Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #12

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #12

Monday 05 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

 Another week, another edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list, bringing you all of the histories of science, technology and medicine that could be scooped up from the distant reaches of cyberspace during the last seven days.

The week saw NASA announce that they had discovered mineral deposits on the surface of Mars that might have been made by flowing water. This announcement kicked off the expected hysteria of where there is water there will be life, as we know it. These reports set off alarm bells in my brain about Giovanni Schiaparelli, Percy Lowell and the canals of Mars.

1877 map of Mars by Giovanni Schiaparelli. Source: Wikimedia Commons

1877 map of Mars by Giovanni Schiaparelli.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Humanity has been obsessed with Mars and the possibility of there being Martians for a long time now and the NASA announcement didn’t just trigger memories in my brain and a number of people throughout the Internet wrote about the history of that obsession. So this edition of Whewell’s Gazette is dedicated to David Bowie’s famous musical question “Is there life on Mars?”

Martian channels depicted by Percival Lowell Source: Wikimedia Commons

Martian channels depicted by Percival Lowell
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 “This week in science: scientists broke the secret pact & talked about water on Mars, making the moon turn red. Now the great doom befalls us” – Ed Yong (@edyong209)

Mars

History Today: Roger Hennessy tells of a hundred years of investigation, imagination and speculation about live on Mars

Ptak Science Books: The Positively Enormous Skyscraper Plant Eyeballs of Mars, 1912

Source: via Chronicles of America series at the Library of Congress, here, and first seen via the interesting Pinterest collection of Trevor Owens, here. Ptak Science Books

Source: via Chronicles of America series at the Library of Congress, here, and first seen via the interesting Pinterest collection of Trevor Owens, here.
Ptak Science Books

The Conversation: NASA: streaks of salt on Mars mean flowing water, and raises new hopes of finding life

Popular Mechanics: A Short History of Martian Canals and Mars Fever

BibliOdyssey: Channelling Martian Maps

Source: BilbliOdyssey

Source: BilbliOdyssey

Scientific American: How Our View of Mars Has Changed from Lush Oasis to Arid Desert

News.com.au: My favourite Martian: behind the science is the story of why we love Mars

Not just little green men ... a scene from the Mars film John Carter.

Not just little green men … a scene from the Mars film John Carter.

“Water, water everywhere

Nor any drop to drink

‘Cause it was all saturated with perchlorate salts” – Rime of the Ancient Rover – Matthew R. Francis (@DrMRFrancis)

Quotes of the week:

“People say history is written by the winners, but actually history is written by historians, and most of them are losers”. – @The TweetOfGod

“’The ohm is where the art is’ is a brilliant title for an article” – Steven Gray (@Sjgray86)

“Everything’s connected, but some things are more connected than others”. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“We need to figure out if Jonas Salk was on the spectrum. Only then can we definitely say whether autism cause vaccines” – @WardQNormal h/t @stevesilberman

“If you don’t feel guilty about using maps and satnavs, don’t feel guilty about using introductory philosophy books and study guides” – Nigel Warburton (@philosophybites)

“Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas.” – Albert Einstein

“Almost all really new ideas have a certain aspect of foolishness when they are first produced”. – A. N. Whitehead h/t @PeterSjostedtH

BEAUTY TIP: Read a book

EMPATHY TIP: Read a book

EDUCATION TIP: Read a book

LOVE TIP: Read a book

HEALTH TIP: Read a book – Matt Haig (@matthaig1)

Birth of the Week:

The Space Race Began 4 October 1957

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Leaping Robot: Apprehending the Artifact

Yovisto: The Sputnik Shock

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Princeton University Press: Keep Watching the Skies!: The Story of Operation Moonwatch and the Dawn of the Space Age

NASA: NASA’s First 5o Years Historical Perspectives

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Youtube: Omnicron & the Sputnik

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Agenda.ge: Ancient astronomy manuscripts published in Georgia

Physics Today: Information: From Maxwell’s demon to Landauer’s eraser

Fermi.lib.uchicago.edu: Letter from Fermi to Szilard re: use of carbon to slow chain reaction

NASA: Alouette 1

The Alouette 1 satellite Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Alouette 1 satellite
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Outside Prague: The Astronomical Clock

AIP: Nobels of the Past

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 1 – NASA

Science News: The amateur who helped Einstein see the light

With some help from Science News Letter (the precursor to Science News), a restaurant dishwasher named Rudi Mandl persuaded Einstein to explore the phenomenon of gravitational lensing.

