Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. #51

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Volume #51

Monday 15 June 2015

EDITORIAL:

 Another seven days have rushed past leaving in their wake a plethora of article and blog posts on the histories of science, technology and medicine scattered across the width and breadth of cyberspace, which we have scooped up and present here for your perusal and delectation in the fifty-first edition of your weekly #histSTM links list Whewell’s Gazette. I love Librarians Historians in general and #histSTM historians in particular would be lost and unable to carry out their research work without the active assistance of a world wide army of archivists and librarians those never tiring workers at the coalface of written records. Archivists and librarians collect, collate, catalogue and make available for the historical researcher all forms of written documents and records and without their work the life of the historians would be immeasurably harder and more strewn with strife than it already is. This being the case this edition of Whewell’s Gazette is humbly dedicated to all the archivists and librarians past, present and future who serve the historian in so many ways. Library Card     Quotes of the week:

Dance like there’s nobody watching, Love like you’ll never be hurt, Sing like there’s nobody listening, Mark all as read. – Ed Yong (@edyong209)

“I always have a quotation for everything – it saves original thinking.” – Dorothy L. Sayers

“History of science makes scientific stories richer and more interesting” – Deborah Blum

“Science is nothing but perception”. – Plato

“The mind was dreaming. The world was its dream.” – Jorge Luis Borges

“All my friends who weren’t at Bletchley think that The Imitation Game is wonderful, and all my friends who were think it’s rubbish” – Pamela Rose (Bletchley Girl)

“Leo Szilard never spelled his name Leó Szilárd after he left Hungary. Respect his choice. Avoid bad memes”. – Gene Dannen

“In the bathtub of history the truth is harder to hold than the soap, and much more difficult to find.” – Terry Pratchett

“There is, however, one trifling point on which I differ; viz. that I believe the high value of well-bred males is due to their transmitting their good qualities to a far greater number of offspring than can the female.” – Charles Darwin h/t @KeesJanSchilt

“The man who doesn’t read good books has no advantage over the man who can’t read them.”– Mark Twain

“Nobel Prizes don’t make one wise, but they’re a fine platform from wh. to reveal who you are” – Thomas Levenson (@TomLevenson)

“To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead” – Thomas Paine

“It is useful to the busy mind of man to be cautious in arguing about things exceeding its comprehension”. – John Locke

“Definition of a college professor: someone who talks in other people’s sleep”. – W H Auden

“Authority without wisdom is like a heavy axe without an edge, fitter to bruise than polish. Meditations Divine and Moral” ― Anne Bradstreet h/t @roos_annamarie

“Solitude is a sublime mistress, but an intolerable wife.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf) Goethe described himself in old age as ‘I appear to myself more and more historical’. h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf)

“CBT (Cognitive Beaverial Therapy) is…” (student spelling error in exam) h/t meta4RN Beaver PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 8–Giovanni Domenico Cassini

Corpus Newtonicum: Folding Pages (Scenes from the Library of Isaac Newton, Part 2)

Once upon a dog-ear (now folded back, but still clearly visible on both sides of the page).

Once upon a dog-ear (now folded back, but still clearly visible on both sides of the page).

The Conversation: Our latest scientific research partner was a medieval bishop

Brain Pickings: The Beauty of Uncertainty: How Heisenberg Invented Quantum Mechanics, Told in Jazz

Mental Floss: The Life and Times of Isaac Newton’s Apple Tree infographic-final-full ccat.sas.upenn.edu: Copernicus in China or, Good Intentions Gone Astray

Graham Farmelo: Talking Bohr and the Bomb in Copenhagen

Dannen.com: The Franck Report, June 11, 1945

The Independent: Albert Einstein’s private letters go up for sale at California auction

Restricted Data The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: What remains of the Manhattan Project

The Guardian: Five reasons we should celebrate Albert Einstein

Clerk Maxwell Foundation: James Clerk Maxwell: Maker of Waves

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 13 – Thomas Young

Standard Daily: Albert Einstein’s Letter explaining the link between Relativity Theory and Japan’s Atomic Bombing sold for $62,500

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Londonist: Compare Detailed Historic Maps With Today’s London

British Library: Online Gallery: Anglo-saxon Mappa Mundi

Anglo Saxon Mappa Mundi Cotton MS Tiberius B.V., 56v Copyright © The British Library Board

Anglo Saxon Mappa Mundi
Cotton MS Tiberius B.V., 56v
Copyright © The British Library Board

British Library: Maps and views blog: A Bohemian rhapsody*?

