that… autism causes vaccines?!” – Zach Wienersmith (@ZachWeiner)

Unsubscribe

“The different branches of Arithmetic – Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision.” – Lewis Carroll

Book joke

“Some details are enormously important.

Some are absolutely worthless.

“Attention to detail” means nothing without context”. – John D Cook (@JohnDCook)

“Jan 1790, Thomas Mann lodges a patent for “a certain instrument for assisting the human body in walking (and which I call an artificial leg)” – Alun Withey (@DrAlun)

Giveup technology

“All human thought, all science, all religion, is the holding of a candle to the night of the universe.” – Clark Ashton Smith h/t @cratylus

Social Media

“Seems to me that kids get taught plenty about writing but not so much about storytelling, which is really its own distinct discipline” – Adrian Bott (@Cavalorn)

Library quote

 

Birthday of the Week:

Camille Flammerion born 26 February 18

Nicolas Camille Flammarion Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nicolas Camille Flammarion
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

Today in Science History: Flammarion The Astronomer

Shareok: Boldly Explore: Camille Flammarion (1888)

Flammarion engraving, Paris 1888, for Flammarion's 1888 L'atmosphère : météorologie populaire (p. 163) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Flammarion engraving, Paris 1888, for Flammarion’s 1888 L’atmosphère : météorologie populaire (p. 163)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Matter Joke

Geographicus: 1801 Bode Celestial Hemispheres or Star Maps

American Astronomical Society: James B. Pollock (1938 – 1994)

AHF: Fritz Strassmann

The Public Domain Review: Self-Portrait by Ernst Mach (1886)

Yovisto: Carl Friedrich Gauss – The Prince of Mathematicians

Yovisto: The Sky Disc of Nebra

Time: How to Watch the Solar Eclipse Like a 1960s School Kid

Caption from LIFE. Fifth-graders at the Emerson School in Maywood, Ill. line up with backs to the sun and their eclipse-watching boxes over their heads. Francis Miller—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Caption from LIFE. Fifth-graders at the Emerson School in Maywood, Ill. line up with backs to the sun and their eclipse-watching boxes over their heads.
Francis Miller—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Paul Tibbets – Reflections on Hiroshima

The Sphere of Sacrobosco: The First (Printed) Portuguese Sphere

irf.se: Viking – Sweden’s first satellite

Astrolabes and Stuff: Medieval (g)astronomy: my PhD in biscuit form

Edible equatorium

Edible equatorium

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Christoph and the Calendar

The Atlantic: A Murder at the American Physical Society

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Kenneth Nichols’ Interview

Royal Society: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: About the Cover

UCL: STS Observatory: Britain’s Oppenheimer?

Atlas Obscura: Dwingeloo Radio Observatory

AHF: James Chadwick

Anna Belfrage: No nose & a burst bladder – poor man!

Ladd Observatory Blog: An Astronomical Blunder

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Cartographia: Archive for the ‘Charles Joseph Minard’ Category: Mondays with Minard: Cotton and Wool Comparisons

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Little-known African-American among Peary’s North Pole explorers

In this May 14, 1926, photo, Matthew Henson, in New York, points to a map of the North Pole. He was part of the expedition of Robert Peary to the Pole. Associated Press

In this May 14, 1926, photo, Matthew Henson, in New York, points to a map of the North Pole. He was part of the expedition of Robert Peary to the Pole.
Associated Press

Slate: The Vault: A Colorful Late-19th-Century Map of Native American Languages

Yovisto: Amerigo Vespucci and the New World

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The naming of America

Atlas Obscura: Can You Spot The Monsters in This Medieval Map of The World

New York Public Library: Open Access Maps at NYPL

Brilliant Maps: An Incredibly Detailed Map of the Roman Empire At Its Height in 211 AD

British Library: Maps and views blog: ‘Whither the Fates Carry Us’: Bermuda goes Off the Map

Mappa ÆSTIVARUM Insularum, alias BERMUDAS dictarum [BL: Maps K Top 123.127]

Mappa ÆSTIVARUM Insularum, alias BERMUDAS dictarum [BL: Maps K Top 123.127]

National Library of Scotland: Scotland – Land Use Viewer

BnF: Gallica: 55 Digitised 3D Globes

Hyperallergic: A Map Library Is Digitizing Its Rarest Globes as 3D Models

The Australian: Finally, history at all our fingertips at National Library

BBC News: What books were taken to the Antarctic 100 years ago?

