Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #51

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #51

Monday 08 August 2016

EDITORIAL:

 Summer advances, if only in my part of the world with deluges and flooding and it’s time once again to flood your computer screen with another edition of the weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing the deluge of history of science, technology and medicine text washed up on the shores of cyberspace over the last seven days.

It would hardly be an exaggeration to say that Whewell’s Gazette wouldn’t exist at all if not for John Wilkins, the Australian philosopher and historian of biology. When I first begun to surf the Internet John’s Evolving Thoughts blog was one of the very first blogs that I began to follow on a regular basis. As I began to clog up his comments column with my overlong cogitations on some his history of science posts, it was John who suggested that I might like to try my hand at blogging myself. So I did. At first as a guest blogger and then again at John’s urging on my own at The Renaissance Mathematicus. John and his regular readers provided much of the encouragement in that early phase that kept me going. Now entering my eighth year and still going strong.

Somehow my blogging on the history of science led to me becoming the manager of the monthly history of science blog carnival On Giants’ Shoulders. A task I carried out for several years. About two years ago I decided to end Giants Shoulders and replaces it with a weekly selection of history of science blogging, Whewell’s Gazette. On 1 September 2010 John Wilkins together with John Lynch had launched the collective blog for the history of science Whewell’s Ghost and I was invited by John Wilkins to be one of the contributors. An invitation I was happy to accept. Over the years Whewell’s Ghost faded into inactivity and as I started Whewell’s Gazette it was the obvious home for our weekly journal.

Sometime back John Wilkins, much to the disappointment of his fans, ceased blogging and Evolving Thoughts also entered a period of inactivity. Last week on social media John Wilkins asked if anybody would be interested if he started blogging the history of biology from its beginning up to the present. The response was immediate, positive and strong and so John did just that.

He took of at a run and the first three posts are already up at Evolving Thoughts. John is a knowledgeable scholar and an excellent blogger and I’m certain that his new endeavour will be a great read for all those interested in the history of science, so get in at the beginning and get reading John’s The History of Life!

Evolving Thought: The History of Life: Prelude

Evolving Thought: The History of Life: Nature versus Humanity

Evolving Thought: The History of Life: Before Aristotle 1; the Milesians and monism

Another of those bloggers on Whewell’s Ghost was the excellent Dr Rebekah “Becky” Higgitt, who at the beginning blogged exclusively on our collective blog. Later she spread her blogging wings and set up home at her own Teleskopos. In 2012, together with Dr Vanessa Heggie, Becky set up a history of science blog on The Guardian website, The H-Word, an excellent example of the genre powered by two professional historians. This wekk The H-Word celebrated its fourth birthday.

The H-Word Blog by at the Guardian was born 2 August 2012

Rebekah Higgitt at the University of Kent and Vanessa Heggie at the University of Birmingham write about the untold history of science.

If you aren’t already a regular reader it’s time to become one. A good starting point would be Becky’s latest offering: The real story of the Secret Agent and the Greenwich Observatory Bomb.

The Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in an early 20th-century postcard. Note the closed gates. Photograph: Wikipedia

The Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in an early 20th-century postcard. Note the closed gates. Photograph: Wikipedia

Quotes of the week:

“The function of the historian is neither to love the past nor to emancipate himself from the past, but to master and understand it as the key to the understanding of the present” – E.H: Carr The Historian and the Facts (1961) h/t @historianess

Hoarding Drew McIntyre (@DrewMcIntyre)

Hoarding Drew McIntyre (@DrewMcIntyre)

 

“The emphasis on the role of the historian in the making of history tends, if pressed to its logical conclusion, to rule out any objective history at all: history is what the historian makes.” – E.H: Carr The Historian and the Facts (1961) h/t @historianess

“History is not a neutral subject that is written by disinterested robots. (…) Obviously a knowledge of history is valuable for a variety of reasons. But historians are not history, if that makes sense. Any policy advised by a historian is going to be just as politicised as a policy advised by anyone else” – Ian Hesketh ((@IanHesketh)

Nietzsche Moose Allain (@MooseAllain)

Nietzsche Moose Allain (@MooseAllain)

“Today’s weird piece of #histSTM/colonial America trivia: Hermann von Helmholtz was a descendant of William Penn!” – Ben Gross (@bhgross)

“We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be”

― Kurt Vonnegut, “Mother Night” (1961) h/t @elanmastai

“Bloody Foreigner, coming over here, wanting to know what love is” – Mat (@MatCro)

“I don’t think that I particularly like the term “scholar” nor do I particularly like “academic” (b/c elitism). I think I’m a storyteller. For me, storytelling is a relational, community-based practice of service. That’s what I’d like to achieve in my scholarly work” – Dr. Lucia Lorenzi (@empathywarrior)

Calvin

“The life of the historian must be short and precarious” – Edward Gibbon

“Friend: Do dates make you nervous?

