Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #13

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #13

Monday 12 October 2015

EDITORIAL:

 If you’ve been holding your breath, you can breathe out now, as the thirteenth edition of the second year of the weekly #histSTM links list, Whewell’s Gazette, is finally here. Putting aside their triskaidekaphobia our editorial team has collected together all that they could find on the histories of science, technology and medicine in the vast reaches of cyberspace over the last seven days.

Whenever I write a blog post or research a lecture, sooner or later I will almost always make a pilgrimage to consult the volumes of the Dictionary of Scientific Biography, a cornucopia of history of science information presented at the highest levels of scholarship. This invaluable tool of historical research was put together under the editorship of Charles Coulston Gillispie one of the giants of post Second World War history of science. Beyond the DSB Gillispie was a important historian of science writing mostly about eighteenth-century French science, whilst teaching and establishing the history of science department at Princeton University.

Charles Gillispie died on 6 October at the age of 97. In the DSB he left behind a monument in the history of science that others will struggle to equal and with this thought I would like to humbly dedicate this edition of Whewell’s Gazette to him.

Charles Coulston Gillispie 6 August 1918­ – 6 October 2015 Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Charles Coulston Gillispie
6 August 1918­ – 6 October 2015
Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

News at Princeton: Charles Gillispie, trailblazer in the history of science, dies at 97

NCSE: Charles Coulston Gillispie dies

facebook: Marco Berratta: Charles Gillispie Obituary

Quotes of the week:

The *Great Man of Science* is a myth. They all had collaborators that disappeared from history. – Andrew David Thaler (@SFriedScientist)

“Sir Humphrey Davy was asked to name the greatest discovery he’d ever made. He answered “Michael Faraday””. – Verity Burke (@VerityBurke)

“‘thank God! there is no drinking of coffee [in the next world], and consequently no waiting for it.’”—De Quincey, quoting Kant h/t @GuyLongworth

“I’m a scientist. I don’t want to people to accept that what I say is accurate. I want to give them the tools to find out for themselves”. – John Hawks (@johnhawks)

“We must labour to find out what things are in themselves by our owne experience … not what another sayes of them” – John Wilkins 1640 h/t @felicityhen

“Science doesn’t suffer fools, but it can make fools suffer.” – Richard Hammond

h/t @Pillownaut

“Nothing more ruins the world than a conceit that a little knowledge is sufficient.” – Thomas Traherne. h/t @telescoper

“50 yrs from now, people will see the discovery of exoplanets as a major development in #HistSTM” – Patrick McCray (@LeapingRobot)

“The only reason that christianity imagined hell as a pit of fire is because Christ was born too early to experience a bus full of teens”. – Marc Girard Alleyn (@StevenAlleyn)

“Is it too much to ask for conference coffee that isn’t brown pisswater? Where is my Black Ichor of Awakeness?” Ed Yong (@edyong209)

“I rather like “defy the facts”. Ignorance is strength”. – Guy Longworth (@GuyLongworth)

“Shit doesn’t just happen. Shits make it happen”. – Peter Coles (@telescoper)

Wren quote

6 October was National Badger Day

A badger, as illustrated in Histoire Naturelle des Mammiféres, 1824-57. (1257.l.1-4)

A badger, as illustrated in Histoire Naturelle des Mammiféres, 1824-57.
(1257.l.1-4)

Birthdays of the Week:

Robert Goddard born 5 October 1882

Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1882. The phyicist determinedly pursued his spaceflight obsession.

Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1882. The phyicist determinedly pursued his spaceflight obsession.

Barron Hilton Pioneers of Flight Gallery: Robert Hutchins Goddard

NASA: Goddard Space Flight Center: Dr. Robert H. Goddard, American Rocketry Pioneer

Niels Bohr born 7 October 1885

 Niels Bohr on G. Gamow's motorcycle, with his wife Margrethe sitting behind. Photo credit Emilio Segrè Visual Archives h/t Alex Wellerstein

Niels Bohr on G. Gamow’s motorcycle, with his wife Margrethe sitting behind.
Photo credit Emilio Segrè Visual Archives
h/t Alex Wellerstein

“An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made, in a narrow field”. – Niels Bohr h/t @ChemHeritage

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 7 – Niels Bohr

AIP: Niels Bohr – Session I

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Cambridge University Library Special Collections Blog: ‘It’s all in a day’s work’: the Royal Greenwich Observatory Audio-Visual Collection, Stories of Observatory Life

Cosmos: Émilie du Châtelet: the woman science forgot

Particle Decelerator: New Zealand recognised as major contributor to radio astronomy history

Physics Today: Seeing dark matter in the Andromeda galaxy

Vera Rubin Source: Physics Today

Vera Rubin
Source: Physics Today

Conciatore: A Fast Calendar

Collect Space: Astronaut Sally Ride’s personal items and papers acquired by Smithsonian

ahram online: Mars, the invincible planet

ethw.org: George Westinghouse AIEE membership application

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 6 – Ernest Walton

Atlas Obscura: These Atomic Tourists Have Visited 160 Forgotten Nuclear Sites Across the U.S.