The National: The Great polish Map of Scotland is shown in great detail by drone image

Tabletop Whale: Here there be robots: A medieval map of Mars

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Leeches for everybody

Penn Libraries Manuscripts: A 15c Italian Herbal with Male & Female Mandrake Plants

NYAM: A Medical Symphony: Celebrating African Americans in New York Medicine

Georgian Gentleman: A method of preventing a Miscarriage, given by Mrs Stringer

Nursing Clio: “She Did It to Herself”: Women’s Health on Television and Film

Thomas Morris: The man with a tooth in his ear

NCBI: Early victims of X-rays: a tribute and current perception

The Public Domain Review: Frederik Ruysch: The Artist of Death

Detail from Jan van Neck’s Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Frederick Ruysch (1683), showing Ruysch in the centre with an infant cadaver  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Detail from Jan van Neck’s Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Frederick Ruysch (1683), showing Ruysch in the centre with an infant cadaver
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Andover Townsman: Illuminating the darkness

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: The College Library: William Macewen, Glasgow Police Surgeon

Circulating Now: Pubmed Central: Visualizing a Historical Treasure Trove

University of Queensland: UQ News: Ancient medicines and bone lever in rare Roman medical kit

Medicine, ancient and modern: Blog Facelift!

The H-Word: How to spot a doctor before the invention of the stethoscope

Nursing Clio: Flowers and Lady Charlotte: Talking about Menstruation, Past and Present

O Can You See?: Kids pitched in to defeat disease and advance medical research

Ida A. Bengston National Library of Medicine #101410279

Ida A. Bengston National Library of Medicine #101410279

 

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: The Battle over Bodies: A History of Criminal Dissection

The Huntingdon: Major History of Medicine Collection Comes to the Huntingdon

Yovisto: Giovanni Battista Morgagni and the Science of Anatomy

Yovisto: The Flaked Cereal turns 128 – thanks to John H. Kellogg

Thomas Morris: Mütter’s operation – plastic surgery 19th-century style

Royal Museums Greenwich: The Great Plague of London in numbers

TECHNOLOGY:

Farmhouse Lighting

Conciatore: Reticello

Conciatore: Glass or Rock

Literacy of the Present: Nothing Left to Invent: Victorian visions of the future

Two Nerdy History Girls: Fashionable Technology, c.1740

New Scientist: Old Scientist: Do you really want this computer?

Ptak Science Books: An Escher-Like Non-Escher Architectural Image

6a00d83542d51e69e201b8d1a2b441970c-500wi

Mental–floss: The Electrifying Rivalry of History’s Greatest Frenemies

Yovisto: Jacques de Vaucanson and his Miraculous Automata

The Atlantic: Hearing the Lost Sounds of Antiquity

Daily Kos: The Baghdad Battery: An Update

The Recipes Project: Making ‘Powder for Hourglasses’ in the Early Modern Household

Shropshire Star: £1.25 million renovation for Shropshire’s Iron Bridge

The Iron Bridge in Ironbridge. Photo by Jamie Ricketts.

The Iron Bridge in Ironbridge. Photo by Jamie Ricketts.

National Railway Museum: Pulling Flying Scotsman off the Drawing Board

Royal Museums Greenwich: St. Michael – identifying the mysterious ship from 1669

Yovisto: Thomas Newcomen and the Steam Engine

Yovisto: Robert Alexander Watson-Watt and the Radar Technology

Upworthy: These 6 women got written out of tech history. They’re finally being recognised

Photo of "the world's first computer" via International Communications Agency/Wikimedia Commons.

Photo of “the world’s first computer” via International Communications Agency/Wikimedia Commons.