Me: omg yes especially when doing math across timezone boundaries” – vowel killer (@dcousineau)

“Teach a man to write and he can write an ill-informed comment today; teach him how to think critically and he might just hold off on that” – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“As its stewards we need to think of our species as being in a race to save living environment” – E.O. Wilson in Half-Earth

Sausage motor car

“History, as nearly no one seems to know, is not merely something to be read.  And it does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past.  On the contrary, the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.  It could scarcely be otherwise, since it is to history that we owe our frames of reference, our identities, and our aspirations” – James Baldwin h/t AHA Today

“How many painstakingly detailed and beautiful craft and art pieces were made by people clenching their teeth with rage?” – Grumpy Historian (@grumpyhistorian)

“History doesn’t lie” – Geoff Boycott

“History at its best is a patchy collection of half-truths” – Thony Christie (@rmathematicus)

Birthdays of the Week:

Maria Mitchell born 1 August 1818

Maria M I

Brainpickings: Maria Mitchell and the Spider’s Web: A Touching Testament to Tenacity from America’s First Woman Astronomer

Maria M II

APS: Maria Mitchell Discovers a Comet

Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck born 1 August 1744

Lamarck by Charles Thévenin (c. 1802) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Lamarck by Charles Thévenin (c. 1802)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

History of Geology: From the Contracting Earth to Supercontinents

Encyclopaedia Britannica: Jean-Baptiste Lamarck

Understanding Evolution: Early Concepts of Evolution: Jean Baptiste Lamarck

John Tyndall born 2 August 1820

Tyndall II

“For those curious: Tyndall was almost certainly born August 2, but the year is somewhat in doubt” – Tyndall Letters (@JohnTyndallCP)

Yovisto: John Tyndall and the Physics of Air

Tyndall I

Joseph Paxton born 3 August 1803

Sir Joseph Paxton Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sir Joseph Paxton
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Yovisto: Joseph Paxton – from Gardens to Architecture

British Library: Facsimile of Joseph Paxton’s original sketch of the Great Exhibition from ‘A Memorial of the Great Exhibition, 1851’

Great Exhibition

Google Arts & Crafts: Owen Jones, The Great Exhibition, a watercolour with pen and ink 1851

Chatsworth: The Case

AD Classics: The Crystal Palace / Joseph Paxton

Crystal Palace

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

AHF: Hiroshima and Nagasaki Bombing Timeline

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Mildred Goldberger’s Interview

Yovisto: Helen Hogg and the Global Clusters

Plaque to Helen Sawyer Hogg at Canada Science and Technology Museum

Plaque to Helen Sawyer Hogg at Canada Science and Technology Museum

Electronic Beats: This Digital Synthesizer Was Accidentally a Cosmic Beast

Physics Today: Meghnad Saha: Physicist and nationalist

AHF: Frederick Ashworth

Yovisto: William Hamilton and the Quaternions

Universe Today: The Constellation Camelopardalis

pitt.edu: How Einstein Did Not Discover

Voices of the Manhattan Project: David Bohm’s Interview

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

New Historian: Christopher Columbus Plants Spanish Flag in South American Soil

Atlas Obscura: This Map Proves Britain Loves Tea More Than Anyone Else

National Geographic: Gorgeous Maps Reveal the History of America’s National Parks

The position of every regiment of both the Union and Confederate armies during all three days of the battle of Gettysburg are depicted on this incredibly detailed map of the battlefield from 1863.  COURTESY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The position of every regiment of both the Union and Confederate armies during all three days of the battle of Gettysburg are depicted on this incredibly detailed map of the battlefield from 1863.
COURTESY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

United States Census Bureau: 1790 Population Map

Smithsonian.com: These Maps Reveal How Slavery Expanded Across the United States

British Library: Maps and views blog: Magnificent Manuscripts Online: Pelagos

berfois: Chair’d in the Adamant of Time: On “America” and Other Fictions

History Today: The Origins of Rio

Rail Map online

esri: The Cartography of the Uprooted

Balandalus: An Andalusi Mudéjar in 14th-c. Constantinople: The Travels of Ibn al-Sabbah

Mediterranean 1400

Mediterranean 1400

DVL: Vatican Mappa Mundi c. 780 CE

 

 

Osher Map Library: Gilbert Humphrey: A General Map, Made Onelye for the Particular Declaration of this Discovery

Hyperallergic: Maps Made to Influence and Deceive

Visions of the North: Utensils and the Franklin search

The Scotsman: Amazing 1800s map details length of Scotland’s rivers

The remarkable drawing lines all of Scotland's rivers next to one another to make an easy comparison. Picture: NLS

The remarkable drawing lines all of Scotland’s rivers next to one another to make an easy comparison. Picture: NLS

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Teaching watercolor of a gangrenous ulcer on the thigh of a boy

The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Teaching watercolor of a gangrenous ulcer on the thigh of a boy

 Mashable: 1800s Victorian Vibrators

ncbi.nim.nih.gov: John Bostock’s first description of hayfever

Northumberland Archives: Life in the County Lunatic Asylum

Thomas Morris: Conceived by a bullet

The Jackson Laboratory: Women in Science: Remembering Henrietta Lacks

Henrietta Lacks.

Henrietta Lacks.

Motherboard: La belle histoire du pêcheur bourré qui perdit un oeil sans s’en rendre compte

Notches: Understanding Zika and the Abortion Debate in Brazil: A View from 1940

Ptak Science Books: Blade Runner Retinal ID, 1936

History of Medical Sciences, Oxford: Website

National Geographic: Fennel: Multitasking Vegetable, Ancient Birth Control

Thomas Morris: The extra jaw

Conciatore: Filippo Sassetti

The Public Domain Review: Re-examining ‘the Elephant Man’

Early Modern Medicine: The Maladies of Midwives

 A woman seated on a obstetrical chair giving birth aided by Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk

A woman seated on a obstetrical chair giving birth aided by
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk

The New York Times Magazine: The Brain That Couldn’t Remember

The Wellcome Library: What did the Victorians make of spectacles

The Atlantic: The Hearing Aid’s Pursuit of Invisibility

TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING:

