Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #50

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #50

Monday 08 June 2015

EDITORIAL:

Somewhat delayed, you can now admire, read, consume, criticise, use, abuse or simple ignore the fiftieth edition of the weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette bringing the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine, which our special team of search owls could dig up over seven days in the Internet, to computer screen all over the world.

The fiftieth edition! When I decided to lay On Giants’ Shoulders the monthly history of science blog carnival to rest and to start this weekly links list in its place, I naively thought that in doing so I would reduce my workload. Each edition being only a quarter of a month would only require a quarter of the effort, right? Unfortunately my own fervour, tendency to perfection and nerd desire for completeness have meant that the Gazette has grown into monster of undreamed of dimensions, consuming far more of my time and energy than On Giants’ Shoulders ever did.

The above should not be seen in anyway as a complaint. Perverse as I am, I enjoy the work and as a good friend of mine used to say, it keeps me off the streets and stops me beating up old ladies. Although I’m now approaching the period of life where the old ladies are more likely to beat me up rather than the other way around.

As long as I have a working computer and the necessary health to continue I see no reason why Whewell’s Gazette shouldn’t continue to collate and present the Internet’s contributions to #histSTM to those eager to consume them. The next two weeks will see the nominal year completed with the fifty-first and fifty-second editions then there will be a brief hiatus, as I shall be off on an adventure more about which more will be revealed on The Renaissance Mathematicus in due time.

@Grammarly

Quotes of the week:

“They must often change, who would be constant in happiness or wisdom”. – Confucius

“I don’t know why we are here, but I’m pretty sure that it is not in order to enjoy ourselves”. – Wittgenstein

“Watch out for the fellow who talks about putting things in order! [That] always means getting other people under your control”. – Diderot

“When scholars work alone, mistakes are made in private. When scholars collaborate, mistakes are made in public, and everyone learns”. – Tom Scheinfeldt (@foundhistory)

“For what could be more beautiful than the heavens which contain all beautiful things?” – Nicolaus Copernicus

Them “You’re too angry. You’ll catch more flies with honey…”

Me “Why the fuck would I want to catch flies.” – @Evie_Eliot

“’Historians’ who put ideology ahead of actual research should simply shut up” – Samuel McLean (@Canadian_Errant)

History doesn’t have to be old. History starts only a few hours ago.” – ESA Space History

History is that certainty produced at the point where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation.” – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

“People remember stories, not facts. Scientists need to use stories or storytellers will (are) make(ing) bad science stick” – Mhari Stewart (@ScienceArtReach)

“Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.” – Mark Twain

“To talk is the best way not to speak about the essential” – Arjen Dijksmam (@materion)

“Before I begin speaking, there is something I’d like to say.” – Raymond Smullyan

“My daughter just asked why we say “hang up” the phone and now I feel 90”. – Jason English (@EnglishJason)

“Thou lookest like the backe syde of my barrell of small beere!” – Insult 1610 h/t Jonathan Healey (@SocialHistoryOx)

“One 17th century newspaper was described by its critics as ‘an increaser of Bum-fodder’.” – Jonathan Healey (@SocialHistoryOx)

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Ptak Science Books: Anti-Gravity Anti-Gravitas

Image source:  My Ear Trumpet via Ptak Science Books

Image source: My Ear Trumpet via Ptak Science Books

arXiv.org: Galileo in early modern Denmark, 1600–1650

Slate: Genius move: Max Planck, the unlikely founder of quantum physics, knew how to change his mind.

Popular Science: Here’s Where Astronomers Discovered We Are All Star Stuff

Big Island Now: Caltech To Shut Down Observatory in September

Phys.org: History of the NASA Skylab, America’s first space station

astro.uni.edu: Ptolemaic System Simulator

AIP: Werner Heisenberg on the scientific style of Bohr and others

Yovisto: Carnot and Thermodynamics

Epoch Times: Music and Physics: The Connections Aren’t Trivial

tuson.com: Astronomer Bart Bok studied the Milky Way

The Hindu: The monsoon watchers

The astronomical observatory in Thiruvananthapuram is one of the oldest in the India. Photo: Anand Narayanan

The astronomical observatory in Thiruvananthapuram is one of the oldest in the India. Photo: Anand Narayanan

The Jerusalem Post: Hebrew University unveils new statue of Albert Einstein on Jerusalem campus

arXiv.org: The Marquise du Chatelet: A Controversial Woman of Science

Ptak Science Books: Isaac Newton, Alpha and Omega

Pacific Standard: Without Christianity, What Year Would It Be?