The New York Times: Wesley A: Clark, Made Computing Personal, Dies at 88

Ptak Science Books: History of the Future of Massiveness: Stadium-Seating Skyscrapers, NYC, 1938 Imaginary New York City Landscapes from CON-ED, 1938

Sarnof Quote

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

jamesungureanu: Visions of Science: Charles Lyell

evolution-institute.org: Was Hitler a Darwinian? No! No! No!

National Graphic: The Plate: Like Sushi? Thank a Female Phycologist for Saving Seaweed

National Geographic: ‘Shark Lady’ Eugenie Clark, Famed Marine Biologist, Has Died

Eugenie Clark examines deep water sharks from Suruga Bay, Japan.  PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DOUBILET

Eugenie Clark examines deep water sharks from Suruga Bay, Japan.
PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID DOUBILET

Yovisto: Andrea Cesalpino and the Classification of Plants

Mental_floss: The King of Scotland’s Peculiar Language Experiment

Notches: Catholicism, Contraception, and The History of Sexuality

The Guardian: Lost Worlds Revisited – an introduction to our new palaeontology blog

BHL: We Need Books to…Identify New Species

The Public Domain Review: Extracts from the Endeavour Journal of Joseph Banks (1769)

JHI Blog: Aldo Leopold and the History of Environmental Ideas

Smithsonian.com: How the Gold Rush Led to Real Riches in Bird Poop

A 19th-century illustration depicts a scene off the coast of Peru, where bird poop, or guano, was harvested as a valuable agricultural fertilizer. (Corbis)

A 19th-century illustration depicts a scene off the coast of Peru, where bird poop, or guano, was harvested as a valuable agricultural fertilizer. (Corbis)

Notches: Gay Politics and Police Politics in the American City

Hindustan Times: Not so dumb: Dodos may have been fairly smart, says study

The Thrifty Traveller: In Search of Wallace – Gading & Ayer Panas

Earth and Planetary Science: Clyde Wahrhaftig (1919–1994)

Seismo Blog: Deep Earthquakes and The King

Understanding Society: History of sociology

Herbarium

CHEMISTRY:

about education: Who is the Father of Chemistry?

about education: Aqua Regis Definition

Royal Society: Glenn Theodore Seaborg 19 April 1912– 25 February 1999

Seaborg in his lab Source: Wikimedia Commons

Seaborg in his lab
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: Plutonium

AHF: Glen Seaborg

Compound Interest: A Periodic Table of Rejected Element Names

Othmeralia: Georg Washington Carver

CHF: Dangerous Materials?

Chem quote

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Harvard Magazine: The Science of History

The Recipes Project: A Recipe for Recipe Research: The Making and Knowing Project

People’s History of the NHS: People’s History of the NHS Introduction

psych.yoku.ca: Partial Bibliography of the History of Black Women Psychologists

The Nation: Ibn Rushd vs Ghazali: Did the Muslim world take a wrong turn?

Niche: #EnvHist Daily

Ambitious about Autism: Guide to an Autism Friendly Museum

HNN: Elizabeth Eisenstein, Trailblazing Historian of Movable Type, Dies at 92

The New York Times: Elizabeth Eisenstein, Trailblazing Historian of Movable Type, Dies at 92

Elizabeth Eisenstein Source: NYT

Elizabeth Eisenstein
Source: NYT

The #EnvHist Weekly

Science Gossip: A Year of Science Gossip

Slate The Vault: Timeline Lets You Browse Hundreds of Historical Documents From The Vaults Blog

Cultures of Knowledge: Giovanni Antonio Magini and the dawn of EMLO’s thematic clusters

Global Dialogue: The Strange History of Sociology and Anthropology

Lady Science: Pitch an article for Lady Science

ESOTERIC:

The Casebook Project: Introduction to the edition of The Astrologicalle Judgmentes of phisick and other Questions

The Casebook Project: The Astrologicalle Judgmentes of phisick and other Questions: witnesses and dating

Heterodoxology: The scholastic imagination

Wellcome Collection Blog: The Hand and the Eye: the story of an amulet

Amulets and charms in Medicine Man gallery.