With some help from Science News Letter (the precursor to Science News), a restaurant dishwasher named Rudi Mandl persuaded Einstein to explore the phenomenon of gravitational lensing.

Radio Ne Zealand News: Rare telescope’s crucial lens survives quake

AIP: Otto Frisch

NASA: Dr. Robert H. Goddard, American Rocketry Pioneer

NASA: NASA “Hacks”: The Real Stories

El País: Un cura dio la “más bella explicación de la Creación”, según Einstein

The Atlantic: Standing the Test of Time (and Space)

WGBH News: Meet America’s First Woman Astronomer: Maria Mitchell

Maria Mitchell's telescope, at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. Credit Dpbsmith / WGBH News

Maria Mitchell’s telescope, at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.
Credit Dpbsmith / WGBH News

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Mary Rockwell’s Interview

flickr: Project Apollo Archive

Sky & Telescope: Beyond the Printed Page: Soviet Stamps and Astronomy

Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings: Niels Henrik David Bohr

Museum Victoria Collections: Astrographic Catalogue

AIP: Happy Birthday Enrico Fermi

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Atlas Obscura: The Maps That Helped The Citizens of a ‘Locked Country’ See The World

Half of “Screens of the Four Continents and People in 48 Countries in the World,” by an unknown Edo-era Japanese painter. (All images: Kobe City Museum/Google Cultural Institute)

Half of “Screens of the Four Continents and People in 48 Countries in the World,” by an unknown Edo-era Japanese painter. (All images: Kobe City Museum/Google Cultural Institute)

D News: 1500-Year-Old Mosaic Map Found

Slate: A Bizarrely Complicated Late-19th-Century Flat-Earth Map

The Hakluyt Society Blog: Australia Circumnavigated: The Story of the HMS Investigator

The Shakespeare Blog: Mapping Shakespeare’s world

The Sheldon tapestry map of Worcestershire

The Sheldon tapestry map of Worcestershire

Halley’s Log: Back in the Thames

Halley’s Log: Halley’s third logbook

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

History Today: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson passed her medical exams on September 18th 1865

Thomas Morris: Speaking in tongues

From the Hands of Quacks: Can Vitamin B Cure Deafness

Smithsonian.com: The Nose Job Dates Back to the 6th Century B.C.

Wellcome Trust: A Brief History of Childbirth: Exploring the National Childbirth Trust Archives

Remedia: The Window Operation: Hope through Surgery

Cross-section of the inner ear, showing the ossicles–mallelus, incus, and stapes. Illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter for Henry Gray, “Anatomy of the Human Body ” (Philadelphia & New York: Lea & Febiger, 1918), plate 919.

Cross-section of the inner ear, showing the ossicles–mallelus, incus, and stapes. Illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter for Henry Gray, “Anatomy of the Human Body ” (Philadelphia & New York: Lea & Febiger, 1918), plate 919.

Medium: Scurvy Dogs

Embryo Project: The Pasteur Institute (1887– )

Public Domain Review: Kaishi Hen, an 18th Century Japanese anatomical atlas

Early Modern Medicine: Dog Danger

Thomas Morris: The child with Bonaparte in his eyes

Wellcome Collection: Hysteria

Gross Science: The Horrors of Ancient Cataract Surgery

tumblr_nv59naD4s61sxczrdo1_1280

Countway Library of Medicine: The Archives for Women in Medicine

Concocting History: Strong as a mountain

Forbes: Ancient Pompeiians Had Good Dental Health But Were Not Necessarily Vegetarians

This Intrepid Band: More Misdeeds of Military Nurses

Embryo Project: The Effects of Thalidomide on Embryonic Development

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog: History of Midwifery

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 2 – Baruj Benacerraf

Science Museum: Brought to Life: Seishu Hanaoka (1760–1835)

Perspectives: The art of medicine: Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Body Snatcher

MBL History Project: “By living we learn.” Happy Birthday Sir Patrick Geddes!