Forbes: Twenty Years of Bose-Einstein Condensation

Ptak Science Books: Early “Image” of Hiroshima – as a Cartoon

Brunellesci: Operations of the Geometric and Military Compass of Galileo Galilei (pdf)

Discover: A History of General Relativity

AZ Daily Sun.com: The View from Mars Hill: The discovery of Charon has Flagstaff roots

Teylers Museum: Fluroscoop naar Becquerel, J. Duboscq

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

arXive.org: The search for longitude: Preliminary insights from a 17th Century Dutch perspective

Mapping London: Hexagonal Map of London

Halley’s Log: Return to sea

The Bodleian’s Map Room Blog: Cartoon Maps

European Revue, Kill that Eagle, Published by Geographia in 1914 and drawn by J. Amshewitz. C1 (407)

European Revue, Kill that Eagle, Published by Geographia in 1914 and drawn by J. Amshewitz. C1 (407)

Yovisto: Knud Rasmussen – the Father of Eskimonology

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: “Secta Empírica y Dogmáticos Racionales”: medicine and the ESD in early modern Spain

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Bladder-Stone Operation: A Most Unusual Composition

New York Times: Medicine’s Hidden Roots in an Ancient Manuscript

Forbes: Castration Affected Skeleton of Famous Opera Singer Farinelli, Archaeologists Say

Mosaic: How to mend a broken heart

Discover: Researchers’ Quest for an Artificial Heart

Mad Art Lab: Lymph, There It Is: Florence Sabin, Pioneer Woman of Medical Research (Women in Science 39)

FlorenceSabin

NYAM: An Eye for Conservation: William Clift, Fenwick Beekman, and John Hunter

Northumberland Archives: Mary Ann Fulcher – School Headmistress

Medievalist.net: What’s Wrong with Early Medieval Medicine?

Inside the Science Museum: A mystery object

Advances in the History of Psychology: Remembering Oak Ridge: A Digital Exhibit

A Canadian Treasury of Medical History

The Atlantic: The Tampon: A History

The Walrus: Archaic instruments from the attic of Montreal’s Royal Victoria Hospital

Wellcome Collection: Exhibitions: Treating yourself

TECHNOLOGY:

Inside The Science Museum: Wonderful Things: Ancient Egyptian Curling Tongs

The Public Domain Review: The Forth Bridge: Building an Icon

Detail from “Plans and sections for a bridge of chains proposed to be thrown over the Frith of Forth at Queensferry”, James Anderson, 1818.

Detail from “Plans and sections for a bridge of chains proposed to be thrown over the Frith of Forth at Queensferry”, James Anderson, 1818.

Tylers Museum: Instrumentzaal: Set telefoons, naar Bell, door Maldant & Cie, 1880

Nature: Ancient humans brought tools to Europe

Louis Prang and Chromolithography: Lithographer

Today’s Document: Patent Drawing for T. Newman’s Poison Warning Bottle 6/2/1908

The Public Domain Review: The Nightwalker and the Nocturnal Picaresque

Ptak Science Books: Socialism, Civilization, and Fertilizer…and Nazis (1945)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: A twelve-year flash of genius

James Eckford Lauder: James Watt and the Steam Engine: the Dawn of the Nineteenth Century, 1855

James Eckford Lauder: James Watt and the Steam Engine: the Dawn of the Nineteenth Century, 1855

Inside the Science Museum: Revealing the invisible

The Enlightened Economist: Inventors and manufacturers, and their economics

AEON: Losing the thread

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

APP: In memoriam: Zofia Kielan-Jaworowska (1925–2015)

Geschichte der Geologie: Die Geburt and der Tod von Kontinente

Amgueddfa Blog: Wallace Goes West…

Embryo Project: Charles Benedict Davenport (1866–1944)

Evolution News: Darwin, Design, and Phototropism

Fossil History: On Being Remembered: Huxley, Busk, & Scientific Friendship

1876nygraphicaug14

Thinking Like a Mountain: Understanding & Altering the Climate: Historical Perspectives

USGS: The Early History of Seismology (to 1900)

Yovisto: James Hutton – the Father of Modern Geology

Popular Science: The Church of George Church

Embryo Project: Petr Alekseevich Kropotkin (1842–1921)