Amulets and charms in Medicine Man gallery.

distillatio: The part medieval alchemy played in the scientific revolution

Conciatore: Friar Mauritio

PIT Journal: Lead to Gold, Sorcery to Science: Alchemy and the Foundations of Modern Chemistry

BOOK REVIEWS:

Science Book a Day: The Mysterious Universe

npr: ‘Pandemic’ Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens of Million Coming?

Backlist: Histories of the Scientific Revolution by Deborah Harkness

Advances in the History of Psychology: New Books Network: Interview Round Up

Nature: History of Science: When eugenics became law

Deseret News: The Mapmakers of New Zion tells the story of Mormonism through maps

1663796

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: The World of Plants in Renaissance Tuscany: Medicine and Botany

Historiens de la santé: The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science During the Third Reich

Historiens de la santé: Therapoetics after Actium: Narrative, Medicine, and Authority in Augustan Epic

Historiens de la santé: Spannungsherde. Psychochirurgie nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg

Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine: Air Pollution Research in Britain c.1955–2000 Free Download

Historiens de la santé: Nurse Writers of the Great War

413fheY5glL._SX300_BO1,204,203,200_

G.T. Labs: The Imitation Game: Alan Turing Decoded

Harvard University Press: Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums

Historiens de la santé: Suicide in Twentieth-Century Japan

OUP: Essays in the Philosophy of Chemistry

Historiens de la santé: La folle clinique sexuelle du Professeur Pxxx, de la Belle époque aux Années folles

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Londonist: 5 Excellent Reasons to Catch the Pepys Show at Greenwich

issuu.com: Pepys Show

Royal Society of Chemistry: Our 175 faces of chemistry exhibition

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

Griseda Heppel: The lost library of Dr Dee

New Scientist: The maddeningly magical maths of John Dee

Towering figures: Euclid’s Elements in a sumptuous edition from 1570 John Chase/RCP

Towering figures: Euclid’s Elements in a sumptuous edition from 1570
John Chase/RCP

University of Delaware: UDaily: Alchemy and Mineralogy 26 February–31 March 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Colonial Williamsburg: We are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence Opening 5 March 2016

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

SciArt in America: Traces of the Space Age and Memories of Tragedy in Robert Rauschenberg’s “Stoned Moon” 

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

gq-magazine: Leonardo da Vinci Will Make You Feel Terrible About Your Career

Queens’ College Cambridge: ‘The Rabbi & The English Scholar’ exhibition in the library 22 February–24 March 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

Watercolour on vellum by James Bolton. Bolton was born in West Yorkshire, England and was the son of a weaver. He was a self- taught botanist, artist and engraver. His brother Thomas Bolton (1722-1778) was also a naturalist. James Bolton was highly successful as a mycologist and author of several botanical books including the first British book on fungi. James and Thomas Bolton were both sponsored by the art and natural history collector Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1715-1785). Painting date c.1790s.

Watercolour on vellum by James Bolton. Bolton was born in West Yorkshire, England and was the son of a weaver. He was a self- taught botanist, artist and engraver. His brother Thomas Bolton (1722-1778) was also a naturalist. James Bolton was highly successful as a mycologist and author of several botanical books including the first British book on fungi. James and Thomas Bolton were both sponsored by the art and natural history collector Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1715-1785). Painting date c.1790s.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Osher Map Library: Masterpieces at USM: Celebrating Five Centuries of Rare Maps and Globes 19 November 2015–12 March 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Closing Very Soon: Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

Closing soon: British Library: 20th Century Maps 4 November 2016–1 March 2017

JHI Blog: Brave Entertainments

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

Science Museum: Churchill’s Scientists Runs till 1 March 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Early Modern Medicine: Review: Mr Foote’s Other Leg

Restricted Data: The nuclear Secrecy Blog: Historical thoughts on Michael Frayn’s Copenhagen

Harvard Observatory History in Images: The Harvard Observatory Pinafore

Actors: Peter Millman, Leon Campbell, [Ransom or Wheelwright], Henrietta Swope, Cecilia Payne, Mildred Shapley, Helen Sawyer, Sylvia Mussels, Adelaide Ames. Characters: William A. Rogers, Arthur Searle, [Pickering or Upton], computer, Josephina, computer, computer, computer, Rhoda Saunders