Library of Congress: World War II Military Situation Maps

JAAVSO Volume 43, 2015: Margaret Harwood and the Maria Mitchell Observatory

Progressive Geographies: Notes towards a critical history of cartography, part 1

Progressive Geographies: #MAPS/// Manifesto for an Alternative Cartography

The Afternoon Map: The First Printed Ottoman Map of Palestine, 1804

The Public Domain Review: The Travels of Ludovico di Varthema (1863)

UKPN Social Science: Coming in from the cold: nineteenth-century exploration and science in the Canadian Arctic

Yovisto: Harry Johnston and the “Scramble for Africa”

Christie’s The Art People: Catalogue: Valuable Books and Manuscripts Including Cartography

Yale News: Hidden secrets of Yale’s 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

Middle East Eye: The Chinese through Abbasid eyes

Halley’s Log: Able seaman wanted!

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Wonders & Marvels: Vesalius – The Ultimate Wedding Present?

Migraine Histories: On Migraines and the Eyes

Regional Medical Humanities: A Thirst for Knowledge

Circulating Now: Where to Find History of Medicine Collections

Atlas Obscura: Would You Like Some Heroin For Your Cough?

American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record, v.36, no. 6 March 25, 1900

American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record, v.36, no. 6 March 25, 1900

Ptak Science Books: Newspapers and Music in Bedlamia, 1850’s

Nursing Clio: A Short History of Homeopathy: From Hahnemann to Whole Foods

Over Newser: Madness Stones to New Age Medicine: A History of Drilling Holes in our Heads

The Recipes Project: In vino sanitas

Lapham’s Quarterly: Rogue Wounds

Early Modern Medicine: Inconvenient Incontinence

Diseases of Modern Life: Workshop Report: Working with 19th-Century Medical and Health Reports

Magic and Medicine: The Casebook Project

The Public Domain Review: Practical Hydrotherapy (1909) 18484496979_98845645b3_c The Public Domain Review: When Chocolate was Medicine: Colmenero, Wadsworth and Dufour

Notches: Astrological Birth Control: Fertility Awareness and the Politics of Non-Hormonal Contraception

Motherboard: A History of the Ice Pick Lobotomy

Medicine, ancient and modern: Thoughts on Galen and Pseudo-Galenic texts

storify: Medical Monopoly: Intellectual Property Rights and the Origins of the Modern Pharmaceutical Industry

Medievalist.net: Medieval Images of the Body

The 9th century scholar Hunayn ibn Ishaq wrote extensively about ophthalmology. This drawing of the eye is based on his works.

The 9th century scholar Hunayn ibn Ishaq wrote extensively about ophthalmology. This drawing of the eye is based on his works.

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 14 June – Karl Landsteiner

TECHNOLOGY:

Irish Examiner: UN marks impact of George Boole

Yovisto: John Smeaton – the Father of Civil Engineering

Smithsonian.com: How Pyrex Reinvented Glass For a New Age

NASA: Robert Goddard: A Man and His Rocket

History Today: Automata in Myth and Science

The mechanical duck, constructed by Jacques de Vaucanson (1709-1782), inventor of silk-weaving machinery. - See more at: http://www.historytoday.com/john-cohen/automata-myth-and-science#sthash.n0bM8N12.dpuf

The mechanical duck, constructed by Jacques de Vaucanson (1709-1782), inventor of silk-weaving machinery. – See more at: http://www.historytoday.com/john-cohen/automata-myth-and-science#sthash.n0bM8N12.dpuf

