Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #35

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #35

Monday 14 March 2016

EDITORIAL:

Time moves on and it’s time once again for your weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette, bringing all of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the depths of cyberspace from the last seven days gathered up and freshly packaged for you delectation.

I wrote the editorial last week on 8 March, International Women’s Day, dedicating last week’s edition of Whewell’s Gazette to the history of women in science. However the collected post went up to Sunday 6 March and the 8 March, of course, brought lots more post dedicated to women in #histSTM, so for a second week we have a special women’s history edition.

A Mighty Girl: Those Who Dared To Discover: 15 Women Scientists You Should Know

Gerty Cori

Gerty Cori

BHL: Women Illustrators in Natural History

Darwin Correspondence Project: Correspondence with women

British Library: Collection items: Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women

Library of Congress: World’s Revealed: Geography & Maps: Putting women back on the map

Anna Beeck. “Plaan van de Dissante of Landing in Spangien voor Cadix…” 1702. Library of Congress, Geography & Map Division.

Anna Beeck. “Plaan van de Dissante of Landing in Spangien voor Cadix…” 1702. Library of Congress, Geography & Map Division.

c-net: The 19th century women who catalogued the cosmos

University of Kent: Thinking Back through our Mothers: The Lady’s Magazine on International Women’s Day

Mashable: 20th Century: The Evolution of Women’s Work Wear

Motherboard: An A-Z of Women Pushing Boundaries in Science and Tech

The American Bookbinding Museum: Bookbinding and the Working Woman

Natural History Museum: Sarah Stone and images from a lost museum

“Mandarin duck, Aix galericulata. Sarah Stone, 1788.” NHM Picture Library Ref 024290

“Mandarin duck, Aix galericulata. Sarah Stone, 1788.” NHM Picture Library Ref 024290

TrowelBlazers: Zonia Baber: The Fearless Firsts of a Scientific Suffragette

Mosaic: In conversation with…Françoise Barré-Sinoussi

Letters from Gondwana: Women in the Golden Age of Geology in Britain

Nature: A tumour through time

Broadly: The History of Erasing Women’s History

CNN: These are the most important women in the history of science

Chien-Shiung Wu Chinese American Physicist (1912–1997)

Chien-Shiung Wu Chinese American Physicist (1912–1997)

Royal Society of Chemistry: shaping the history of science

Natural History Museum: Metamorphosis of an artist: Maria Sybilla Merian

Nursing Clio: Women, Animals, and the Poetry of Activism

Lady Science: Wonder Women of STEM

Wiley Online Library: Women in evolution – highlighting the changing face of evolutionary biology

Madelene College Libraries: Women Printers

PL 1077(2): CORTÉS, MARTIN: THE ARTE OF NAUIGATION… [IMPRINTED AT LONDON: BY THE WIDOWE OF RICHARD IUGGE, LATE PRINTER TO THE QUEENES MAIESTIE, 1584].

PL 1077(2): CORTÉS, MARTIN: THE ARTE OF NAUIGATION… [IMPRINTED AT LONDON: BY THE WIDOWE OF RICHARD IUGGE, LATE PRINTER TO THE QUEENES MAIESTIE, 1584].

Smithsonian.com: Ten Historic Female Scientists You Should Know

Conciatore: Sara Vincx

Conciatore: Béguines of Malines

Conciatore: Dianora Parenti

Yakima Herald: Mitchell made the most of her opportunities

Nature: Women at the edge of science

Caterina Sforza defended cities and hoarded alchemical secrets in the fifteenth century.

Caterina Sforza defended cities and hoarded alchemical secrets in the fifteenth century.