Trowelblazers: Gertrude Caton Thompson

Caton-Thompson_Gertrude_1_full-580x783

Science Comma: CHOTS Away! At Down House

The Alfred Russel Wallace Correspondence Project: Annual report on work of the project 14 May 2014–13 May 2015

National Geographic: Read Francis Crick’s $6 Million Letter to Son describing DNA

The Royal Society: The Repository: Nature’s pins and needles

BHL: World Oceans Day: Ernst Haeckel and Art Forms in Nature

Ocean Portal: Art Forms in Nature: Marine Species From Ernst Haeckel

The siphonophores are an order of marine animals in the phylum Cnidaria (the same phylum containing jellyfish).  Credit: Ernst Haeckel, Kunstformen der Natur / Biodiversity Heritage Library

The siphonophores are an order of marine animals in the phylum Cnidaria (the same phylum containing jellyfish).
Credit: Ernst Haeckel, Kunstformen der Natur / Biodiversity Heritage Library

Braintree & Witham Times: Free new exhibition at Chelmsford Museum explores the exotic collections of Alfred Russel Wallace

Trowelblazers: Nieves López Martínez

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Richard Smalley – the Father of Nanotechnology

Buckminsterfullerene C60

Buckminsterfullerene C60

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ptak Science Books: An Alphabet of Ages of Scientific Terms

Newsweek: Frankenstein Has Been Given a Bad Rap – And Science Suffers

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Huntingdon Library

NYAM: Recommended Resources

Harvard Gazette: ‘a completely new life was beckoning’: Beyond the reach of monsters, Gerald Holten found infinite possibilities

Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Professor of the History of Science, Emeritus Gerald Holton is pictured in his Cambridge home. He first arrived at Harvard in 1943. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Professor of the History of Science, Emeritus Gerald Holton is pictured in his Cambridge home. He first arrived at Harvard in 1943. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

AIP: New Oral Histories Website

The Partially Examined Life: Science, Technology and Society IV: Paul Feyerabend

In the Middle: How Do We Write? Dysfunctional Academic Writing

Reflections: Blog of the STS Department at the University of Vienna: The Science of Science Maps

Connected Histories: Digital Resources

The Guardian: Readers suggest the 10 best unsung female scientists

Informs: History and Traditions

How do we tell the history of science?

LSE: The Academic Book of the Future: exploring academic practices and expectations for the monograph

Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: Setting “Objects” in Motion

History Womble: Toe-dipping in the mainstream

Popular Science: My Temple, My Mountain

Enviromental History: Volume 20 Issue 3 July 2015 Table of Contents

Open Culture: The History of Philosophy, from 600 B.C.E. to 1935, Visualized in Two Massive, 44-Foot High Diagrams

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Agnolo della Casa

Conciatore: Dear Friends

Conciatore: Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750) Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Acq. nr. M.68-1962

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)
Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
Acq. nr. M.68-1962

Astrolabes and Stuff: Drawing up a medieval horoscope

Beyond the Reading Room: Another Book from the Library of Isaac Newton

Corpus Newtonicum: The world has heeded my plea! Another Newton book found

academia.edu: Dis/unity of Knowledge: Models for the Study of Modern Esotericism and Science

BOOK REVIEWS:

National Geographic: In Age of Science, Is Religion ‘Harmful Superstition’?

Scientific American Blogs: Cross–Check: Book by Biologist Jerry Coyne Goes Too Far Denouncing Religion, Defending Science

Wall Street Journal: Preaching to the Converted

THE: Radium and the Secret of Life, by Luis A. Campos

Radium-and-the-secret-of-life-by-Luis-Campos

St John’s History Department: Book Review: Laura J. Snyder Eye of the Beholder

Termessos: The Born Family in Göttingen and Beyond

Viktor Weisskopf, Maria Göppert and Max Born on bicycles in Göttingen in the 1920s

Viktor Weisskopf, Maria Göppert and Max Born
on bicycles in Göttingen in the 1920s

Popular Science: Professor Povey’s Perplexing Problems

NEW BOOKS:

Ashgate: Renaissance Mad Voyages and the ‘Culture of Play, 1300–1700’ series

Historiens de la santé: When Good Drugs Go Bad: Opium, Medicine, and the Origins of Canada’s Drug Laws

51AZYyTiNHL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

ART:

Royal Museums Greenwich: Strange Creatures: The Art of Unknown Animals at the Grant Museum