Ptak Science Books: The Telephone-Wife (Lonely No More), 1925

The Guardian: The secret history of 19th century cyclists

The Wall Street Journal: The Enduring Genius of the Ballpoint Pen

Ptak Science Books: The Proposed Balloon Car of 1895

Conciatore: Neri in Pisa

Conciatore: Travels To The East

Wales On Line: Napoleon’s telescope found in cellar of Welsh country house

Daily Post: Napoleon’s spyglass found at Plas Neydd on Anglesey

Science Notes: Today in Science History – June 11 Carl von Linde

Ptak Science Books: A Remarkably- and Completely-Disappeared Invention from 1890

Gizmodo: How This Revolutionary Industrial Glass Made Its Way Into Your Kitchen

Scientific American: Inventions: 70 Years That Changed the World, 1845–1915

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Stir-fried Science: An evolutionary excursion 

UCL: Museums and Collections Blog: Specimen of the Week 191: Rhaphorhynchus wing cast

Embryo Project: Francis Harry Compton Crick (1916–2004)

The Conversation: Revealed: the great geologist behind the Origin of Species

Embryo Project: Eric Wieschaus (1947– )

Sotheby’s: Darwin Charles Autograph Letter [1877]

Forbes: This 1783 Volcanic Eruption Changed The Course of History

Embryo Project: Patrick Christopher Steptoe (1913–1988)

European Geosciences Union: Floods as war weapons – Humans caused a third of floods in past 500 years in SW Netherlands

Data is Nature: ‘You Really Do Not See a Plant Until You Draw it’ – Botanical Wall Charts at the Academic Heritage Foundation

Bladstanden – A.A.Van Voorn

Bladstanden – A.A.Van Voorn

I am Safari: Life on the Forest Floor #1 – Wallace’s legacy

Quartz: To revolutionize biology, Charles Darwin got inspiration from the science of rocks

James C Ungureanu: Darwin and the Divine Programmer

Laelaps: A Dinosaur Reading List for Everyone

Yovisto: The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau

The Guardian: The unseen women scientists behind Tim Hunt’s Nobel Prize

Natural History Apostilles: A.P. De Candolle’s anticipation of natural selection (1820)

Niche: #EnvHist Worth Reading: May 2015

CHEMISTRY:

Homunculus: Set for chemistry: a longer view

A chemical manual from c.1894, in which the link to stage magic is clear. (Harry Price Library, UCL)

A chemical manual from c.1894, in which the link to stage magic is clear. (Harry Price Library, UCL)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Research Resources

The Chronicle of Higher Education: The Attack on Truth

imgur: The History of Science Fiction (created as an entry to a science mapping exhibit at Indiana University)

dataphys.org: List of Physical Visualizations

SciLogs: No, Writing Intelligibly Is Not ‘Dumbing It Down’

National Museums of Scotland: Delving into the past for International Archives Day 2015

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland in 1932.

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland in 1932.

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland today. Image © Andrew Lee.

The Grand Gallery of the National Museum of Scotland today. Image © Andrew Lee.

James B Sumner: Sites and resources on history and science communications

The Science and Entertainment Lab: Stories About Science: Symposium Round-up

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Announcing the 2015–2016 Lemelson Center Fellows

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Creating a holy cow

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Now We Are Six

Pooh Sticks E. H. Shepard

Pooh Sticks E. H. Shepard

academia.edu: Curiosity, Horror and Freedom in the Wunderkammer

The Irish News: Pioneer of science journalism Mary Mulvihill dies aged 55

William & Mary: Whodunit: What learned hand wrote all over Isaac Newton’s masterpiece?

Leaping Robot: Worldly Devils

History NASA: The Impact of Science on Society – James Burke – Jules Bergman – Isaac Asimov

British Society for the History of Mathematics: New Website

HNN: Why Historians Should Use Social Science Insights When Writing History

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: We were Trojans

Ptak Science Books: Reading Symbolism in Raymond Lull’s Portrait

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

Independent.ie: Magic, myth and secrecy – WB Yeats and the occult

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Guardian: Life’s Greatest Secret: The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code   9781781251409 THE: Birds and Frogs: Selected Papers, 1990–2014, by Freeman Dyson

The Guardian: A Natural History of English Gardening by Mark Laird review – gorgeous and diverse

The Guardian: Agents of Empire by Noel Malcolm review – a dazzling history of the 16th-century Mediterranean

NEW BOOKS:

A Canadian Treasury of Medical History: Champagne and Strawberries to Celebrate New Books in Canuk HM and HN

Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine: Human Gene Mapping Workshops c.1973–c.1991 Free Download!