1 August 1831, the New London Bridge opened to traffic. Pic of John Rennie's plan from Science Museum Archive

1 August 1831, the New London Bridge opened to traffic. Pic of John Rennie’s plan from Science Museum Archive

 

Plan of approaches to new London Bridge, signed J Rennie 1827 ICE Library

Plan of approaches to new London Bridge, signed J Rennie 1827 ICE Library

Open Culture: How the Moog Synthesizer Changed the Sound of Music

Smithsonian.com: What the Candidates (and Journalist) Can Learn from the 1948 Democratic Convention

Forbes: ‘Pass Me a Cold One’: A Short History of Refrigerating Wine and Beer

The BSA and Military Bicycle Museum: WW1 Military Bicycles

Yovisto: Timing is Everything – Elisha Gray and the Telephone Patent

Connected Earth: The Telephone

Strowger Automatic Exchange (& Automatic Electric Co.) (1891) : automating the phone

Strowger Automatic Exchange (& Automatic Electric Co.) (1891) : automating the phone

The New York Times: Not Forgotten: Alexander Graham Bell, Who Sparked a New Era of Communication

DIY Photography: The World’s First Digital Camera, Introduced by the Man Who Invented It

flickr: Tyne and Wear Archives: Mauretania sliding down the slipway

Atlas Obscura: The Strangely Perplexing Problem of Communicating Numbers Out Loud

Medium: Xerox Alto Is Rebuilt and Reconnected by the Living Computer Museum

Yovisto: Richard Arkwright – the Father of the Industrial Revolution

Atlas Obscura: The Alarming Aesthetics of Jazz Age Perm Machines

The Public Domain Review: “Unlimiting the Bounds”: the Panorama and the Balloon View

Atlas Obscura: Daugavpils Shot Tower

Yovisto: Nicolas-Jacques Conté and the Pencil

Atlas Obscura: The Sunsphere

Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection: Roman Pyxis with Lid

Creative Review: Restricted Areas – Danila Tkachenko’s photographs of Soviet ruins

Danila Tkachenko. The world’s largest diesel submarine

Danila Tkachenko. The world’s largest diesel submarine

Computer History Museum: Happy 25th Birthday to the Public Webb

Yovisto: Jon Postel – Editor in Chief of the Internet

Yovisto: The Tower Subway – the World’s First Tube Railway

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Talk Origins: Biographies: Louis Leakey

Penn State: Earth 520:Richard Dixon Oldham

Shells and Pebbles: Dissecting the ‘chain of Creation’: Edward Tyson and Anatomical Natural History

Blog-Image-2

Justin Erik Halldór Smith: Edward Tyson’s Orang-Outang

BHL: Orang-Outang, sive homo sylvestris: or, The Anatomy of a Pygmie compared with that of a Monkey, an Ape , and a Man

journals.ametsco.org: World Meteological Organisation Assessment of the Purported World Record 58°C Temperature Extreme at El Azizia, Libya (13 September 1922)

The Public Domain Review: Olaus Magnus’s Sea Serpent

Clerk of Oxford: An Anglo-Saxon August

The New York Times: Seeking Climate Change Clues in Old Pollen and Mammoth Dung

Nature: 180,000 forgotten photos reveal the future of Greenland’s ice

Royal Society Open Science: First diagnosis of septic arthritis in a dinosaur

Smithsonian.com: Solving a Mystery of Mammoth Proportions

Cambridge blog: History & Classics: What Can Medieval History Tell Us About Environmental Change?

Letters from Gondwana: Forgotten Women of Paleontology: Erika von Hoyningen-Huene

Erika von Huene at the Tuebingen University.

Erika von Huene at the Tuebingen University.

Dr Johnson Reading Circle: Pilgrimage to Lichfield

The Washington Post: This Smithsonian scientist’s death was a mystery: 150 years later, his skeleton helped solve it

CBC News: Last mammoths on Alaska island likely died of thirst

Science League of America: A Justly Neglected Argument Redivivus

The Friends of Charles Darwin: The HMS Beagle Olympics

Blink: The metamorphosis of gods

Bulletin of the History of Archaeology: Boucher de Perthes and the Discovery of Human Antiquity

Historical Dewitticisms: Park Consciousness

flickr: BHL: Curtis’s botanical magazine v.80…

libweb5.princeton.edu: Hydrography

CHEMISTRY:

Moles

The Recipes Project: Palm Trees and Potions: On Portuguese Pharmacy Signs

c&en: Chemistry Nobel Laureate Ahmed Zewail dies at age 70

Zewail is pictured here on the Caltech campus in 2011. Credit: Mitch Jacoby/C&EN

Zewail is pictured here on the Caltech campus in 2011.
Credit: Mitch Jacoby/C&EN

Nobelprize.org: Ahmed Zewail – Biographical

Yovisto: Leopold Gmelin and the Chemistry of Digestion

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

the many-headed monster: Understanding Sources: doing history by numbers

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Words matter

HSS Online: Chinese Reader Project – A Note from HSS Past President Angela Creager

Arts & Humanities Research Council: Interview: Seb Falk

Seb-Falk-HAY_WEB

Johns Hopkins University Press: Testing Theories: Edison’s Scorecard

Places: Cloud and Field

Building Blocks of Human Experience: A Contribution to the Explanatory Humanities: Website launch