Embryo Project: Marie Charlotte Stopes (1880–1958)

Marie Stopes in her laboratory, 1904 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Marie Stopes in her laboratory, 1904
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Thomas Morris: Electrical anaesthesia

Bustle: The Average Age Women Got Their First Period, Throughout History

Mosaic: How to mend a broken heart

Thomas Morris: The petrol cocktail: a cure for cholera

TECHNOLOGY:

Medievalists.net: Rapid Invention, Slow Industrialization, and the Absent Entrepreneur in Medieval China

Open Culture: The World’s Oldest Surviving Pair of Glasses (circa 1475)

Yale Books: Dirty Old London: 30 Days of Filth: Day 13 Deodorising and Flushing

Thomas Morris: Top Gear (steam edition)

Atlas Obscura: The Rise and Fall of the Cash Railway

Inside the Lamson ball, from a 1912 Lamson catalogue. (Image: Tony Wolf)

Inside the Lamson ball, from a 1912 Lamson catalogue. (Image: Tony Wolf)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 29 – Rudolf Diesel Mystery

Airminded: The oscillation of R33

Conciatore: The Art of Metals

Conciatore: The Blue Tower

Medium: Backchannel: How Steve Jobs Fleeced Carly Fiorina

Quartz: Not Enough for Goodenough: The man who brought us the lithium-ion battery at the age of 57 has an idea for a new one at 92

Yovisto: Tōkaidō Shinkansen – the Bullet Train

Tōkaidō Shinkansen passing tea fields between Shizuoka and Kakegawa

Tōkaidō Shinkansen passing tea fields between Shizuoka and Kakegawa

Yovisto: The Unfortunate Inventions of Charles Cros

IEEE Spectrum: When Engineers Had the Stars in Their Eyes

News Works: Sound it out: the (sometimes creepy) history of the talking machine

Slate: What Could Go Wrong?

Collectors Weekly: Rise of the Synthesizer: How an Electronics Whiz Kid Gave the 1980s Its Signature Sound

Paleofuture: Drunk Driving and The Pre-History of Breathalysers

BBC News: Drawings reveal Germans’ World War Two boobytrap bombs

One of Fish's drawings shows an Army mess tin adapted for nefarious purposes Picture: Anthony Thompson TWN

One of Fish’s drawings shows an Army mess tin adapted for nefarious purposes
Picture: Anthony Thompson TWN

BBC News: Dorman Long: The Teesside firm that bridged the world

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 31 – Joseph Wilson Swan

United States Patent and Trademark Office: A. C. Reid Handset Telephone

BBC News: The lost rivers that lie beneath London

Ian Visits: Unbuilt London: Straightening the River Thames

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Making Science Public: The pause

Ptak Science Books: Charting the Winds: a Superb Anemographic Chart from 1598

ChoM News: New Acquisitions: Rose E. Frisch Papers

Slate: The Great September Gale of 1815

TrowelBlazers: Lucy Allen: Curator and Librarian

Lucy Allen Smart, 1955. This photo is reproduced here under the Central Library Consortium's fair use policy; may not be used for commercial purposes without contacting copyright holder.

Lucy Allen Smart, 1955. This photo is reproduced here under the Central Library Consortium’s fair use policy; may not be used for commercial purposes without contacting copyright holder.

NYAM: Censoring Leonhart Fuchs: Examples from the New York Academy of Medicine

Notches: “A promiscuous class of females. All huddled together in a mass”: Sex and Food in the Nineteenth-Century American Metropolis

University of Cambridge Museums: The Next Big Leap at the Whipple

io9: Which Animals Did Nuclear Scientists Pick to Represent the Entire World?

Science League of America: Did Darwin Know “Acres of Diamonds”?

Circulating Now: A German Botanical Renaissance

Perspectives on History: An Environmental History of the Real Thing

The Guardian: Calling all palaeo bloggers! Do you ant to write for the Guardian science blog network

Forbes: How Geologists Determined The Way That Mountains Formed

The mountains around the Urnersee, from Scheuchzer´s “Helvetiae Stoicheiographia” published in 1716 (image in public domain).

The mountains around the Urnersee, from Scheuchzer´s “Helvetiae Stoicheiographia” published in 1716 (image in public domain).

Mommoth Tales: Mammoth in the News: Michigan Edition

Scientific American: Tetrapod Zoology: Piltdown Man and the Dualist Contention

Wired: The Battle Over Genome Editing Gets Science All Wrong

The Leakey Foundation: Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey

Science Insider: Q&A: Francis Crick’s granddaughter on her genomic sculpture

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 28 – Henri Moissan

News Work: A Nobel Prize for noble gasses

William Ramsay in 1904 (Munn & Co./Appleton's Magazine)

William Ramsay in 1904 (Munn & Co./Appleton’s Magazine)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 4 – Mole

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

History Matters: Voices from 1915: Public Engagement with the First World War

New HSS: Sleep Laboratories, Psychiatry in Penguin Books, & More

Mersenne: Heroic Journeys? Networks of women scientists in the late nineteenth and twentieth century: Conference Report

