Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #01

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #01

Monday 13 July 2015

EDITORIAL: 

Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list returns today, after a short break, with the first edition of its second year bringing you all the best that out editorial staff could sweep up of the histories of science, technology and medicine in the Internet over the last seven days. During that period many of our supporters and readers, who also supply much of the material collected here, were gathered together in Swansea for the annual conference of the BSHS discussing lots of interesting topics from the history of science. One central theme that is a principal interest of our long-suffering chief sub-editor was, how can science communicators use history of science?

Many of those present in Swansea are highly active on Twitter and tweeted this discussion in great detail. Katherine McAlpine, a curator, collected and storified those tweets and we present her efforts in place of an editorial for this edition.

storify: How do we tell the history of science?

As a bonus a couple of other BSHS15 tweet storifies.

storify: #bshs15 outtakes – the hype (and) en route

storify: #bshs15 The first full day

“It never helps historians to say too much about their working methods. For just as the conjuror’s magic disappears if the audience knows how the trick is done, so the credibility of scholars can be sharply diminished if readers learn everything about how exactly their books came to be written. Only too often, such revelations dispel the impression of fluent, confident omniscience; instead, they suggest that histories are concocted by error-prone human beings who patch together the results of incomplete research in order to construct an account whose rhetorical power will, they hope, compensate for gaps in the argument and deficiencies in the evidence.” – Keith Thomas h/t Sharon Howard

Quotes of the week:

“Your password must contain a ferrous metal, an embarrassing sexual memory, at least one Norse god and the seeds of its own destruction”. – @daniel_barker

“First rule of Thesaurus Club. You don’t talk, discuss, converse, speak, chat, confer, deliberate, gab, or gossip about Thesaurus Club”. – @SwedishCanary

“How long until we find out if Pluto has feathers?” – Tom Swanson {@Swansontea)

“”Genital” is an anagram of “gelatin.” I wonder who’s responsible for that”. – Allen Stairs (@AllenStairs)

“The pen is writier than the sword”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

 “People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” – A.A. Milne (Winnie-the-Pooh)

“Buying books would be a good thing if one could also buy the time to read them in.” – Schopenhauer

“Part of making progress in science is about recognizing which problems are ready to be solved” – Frank Wilczek h/t Philip Ball

“‘Easy’ is a word to describe other people’s jobs.” – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“When you treat people like children, you get children’s work.” – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“It’s tempting to cover up boring with polish, but it rarely works.” – Seth Godin h/t @JohnDCook

“I’ve never known any trouble that an hour’s reading didn’t assuage.” ― Charles de Secondate.

“A man is responsible for his ignorance.” ― Milan Kundera

“The print codex is merely one form of “the book.” It is mutable, in both text & form. The change agent is human, not technological”. Shannon Supple (@mazarines) Tweet from #sharp15

“The age of innocent faith in science and technology may be over.” Barry Commoner (1966). h/t Michael Egan (@EganHistory)

“Science is about as emotion-free as poetry”. – Tom McLeish (@mcleish_t)

“In science, most ideas are obvious. It’s how to TEST them that requires cleverness”. – John Hawks (@johnhawks)

“Since it pissed off so many nerds yesterday, let me reiterate: evolutionary psychology is shoddy science used to uphold retrograde beliefs”. – Bailey (@the_author)

“Nature composes some of her loveliest poems for the microscope and the telescope”. – Theodore Roszak h/t @hist_astro  

Birthdays of the Week:  

90th Anniversary of the Scopes Trial 10 July  Peddling and Scaling God and Darwin: Ninetieth Anniversary of the Scopes Trial

The teacher at the center of proceedings, John Thomas Scopes Source: Wikimedia Commons

The teacher at the center of proceedings, John Thomas Scopes
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The New York Times: The Scopes Trial: Remembering When Teaching Evolution Went to Court

Smithsonian.com: The Scopes Trial Redefined Science Journalism and Shaped It to What It Is Today

Robert Fitzroy born 5 July 1805

Stay Thirsty: A Conversation with Juliet Aykroyd about Darwin & Fitzroy

FitzRoy later in life (probably mid-fifties). Source: Wikimedia Commons

FitzRoy later in life (probably mid-fifties).
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dolly the Sheep