The Royal Society: Notes and Records Table of Contents

Niche: CHESS 2016 Reflections: Reconciliation and Environment

AHF: Monthly News Letter

Nature: Donald Trump’s appeal should be a call to arms

RBSC Manuscripts Division News: Commonplace Books and Uncommon Readers

Atlas Obscura: Marie Curie Got Her Start at a Secret University for Women

The Recipes Project: Recipes Round-Up: Research Presented at Scientiae and SSHM 2016

Chris Coltrane: Everyday Science: Scans from a Science Magazine, 1919-1921

 

The Scientific Method The Debate:

Stop arguing! There is indeed a real scientific method. Here you have! – Lautaro Vergara (@VergaraLautaro)

Stop arguing! There is indeed a real scientific method. Here you have! – Lautaro Vergara (@VergaraLautaro)

One of the (dis?)advantages of the digital age is the speed with which international debates on hot topics can develop. In the pre-Internet days somebody would publish a possibly contentious article in a journal. A week, a month or even several months later somebody else would respond in the same or a different journal provoking a further delayed response from the original author or possibly third or even a fourth party. And so the debate would grind on, sometimes over a period of several years. In this age of instant cyberspace communication the whole process can take place within the space of a few days, as was recently demonstrated by a hot debate on the existence or lack thereof of the scientific method.

The whole thing kicked was kicked off in the New York Times by philosopher James Blachowicz with a piece entitled, There Is No Scientific Method: This drew responses from Chad Orzel on his blog Uncertain Principles who explained, Why Physicists Disparage Philosophers, In Three Paragraphs and Ethan Siegel on Forbes, who angrily proclaimed, Yes, New York Times, There Is A Scientific Method. The Renaissance Mathematicus took Ethan to task for his misrepresentation of Kepler’s work in his, Getting Kepler wrong and William Storage at The Multidisciplinarian did the same for Ethan’s misrepresentations of Galileo in his The Myth of the Scientific Method On the big think, Jag Bhalla interviewed Rebecca Newberger on the topic asking the question, What’s Behind A Science vs. Philosophy Fight?  Never one to miss out on a bun fight Jerry Coyne reacted sourly to the original article on his Why Evolution is True website asking Is this the worst popular philosophy piece ever? A philosopher argues that science is no more reliable than philosophy at finding truth. Psybertron reacted in turn to Coyne under Blachowicz’s original title, There Is No Scientific Method? And a second time under the title, More On The Myths of Science. And so the debate rumbles on…

 

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Reports from Parnassus

Conciatore: Crocus Martis

Whipple Library Books Blog: P is for…Phrenology

Handwritten phrenological measurements

Handwritten phrenological measurements

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

Dave’s Book Blog: “The Strangest Man” by Graham Farmelo

Discover Society: Viewpoint: The Invention of Nature

Popular Science: Cracking Mathematics: You, This Book and 4,000 Years of Theories

The Penn Press Blog: Afternoon Coffee Break: Medieval Robots by E.R. Truitt

The New York Times: Maria Popova Reviews Janna Levin’s ‘Black Hole Blues’

Some Beans: The Company by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge

the_company

ABC: Late Line: Interview: Steve Silberman, author of Neurotribes

Financial Times: The Water Kingdom: A Secret History of China by Philip Ball

Nature: China A Hydrological history

The Times: The Water Kingdom: A Secret History of China by Philip Ball

513Cv4Ur96L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

NEW BOOKS:

Hermann: Écritures de soi, Écritures du corps

OUP: The Tale of Seven Scientists and a New Philosophy of Science

9780190232993

The Royal Society: Insight Investment Science Book Prize 2016 Short List

ART & EXHIBITIONS

The Star: Sea monsters, beavers and made-up lands dot Toronto Reference Library map exhibit

National Railway Museum: National Railway Museum marks historic First World War centenary with new exhibition

BBC News: James Brindley: The canal pioneer who changed England

Various accounts suggest Brindley carved cheese to showcase his Barton Aqueduct design to a parliamentary committee HERBERT DUNKLEY

Various accounts suggest Brindley carved cheese to showcase his Barton Aqueduct design to a parliamentary committee
HERBERT DUNKLEY

The Map Room: MacDonal Gill Exhibition in San Diego

HSS: On Time: The Quest for Precision

Christ Church Oxford: Hakluyt and Geography in Oxford 1550–1650 Opens 14 October 2016

Bodleian Library: The World in a Book: Hakluyt and Renaissance Discovery Opens 28 October 2016

Heriot Watt University: New exhibit unveiled at ICE museum

National Library of Scotland: You Are Here 22 July 2016–3 April 2017

The Walters Museum: Waste Not: The Art of Medieval Recycling 25 June–18 September 2016

The Holburne Museum: Stubbs and the Wild June 25–2 October 2016

George Stubbs A Lion and a Lioness 1778 Enamel on Wedgwood ceramic  The Daniel Katz Gallery London

George Stubbs A Lion and a Lioness 1778 Enamel on Wedgwood ceramic
The Daniel Katz Gallery London

Linda Hall Library: Drawn from Nature: Art, Science, and the Invention of the Bird Field Guide 12 March–10 September 2016

Australian National Maritime Museum: Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude 5 May–30 October 2016

Science Museum: Wounded: Conflict, Casualties and Care 29 June 2016–1r January 2018

Art Institute Chicago: The Shogun’s World: Japanese Maps from the 18th and 19th Centuries 25 June–6 November 2016

Museum of London: Fire! Fire! 23July 2016–17 April 2017

Royal Museums Greenwich: Above and Beyond: The ultimate interactive flight exhibition 27 May–29 August 2016