Actors: Peter Millman, Leon Campbell, [Ransom or Wheelwright], Henrietta Swope, Cecilia Payne, Mildred Shapley, Helen Sawyer, Sylvia Mussels, Adelaide Ames.
Characters: William A. Rogers, Arthur Searle, [Pickering or Upton], computer, Josephina, computer, computer, computer, Rhoda Saunders

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Coming Soon: The Crescent Theatre: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

Descartes event

British Society for the History of Pharmacy: Pharmacy History: sources and resources 18 April 2016

Wren Library Lincoln Cathedral: Lecture: Anna Agnarsdóttir – Sir Joseph Banks and Iceland 28 April 2016

Atlas Obscura: OBSCURA SOCIETY NY: AFTER-HOURS AT THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE “EAST MEETS WEST” 10 March 2016

Cambridge Bright Club: 10 March 2016 Featuring Seb Falk and his Astrolabe

Boole-Shannon

The Royal Society: Workshop: The Politics of Academic Publishing 1950–2016 22 April 2016

The Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine: Lecture: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

RCP: Dee late: rediscovering the lost world of John Dee 10 March

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Mental Maps of the World in Great Britain and France, 1870–1914

University of Greenwich: Greenwich Maritime Centre Launch 8 March 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Dee late: inside Dee’s miraculous mind

CRASSH: Cambridge: Genius in History: A Public Conversation: 2 March 2016

University of Manchester: Master’s Study Information Day: Science communication; History of science, technology and medicine; Medical humanities 2 March 2016

Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine: Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England 8 March 2016

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Waterhouse Room Gordon Hall Harvard Medical School: The Unknown Story of Art and Artists in Louis Pasteur’s Personal and Professional Life 3 March 2016

University of York: Lecture: “Not Everyone Can Be Gandhi”: The Global Indian Medical Diaspora in the post WWII Era 3 March 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

Glasgow histmed events

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin. The Attributes of the Sciences. 1731.

Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin. The Attributes of the Sciences. 1731.

 

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

Ordered Universe: Lessons for Interdisciplinary Working from Medieval Science

VIDEOS:

Youtube: MHS Oxford: Animate It – Diptych Dial

Youtube: Gauss and Germain – Professor Raymond Flood

WIMP: 1930: Rare Footage of Helen Keller Speaking With the Help of Anne Sullivan

RADIO & PODCASTS:

V&A Podcast: What was Europe? A New Salon

Ben Franklin’s World: Episode 070: Jennifer Morgan, How Historians Research

University of Cambridge: Sandars Lectures 2016: 3 Adam Winthrop: History of Resource Anthony Grafton

History of Alchemy: Abufalah, Soul Dust, and making a Basilisk

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Oxford: Call for Registration: Oxford Scientiae 5–7 July 2016

AAAS: History and Philosophy of Science at AAAS call for symposia proposals for 2017 AAAS Meeting

Workshop RS

La mort en Europe du XVIIe au XXIe siècle. Représentations, rites et usages: Appel à contribution

University of St Andrews: Mathematical Biography: A Celebration of MacTutor 16–17 September 2016

Budapest: CEU Summer University: Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe 18–27 July 2016

Conf. People Places

Amsterdam: Conference by Women in Philosophy #3 1 July 2016

University of Oklahoma: Midwest Junto for the History of Science: 1–3 April 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Music and Sexuality

Hist Geo Conf

University of Plymouth: CfP: One-Day Symposium: Pilgrimage, Shrines and Healing in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe 24 June 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Bridging the Divide: Literature and Science 3 June 2016

23 Things for Research: Book now for a Women in Wikipedia edit-a-thon, 23 March 2016

Vatican Library Conference

NYAM: Scientific Illustration: A Workshop Using the Collections of the Academy 7 April 2016

University of Kassel: CfP: Workshop: Representing Scientific Results 18–19 November 2016

Victoria University of Wellington: CfP: The New Zealand Polymath – Colenso and his contemporaries 17–19 November 2016

Rio de Janeiro: 25th International Congress for the History of Science and Technology: CfP: Global Mathematics 23–29 July 2017