The Globe and Mail: The Women on the Moon

CPH Post Online: Low on the Richter scale, but highly respected in the lab

Bletchley Park: Bombe Girls

Royal Museums Greenwich: Three Women in the London Chart Trade, c.1800-1860

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Baumgartner, Leona papers, 1837–1993 (inclusive) 1930–1970 (bulk)

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Dawes, Lydia M. Gibson papers, 1926–1959

The Guardian: Pioneering woman who mapped the ocean floor

Marie Tharp at work on her maps of the Atlantic Ocean floor, in the early 1950s. Photograph: Alamy

Marie Tharp at work on her maps of the Atlantic Ocean floor, in the early 1950s. Photograph: Alamy

Science: Q&A: Author of ‘feminist glaciology’ study reflects on sudden appearance in culture wars

Nicholson’s Journal

I recently got this email forwarded by Sue Bramall concerning the Nicholson’s Journal website, which she runs. This is a wonderful #histSTM resource and it is to be wished that more people follow he lead and produce similar websites for other important by long forgotten scientific periodical from the past.

Dear all,

Especially for those interested in the 18th and the 19th centuries, there is a very useful and impressive new resource. It is a gateway to the whole set of A Journal of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and the Arts, edited by William Nicholson (affectionately known, then and now, as “Nicholson’s Journal”), gathered together in one convenient place:
All of the 3,000 articles have also been indexed, so you can search by author, subject, keyword, and time period from the “Index” tab. You can also find a complete list of authors on the same website, and bibliographies of works by and about Nicholson.
All of this is the work of Sue Bramall, amateur historian and a descendant of William Nicholson. Sue is also in the process of completing a biography of Nicholson, which will fill an important gap in the literature. Information about the forthcoming book can also be found on the website.
Enjoy!
best,
Hasok

…brought to you by HPS-discussion.

The Guardian all brought an excellent article on the H-Word Blog on Ms Bramall’s efforts

The H-Word: Nicholson’s Journal: Britain’s fist commercial science periodical

 Illustration from the 1810 volume of the Journal of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and the Arts. Photograph: Natural History Museum/Wikimedia

Illustration from the 1810 volume of the Journal of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and the Arts. Photograph: Natural History Museum/Wikimedia

Quotes of the week:
“Imagine what would happen if Schroedinger’s cat was asked to “think outside the box”” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“His sort’s nowt a pound, and shit’s tuppence…” – Inspector Thursday h/t @telescoper

“Sensible 17th century medical proverb: ‘You should never touch your eye but with your elbow.’” – Jonathan Healey (@SocialHistoryOx)

“Mr. Watson—Come here—I want to see you” – famous first words over Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone to his assistant Thomas A. Watson @yovisto

Homin Pigeon

“Historical context is no trivial matter”. Michael Egan (@EganHistory)

“Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.” Douglas Adams (1952-2001)

“In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.” Douglas Adams

“I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.” Douglas Adams (1952-2001) h/t @yovisto

“And bleeding Nature with all its bloody laws that we never voted for #brexit” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“Too many cosmologists spoil the primordial soup” – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

“Don’t put your trust in revolutions. They always come around again. That’s why they’re called revolutions.” – Terry Pratchett

Roman Algebra

“I never let practical considerations clutter my youthful dreams.” – Roy Chapman Andrews, fossil discoverer and explorer.

“All this fuss about artificial intelligence, I’d settle for a bit more human intelligence” – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

“Science is a tribute to what we can know ‘although’ we are fallible.” – Jacob Bronowski

“How do you titillate an ocelot? Oscillate its tit a lot”. – Jon Sutton (@jonmsutton)

Birthdays of the Week:

William Herschel discovered Uranus 13 March 1781

Herschel  Neptune

NASA Space Place: Why did it take so long to discover Uranus?