'Spithead in Wartime' William Lionel Wyllie National Maritime Museum

‘Spithead in Wartime’
William Lionel Wyllie
National Maritime Museum

CLOSING SOON: Brooklyn Daily Eagle: Brooklyn Historical Society to exhibit two rare Revolutionary War-era maps in honour of upcoming 240th anniversary of Battle of Brooklyn 29 June–28 August 2016

The Mary Rose: Mary Rose Museum re-opening on 20th July 2016

The College of Physicians of Philadelphia: Digital Library: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

St. Louis Central Library: Fantasy Maps Exhibit 11 June–15 October 2016

Uzeeum: House of Wax: Anatomical, Pathological, and Ethnographic Waxworks from Castan’s Panopticum, Berlin, 1869–1922

Amritt Museum: Beatrix Potter – Image & Reality

Science Museum: Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph

Until Darwin: Maria Martin Bachman’s sketches and paintings for Audubon: On-line Exhibition from the Charleston County Public Library

Historiens de la santé: Sexual Forensics in Victorian and Edwardian England: Age, Crime and Consent in the Courts

Science Museum: Robots

Horniman Museum & Gardens: H Blog: Tyrannosaurus and Tarbosaurus

Royal Collections Trust: Maria Merian’s Butterflies 15 April–9 October Frome Museum:

Fine Books & Collections: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at BPL to Host Exhibit, “From the Sea to the Mountains” 2 April–28 August 2016

Bodleian Library & Radcliffe Camera: Bodleian Treasures: 24 Pairs 25 February2016–19 February 2017

AMNH: Opulent Oceans 3 October 2015–1 December 2016

Globe Exhibition

Corning Museum of Glass: Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope: April 23, 2016–March 18, 2017

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Wellcome Collections: States of Mind 4 February–16 October 2016

Royal College of Physicians: “Anatomy as Art” Facsimile Display Monday to Friday 9.30am to 5.30pm

Manchester Art Gallery: The Imitation Game

CLOSING SOON: The John Rylands Library: Magic, Witches & Devils in the Early Modern World 21 January–21 August 2016

Magic Witches

Historical Medical Library: Online Exhibition: Under the Influence of the Heavens: Astrology in Medicine in the 15th and 16th Centuries

Somerset House: Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Hunterian Museum: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Natural History Museum: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017 

Science Museum: Information Age

Wellcome Library: Vaccination: Medicine and the masses 19 April–17 September 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: YOUTOPIA: VISIONS OF THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: THE MAUDSLEY AT WAR 25 May–20November 2016 

Herschel Museum: Science and Spirituality: Astronomy and the Benedictine Order 4 May–12December

Science Museum: Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph 14 April–11 September 2016

Science Museum: Einstein’s Legacy

Bethel Museum of the Mind: The Weight of History 27 July – 18 November 2016 

Royal Collection: Maria Merian’s Butterflies

Royal Society of Medicine: charcot, hysteria, & la salpetriere 3 May 2016–23 July 2016 

Horsham Museum: Dinosaurs of Horsham – Art, Reality and Fun 9 July–5 September 2016

COMING SOON:  Royal College of Physicians: ‘To fetch out the fire’: reviving London, 1666 1 September–16 December 2016 

Science Museum: Wounded: Conflict, Casualties and Care 29 June 2016–15 January 2018

COMING SOON:  Royal College of Physicians: ‘To fetch out the fire’: reviving London, 1666 1 September–16 December 2016

COMING SOON: Wellcome Collection: Bedlam: The asylum and beyond 15 September 2016–15 January 2017

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: THE WEIGHT OF HISTORY 27 July–18 November 2016

Museum of the History of Science, Oxford: Shakespeare’s World View: Stars, Globes and Magic

Horsham Museum: Dinosaurs of Horsham – Art, Reality and Fun 9 July–5 September 2016

COMING SOON: Wellcome Collection: Bedlam: The asylum and beyond 15 September–15 January

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Smithsonia.com: The Cosmos Sings in This Fusion of Astrophysics and Music: The Hubble Cantata

NIST: Public Affair Office: Funding Opportunity to Produce Science Documentary

SFGate: Doc resurrects weird 20th century con man

CLOSING SOON: Royal Shakespeare Company: Doctor Faustus Swan Theatre Stratford-Upon-Avon 8 February–4 August 2016

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 07 January 2017

The Regal Theatre: The Trials of Galileo International Tour March 2014­–December 2017

CLOSING SOON: Swan Theatre: Doctor Faustus 7 March–4 August 2016

COMING SOON: The Grand Theatre Blackpool: Jekyll and Hyde

COMING SOON: Barbican: The Alchemist

COMING SOON: Barbican: Doctor Faustus

EVENTS:

Evenbrite: London 1708: a Walk into Library History 4 October 2016

The Warburg Institute: Maps and Society Lectures 26th Series Programme 2016–2017

Wellcome Collection London: Museums Computer Group: First Keynote 2016: Museums & Tech 19 October 2016

New Scientist: The life and work of Alan Turing 4_8 November 2016 (other dates available) £££

Martin Randall Travel: History of Medicine – Florence, Bologna & Padua in the Age of Humanism 12–18 September 2016 $$$

Royal College of Physicians: Walking Tour: The Making of Thoroughly Modern Medicine

The National Museum of Computing: Summer Bytes 30 July–28 August 2016

Museum of Science and Industry Manchester: Engine Demonstration

Morbid Anatomy: Upcoming Morbid Anatomy Events

Victoria Baths – Hathersage Road, Chorlton-on-Medlock: Talk: “The Evils of Dirt and the Value of Cleanliness:” a history of Manchester’s early baths and wash-houses, 1840-1876 10 September 2016

Nature: Medical research: Citizen medicine: Vaccination: Medicine and the Masses Hunterian Museum till 17 September 2016

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: Talk: Bad Medicine and Quackery in Edinburgh 9–13 August 2016

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: One for the Road

Royal College of Physicians: Upcoming Events

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: “London’s Plagues”

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: John Dee and the History of Understanding

University of Utrecht: Descartes-Huygens Lecture by J.B. Shank on ‘Newtonian’ Mechanics in France around 1700

University College Cork: Walking Tours: A second chance to solve the mystery of ‘Being Boole’!