NASA History: James E. Webb

Pasadena Star-News: Astronomy: These women were ‘human computers’ before they were allowed to be astronomers

AHF: Operation Plumbbob – 1957

AEON: Light dawns

Scientific American: 20 Years Later – a O&A with the first Astronomer to Detect a Planet Orbiting Another Sun

Independent: Prague Astronomical Clock: Three things you probably didn’t know about today’s Google Doodle

Prague astronomical clock Source: Wikimedia Commons

Prague astronomical clock
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Heavy: Prague Astronomical Clock: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Gizmodo: Prague Astronomical Clock Celebrated by Google Doodle on its 605th Birthday

The Guardian: A Fife church minister first imagined space flight – beating Jules Verne

AHF: Britain’s Early Input – 1940–41

IET Blog: The Great Melbourne Telescope

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Neglected Niigata

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 11 – James Prescott Joule

AHF: The Einstein Letter – 1939

Dannen.com: Einstein to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939

BLink: Mystery of the starry sphere

Too big for the palm: Emperor Jahangir is shown holding a globe in this Mughal-era painting. The globe is believed to have been made by metallurgist Muhammad Salih Tahtawi. Photo: Wikipedia

Too big for the palm: Emperor Jahangir is shown holding a globe in this Mughal-era painting. The globe is believed to have been made by metallurgist Muhammad Salih Tahtawi. Photo: Wikipedia

AIP: Robert Marshak

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Ptak Science Books: Blank and Missing Things: a Map of Missing people of Europe and Russia, 1881

University of Cambridge: Digital Library: Oppidium Cantebrigiae

British Library: Maps and views blog: Drawing Lines across Africa – from the War Office Archive

World Digital Library: Map of Louisiana, View of New Orleans

The French royal engineer, de Beauvilliers, drew this 1720 map of the entire hydrographic network of the Mississippi River Source: World Digital Library

The French royal engineer, de Beauvilliers, drew this 1720 map of the entire hydrographic network of the Mississippi River
Source: World Digital Library

A Thoroughly Anglophile Journal: The Center of Space and Time, and History

Geographicus Rare Antique Maps: 1650 Jansoon Wind Rose, Anemographic Chart, or Map of the Winds

Factum Arte: Terra Forming: Engineering the Sublime

Atlas Obscura: Found: 39 Maps from the Mid-1800s That ‘Show Chicago Being Born’

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Yovisto: James Lind and a Cure for Scurvy

Vice: How One Man Ran the World’s Only Menstruation Museum from his Basement

The first-ever Kotex advertisement, from January 1921

The first-ever Kotex advertisement, from January 1921

Thomas Morris: The case of the luminous patients

Remedia: Roaring Horses, Lame Dogs and the Re-framing of British Veterinary Surgery

Medievalists.net: Medieval Viagara [sic]

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: “Secta Empírica y Domáticos Racionales”: medicine and the ESD in early modern Spain II

BBC Future: It’s time we dispelled these myths about autism

Conciatore: The Duke’s Mouthwash

The Conversation: Could ancient textbooks be the source of the next medical breakthrough

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR). 1967-68

Circulating Now: Radam’s Microbe Killer: Advertising Cures for Tuberculosis

Advertisement in Roanoke Times, March 28, 1894

Advertisement in Roanoke Times, March 28, 1894

ph.ucla.edu: On The Inhalation of the Vapour of Ether in Surgical Operations (pdf)

Philly.com: Remember what ‘Aunt Sammy’ said … about babies and drafts?