JHA: Uranus and the Establishment of Herschel’s Astronomy (pdf)

iscovery of Neptune

EarthSky: This date in science: Uranus discovered, completely by accident

Yovisto: Sir William Herschel and the Discovery of Uranus

John Herschel born 7 March 1792

John Herschel 1846

John Herschel 1846

Encyclopædia Britannica: Sir John Herschel, 1st Baronet

Yovisto: John Herschell – A Pioneer in Celestial Photography

Urbain Le Verrier born 11 March 1811

Urbain Le Verrier

Urbain Le Verrier

Yovisto: Urbain Le Verrier and the hypothetical Planet Vulcan

Georg Buckland born 12 March 1784

BUckland

History of Geology: Geology history in caricatures: A Coprolitic Vision

Strang Science: William Buckland

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Henry Draper and his Passion for Astronomy

Ptak Science books: Kingdom of Dust: Dancing Dust and Vibrating Membranes

6a00d83542d51e69e201bb078a6864970d-500wi

Linda Hall Library: Scientist of the Day – Johann Bayer

AHF: Enrico Fermi

Yovisto: Johannes van der Waals – A Pioneer in the Molecular Sciences

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Hans Bethe

Fornax Chimiæ: Prismatic Analysis

Sky and Telescope: Flood Threatens Photographic Plates

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Leon Overstreet’s Interview

Motherboard: When Astronomers Chased a Total Eclipse in a Concorde

Concorde 001 taking off on its eclipse mission. Photo: Jim Lesurf

Concorde 001 taking off on its eclipse mission. Photo: Jim Lesurf

Forbes: Astronomy and the Cold War

Royal Astronomical Society: A brief history of the RAS

Voices of the Manhattan Project: James C. Hobbs’ Interview

The Renaissance Mathematicus: We’re British not European – Really?

In The Dark: “British Physics” – A Lesson from History

APS: John van Vleck: Quantum Theory and Magnetism

Macau Daily Times: This Day in History: 1960 Radio Telescope Makes Space History

The British radio telescope at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire

The British radio telescope at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Brilliant Maps: 1853 Japanese Map of the World by Suido Nakajima

1853 Japanese Map Of The World By Suido Nakajima

1853 Japanese Map Of The World By Suido Nakajima

The National Archives: The Text Message Blog: Fur Warden Sketches Map of Fortymile River Basin in Alaska

NEH 50th Anniversary: History of Cartography

Smithsonian.com: Was America Named for a Pickle Dealer

Yovisto: Richard E. Byrd, Jr. – Aviator and Polar Explorer

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Cured by a lightning bolt

ART UK: Barber-surgeons and the history of the dentist

Nezzo, Luciano; A Toothdrawer Concealing the Key from the Patient; Wellcome Library;

Nezzo, Luciano; A Toothdrawer Concealing the Key from the Patient; Wellcome Library;

The History of Modern Biomedicine: Pyjamas on Everest and in the lab – tales from the National Institute of Medical Research

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: Maister Peter Lowes Gloves

dcist.com: St. Elizabeths Stories: How the World’s Most Notorious Lobotomist Got His Start in D.C.

IEEEXplore: Ask your doctor…About Computers

Yovisto: John Fothergill – Physician and Gardener

Thomas Morris: Wrapped in a dead sheep

cha-fr.net: Le club de l’Histoire de l’Anesthésie et de la Réanimation

Cambridge Journals Medical Histoy: Professional Heresy: Edmund Gurney (1847–88) and the Study of Hallucinations and Hypnotism

Thomas Morris: Jaundice and night blindness

SSHM: The Evolving Functions and Roles of the Bristol and Dudley Dispensaries, 1888–1914

NYAM: Solving Woman’s Oldest Hygienic Problem in a New Way. A History of Period Products

“Farr’s Patent Ladies’ Menstrual Receptacle,” advertised in American Druggist, January 1884.

“Farr’s Patent Ladies’ Menstrual Receptacle,” advertised in American Druggist, January 1884.