The National Museum of Computing: Guided Tours

Gresham College: Lecture: The Expanding Universe 26 October 2016

Gresham College: Future Lectures (some #histSTM)

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Harley Street: Healers and Hoaxers

The Royal College of Physicians: Discover Medical London: Walking Tour:  “Sex and The City”

Norcroft Auditorium, Norcroft Centre, University of Bradford: The secret chemistry of art: unravelling an age-old textile mystery / September 2016

Glasgow: Science on the Streets – Free Walking Tours

Admundson Lecture

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Medicine at War

Discover Medical London: Tour: Who needs doctors anyway?

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: The weight of History 6 August 2016

Royal College of Physicians: Walking Tour: John Dee and The History of Understanding

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Louis Pasteur pursuing a rabies vaccine in this etching by Léopold Flameng from CHF’s collection. Gift of Fisher Scientific International, CHF Collections/Gregory Tobias

Louis Pasteur pursuing a rabies vaccine in this etching by Léopold Flameng from CHF’s collection.
Gift of Fisher Scientific International, CHF Collections/Gregory Tobias

CHF: The Artist in the Laboratory

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Read Science! Microbiome Edition

Youtube: Homo Diluvii Testis EN

Youtube: The Sigma Club: Interview with Hasok Chang

Youtube: Thagomizers: Histories: Pteranodon

Hagley Oral History: Kevlar R&D: An Oral History

BBC Radio 4: A History of Ideas: Most Popular: A collection of the most watched History of Ideas animations

Vimeo: Graphic Means (Official Trailer)

RADIO & PODCASTS:

WNYC: Darwin’s Life in Verse

Dolly Jørgensen: Podcast with Lund University

STAT: The Chinese hamsters that helped birth biotech

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Muslim Conference

The Medical School of Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah University, Fez: 7th International Congress of the International Society for the History of Islamic Medicine (ISHIM) & 4th Congress of Fez on the History of Medicine 24–28 October 2016

CRASSH: University of Cambridge: Techniques, Technologies and Materialities of Epidemic Control 16-17 September 2016

University of York: Institute for the Public Understanding of the Past: International Workshop 14 September 2016

BSHS: Annals of Science Student Essay Prize Deadline 30 September 2016

 

International Map Collectors Society: IMCoS 34th International Symposium, Chicago 24–29 September 2016

Royal Historical Society: University of Chester: CfP: Putting History in its Place: Historic Landscapes and Environments 21 April 2017 – deadline 28 October 2016

IWHA: CfP: Water History Conference 2017 Grand Rapids USA 15–17 June 2017

All Souls College Oxford: Second CfP: Teaching mathematics in the early modern period

University of York: Northern Network for Medical Humanities: Research Workshop: 22 September 2016

University of Kalamazoo: 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies: Body and Soul in Medieval Visual Culture 15 September 2016

University of Reading: Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums 23 September 2016 Registration now open

University of Mainz: Conference: Finding, Inheriting or Borrowing? Construction and Transfer of Knowledge about Man and Nature in Antiquity and the Middle Ages 14–16 September 2016

University of Milan: Conference: Mathesis quaedam Divina seu Mechanismus Metaphysicus -Leibniz and the sciences 7–8 October 2016

University of St. Andrews: Conference: Mathematical Biography: A MacTutor Celebration

University of Durham: Conference: Quo Vadis Selective Scientific Realism? 5–7 August 2017

Salem Academy Charter School, Salem MA: New England Regional World History Association Fall Symposium: CfP: Navigation, Travel, and Exploration in World History 24 September 2016

Istanbul: XXXVth Scientific Instrument Symposium: Draft Programme 26–30 September 2016

Universidade de Évora: Conference: Évora’s 7th Symposium on Philosophy and History of Science and Technology: Structuralism: Roots, Plurality and Contemporary debates 4–5 November 2016

University of Valencia: Institute for the History of Medicine and Science “López Piñero”: Programme Fall 2016 Seminars, Conferences etc

Tranforming Bodies CfP

EOI: Call for Expressions of Interest: Learned societies and the circulation of knowledge, 1750-2000 From Aileen Fyfe and Jenny Beckman

Urbino & Cesena: XIX Summer School in Philosophy of Physics 5-9 September 2016

Radboud University Nijmegen: Call for nominations: Hanneke Janssen Memorial Prize 2016: Essay in History and Philosophy of Physics Deadline 1 November 2016

Mahon/Maó (Menorca): 9th European Spring School on History of Science and Popularisation: CFP: Living in Emergency: humanitarianism and medicine 18–20 May 2017

Berlin –Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaft: Project: Galen of Pergamum: The Transmission, Interpretation and Completion of Ancient Medicine

Wellcome Collection London: The Physiological Society: Physiology: An Historical Perspective 13 September 2016

