Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #02

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #02

Monday 20 July 2015

EDITORIAL:

Welcome to the second edition of the second year of Whewell’s Gazette, the weekly #histSTM links lists, which brings you all that we could gather of the histories of science, technology and medicine throughout the Internet in the last seven days.

The last week has seen a great triumph for science and technology with the successful flypast of Pluto by the space probe New Horizons after more than nine years en route. This prompted many articles on the history of the discovery of Pluto and its discoverer Clyde Tombaugh.

However this week also saw the seventieth anniversary of what many consider to be the greatest ever fall from grace of science and technology with the detonation of the first atomic bomb at the Trinity nuclear test on 16 July 1945.

These two episodes show that science and technology being human activities are far from being the neutral subjects that many would like to claim them to be. Humans create science and technology and humans determine how they will be put to use. The achievements of both the New Horizons and the Manhattan Project teams are viewed objectively amongst the greatest technical triumphs that our approximately four thousand years of science have delivered. However whereas the one is a cause for jubilation the other, releasing as it did undreamed of forces of destruction, can only be viewed with horror by any rational human being.

The Triumph – Pluto:

Not that Pluto!

Not that Pluto!

Johns Hopkins: Happy 100th Birthday, Clyde Tombaugh

Clyde Tombaughs notebook

Clyde Tombaughs notebook

io9: When We Discovered Pluto, It Changed How We Saw The Solar System

Cosmographia: Pluto – Predicted

Nautilus: A Visual History of Humanity’s Exploration of Pluto

PACHSmörgåsbord: Interview with Clyde Tombaugh, March 31, 1996

Clyde Tombaugh with his "automobile" telescope

Clyde Tombaugh with his “automobile” telescope

Timothy Hughes: Rare & Early Newspapers: Planet Pluto officially discovered

The Mitchell Archives: The Discovery of Pluto

The New York Times: Says Pluto’s Size is That of Mars

Popular Science: How a ‘Farm Boy’ Found Pluto 85 Years Ago

Glass positive of The new planet Pluto; Lowell Observatory 42-inch Reflector

Glass positive of The new planet Pluto; Lowell Observatory 42-inch Reflector

Academy of American Achiements: Clyde Tombaugh Photo Gallery

Modern Mechanix: Pluto is an Exceedingly Minor Planet (Nov, 1934)

Mammoth Tales: On Planet X and Naming Names

The Atlantic: The Women Who Rule Pluto

The H-Word: Seeing Pluto: strain, pain and ‘awesome’ science

Paige Fossil History: Retaining Childhood Curiosity: Pluto & Scientific Achievement

True Anomalies: Pluto, Mars, Moon, Earth

The Guardian: Pluto and other historical first pictures of planets

The New York Times: Summer of Science

The level of detail on the latest #PlutoFlyby images is astounding! Source: Twitter originator unknown

The level of detail on the latest #PlutoFlyby images is astounding!
Source: Twitter originator unknown

 

The Fall From Grace – Trinity:

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge petition, mid-July 1945

Dannen.com: Oak Ridge petition, 13 July 1945

Dannen.com: July 17, 1945. Leo Szilard’s petition against using the atomic bomb

Ptak Science Books: The Atomic Bomb and Satan’s Release, 1947

Dannen.com: Target Committee, Los Alamos, May 10-11, 1945

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Lilli Hornig’s Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project: George Kistiakowsky’s Interview

The Washington Post: Senator: Compensate residents near site of atomic bomb test

The Trinity explosion, 16 ms after detonation. The viewed hemisphere's highest point in this image is about 200 metres (660 ft) high. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Trinity explosion, 16 ms after detonation. The viewed hemisphere’s highest point in this image is about 200 metres (660 ft) high.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Trinity test bomb was the model dropped over Nagasaki. The bomb dropped over Hiroshima was never tested–not enough U-235 to spare. Audra J. Wolfe (@ColdWarScience)