Embryo Project: Nuclear Transplantation

Dolly's taxidermied remains Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dolly’s taxidermied remains
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Embryo Project: Ian Wilmut (1944– )

Science Notes: Today in Science History – July 5 – Dolly the Sheep

Nikola Tesla born 10 July 1956

Mental Floss: The Time Nikola Tesla Paid for His Hotel Room With a “Death Ray”

Excluded Middle: Nikola Tesla’s Earthquake Machine

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 10 July – Nikola Tesla WSJ: The Wizard of Houston Street

Tesla wearing a folk costume, c. 1880 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tesla wearing a folk costume, c. 1880
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Engineering and Technology History Wiki: Initial Tesla Polyphase

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY:

Smithsonian.com: Urban Explorations: The Great Moon Hoax Was Simply a Sign of Its Time

Yovisto: Henrietta Swan Leavitt and the Light of the Cepheids

Yovisto: Macquorn Rankine and the Laws of Thermodynamics

arXiv.org: The Collaboration of Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein and his wife Mileva Maric Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein and his wife Mileva Maric
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Motherboard: A Visual Tribute to Isaac Newton’s ‘Principia’

Universe Today: Who Was Nicolaus Copernicus?

AHF: J. Carson Mark

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Dorothy Wilkinson’s Interview

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 7 July – Giuseppe Piazzi

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Ralph Gates’s Interview

Atlas Obscura: Cincinnati Observatory

Plutovian: Planet X is 1200 times bigger than Earth – approximately

academia.edu: Learned modesty and the first lady’s comet: a commentary on Caroline Herschel (1787) ‘An account of a new comet’

AIP: Oral Histories: John Wheeler – Session I

AHF: John Wheeler

The Irish Times: The Grubbs: 19th-century Irish stargazers

Thomas Grubb: his apparent lack of formal education did not prevent him from tinkering with telescopes and becoming an astronomical observer Source: Irish Times

Thomas Grubb: his apparent lack of formal education did not prevent him from tinkering with telescopes and becoming an astronomical observer
Source: Irish Times

The New York Times: Reaching Pluto, and the End of an Era of Planetary Exploration

Black Hills Pioneer: 50 years of deep discovery

Pugwash: The Russell-Einstein Manifesto 9 July 1955

Voices of Manhattan: Ray Gallagher’s Accounts of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Missions

APS Physics: This Month in Physics History: Einstein and Women

The New York Times: Venetia Phair Dies at 90; as a Girl, She Named Pluto

academia.edu: A Book, a Pen, and the Sphere: Reading Sacrobosco in the Renaissance

Muslim Heritage: Glances on Calendars and Almanacs in the Islamic Civilization

Traditional Turkish Calendar (1452). This kind of calendar was based on a cycle of 12 months, each corresponding to a different animal. This calendar for the year of the monkey by Hamdi Mustafa b. Sunbul was presented to Mehmed II. Topkapi Palace Museum Library, MS B 309.

Traditional Turkish Calendar (1452). This kind of calendar was based on a cycle of 12 months, each corresponding to a different animal. This calendar for the year of the monkey by Hamdi Mustafa b. Sunbul was presented to Mehmed II. Topkapi Palace Museum Library, MS B 309.

International Year of Light 2015 – Blog: Heaven on Earth

AHF: Remembering the Trinity Test

Christie’s The Art People: Newton, Sir Isaac (1643–1727) Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathematica

National Geographic: Why Do We Call Them the ‘Dog Days’ of Summer?

Phys.Org: What is Halley’s Comet?

Discover: The Man Who (almost) Discovered Pluto…and Also (Almost) Discovered the Expanding Universe

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

BHL: The Description de L’Égyte: The Savants of Napoleon’s Egyptian CampaignHilaire 3 Canadaland: Q&A with Paul Watson, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist, on why he just Resigned from the Toronto Star (The Franklin Ships Erebus & Terror)

Linguistic Geographies: The Gough Map of Great Britain

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Atlas Obscura: The Pest House Medical Museum

From the Hands of Quacks: The Reed Hearing Test

Clinical Curiosities: History of Medicine at BSHS15

Forbes: Why Were Cases Of Autism So Hard To Find Before the 1990s?