The Recipes Project: From Bloodstone to Fish Soup: Iron Recipes

TECHNOLOGY:

Yovisto: John Atanasoff and the first Electronic Computer

Yovisto: Christiaan Huygens and the Pocket Watch

Atlas Obscura: The Simple, Elegant History of the Swiss Army Knife

Modell 1890, the first Swiss Soldier Knife produced by Wester & Co. Solingen. (Photo: Cutrofiano/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

Modell 1890, the first Swiss Soldier Knife produced by Wester & Co. Solingen. (Photo: Cutrofiano/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 3.0)

Engineering & Technology History Wiki: Reginald A. Fessenden Biography

BBC News: Forth Bridge ‘is Scotland’s favourite engineering work’

Atlas Obscura: Kansas Barbed Wire Museum

Conciatore: Antonio Who?

Yale Books Blog: Dirty Old London: 30 Days of Filth: Day 29: The Great Exhibition Toilet Myth

Pioneers of Flight: Amelia Earhart and Eleanor Roosevelt flying from Washington, D.C. to Baltimore

Amelia Earhart and Eleanor Roosevelt flying from Washington, DC to Baltimore in 1933

Amelia Earhart and Eleanor Roosevelt flying from Washington, DC to Baltimore in 1933

Ptak Science Books: A Massively Geared “Tricycle” of 1879

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Dispersal of Darwin: Article: Exploration and Exploitation of Victorian Science in Darwin’s Reading Notebooks

Dispersal of Darwin: Article: Flattening the World: Natural Theology and the Ecology of Darwin’s Orchids

Gizmodo: Here’s the Drawing That Proved the Earth has a Solid Core

1460648158338612877

Engineering Life: Putting synthetic biology in historical context: Becoming a Tralfamadorian

The Scientist: The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

Notches: The Hunger of the Finnish Bachelor: Married Men, Desire and Domesticity in 20th Century Finland

geoitaliani: Tacchi a spillo, capigliature corte alla garconne, continenti alla deriva: Federico Sacco contro tutti

Atlas Obscura: The Scrappy Female Paleontologist Whose Life Inspired a Tongue Twister

Ancient Origins: The Ancestral Myth of the Hollow Earth and Underground Civilizations

MBL History Project: Zoology in Color: Rudolf Leuckart

“It is not possible for man, as a thinking being, to close his mind to the knowledge that he is ruled by the same power as is the animal world.” –Rudolf Leuckart

“It is not possible for man, as a thinking being, to close his mind to the knowledge that he is ruled by the same power as is the animal world.” –Rudolf Leuckart

Physics Buzz Blog: Meteorite Markings Offer Clues to Their Past

Science Magazine: Beyond the “Mendel-Fisher Controversy”

Notches: “This is Your Pasty”: The Performance of Queer Domesticity in Small-Town Wisconsin

Embryo Project: Study of Fossilized Massospondylus Dinosaur Embryos from South Africa (1978–2012)

Audubon: John J. Audubon’s Birds of America: The life’s work of both a lover and observer of birds and nature

Plate 1 of Birds of America by John James Audubon depicting a wild turkey. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Plate 1 of Birds of America by John James Audubon depicting a wild turkey.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

U.S: Immigration and Customs Enforcement: ICE returns stolen Charles Darwin book

Road to Paris: A very short history of climate change research

Fistful of Cinctans: The Well Worn Paths of Natural History

Macroevolution: Orangutan-human hybrids?

MBL History Project: People of the Lab: Calvin Bridges

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 8 – Henry-Louis Le Chatelier

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 9 – Max von Laue

Science Notes: Today in Science History – October 10 – Henry Cavendish

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

The H-Word: The Greenwich longitude exhibition on tour

Adam Matthew: To Publish 500 Years of Unique Materials on the History of Printing, Publishing and Bookselling (Stationers’ Company Archives)

Smithsonian.com: How Not to Win a Nobel Prize

3 Quarks Daily: How did the Nobel Prize become the biggest award on earth?

Washington Post: What people in 1900 thought the year 2000 would look like

Air Canada enRoute: The World’s 14 Coolest New Museums

Shanghai Natural History Museum

Shanghai Natural History Museum

Independent: Paintings reveal what people in 19oo thought the year 2000 would look like

AHA Today: The Past for the Present: the New Mock Briefings Program and Reasons to Study History

Wynken de Worde: questions to ask when you learn of digitization projects

INKUNABULA: New Blog (German)

The Recipes Project: Exploring Six Degrees of Francis Bacon in Beta

Portrait of Francis Bacon, by Frans Pourbus (1617), Palace on the Water in Warsaw. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of Francis Bacon, by Frans Pourbus (1617), Palace on the Water in Warsaw.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