ARD Mediathek: Zündung der ersten Atombombe am (16.7.1945) podcast

The New York Times: The First Light of Trinity

Restricted Data: Brig. Gen. Thomas Farrell, on the Trinity test, July 16, 1945

Ptak Science Books: Eyewitness Account “Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima” April 1946

The Boston Globe: The deterrent that wasn’t

AHF: News Articles on Trinity Test

Restricted Data: Trinity at 70: “Now we are all sons of bitches”

 

Quotes of the week:

 “And remember, with great power comes great utilities bill”. – Peter Broks (@peterbroks)

 “It’s the right idea, but not the right time.” – John Dalton.

“I don’t exactly know what I mean by that, but I mean it.” – J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

“Personally, I’m always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.” – Winston Churchill

“You have to be nice to humans and when they don’t behave properly you can’t kill them” – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

“It took 100s of years to map the continents on Earth; it took just 50 years to see all the planets up close”. – John Grunsfeld

“In astronomy, looking over a long distance also means looking through expanses of time”. – Marek Kukula (@marekkukula)

“Frederick Great asked young Humboldt if he planned to conquer world like namesake Alexander the Great: ‘yes sir, but with my head’” h/t Andrea Wulf (@andrea_wulf)

“That men do not learn very much from lessons of history is the most important of all lessons that history has to teach.” – Aldous Huxley

“A coffee cup is homeomorphic to a donut”.

“A coffee cup with a broken handle is homeomorphic to a donut with a bite taken out”. – @TopologyFact

“There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed”. –Hemingway

“Nature never deceives us; it is we who deceive ourselves”. – Rousseau

“All a musician can do is to get closer to the sources of nature, and so feel that he is in communion with the natural laws” – John Coltrane

“I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.” – John Cage

“Physics is the unfolding of the laws of the intelligible world, pure mathematics is the unfolding of laws of human intelligence”. – J Sylvester

 Birthdays of the Week:

John Dee born 13 July 1527

The Renaissance Mathematicus: John Dee, the “Mathematicall Praeface” and the English School of Mathematics

A 16th-century portrait by an unknown artist Source: Wikimedia Commons

A 16th-century portrait by
an unknown artist
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee

English Historical Fiction Authors: “This Rough Magic”: The Secrets of the Tudor-Era Seers

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 15 July – Jocelyn Bell Burnell

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 2009 Source Wikimedia Commons

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 2009
Source Wikimedia Commons

Starchild: Jocelyn Bell Burnell

AIP: Leon Lederman

arXiv.org: Records of sunspots and aurora during CE 960–1279 in the Chinese chronicle of the Song Dynasty

Forbes: History of Science Notes: For Whom The Prague Tolls

NASA Mars Exploration: Mars @ 50

Royal Museums Greenwich: A Glimpse of Mars Through Fractured Illusion: The Materiality of the Stereo Image

Daily Sabah: Astrolabe: the 13th Century iPhone

1437076313625

Science 2.0: Big Science: Ernest Lawrence Gets His Hagiography

The New Atlantis: The Unknown Newton (Introduction)

The New Atlantis: The Unknown Newton (Articles)

Astronomy Magazine: Pioneering Rosetta mission scientist Claudia Alexander dead at 56

Claudia Alexander Source: Wikimedia Commons

Claudia Alexander
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Los Angeles Times: Claudia Alexander dies at 56; JPL researcher oversaw Galileo, Rosetta missions

Teyler’s Museum: Planetarium, George Adams, London

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: Curiouser and Curiouser: The World’s Most Unusual and Beautiful Maps

Yovisto: Edward Whymper and the Matterhorn

Yovisto: Salomon August Andrée’s Artic Baloon Expedition of 1897

S. A. Andrée and Knut Frænkel with the crashed balloon on the pack ice, photographed by the third expedition member, Nils Strindberg

S. A. Andrée and Knut Frænkel with the crashed balloon on the pack ice, photographed by the third expedition member, Nils Strindberg