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo), George Stubbs, 1772

The Kongouro from New Holland (Kangaroo), George Stubbs, 1772

The Recipes Project: Clear as Crystal: Leonardo da Vinci’s Walnut Oil

Science Museum: First operation performed using anaesthesia, 1846

Science Museum: The Rise of Anatomy, a dissection in the 14th century

Science Museum: Exhibition: Revelations: Experiments in Photography 20 March–13 September 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Theatre Royal Winchester: Matchbox Theatre in conversation with Michael Frayn (Copenhagen)

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Glasgow Science Festival: Festival of Light: Illuminating James Clerk Maxwell 13 June 2015

Glasgow Science Festival: Science on the Street 13 June 2015

Welcome Collection: Exhaustion Then and Now 11 June 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

The Surgeon Barber

DAVID TENIERS THE YOUNGER, The surgeon-barber , oil on cloth 57,15 x 73,66 cm The Chrysler Museum of Art,  Norfolk, VA. Gift Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

DAVID TENIERS THE YOUNGER, The surgeon-barber , oil on cloth 57,15 x 73,66 cm The Chrysler Museum of Art,
Norfolk, VA. Gift Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

TELEVISION:

ITV News: A long-lost microscope

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

University of Cambridge: Rebekah Higgitt – Longitude found

Torch Oxford: Aristotle on Perceiving Objects

Youtube: Robert Oppenheimer speaking at UCLA 5/14/1964

Youtube: Albert Einstein statue unveiled in Jerusalem

Ustream: Webcast: Unseen Connections – A Natural History of the Cellphone

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

De Uzeren Eeuw: Een nieuwe wereld Aflevering 10: Dubois en Lorentz

Youtube: What Range of subjects did Newton study at Cambridge?

Youtube: Information Age: The microchip that changed our world

RADIO:

cbc radio: Ideas: Science Under Siege, Part 1

cbc radio: Ideas: Science Under Siege, Part 2

BBC: Lisa Jardine on Desert Island Discs

Source: The Independent 10 June 2015 Photographer: Unknown

Source: The Independent 10 June 2015 Photographer: Unknown

PODCASTS:

History of Philosophy without any gaps: Full of Potential: Thirteenth Century Physics

Open Culture: Listen as Albert Einstein Calls for Peace and Social Justice in 1945

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Gresham College: Lecture: Babbage and Lovelace 19 January 2016

University of Notre Dame: Locating Forensic Science and Medicine. University of Notre Dame Global Gateway, London: 24-25 July 2015

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Exhibition: Specimens of Natural History: Komunitas Salihara Gallery Jakarta 15 August–15 September 2015

eä Journal of Medical Humanities & Social Studies of Science and Technology: CfP: Deadline 15 June 2015

Difficult Women Conference: CfP: Difficult Women in the Long Eighteenth Century: 1680–1830 University of York 28 November 2015

University of Umeå: Workshop: CfP: History of field research stations at Umeå University 26–27 August 2015

University of Swansea: Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies Regional Conference: Technologies of Daily Life in Ancient Greece 2–3 July 2015

University of Durham: Feyerabend 2015: Forty Years ‘Against Method’ 15–16 July

York Festival of Ideas: Talk: The Occult Roots of Modern Psychology 13 June 2015

The Hidden Persuaders Project and the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image present:

Brainwash: History, Cinema and the Psy Professions 3-4th July 2015

Discover Medical London: Study Tour: Path–ologies: A capital’s contagious geography 29 June 2015

Discover Medical London: Women and Medicine – For dates see website

The Royal Institution: Talk: The story of life – Matthew Cobb & Nick Lane 11 June 2015

Morbid Anatomy: New Conference Devoted to 19th Century Eccentric, Naturalist, Traveler and Taxidermist Charles Waterton, July 31 – August 1, West Yorkshire, England

University of Wales Trinity Saint David: Sophia Centre: Astrology as Art 27-28 June 2015

Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry: An incredibly varied spring meeting, from alchemy to Arrhenius, elixirs to electrons Clare Hall Cambridge 15 June 2015

CHF: Synthesis Lecture Series: Joseph Gabriel, “Medical Monopoly: Intellectual Property Rights and the Origins of the Modern Pharmaceutical Industry”

Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: About 18–20 June 2015

University of Kent: Conference: Science and Engineering in Cultural Context 25–26 June 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Valencia: Master in History of Science and Scientific Communication

RCN Foundation: Monica Baly Bursary for Scholarship in Nursing History

King’s College London: Research and Teaching Associate History of Science and Medicine

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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