The Recipes Project: A Medicine for the Archduchess of Innsbruck

Thomas Morris: The stomach eel

Yovisto: Alexander Fleming and the Penicillin

Atlas Obscura: Museum of Medical History Hamburg

Atlas Obscura: Bile Beans, The Incognito Laxative That Claimed to be a Cure-All

Smithsonian.com: These Erie Civil War Photos Changed How the U.S. Saw Veterans

John Bowers was 19 when he was injured in the Battle of Fredericksburgh. (U.S. National Library of Medicine)

John Bowers was 19 when he was injured in the Battle of Fredericksburgh. (U.S. National Library of Medicine)

Listverse: 10 Horrifying Medical Cases That Make You Glad You Didn’t Live in the Past

TECHNOLOGY:

The Guardian: Ray Tomlinson, email inventor and selector of the @ symbol, dies at 74

Smithsonian.com: The Accidental History of the @ Symbol

Yovisto: Nicéphore Niépce and the World’s First Photograph

Ptak Science books: Two Dimensions to Three and Back Again (1588) – a Bit of an Optical Illusion

Ptak Science Books: Universal Spelling Board, 1889

Smithsonian.com: The Laptops That Powered the American Revolution

Atlas Obscura: Text-to-Speech in 1846 Involved a Talking Robotic Head With Ringlets

Newsworks: Sound it out: the (sometimes creepy) history of the talking machine

Yovisto: Thomas Augustus Watson – Recipient of the Very First Phone Call

Bell telephone

Ptak Science Books: The Big Stuff – Heavy Numbers, 1939

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Electromechanical Telephone Switching

Yovisto: Vannevar Bush and the Memex

Yovisto: J.C.R. Licklider and Interactive Computing

Primitive Method: Clay & Ceramics in “On Divers Arts” – Medieval Crucibles Part 1

Open Culture: Meet the Telharmonium the First Synthesizer

Telharmonium console by Thaddeus Cahill 1897. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Telharmonium console by Thaddeus Cahill 1897.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Notches: Presidential Penis Politics: A Micro-History

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Library & Archives: College Botanical Books

otto_brunfels_1

Atlas Obscura: Thomas Jefferson’s Dream to Rid the Oceans of Salt

BHL: Following Early Naturalists of the American West

Yovisto: Georg Wilhelm Steller and the Great Nordic Expedition

Yovisto: Rembert Dodoens and the Love for Botanical Science

Origins: Washed Ashore: Marine Mammals from Medieval Times to Today

AIP: The Discovery of Global Warming

BHL: Is it Hoppy Hour yet?

H. lupulus from American Medical Botany vol. 3 (1820)

H. lupulus from American Medical Botany vol. 3 (1820)

University of Birmingham: Professor Charles Lapworth LL D FRS

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Harry Coover and the Super Glue

rsc.org: Dmitri Mendeleev

Chemistry World: Sodium hypochlorite

Yovisto: Jeremias Richter and the Law of Definite Proportions

Jeremias Benjamin Richter Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jeremias Benjamin Richter
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Sir William Henry Bragg and his Work with X-Rays

Yovisto: Johann Rudolf Glauber – the first Chemical Engineer

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Sybiartic: Magic Beans

Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Brotherton Library at the University of Leeds

The Bigger Picture: Knowledge Begins in Wonder: The Design Behind the Smithsonian Children’s Room

An illustration of the Children’s Room in the Smithsonian Castle. Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1901. Smithsonian Libraries.

An illustration of the Children’s Room in the Smithsonian Castle. Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1901. Smithsonian Libraries.

JHI Blog: The Methodology of Genealogy: How to Trace the History of an Idea
Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Experimental Philosophy and Early Modern Ethics: Turnbull and Fordyce

Medium: Decolonising Science Reading List

storify: Social History of Medicine Why Does it Matter?

storify: ISISCB feedback

Computer History Museum: Reading Artifacts, Finding Culture

University of Leeds: Museum of the History of Science Technology and Medicine: History and Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects

Object 2: Two-Headed Fish

Object 2: Two-Headed Fish

BSHS: New Lecture Series: History and Philosophy of Science in 20 Objects

Town Topics: The Local Angle Enters Into the Picture in Library’s History of Science Series

The #EnvHist Weekly

Der Donerstagphilosoph: The Future of the History of Medicine

OUP: Galileo’s legacy: Catholicism, Copernicanism, and conflict resolution

ESOTERIC:

Computer History Museum: Digicomp DR-70 Astrology Minicomputer

Yovisto: Franz Josef Gall – the Founder of Phrenology

Wellcome Library: The origins of the English almanac

Zodiac man in EPB/61971/A: Goldsmith, 1679. An almanack for the year of our Lord God, 1679 (London: Printed by Mary Clark, for the Company of Stationers, 1679), leaf B2 recto. Image credit: Elma Brenner.