The Renaissance Mathematicus: The Penny Universities

Coffeehouse in London, 17th century Source: Wikimedia Commons

Coffeehouse in London, 17th century
Source: Wikimedia Commons

ChoM News: Archivist attends “Women in Biotech” symposium at Radcliffe Institute

Chronologia Universalis: A Moment of Wonder: Overlapping Networks

Chronologia Universalis: Pervolvi totum librum…

JCOM: Ships, Clocks and Stars: The Quest for Impact

Deathplanation: Publishing with Integrity (Whilst Still Having Career Options)

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Political correctness and the history of science

The Conversation: Jesuits as science missionaries for the Catholic Church

BBC Culture: The places the world forgot (includes several #histSTM sites)

Flanders and Brabant power station, Belgium Source: BBC

Flanders and Brabant power station, Belgium
Source: BBC

The Recipes Project: The Digital Humanities Turn

THE: What it’s like to work with the academic greats

MHS Oxford: Newsletter – October 2015

The Harvard Crimson: Gathering the Galleries

Medieval Books: The Incredible Expandable Book

Wired: The Nobel Committee Hasn’t Always Picked the Right Winners

THE: Progressive Science Institute challenges researcher ‘bias’

Nautilus: Why Science Needs Metaphysics

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Alchemy of Plants

Compasswallah: Annie Besant: The Occult Freedom Fighter

Annie Besant Source: Wikimedia Commons

Annie Besant
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Academia: Physics in the Twelfth Century: The Porta Elementorum of Pseudo-Avicenna’s Alchemical De Anima and Marius’ De Elementis

Sociatas Magia: A Medieval Charm with Music

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Space Review: A Sky Wonderful with Stars: 50 Years of Modern Astronomy on Maunakea

Thinking Like a Mountain: Food, Inc: Mendel to Monsanto – The Promises and Perils of the Biotech Harvest

Public Domain Review: Bad Air: Pollution, Sin, and Science Fiction in William Delisle Hay’s The Doom of the Great City (1880)

Front cover of Hay’s The Doom of the Great City Source: The British Library

Front cover of Hay’s The Doom of the Great City
Source: The British Library

The New York Times: Sunday Book Review: ‘The Invention of Nature,’ by Andrea Wulf

Dissertation Reviews: Chemistry in Imperial and Weimar Germany

Geographical: Alfred Russel Wallace; Letters from the Malay Archipelago OUP

The Dispersal of Darwin: Darwin on Evolution: Words of Wisdom from the Father of Evolution  

Popular Science: 13.8: the quest to find the true age of the universe and the theory of everything John Gribbin

Los Angeles Review of Books: Paula Findlen on Galileo’s Telescope: A European Story

Archives of Natural History: Benton, Ted: Alfred Russel Wallace: explorer, evolutionist, public intellectual – a thinker for our own times?

Science News: Centennial books illuminate Einstein’s greatest triumph

NEW BOOKS:

Vrin: Psychologie et psychologisme

Enfilade: Scenes of Projection: Recasting the Enlightenment Subject

image-3

Historiens de la santé: Bretonneau: Correspondance d’un médicine

NCSE: The Story of Life in 25 Fossils

Emotions Blog: History in British Tears

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Nature: Space Travel: When Soviets ruled the great beyond

MHS Oxford: ‘Dear harry…’ – Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Extended till 31 January 2016

CHF: Science at Play On view through September 2 2016

Skil-Craft No. 430 Microscope Chemistry Lab, ca. 1955. CHF Collections. Photo by Gregory Tobias.

Skil-Craft No. 430 Microscope Chemistry Lab, ca. 1955. CHF Collections. Photo by Gregory Tobias.

Massachusetts Historical Society: Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Closes 25 October 2015

Hunterian Glasgow: The Kangaroo and the Moose 2 October 2015–21 February 2016

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph 51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Etcetera Theatre: LHF: The Devil Without 13–18 October 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Wellcome Collection: ‘The Thing is …Beards!’ 15th October 2015

World Health Organization Global Health Histories: Webinar: Ebolar: exploring the cultural contexts of an epidemic 8 October 2015

Royal Museums Greenwich: Plague takeover 21 November 2015

Royal Society: Cells: from Robert Hooke to Cell Therapy – a 350 year journey 5_6 October 2015

Royal Astronomical Society: Fred Hoyle Birth Centennial – his remarkable career and the impact of his science 9 October 2015

A statue of Fred Hoyle at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge Source: Wikimedia Commons

A statue of Fred Hoyle at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Providence Public Library: Exploring the Eye of History: NEA Symposium on 19th Century Photography 7 November 2015

Dittrick Museum: Lecture: The Eye as Art: Anatomy and Vision in the 18th Century 14 October 2015

CHoM News: Celebrating 10 Years of the Archive for Women in Medicine 7 November 2015

Musée Claude Bernard: Colloque: Claude Bernard et le diabète 10 Octobre 015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour One for the Road!