Yovisto: Camillo Golgi and the Golgi Apparatus

The Recipes Project: Of Quacks and Caustics

Titlepage: Novum lumen chirurgicum Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

Titlepage: Novum lumen chirurgicum
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org

Dr Alun Withey: Religion & the Sickness Experience in Early Modern Britain

Fiction Reboot–Daily Dose: Are we running out of Bodies? Dissection, Cadavers, and Medical Practice

Notches: The Sacred Precincts of Marital Bedrooms: Religion and the Making of Griswold

Embryo Project: Wilhelm His, Sr. (1831–1904)

Christie’s The Art People: The ‘Google Maps’ of the human body

Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: The Skeleton Trade: Life, Death and Commerce in Early Modern Europe

Circulating Now: Medieval Herbals in Movable Type dsc1853 Nautilus: The Split Personality of the Color Yellow

NPR: The Salt: From Medicine to Modern Revival: A History of American Whiskey, In Labels

Nain, Mam and Me: Allenburys hygienic baby bottle: a picture of domestic bliss Concocting History: The snake-goddess, the satyr and the parturient: Jean Chièze’s Hippocratic illustrations

TECHNOLOGY:

Motherboard: This Is What 70 Years of Computing Sounds Like

Conciatore: True Colors

Aldrovandi's pica marina Source: Conciatore

Aldrovandi’s pica marina
Source: Conciatore

Conciatore: Don Giovanni in Flanders

Conciatore: The Material of All Enamels

Teylers Museum: Berliner Gramophone 4 sound clips

Canada Science and Technology Museum: Cycling: The Evolution of an Experience, 1818–1900

Smithsonian.com: Five Epic Patent Wars That Don’t Involve Apple

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 11 July – NASA’s Skylab space station returns to Earth

BuzzFeed: 11 Female Inventors Who Helped Power The Information Age

Harry Kalish / Chemical Heritage Foundation (CC BY-SA 3.0) / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Harry Kalish / Chemical Heritage Foundation (CC BY-SA 3.0) / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Wordnik: Come Fly With Me: 9 Common Words with Aviation Origins

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Wallace Medal LA Times: Alexander von Humboldt: The man who made modern nature

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Ernst Mayr

MSN News: The story of John Money: Controversial sexologist grappled with the concept of gender

Yovisto: Albert von Kölliker and the Origins of Embryology

xroads.viginia.edu: Alexander Wilson

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 6 July – Rabies Vaccine

Evolution Institute: Truth and Reconciliation for Social Darwinism

The Sloane Letters Blog: The Sad Kiss of 1722

Atlas Obscura: Thomas Jefferson Built This Country on Mastodons

Drawing of an early 19th century attempt at a mammoth restoration. Note the upside-down tusks. (Image: WikiCommons/Public Domain)

Drawing of an early 19th century attempt at a mammoth restoration. Note the upside-down tusks. (Image: WikiCommons/Public Domain)

The Alfred Russel Wallace Website: Early evolution pioneers’ artwork now online

The H-Word: Sexism in science: did Watson and Crick really steal Rosalind Franklins’ data?

Wonders & Marvels: History is Sometimes Made by Great Men (and Women)

Embryo Project: Studies in Spermatogenesis (1905), by Nettie Maria Stevens

PRI: Meet the man who gave the name to the creatures we now know as dinosaurs

Medievalist.net: Avalanches in the Middle Ages

Tand Online (OA): The Rat-Catcher’s Prank: Interspecies Cunningness and Scavenging in Henry Mayhew’s London

Cambrian News Online: 17th century nature under the microscope

Paige Fossil History: Additional Pieces of Neandertal 1: History Aiding Science

The Guardian: Conjoined piglets and two-faced kittens: Victorian oddities ­– in pictures