Zodiac man in EPB/61971/A: Goldsmith, 1679. An almanack for the year of our Lord God, 1679 (London: Printed by Mary Clark, for the Company of Stationers, 1679), leaf B2 recto. Image credit: Elma Brenner.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Niche: Bouchier and Cruikshank, The People and the Bay

Notches: The Calendar of Loss: Dagmawi Woubshet on Race, Sexuality, and Mourning in the Early Era of Aids

The Guardian: Imaginative science of Einstein celebrated in short story anthology

The Guardian: Battling the Gods: Atheism in the Ancient World – disbelief has been around for 2,500 years

A 19th century Greek vase illustration of Zeus abducting Leda in the form of a swan. Photograph: Stapleton Collection/Corbis

A 19th century Greek vase illustration of Zeus abducting Leda in the form of a swan. Photograph: Stapleton Collection/Corbis

H-Histsex: Jennings on Lanser: The Sexuality of History: Modernity and the Sappic, 1565–1830

TLS: Calendars and capitalism, from the Middle Ages to the present

TLS: Localization and its Discontents: A Genealogy of Psychoanalysis and the Neuro Disciplines, by Katja Guenther

NEW BOOKS:

Enfilade: The Global Live of Things

Historiens de la santé: Heightened Expectations: The Rise of the Human Growth Hormone Industry in America

Hachette Book Group: Rise of the Rocket Girls

Early Modern Medicine: Children of Wrath: Possession, Prophecy and the Young in Early Modern England – Anne French

9781472443670-201x300

Historiens de la santé: Jean Fernel, premier physiologiste de la Renaissance

OUPO: Essays in the Philosophy of Chemistry

Heterodoxology: Replacing the Dictionary: Brill launches new Esotericism Reference Library

Historiens de la santé: Le rose et le bleu : La fabrique du féminin et du masculin

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée, Marsella: “Made in Algeria, généalogie d’un territoire” runs till 2 May 2016

The Guardian: Cambridge University Library dusts off Darwin and Newton for display

Universty of Cambridge: Research: Newton, Darwin, Shakespeare – and a jar of ectoplasm: Cambridge University Library at 600

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Bay Area Reporter: Wonderful worlds of 17th-century China: Asian Art Museum Runs till 8 May 2016 

A Complete Map of the World (1674) (detail) by Ferdinand Verbiest (Flemish, 1623-88). Beijing, China. Ink on paper. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Photo: Courtesy Asian Art Museum

A Complete Map of the World (1674) (detail) by Ferdinand Verbiest (Flemish, 1623-88). Beijing, China. Ink on paper. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Photo: Courtesy Asian Art Museum

Greenwich Historical Society: Upcoming Exhibitions: Close to the Wind: Our Maritime History

Royal Society of Chemistry: Our 175 faces of chemistry exhibition

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January29–July 2016

University of Delaware: UDaily: Alchemy and Mineralogy 26 February–31 March 2016

The National Air and Space Museum: A New Moon Rises: An Exhibition Where Science and Art Meet

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Colonial Williamsburg: We are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence Opening 5 March 2016

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Queens’ College Cambridge: ‘The Rabbi & The English Scholar’ exhibition in the library 22 February–24 March 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

CHF: The Art of Iatrochemistry

University of Oklahoma: Galileo’s World: National Weather Center: Exhibits

The English Garden: Visit the RHS Botanical Art Show

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time Runs until 27 March 2016

ARTFIXdaily: “We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence” Will Examine Events Preceding, During and Following the Fight for Freedom from a Cartographic Perspective and Will Open at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg in March 2016