Berlin: Call for Participants: Convening for three workshops in Berlin, 2016-2017 Accounting for Health: Economic Practices and Medical Knowledge, 1500–1970

Public Communication of Science and Technology: Conference program (Draft: PCST Conference Istanbul 26–28 April 2016

University of York: Research Masterclass: Death of the king: smallpox vaccination and diplomacy in Nepal in 1816 9 March 2016

AAR: Western Esotericism Group: CfP: AAR Annual Meeting San Antonio 19–22 November 2016

University of Warsaw: CfP: Interim Conference of ISA Research Committee on the History of Sociology 6–8 July 2016

Boston University: Conference: How Can HPS Contribute to Science Literacy and Policy? 26–27 February 2016

BSHS: Call for Papers and Panels: Science in Public 2016

Science in Public

University of Sussex: CfP: SPRU 50th anniversary conference on ‘Transforming Innovation’

Mexico City: CfP: The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T²M) 14thAnnual Conference 27–30 October 2016

NACBS, Washington DC: CfP: Early Modern History Workshop on “Networks of Knowledge” November 2016

UCL: STS: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2016

Rutgers University: Workshop for the History of Environment, Agriculture, Technology, & Science (WHEATS) 30 October–2 October 2016

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: The Museum as Method: Collections, Research, Universities 14–15 March 2016

University of Zürich: Conrad Gessner Congress Program 6–9 June 2016

University of Kent: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference Programme (DRAFT as at Feb 15, 2016) 7–10 July 2016

University of York: History of Medicine Masterclass – Smallpox Vaccination and Diplomacy in Nepal 9 March 2016

London Metropolitan University: CfP: ‘Made in London’: Makers, designers and innovators in musical instrument making in London, from the 18th to 21st centuries

Summer School: Rethinking Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 23–25 July 2016 Part I Lisbon 26–30 July 2016 Part II Porto

Istanbul: XXXV Scientific Instrument Symposium: CfP: Instruments between East and West 26–30 September 2016

University of York: Conference: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences 7-8 April 2016

Harvard University: 51st Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 2 April 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP Teaching and Learning in Early Modern England: Skills and Knowledge in Practice

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: The 131st Annual Meeting Call for Proposals and Theme Denver CO 5–7 January 2017

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Antiquity

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Call for Submissions: Book: Historical Epistemology of Science/Philosophy of Science, Torricelli

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

University of Western Ontario: CfP: Philosophy of Logic, Mathematics, and Physics Graduate Conference

Institut d’Études Scientifiques de Cargèse, Corsica: CNRS School “BioPerspectives” Philosophy of Biology 29 March–1 April 2016

Klosterneuburg: CfP: European Advanced School in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) 59 September 2016

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester: Lunchtime Seminar Series Feb–June 2016

AIP: Lyne Starling Trimble Science Heritage Public Lectures Feb–Sept 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: ICOHTEC Symposium in Rio de Janeiro on 23-29 July 2017

Asian Society for the History of Medicine: Call for Submissions: Taniguchi Medal 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Essay

International Committee for the History of Technology: CfP: 43rd Annual Meeting in Porto, Portugal Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

University of York 7–8 April 2016

UCL: London Ancient Science Conference: 15–18 February 2016

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: CfP: Maculinity, health and medicine, c.1750–present 28–29 April 2016

Effaced Blog: CfP: History of Facial Hair

Sidney Sussex College: University of Cambridge: Programme and Registration Treasuries of Knowledge: 8 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Queen Mary University of London: Applications Invited for AHRC CDP with British Library: Hans Sloane’s Books

Scientific Instrument Society: SIS grants

Univesity of Umeå: PhD student in History of Science and Ideas

Science Museum: Assistant Curator, Technologies and Engineering (maternity cover)

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh: Library and Archive: Wellcome Trust Research Bursaries

University of Leeds: AHRC Funded PhD Studentship: “The Working Life of Evolutionary Biologists: Exploring the Culture of Scientific Research Through the Personal Archive of John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)”

AIP: Director of Niels Bohr Library

AHA Today: Cornell University History of Home Economics Fellowship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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