 

Ptak Science Books: The Unstoppable Mawson (1914)

Royal Museums Greenwich: Looking across the Atlantic in 18th-century maps

I Like: The Map That Came To Life

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Forensic Anna:thropology: the sent of death

Conciatore: Francesco and Bianca

Remedia: Cinchona

17th century jar of quinine. The jar is believed to be from the pharmacy of the Milosrdnych Bratri Monastery and Hospital Brno, in the Czech Republic. L0057596 Credit: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

17th century jar of quinine. The jar is believed to be from the pharmacy of the Milosrdnych Bratri Monastery and Hospital Brno, in the Czech Republic. L0057596 Credit: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images

Morbid Anatomy: Fabulous Senior Thesis Project Inspired by Remmelin’s Flap Anatomy

The Telegraph: The pioneering surgeon who healed men scarred by war, a new monument created in his honour – and the remarkable twist of fate that links them

academia.edu: Médecine et hellénisme à la Renaissance: Le problème du grec chez Baillou

Nain, Mam and Me: Allenburys milk foods: a triumph of industrialisation

The Atlantic: The Victorian Anti-Vaccination Movement

A cartoon from a December 1894 anti-vaccination publication Courtesty of The Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

A cartoon from a December 1894 anti-vaccination publication
Courtesty of The Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

The Guardian: CIA torture is only part of medical science’s dark modern history

Mosaic: Step-by-step: prosthetic legs through the ages (gallery)

The Sloane Letters Blog: On Hans Sloane’s Copies of De Humani Corporis Fabrica

RCS: William Clowes – A prooved practice for all young chirurgiens, 1588

CHoM News: Bernard D. Davis Papers Processing Has Begun, as part of Maximizing Microbiology Project

Collectors Weekly: Bloodletting, Bone Brushes, and Tooth Keys: White-Knuckle Adventures in Early Dentistry

TECHNOLOGY:

Invention: A twist of Fate: The Invention of the Rubik’s Cube

Today’s Document: Eli Barum & Benjamin Brooks Still Patented 13 July 1808

Thick Objects: Remaking a local object: The Kirschmann coaxial colour mixer

National Museum of American History: Galileo Pendulum Clock Model, Replica

Nautilus: The Rube Goldberg Machine That Mastered Keynesian Economics

Schematic diagram of the MONIAC machine LSE Library collections, Meade/16/3

Schematic diagram of the MONIAC machine
LSE Library collections, Meade/16/3

web.stanford.edu: The Defecating Duck, Or The Ambiguous Origins of Artificial Life

The Guardian: The world’s first hack: the telegraph and the invention of privacy

The National Museum of Computing: EDSAC Shortlisted for prestigious ICON Award

Ptak Science Books: Heavy Electricity, 1879

Conciatore: Vitrum Flexile

Teyler’s Museum: Sound Synthesizer, after Helmholtz, Rudolph Koenig Paris

Vox: 7 horrifying attempts at building a better mousetrap

Yes, this is an actual mousetrap patent from 1882. Google patents

Yes, this is an actual mousetrap patent from 1882.
Google patents

Barron’s: Optical Inventions Opened the Modern World (google title and click on first link to circumnavigate pay wall!)

BBC: Flying Scotsman nearing end of decade-long overhaul

The York Press: Flying Scotsman restoration enters final stage

The New York Times: The Bicycle and the Ride to Modern America

Canadian Science and Technology Museum: Cycling: The Evolution of an Experience, 1818–1900

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 19 July – Percy Spencer and the Microwave Oven

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Nature: Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace

Embryo Project: Friedrich Tiedemann (1781–1861)

Environmental History Resources: Timeline of environmental history

Recipes Project: How to brew beer with a ‘paile of cold water’

The Bigger Picture: William Stimpson and the Smithsonian’s First Aquarium

An aquarium has recently become “a necessary luxury in every well-appointed household, both of Europe and America.” Henry D. Butler, The Family Aquarium (New York, 1858). Colored frontispiece, Biodiversity Heritage Library.