ZSL: London Zoo: Discover the fascinating wildlife of Nepal and Northern India

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

JHI Blog: Dissenting Voices: Positive/Negative: HIV/AIDS In NYU’s Fales Library

St John’s College: University of Cambridge: Fred Hoyle: An Online Exhibition

Culture 24: Small but worldly maps exhibition makes sense of human wandering at London’s Store Street gallery

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: Dinosaurier in Berlin: Brachiosaurus as an Icon of Politics, Science, and Popular Culture 1 April 2015–31March 2018

allAfrica: Algeria: Exhibition on Algeria (cartography) Marseille 20 January–2 May 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: Mar. 12th Pop-Up Museum Explores Contributions of Women of Colour in Psych

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

New York Public Library: Printmaking Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900 Runs till 27 May 2016

New-York Historical Society: Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York 13 November 2015–17 April 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

National Library of Scotland: Plague! A cultural history of contagious diseases in Scotland Runs till 29 May 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

HBO Movies: Einstein & Eddington

The Rose Theatre: The Alchemist by Ben Jonson 7–30 June 2016

Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

Macrobert Arts Centre: The Trials of Galileo

Perth Concert Hall: The Trials of Galileo

Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016 

EVENTS:

Salle du Conseil de l’ancienne Faculté, Paris: Prochaine séance de la Société Française d’Histoire de la Médecine 19 Mars 2016

The Early Modern Intelligencer: John Dee, the Magus of Mortlake Birkbeck 18 March 2016

FitzPatrick lecture – Churchill’s medical men, Dr David Eedy 21 March 2016

Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne: Leonardo And Anatomical Drawing: A Brief History Of Anatomy Illustration In Medical Education 17 March 2016 

Birkbeck, University of London: The History of Number Theory 21 May 2016

Workshop RS

Royal College of Surgeons of England: Skeletons in the Closet: The Grant Museum

Wellcome Trust: Pharmacy history: sources and resources 18 April 2016

UCL: STS: Haldane Lecture: Helen Longino ‘Underdetermination in science:  a dirty little secret?’! 16 March 2016

Science Museum: Women Engineers in the Great War and after 23 April 2016

British Society for the History of Pharmacy: Pharmacy History: sources and resources 18 April 2016

Boole-Shannon

Wren Library Lincoln Cathedral: Lecture: Anna Agnarsdóttir – Sir Joseph Banks and Iceland 28 April 2016

Atlas Obscura: OBSCURA SOCIETY NY: AFTER-HOURS AT THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE “EAST MEETS WEST” 10 March 2016

The Royal Society: Workshop: The Politics of Academic Publishing 1950–2016 22 April 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Warburg Institute: ‘Maps and Society’ Lectures: Mental Maps of the World in Great Britain and France, 1870–1914

Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons: People Powered Medicine: A one day public symposium 7 May 2016

Bletchley Park: Alan Turing Through His Nephews Eyes 3 April 2016

Glasgow histmed events

Discover Medical London: “Dr Dee” & The Magic of Medicine A Special Half Day Tour 23 March & 27 May 2016

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Spring 2016

NYAM: Credits, Thanks and Blame in the Works of Conrad Gessner

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

City Arts and Lectures: Steve Silberman: The Untold History of Autism 28 March 2016 Live on Public Radio

Schwetzingen: Astronomie-Tagung: Von Venus-Transit zum Schwarzen Loch 19 März 2016

Map Event

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Henry Stacy Marks: Science is Measurement, 1879

Henry Stacy Marks: Science is Measurement, 1879

TELEVISION:

M Télévision & Radio: « T4 », prologue de la « solution finale »

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Albert Einstein – Draw My Life

Gresham College: Darwin, Evolution and God: The Present Debates

Youtube: Cosmos – Experiment

RADIO & PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Conf. People Places

Institute of Physics: A history of Units from 1791 to 2018 17 March 2016

Notches: History of Sexuality at the 2016 European Social Science History Conference