Amazon: The Cybernetic Moment: Or Why We Call Out Age The Information Age

Historiens de la santé: August Weismann: Development, Heredity, and Evolution 9780674736894-lg University of Chicago Press: How Our Days Became Numbered

Harvard University Press: Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

ART: The Paris Review: True Blue

Full title: The Virgin in Prayer Artist: Sassoferrato Date made: 1640-50 Source: http://www.nationalgalleryimages.co.uk/ Contact: picture.library@nationalgallery.co.uk Copyright © The National Gallery, London

Full title: The Virgin in Prayer
Artist: Sassoferrato
Date made: 1640-50
Source: http://www.nationalgalleryimages.co.uk/
Contact: picture.library@nationalgallery.co.uk
Copyright © The National Gallery, London

University of Durham: Workshop: ‘Visual Culture in Medical Humanities’ 18 June 2015

National Museum of Scotland: Photography: A Victorian Sensation 19 June–22 November 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Arts Theatre: The Waiting Room Closes 19 June 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

THE: Science inspired by fiction

The Guardian: Rare footage surfaces of Amelia Earhart shortly before she vanished

Royal Society: Last Chance: Philosophical Transactions: 350 years of publishing Closes 23 June 2015

National Library of Scotland: Last Chance: The Forth Bridge: Building an icon Closes 21 June 2015

Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy Evenings

MHS Oxford: Family Friendly: Beam me up, Harry! Discover the story of Harry Moseley

Royal College of Physicians: ‘This calamitous year’: plague, doctors and death

John Baines Tours: Wallace in the Malay Archipelago 8-25 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

BBC: Sir William Crookes (17 June 1832–4 April 1919) by Charles Albert Ludovici

(c) National Portrait Gallery, London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

(c) National Portrait Gallery, London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

ISSUU.com: Actes D’hisòria De La Ciència I De La Tècnica: Volume 7 2014: Science on Television

BBC: Catching History’s Criminals: The Forensics Story

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS: Youtube: National Geographic: From Patents to Profits – American Genius

Youtube: The Royal Institute Channel

HUMLab: HUMlab Seminars Video Archive

Strata Smith: The Man & The Map

V&A: Printing and Binding a Handmade Book

Museo Galileo: Galileo’s disciples

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Science Stories

PODCASTS:

ODNB: Roy Porter Historian

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Manchester: Symposium: The university reimagined: past and Present 16 September 2015

LMU: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society: Workshop: Back to a Sustainable Future: Visions of Sustainability in the History of Design 19 June 2015

University of Aarhus: Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice (SPSP) Fifth Biennial Conference 24-26 June 2015

UCL: Seminar: History of the Psychological Disciplines Series 16 June 2015

Galileo Teacher Training Program: Eratosthenes Experiment 15-17 June 2015 Eratosthenes-June-2015-banner University of Manchester: How do we tell the history of science? 19 June 2015

Rijks Museum: Conference Art and Science in the Early Modern Low Countries 17-18 September 2015

HSTM Network Ireland: Conference: Food as Medicine 9-10 October 2015

University of Wuppertal: Workshop: Before Montucla: Historiography of Science in the Early Modern Era 3–4 March 2016

edtechteacher: Summer Workshop: Teaching History with Technology 23–24 July 2015

Ant Spider Bee: CfP: A Campfire Conversation About Small Data and Big Stories, ASEH 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality in Latin America

The Programming Historian: Training Programme: Programming Historian Live, British Library 19 October 2015

LOOKING FOR WORK:

National Science Foundation: NSF Historian

ETH Zurich: Professor of History of Exact Sciences

Universitat de València: Programa de Doctorado en Estudios Históricos y Sociales sobre Ciencia, Medicina y Comunicación Científica

Universitat de València: Máster Universitario en Historia de la Ciencia y Comunicación Cientifica

University of Sussex: Research Fellow in Digital Humanities/Digital History (Fixed Term)

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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