An aquarium has recently become “a necessary luxury in every well-appointed household, both of Europe and America.” Henry D. Butler, The Family Aquarium (New York, 1858). Colored frontispiece, Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Yovisto: Carl Woese and the Archaea

Embryo Project: Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov (Elie Metchnikoff) (1845–1916)

big think: Charles Darwin Would Be Ashamed of ‘Social Darwinism’

History of the Marine Biological Laboratory: The MBL Embryology Course 1939

Smithsonian Libraries: The Body Electric: Inspiring Frankenstein

OUP Blog: Alice down the microscope

Down the Microscope and what Alice found there. Biochemical Society, December 1927 by the Wellcome Library, London. CC-BY-4.0 - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/alice-microscope/#sthash.t8XwoS6I.dpuf

Down the Microscope and what Alice found there. Biochemical Society, December 1927 by the Wellcome Library, London. CC-BY-4.0 – See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/alice-microscope/#sthash.t8XwoS6I.dpuf

The Royal Society: The Repository: A bad break in the Lakes

The New York Times: David M. Raup, Who Transformed Field of Paleontology, Dies at 82

David M. Raup in 1981. Credit William Franklin McMahon/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

David M. Raup in 1981. Credit William Franklin McMahon/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

Why Evolution is True: David M. Raup, 1933–2015

The Nation: Can We Cure Genetic Diseases Without Slipping Into Eugenics?

AMNH: Epitonium scalare

10 Things Wrong With Environmental Thinking: The Pastoral, literal and environmental, defined

NPR: The Salt: We Didn’t Build This City on Rock’N’Roll. It Was Yogurt

Data is Science: Thomas Sopwith’s Stratigraphic Models

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 13 July – August Kekulé

1979 East German stamp of Kekulé, in honour of the sesquicentennial of his birth. Source: Wikimedia Commons

1979 East German stamp of Kekulé, in honour of the sesquicentennial of his birth.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

storify: Science on Tap: A History of the Chemical Elements for (Big) Kids

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Ether Wave Propaganda: If You Read Joseph Agassi, Man and Nature Become More Complex

Niche: ICHG 2015: History and Geography in a Digital Age

JHI Blog: The Archival Agenda: Thinking Through Scientific Archives at the Royal Society

Museum of HSTM Blog: Gillinson Room Project

storify: Science in Public 2015

Environmental History Resources:

Bishop Blog: Publishing replication failures: some lessons from history

THE: Can history and geography survive the digital age?

The History Vault: Reading Anatomy in Francis J. Cole’s Collection

Francis J Cole Source: Franklin, K. J

Francis J Cole
Source: Franklin, K. J

Conciatore: Montpellier

Public Domain Review: Cat Pianos, Sound-Houses, and Other Imaginary Musical Instruments

University of Leicester: From Citizen Science to Citizen Humanities – 19th Century history in the digital age

Punk Rock Operations Research: Life was simple before World War II. After that, we had systems

A view from the bridge: Of mud pies, muscle and science education

Faith and Wisdom in Science: The Faith and Wisdom in Science Story in Three Steps

Spitalfields Life: Kirby’s Eccentric Museum, 1820

This wonderful boy, who in early age outstripped all former calculators, was born in Morton Hampstead on 14th June 1806

This wonderful boy, who in early age outstripped all former calculators, was born in Morton Hampstead on 14th June 1806

ESOTERIC:

tspace.library.utoronto.ca: Cultural Uses of Magic in Fifteenth-Century England (pdf)

BOOK REVIEWS:

Philadelphia City Paper: “What’s the Matter with Pluto?”

arts_col_pluto_rgb

Back Re(Action): Eureka by Chad Orzel

Popular Science: The Lightness of Being – Frank Wilczek

Los Angeles Review of Books: James K. A. Smith on The Territories of Science and Religion

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Psychiatry in Communist Europe