Notches: CfP: Histories of Magic and Sexuality

University of Göttingen: Göttingen Spirit Summer School: Academic Collecting and the Knowledge of Objects, 1700-1900 5-10 September 2016

Atelier du Centre d’Études Médiévales et Post-médiévales de l’Université de Lausanne: Alimentation et santé au Moyen-Âge Le 18 mars 2016

Institute of Historical Research, London: Conference: Best-Laid Plans 8 April 2016

Manipulatingflora: CFP: Publications on JEMS: Gardens of Laboratories. The History of Botany through the History of Gardens Deadline 1 October 2016

Hist Geo Conf

Heterodoxology: CfP: Trans-States: the art of crossing over Deadline 20 March

University of Cambridge: The African Studies Association of the UK (ASAUK) biennial conference: CfP: Medical knowledge and practice in print 7-9 September 2016

McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada: CFP: Early Modern Works by and about Women: Genre and Method 4-6 November 2016

AIP: Center for History of Physics: Early Career Conference Annapolis Maryland 6-10 April 2016

Museum of the History of Psychiatry S. Lazzaro, Reggio Emilia, Italy: CfP: The conflict, the trauma. Psychiatry and First World War September 2016

Nice: Appel à communication: Quatrième rencontre du groupe RES-HIST (Réseaux & Histoire) 22-24 septembre 2016

Science Museum: CFP: Artefacts Meeting 2–6 October 2016

Vatican Library Conference

Butser Ancient Farm (UK): Experimental Archaeometallurgy Course 13–16 May 2016

Hunterian Museum: One-Day Symposium: People-Powered Medicine 7 May 2016

Eidyn Research Centre: Workshop: Relativism in Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science, 16 March 2016

Institut d’Anatomie Pathologique, Hôpital Civil – Strasbourg: Mardis de l’Histoire Médicale Programme 2015-2016

(HSTM) Network Ireland: CfP: Annual conference of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (HSTM) Network Ireland in association with Celsius 11–12 November 2016

American Printing History Association: CfP: The Black Art & Printer’s Devils: The Magic, Mysticism, and Wonders of Printing History Huntingdon Library 7–8 October 2016

CHPHM Blog: Crossing Boundaries: The Histories of First Aid in Britain and France, 1909–1989

University of Leeds: CfP: Telecommunications in the Aftermath of WW1: Civilian and Military Perspectives (Deadline 30 March) 10 August 2016

The Renaissance Society of America: CfP: Early Modern Works by and about Women: Genre and Method McGill University Montreal 4–6 November 2016

NEASEC Amherst MA: CfP: The Globe, the World, and Worldliness: Planetary Formations of the Long Eighteenth Century

EHESS; Paris: Appel à communications: Santé au travail, santé environnementale : quelles inclusions, quelles exclusions ? 29 juin 2016

University of Oxford: Call for Registration: Oxford Scientiae 5–7 July 2016

AAAS: History and Philosophy of Science at AAAS call for symposia proposals for 2017 AAAS Meeting

La mort en Europe du XVIIe au XXIe siècle. Représentations, rites et usages: Appel à contribution

University of St Andrews: Mathematical Biography: A Celebration of MacTutor 16–17 September 2016

Budapest: CEU Summer University: Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe 18–27 July 2016

Amsterdam: Conference by Women in Philosophy #3 1 July 2016

University of Oklahoma: Midwest Junto for the History of Science: 1–3 April 2016

University of Plymouth: CfP: One-Day Symposium: Pilgrimage, Shrines and Healing in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe 24 June 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Bridging the Divide: Literature and Science 3 June 2016

23 Things for Research: Book now for a Women in Wikipedia edit-a-thon, 23 March 2016

NYAM: Scientific Illustration: A Workshop Using the Collections of the Academy 7 April 2016

University of Kassel: CfP: Workshop: Representing Scientific Results 18–19 November 2016

Victoria University of Wellington: CfP: The New Zealand Polymath – Colenso and his contemporaries 17–19 November 2016