Preserved conjoined piglets, European, 19th century Photograph: Rosamund Purcell

Preserved conjoined piglets, European, 19th century
Photograph: Rosamund Purcell

The Recipes Project: A Cartography of Chocolate

Medievalist.net: Medievalist helps scientists rewrite climate records

Niche: ICHG 2015: Environmental, but not necessarily environmental history

The Scientist: Water Fleas, 1755

CHEMISTRY:

Open Culture: Marie Curie’s Research Papers Are Still Radioactive 100+ Years Later

Science Notes: Today in Science History – 9 July – Loenzo Romano Carlo Avogadro di Quarengna e di Cerreto

Back Re(Action): Liquid Helium

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (left) and Johannes Diderik van der Waals in 1908 in the Leiden physics laboratory, in front of the apparatus used later to condense helium. (Source: Museum Boerhaave, Leiden)

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (left) and Johannes Diderik van der Waals in 1908 in the Leiden physics laboratory, in front of the apparatus used later to condense helium. (Source: Museum Boerhaave, Leiden)

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Nautilus: The Nautilus Weekly Science Quiz: How Much Science Is In The Constitution?

The Recipe Project: First Monday Library Chat: The Boots Archive

Niche: ICHG 2015: Big Ideas in Historical Geography and “Door Crashers”

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Scholars Spin Their Own Nursery Rhymes (Without the Happy Endings)

Jack and Jill Went up the hill To fetch a pail of water and met an anonymous peer reviewer they threw down the well   Douglas Hunter

Nautilus: How Science Helped Write the Declaration of Independence

flickr: University of Victoria Libraries

The Telegraph: A Clerk of Oxford’s guide to a bright old world

homunculus: Does anyone have any questions?

Royal Society: Conservative attitudes to old-established organs: Oliver Lodge and Philosophical Magazine

Digital Bodleian: Makes These Extraordinary Library Collection Available Online For The Very First Time…

Translation and Print: Translations and the making of Early English Print Culture (1473–1660)

CHF: Episode 200: Distillations Turns 200

PLOS Blogs: J. Andrew Bangham (1947–2014): Enterprising scientist who broke new ground in computational biology and image analysis

Andrew teaching in Italy

Andrew teaching in Italy

British Naval History: Why I Became a Historian: Peter Hore

Ether Wave Propaganda: The Benefits of Technology: Productivity as a Measure

ESOTERIC:

distillatio: On the word “Alchumy”, “Alconamye” and variations thereof in English

BOOK REVIEWS:

Popular Science: Chilled – Tom Jackson

Science Book a Day: The Door in the Dream: Conversations with Eminent Women in Science

Science Book a Day: The Earth: From Myths to Knowledge Krivine_TheEarth_JK_V3.indd British Journal for the History of Science: Book Reviews

TLS: Dissent of man: Piers J. Hale Political Descent: Malthus, mutualism, and the politics of evolution in Victorian England

Morbid Anatomy: The Call of Abandoned Souls: Guest Post and New Book By Ivan Cenzi of Bizzaro Bazar

The Financial Times: ‘A Beautiful Question’, by Frank Wilczek

The New York Review of Books: How You Consist of Trillions of Tiny Machines

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Indian Doctors in Kenya, 1895–1940: The Forgotten History index The Guardian: Colouring-in books boom continues with volume of mathematical patterns

Barnes & Nobel: History of Chemistry Books

Occult Minds: Forthcoming publications

ART & EXHIBITIONS

University of Lincoln: Exhibition to celebrate the life and legacy of George Boole forefather of the information age

Glucksman: Boolean Expressions: Contemporary art and mathematical expression 25 July–8 November 2015

John Craig Freeman: Platonic Solids

Gulf Times: Three great Muslim inventors

Shackleton 100: By Endurance we Conquer: The Polar Museum: Shackleton and his men 22 September 2015–18 June 2016

M Library Blogs: New Online Exhibit: Beer Brewing and Technology

Cecilia Brunson Projects: A Garden for Beatrix 20 May-July 24 2015

Lucia Pizzani A Garden for Beatrix Series

Lucia Pizzani A Garden for Beatrix Series

Life: Artatomy 5 June-6 September 2015

Science Museum: The Science and Art of Medicine

Grain: Album 31: Exhibition: 19 June-29 August 2015

The National Library of Wales: ‘The Secret Workings of Nature’ 7 July 2015–9 January 2016