Warwick: Humanities Research Centre: Conference: CfP: More than meets the page: Printing Text and Images in Italy, 1570s–1700s 4 March 2017

Worlds of Knowledge

ECHOPHYSICS Pöllau Austria: 2nd International Conference on the History of Physics 5–7 September 2016

The German Chemical Society (Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker- GDCh): PAUL BUNGE PRIZE 2017: HISTORY OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Deadline 30 September 2016

Birkbeck University of London: The Birkbeck Trauma Project: CfP: Gender and Pain in Modern History 24–27 March 2017

Christ Church & Bodleian Library Oxford: Conference: Hakluyt and the Renaissance Discovery of the World 24–25 November 2016

CELFIS University of Bucharest: Call for Applications: Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science 24–26 October 2016

University of Sydney: CfP: Workshop: Race, Sex, and Reproduction in the Global South, c.1800–2000 18 April 2017

Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall: Workshop: Tools of Reason: The Practice of Scientific Diagramming from Antiquity to the Present 10–11 February 2017

American Association for the History of Medicine: Awards and Grants

Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries Oxford: Women in Science in the Archives 8 September 2016

University of Edmonton: CfP: Theology and the Philosophy of Science 14–15 October 2016

The Lowry, Salford Quays: Discovering Collections Discovering Communities 10–12 October 2016

Universidade de Évora (Portugal): Évora’s 7th Symposium on Philosophy and History of Science and Technology 4–5 November 2016

HUMANA.MENTE Journal of Philosophical Studies: CfP: Issue 32, April 2017: Beyond Toleration? Inconsistency and Pluralism in the Empirical Sciences

Centre de Russie pour la Science et la Culture, Paris: Appel à communications: “L’Homme dans le monde de l’incertitude. Méthodologie de la cognition culturelle et historique”. Colloque international pour le 120e anniversaire de la naissance de Lev Vygotsky 13 octobre 2016

University of Glasgow: CfP: Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures 3–4 April 2017

IUHPST: Call for entries: IUHPST Essay Prize in History and Philosophy of Science “What is the value of philosophy of science for history of science?” Deadline 30 November 2016

Eä: A workshop in Rio to debate about the challenges facing interdisciplinary journals

Université François Rabelais, Tours: Appel à communications: Représentations et figures de la maternité dans le monde anglophone 3 au 5 avril 2017

JOURNÉES D’ÉTUDES: Appel à communicatio: « Petites mains » d’artistes dans les pratiques scientifiques

BSHS: Museum of the History of Science Upcoming Free Lecture Series

Université de Strasbourg: Appel à symposia: 6ème Congrès de la Société française d’histoire des sciences et des techniques (SFHST) 19-20-21 avril 2017

Birkbeck University of London: CfP: Gender and Pain in Modern History 24–25 March 2017

Lexicon Philosophicum: CfP: Issue 5 (2017) Histories of Philosophy, Science and Ideas

Thackray Medical Museum, Leeds: CfP: Workshop: Exploring Histories and Futures of Innovation in Advanced Wound Care 20 September 2016

Université de Caen: Colloque: Le corps humain saisi par le droit : entre liberté et propriété 14 Octobre 2016

HSTM Network Ireland: International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology Young Scholar Prize

ENVA, Amphithéâtre Blin: Appel à communications: Animalhumanité. Expérimentation et fiction : l’animalité au cœur du vivant 1er et 2 décembre 2016

New Bern NC: CfP: North Carolina Maritime History Council Conference 4–5 November 2016

Christ’s College Cambridge: CfP: Medicine, Environment and Health in the Eastern Mediterranean World (1400-1750) 3–4 April 2017

Villa Mirafiori, Rome: Conference: Building Theories, Hypothesis & Heuristics in Science

UCL: CfP. Second London Philosophy of Science Graduate Conference 1–2 September 2016 Deadline 4 July 2016

Society for U.S: Intellectual History: Conference: From the Mayflower to Silicon Valley: Tools and Traditions in American Intellectual History October 13-15, 2016

University of Lisbon: CfP: Third Lisbon International Conference on Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Issues 14–16 December 2016

San Sebastian: Physics in the XII International Ontology Congress 3-7 October 2016

Westminster Quaker Meeting House: ‘A MANY-SIDED CRYSTAL’: THE QUAKER PHYSICIST & ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, SILVANUS PHILLIPS THOMPSON (1851–1916) A Workshop to Mark the Centenary of his Death 16 September 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Disability and Sexuality

Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science: CfP: Special Issue: Knowledge Transfer and Its Context

The Victorianist: CfP Reminder: The “Heart” and “science” of Wilkie Collins and His Contemporaries 24 September 2016 London

ICOHTEC Conference Porto: CfP: Early Career Scholars Workshop: Tension of Europe 1 August 2016

Society for Renaissance Studies: CfP: More than meets the page: Printing Texts and Images in Italy, 1570s–1700s

Transversal: International Journal for the Historiography of Science: CfP: “Ludwik Fleck’s Theory of Thought Styles and Thought Collectives – Translations and Receptions” Deadline 30 August 2016

HPDST: 2017 DHST Prize for Young Scholars

BSHS: Great Exhibitions Competition 2016

Académie Polonaise des Sciences, Paris: Colloque: Les sciences du vivant. Imaginaire et discours scientifique 20–21 Octobre 2016

King’s College London: From Microbes to Matrons: The Past, Present and Future of Hospital Infection Control and Prevention 1-2 September 2016