Rio de Janeiro: 25th International Congress for the History of Science and Technology: CfP: Global Mathematics 23–29 July 2017

Berlin: Call for Participants: Convening for three workshops in Berlin, 2016-2017 Accounting for Health: Economic Practices and Medical Knowledge, 1500–1970

Public Communication of Science and Technology: Conference program (Draft: PCST Conference Istanbul 26–28 April 2016

AAR: Western Esotericism Group: CfP: AAR Annual Meeting San Antonio 19–22 November 2016

University of Warsaw: CfP: Interim Conference of ISA Research Committee on the History of Sociology 6–8 July 2016

BSHS: Call for Papers and Panels: Science in Public 2016

Science in Public

University of Sussex: CfP: SPRU 50th anniversary conference on ‘Transforming Innovation’

Mexico City: CfP: The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T²M) 14thAnnual Conference 27–30 October 2016

NACBS, Washington DC: CfP: Early Modern History Workshop on “Networks of Knowledge” November 2016

UCL: STS: Workshop: Technology, Environment and Modern Britain 27 April 2016

Rutgers University: Workshop for the History of Environment, Agriculture, Technology, & Science (WHEATS) 30 October–2 October 2016

University of Zürich: Conrad Gessner Congress Program 6–9 June 2016

University of Kent: Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference Programme (DRAFT as at Feb 15, 2016) 7–10 July 2016

London Metropolitan University: CfP: ‘Made in London’: Makers, designers and innovators in musical instrument making in London, from the 18th to 21st centuries

Summer School: Rethinking Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 23–25 July 2016 Part I Lisbon 26–30 July 2016 Part II Porto

Istanbul: XXXV Scientific Instrument Symposium: CfP: Instruments between East and West 26–30 September 2016

University of York: Conference: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences 7-8 April 2016

Harvard University: 51st Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Biology 2 April 2016

University of Cambridge: CfP Teaching and Learning in Early Modern England: Skills and Knowledge in Practice

American Historical Association: Perspectives on History: The 131st Annual Meeting Call for Proposals and Theme Denver CO 5–7 January 2017

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science: Call for Submissions: Book: Historical Epistemology of Science/Philosophy of Science, Torricelli

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

University of Western Ontario: CfP: Philosophy of Logic, Mathematics, and Physics Graduate Conference

Institut d’Études Scientifiques de Cargèse, Corsica: CNRS School “BioPerspectives” Philosophy of Biology 29 March–1 April 2016

Klosterneuburg: CfP: European Advanced School in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) 59 September 2016

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester: Lunchtime Seminar Series Feb–June 2016

AIP: Lyne Starling Trimble Science Heritage Public Lectures Feb–Sept 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CfP: ICOHTEC Symposium in Rio de Janeiro on 23-29 July 2017

Asian Society for the History of Medicine: Call for Submissions: Taniguchi Medal 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Essay

International Committee for the History of Technology: CfP: 43rd Annual Meeting in Porto, Portugal Technology, Innovation, and Sustainability: Historical and Contemporary Narratives 26–30 July 2016

Advances in the History of Psychology: The Future of the History of the Human Sciences

University of York 7–8 April 2016

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: CfP: Maculinity, health and medicine, c.1750–present 28–29 April 2016

Effaced Blog: CfP: History of Facial Hair

Sidney Sussex College: University of Cambridge: Programme and Registration Treasuries of Knowledge: 8 April 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

AIP: Research Assistant: two full-time temporary Research Assistants to join the Center for History of Physics for Summer 2016.

Bath Spa University: PhD Fee Waiver Studentships

Queens University Belfast: Research Fellow: War and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe

University of York: AHRC-funded PhD Studentship at the University of York (History dept.) in collaboration with the Science Museum “Instruments and their makers: A study of experiment, collaboration and identity in seventeenth-century London”

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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3 Responses to Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #35

  1. Between “Baronet” and “JHI” the links aren’t.

  2. thonyc says:

    I know WordPress decided to undo them, am about to start repairing!

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