Explore Art at Gracefield Arts Centre: Dumfries Crichton Royal – A Hidden Gem 18 July–22 August 2015

Chelmsford Museum: World of Wallace Last Chance closes 19 July

London Museum of Health and Medicine: The Riddle of Shock 17 July 2015–30 June 2016

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Young Vic: A Number 3 July-15 August 2015

Theatre Royal Haymarket: The Elephant Man 19 May-8 August 2015 246x380-TEM Arts Theatre: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein 14 July–31 July 2015

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Science Museum: Beyond Vision: Photography, Art and Science symposium 12 September 2015

The Guardian: Guardian Masterclasses: Everything you need to know about science communication

The Royal Institution: To infinity and beyond: the story of the spacesuit 30 July 2015

Shadow and Act: Film Based on Story of Black Women Mathematicians Who Worked for NASA During the Space Race, in the Works

Margot Lee Shetterly Image Credit: NASA/David C. Bowman

Margot Lee Shetterly
Image Credit: NASA/David C. Bowman

Morbid Anatomy Museum: Morbid Anatomy One Year Anniversary Festival of Arcane Knowledge and Devil’s Masquerade Party Fundraiser with MC Even Michelson!

Discover Medicine: Walking Tour: The Making of Thoroughly Modern Medicine

Discover Medicine: Walking Tour: Healers and Hoaxers

The List: Lecture: Faith and Wisdom in Science York Minster 22 July 2015

Bethlem Museum of the Mind: He Told Me That His Garden… 16 July 2015

PAINTINGS OF THE WEEK: “Newton” by William Blake, 1795–c. 1805

Newton 1795/c.1805 William Blake 1757-1827 Presented by W. Graham Robertson 1939 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N05058

Newton 1795/c.1805 William Blake 1757-1827 Presented by W. Graham Robertson 1939 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N05058

Dr. Philippe Pinel at the Salpêtrière, 1795 by Tony Robert-Fleury. Philippe_Pinel_à_la_Salpêtrière Pinel ordering the removal of chains from patients at the Paris Asylum.

TELEVISION:

Forbes: Review: ‘First Peoples’ Series Chronicles Origins And Spread of Modern Humans SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Revelations: The science of making a daguerreotype Museo Galileo: Pre-telescopic astronomy

Astronomy Central: Discovery: 100 Greatest Discoveries 1 of 9 Astronomy {History… Youtube: AHF: Trinity Test Preparations Youtube: AHF: Moving the Plutonium Core     RADIO:

BBC: HG and the H-Bomb

BBC: The Life Scientific: Dorothy Bishop

BBC Radio 4extra: Georg Mendel – A Monk and Two Peas

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Nuclear War Radio Series

BBC Radio 4:Science Stories: Seeing is Believing – The Leviathan of Parsonstown

PODCASTS:

Science Friday: The Ultimate Geek Road Trip

Route layout by Randal Olson

Route layout by Randal Olson

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

National Maritime Museum: Conference: Ways of Seeing 17 July 2015

St Anne’s College Oxford: Workshop: Texts and Contexts: The Cultural Legacies of Ada Lovelace 8 December 2015

University of Leeds: CfP: Alternative Histories of Electronic Music

George Boole 200: Get Involved: Celebrate the life and legacy of George Boole with UCC: Boole2School 2 November 2015

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy Conference 3-6 June 2016

Royal Society: Cells: from Robert Hooke to Cell Therapy – a 350 year journey 5-6 October 2015

Society for the Social History of Health: CfP: Health, Medicine and Mobility: International Migrations in Historical Perspective University of Prince Edward Island: 24-26 June 2016

Flamsteed Astronomy Society: Flamsteed Lecture

BSHS: Ayrton Prize

The Renaissance Diary: Call for Contributions: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

University of Bucharest: Master Class: Isaac Newton’s philosophical projects 6-11 October 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

The Royal Society: Newton International Fellowship

Royal Museums Greenwich: Curator of Cartography

University of Toronto: Assistant Professor – History of Technology

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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