Museum of the History of Science: Sacrifice of a Genius Tonight!

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Joaquin Sorolla 1863- 1923 Doctors Laboratory, an investigation, Oil on canvas

Joaquin Sorolla 1863- 1923 Doctors Laboratory, an investigation, Oil on canvas

TELEVISION:

BBC 2: Bletchley Park: Code-breaking’s Forgotten Genius

Gordon Welchman Source: Wikimedia Commons

Gordon Welchman
Source: Wikimedia Commons

AHF: “Manhattan” Season One Recaps

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Museo Galileo: Eudoxus’s system

Youtube: Royal Society: Science stories – Small

Youtube: Interview with J. Robert Oppenheimer

Youtube: The Royal Institution: Quantum Physics and Universal Beauty – with Frank Wilczek

Youtube: Polio Hero Frank Shimada

Youtube: Gilbert White: The Nature Man (2006) May Vision International

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Natural History Heroes

PODCASTS:

The Diane Rehm Show: Andrea Wulf: “The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies: Symposium: Early Modern Journeys: Practice and Everyday Experiences of Travel, 1450–1800 15-16 October 2015

University of Leeds: Centre for HPS: HPS Seminars, Semester 1, 2015-2016

Harnack House Berlin: The 100th anniversary of Einstein’s field equations 30 November–2 December 2015

ChoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine: Madness and Mayhem in Maine: The Parkman-Portland Parley and a Mass Murder 12 November 2015

ChoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine: War and Human Nature in Modern America 17 December 2015

ChoM News: Studying Traumatic Wounds and Infectious Diseases in the Civil War Hospitals: The Medical Photography of the American Civil War 19 November 2015

Historiens de la santé: CfP: ISCHE 38 Education and the Body

University of Kent: CfP: Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Contexts 7-10 July 2016

IHPST: 1st Regional IHPST Conference: Science as Culture in the European Context: Historical, Philosophical, and Educational Perspectives Flensburg Germany 22–25 August 2015

Oxford Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine, and technology: Michaelmas Term 2015

HSS: THATCamp: The History of Science Society hosts its second annual THATCamp on November 19 2015 San Francisco

The Haluyt Society: Conference: Maritime Trade, Travel and Cultural Encounter in the 18th and 19th Centuries 13–14 November 2015

University of Birmingham: History of Medicine and Health Seminars

UCL STS: Seminar Series

University of Vienna: CfP: Claiming authority, producing standards: The IAEA and the history of radiation protection 3–4 June 2016

Maynooth University: HSTM Network Ireland Inaugral Conference 13–14 November 2015

Birkbeck College University of London: CfP: After the End of Disease 26–27 May 2016

University of Edinburgh: CfP: Eighteenth–Century Research Seminars Series 2016

University of London: School of Advance Study EMPHASIS Seminar: Amateurs and Authorship: Oronce Fine’s Projection of a Republic of Mathematics 17 October 2015

Oronce Fine Source: Wikimedia Commons

Oronce Fine
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Res Philosophica: CfP: Res Philosophica Essay Prize: Philosophy of Disability

The Warburg Institute: Colloquia 2015–2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Huddersfield: Research Assistant in History of Health or Medicine

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Awards in the Science Museums and Archives Consortium (SMAC) from October 2016

H-Sci-Med-Tech: Fully Funded PhD Studentship – Science and Religion in Society

Ohio State University Department of History: Assistant or Associate Professor in Environmental History and Sustainability

University of Harvard: Tenure–track Assistant Professor History of Pre-Modern or Early Modern Science or Medicine

University of Groningen: Netherlands Research School for Medieval Studies: 4 PhD Positions: Communication and Exploitation of Knowledge in the Middle Ages

Oxford Brookes University: PhD Studentships

University of Copenhagen: Professor of History and Philosophy of Science

Think Oxford: Over 1000 Scholarships

University of London: Research fellowships in cultural and intellectual history

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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