Remedia: Charismatic Substances

CHF: Pure Intelligence: The Life of William Hyde Wollaston

Historiens de la santé: The Evolution of Forensic Psychiatry: History, Current Developments, Future Directions

Historiens de la santé: Plague and Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean World. The Ottoman Experience, 1347–1600

9781107013384

Wiley Online Library: The International Handbooks of Museum Studies

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Irish Tech Times: Boolean expressions: Art meets maths to celebrate George Boole bicentennial at Lewis Glucksman Gallery, UCC

tatsuo-miyajima-life-palace-tea-room-designboom-04

tatsuo-miyajima-life-palace-tea-room-designboom-04

George Boole 200: The Life and Legacy of George Boole

The Irish Times: George Boole exhibition opens in UCC to mark bicentennial

Royal College of Physicians: Re-framing disability: portraits from the Royal College of Physicians

Natural History Museum: Images of Nature

The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: Gold Last Chance closes 26 July 2015

The Royal Society: Seeing Closer: 350 years of microscopy 29 June–23 November 2015

THEATRE AND OPERA:

What’s on Stage: Jonathan Holloway’s Jekyll & Hyde Starts 28 July 2015

Winterbourne Opera: Gounod’s Faust 28 July–1 August 2015

Worthing Theatres: Dr Bunhead’s Secret Science Lab 24-25 July 2015

National Theatre: The Curious Incidence of the Dog in the Night-Time 21-29 July 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Wellcome Collection: Minds and Bodies 23 July 2015

Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy Evenings Every Friday

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Sex and the City

nowvenerealdiseases

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK:

Gregor Johann Mendel (20 July 1822 – 6 January 1884)

ZGS4F2

From the Album Benary

TELEVISION:

HSS: PBS Series to Portray the History of Chemistry

SLIDE SHOW:

BHL: Sloths!

VIDEOS:

Youtube: The History and Philosophy of Science in 6 Easy Steps – Intro

Fusion: Why would a scientist inject gonorrhoea pus into his own penis?

Youtube: Unnatural histories Amazon

Royal Society Objectivity

Youtube: The Phoenix Index

The Telegraph: Apollo 11:12 key steps to the moon in video

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Natural Histories

PODCASTS:

Filament Communication: Episode 3: Matthew Cobb on writing science history

Folger Shakespeare Library: The Shakespearean Moons of Uranus

British Academy: Who reads Geography or History anymore? The challenge of audience in a digital age

Big Picture Science: It’s All Relative

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Framing the Face: CfP: One-day workshop Friend’s Meeting House Euston Road London 28 November 2015

Royal Society: 4th Notes and Records Essay Award

Imperial & Global Forum: CfP: Colonialism, War & Photography

University of York: Medical History William Bynum Essay Prize

HSS: Preliminary Program 2015 History of Science Society Meeting San Francisco 19–22 November

University of Toronto: HPS100 Trailer – Why History & Philosophy of Science?

Wikimedia: Wikipedia Science Conference: The Henry Wellcome Auditorium London 2-3 September 2015

University of Wuppertal: CfP: Workshop: Early modern Jesuit science in a digital perspective – The Jesuit Science Network 26–27 November 2015

V&A Museum: On the Matter of Books and Records: Workshop: 23 November 2015 – Programme

University of Oxford: CfP: 6th SHAC Postgraduate Workshop: Alchemy and Chemistry in Sickness and in Health 30 October 2015

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Call for Reviewers

Advances in the History of Psychology: CfP: Special Issue of HoP on History of Psychotherapy in North and South America

 

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Manchester University: CHSTM: Taught master’s in history of science, technology and medicine Applications close 31 July 2015

Notches: Assistant Editor Positions at Notches

Eccles Centre for American Studies: Eccles Centre Writers in Residence – 2016 Awards Applications Open

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: Research Assistant #histMed

Jacobs Foundation: Jacobs Science Writers Fellowship

Atomic Heritage Foundation: Program Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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