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory: CFP: Conference: HIV/AIDS Research: Its History and Future 13–16 October 2016

Australian Academy of Science: The Moran Award for History of Science Research

Florida Atlantic University: International Society for the Philosophy of Chemistry Summer Symposium 1–4 August 2016

University Of Belgrade: CfP: Philosophy of Scientific Experimentation-5 22–23 September 2016

Mediterranean Institute at the University of Malta, and the University of Warwick: CfP: Beauty and the Hospital in History 6–8 April 2017

Institution of Engineering and Technology, London: Conference: Telecommunications in the Aftermath of World War 1: Civilian and Military Perspectives 10 August 2016

MedHum Fiction – Daily Dose: CfP: Medical Humanities

BSHS: The British Society for the History of Science Prize for Exhibits on the History of Science, Technology and Medicine 2016

University of Birmingham: Social Studies in the History of Medicine – ‘Forged by Fire: Burns Injury and Identity in Britain, c.1800-2000’

The Nobel Museum Stockholm: Prizes and Awards in Science before Nobel. 5th Watson Seminar in the Material and Visual History of Science 5 September 2016

Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry: Partington Prize

University of Glasgow: CfP: Discourse of Care: Care in Media, Medicine and Society 5-7 September 2016

Western Michigan University: CfP: Sixth Annual Medical Humanities Conference 

University of Cambridge: CfP: Medicine, Envirment, and Health In the Easterm Mediterranean World, 1400–1750 3–4 April 2017

Pittsburgh Center for Philosophy of Science: Upcoming Events

Fórum Lisboa (Antigo Cinema Roma): CFP: Lisbon International Conference on Philosophy of Science 14–16 December 2016

Everything Early Modern Women: CfP: The Body and Spiritual Experience: 1500–1700 (RSA 2017)

Calenda: Le Calendrier des Lettres et Sciences Humains et Sociales: Appel à contribution « Les sciences du vivant. Imaginaire et discours scientifique »

Western Michigan University: Call for Abstracts: Sixth Annual Medical Humanities Conference 15–16 September 2016

Society for the Social History of Medicine: Undergraduate Essay Prize Deadline 1 October 2016

Kunsthistorisches Institut In Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut: CfP: Photo-Objects. On the Materiality of Photographs and Photo-Archives in the Humanities and Sciences 15–17 February 2017

University of Leuven: CfA: The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences 12–13 October 2016

Science Museum: Artefacts Meeting 2–4 October 2016: CfP: Understanding Use: Science and Technology Objects and Users

Cambridge: CfP extended: Science and Islands in the Indo-Pacific World 15–16 September 2016

Women's history ad

University of Bristol: Centre for Science and Philosophy: Events

BSHS: Singer Prize: The Singer Prize, of up to £300, is awarded by the British Society for the History of Science every two years to the writer of an unpublished essay, based on original research into any aspect of the history of science, technology or medicine.

Society for the Social History of Medicine: 2016 Undergraduate Essay Prize Deadline 1 October

BJHS Themes: We are calling for proposals for Issue 3 (2018) of BJHS Themes, the annual open-access journal that is a companion to the British Journal for the History of Science. Like the BJHSBJHS Themes is published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the BSHS.

H-Pennsylvania: Philip J. Pauly Book Prise Nominations Sought for Histories of Science in the Americas

BSHS: Prizes

Queen Mary University of London:Upcoming History of Emotions Work in Progress Seminars

University of Reading: Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums  23 September 2016 

Barts Pathology Museum: CfP: The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries 24 September 2016

Wilkie Collins Portrait by Rudolph Lehmann, 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Leicester: Centre for Medical Humanities: Seminars:

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware: CfP: Making Modern Disability: Histories of Disability, Design, and Technology 28 October 2016

New York City: CfP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine 30 September–1 October 2016

Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology (Rio de Janeiro, 23-29 July 2017): CfP: Blood, Food, and Climate: Historical Relationships Between Physiology, Race, Nation-Building, and Colonialism/Globalization

CFP Early Modern World

IHPST, Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques, Paris: CfP: International Doctoral Conference in Philosophy of Science 29-30 September 2016

Hist Geo ConfAnnals of Science: Annals of Science Essay Prize for Young Scholars

H-Sci-Med-Tech: CFP: Blood, Food & Climate – Symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology

2nd International Conference on the History of Physics: Invention, application and exploitation in the history of physics Pöllau, Austria 5–7 September 2016

The International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST): Invites submissions for the fourth DHST Prize for Young Scholars, to be presented in 2017.

Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST: CfP: 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature

University of Greenwich: Society and the Sea Conference: 15–16 September 2016

Society and th Sea

University of Illinois, Chicago: CfP: STS Graduate Student Workshop: 16-17 September

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

St Anne’s College: University of Oxford: Constructing Scientific Communities: Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Seminars in Trinity Term 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Scientific Instrument Society: Research Grants Programme: Deadline 1 September 2016

BSHS: Time Measurement Research Funding: Deadline 2 September 2016

Toronto, St. George Campus: Philosophy of Science

Smithsonian Institution: Museum Curator: National Air and Space Museum

University of Paderborn: Department of Philosophy: Research Associate: Center History of Women Philosophers and Scientists

University of Miami: History Department: Phillip R. Shriver Professor of History 

Freie Universität Berlin: 12 PhD & 1 Postdoc positions, Graduate School Global Intellectual History

Scientific Instrument Society: SIS Grants

University of Vienna: Post Doc: Applied Epistemology and Philosophy of Science

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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