#EnvHist Weekly

Science Museum: Clockmaker’s Museum

Scroll.in: The history of science has been West-centric for too long – it’s time to think global

University of Cambridge: Research: A world of science

151007historyofindianscience

Richard Carter: Bacon and X

Tincture of Museum: The Crime Museum Uncovered, Museum of London, October 2015

Somatosphere: Summer Roundup: Forums – Books & Films

Academia: Science in the Everyday World: Why Perspectives from the History of Science Matter

h-madness: How I Became a Historian of Psychiatry: Andrew Scull

Engaging Science, Technology, and Society: First Issue: Table of Contents

The Atlantic: 12 Historical Gems From One of the Best Time Capsules Online

ESOTERIC:

University of Cambridge: Digital Library: Chinese Oracle Bones

distillatio: Alchemy and Magic, are they related

Royal 6.E.vi, f. 396v. detail

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Science contra Copernicus

Graney001

sehepunkte: Audra J. Wolfe: Competing with the Soviets (German!)

Nature: Geology: The continental conundrum

NEW BOOKS:

Routledge: Ancient Botany

9780415311205

URSUS: World of Innovation: cartography in the time of Gerhard Mercator

Historiens de la santé: On Hysteria: The Invention of a Medical Category between 1670 & 1820

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Bletchley Park: Last Chance to see the Imitation Game, The Exhibition: Closes 1 November 2015

Alan Turing memorial statue in Sackville Park, Manchester. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alan Turing memorial statue in Sackville Park, Manchester.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Right Relevance: Gender and Representations of the Female Subject in Early Modern England

Musée d’Orsay: Splendours and Misery, Pictures of Prostitution, 1850–1910

Museum of the History of Science: ‘DEAR HARRY…’ – HENRY MOSELEY: A SCIENTIST LOST TO WAR Extended to 31 January 2016

Hunterian Glasgow: The Kangaroo and the Moose 2 October 2015–21 February 2016

Dundee Science Centre: Nature’s Equations: D’Arcy Thompson and the Beauty of Mathematics Closes 25 October 2015

Science Museum: Cosmos & Culture

THEATRE AND OPERA:

Etcetera Theatre: LHF: The Devil Without 13–18 October 2015

Noel Coward Theatre: Photograph 51 Booking until 21 November 2015

Nicole Kidman as Rosalind Franklin Photograph: Johan Persson/Johan Persson Source: The Guardian

Nicole Kidman as Rosalind Franklin Photograph: Johan Persson/Johan Persson
Source: The Guardian

FILMS AND EVENTS:

Dittrick Museum Blog: Conversations: Bodies Wanted – Anatomy and the Dissection Debate 4 November 2015

CHoM News: Celebrating 10 Years of the Archive for Women in Medicine 3 November 2015

Dittrick Museum: Lecture: Eye of the Artist 14 October 2015

Engraving of the eye in A Complete Physico-Medical and Churugical on the Human Eye and the Demonstration of Natural Vision (Degraver, 1780).

Engraving of the eye in A Complete Physico-Medical and Churugical on the Human Eye and the Demonstration of Natural Vision (Degraver, 1780).

CHoM News: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine “Remorse Without Regret: Experimentalism, Consent, Apology, and the Affective Economies of Biomedicine” 15 October 2015

The Royal Society: The Big Draw – Seeing Closer 17 October 2015

Dr John Dee Mortlake Society: Events: AGM 13 October 2015

Open Culture: Watch Breaking the Code, About the Life & Times of Alan Turing (1996)

Wellcome Library: Talk: A history of health? Integrating food and drink into the history of medieval medicine 13 October 2015

Discover Medical London: Walking Tour: Women and Medicine

Wellcome Library: Joseph Banks: Lincolnshire botanist 12 October 2015

Sir Joseph Banks, as painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1773 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sir Joseph Banks, as painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1773
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Royal Society: A new visible world: Robert Hooke’s Micrographia 17 October 2015

Museum of the History of Science Oxford: Too Valuable to Die? 13 October 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Don Shank: Laboratory Still Life 1

Don Shank: Laboratory Still Life 1

TELEVISION:

Indiewire: Can WGN America’s Stellar ‘Manhattan’ Finally Break Through?

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: Turkey

Youtube: Invention of Radio – Reginald A. Fessenden Part 1

The Excavator: Bill Bailey on Alfred Russel Wallace

Youtube: Gresham College: Was the Great Plague of 1665 London’s Problem? – Professor Vanessa Harding

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Great Lives: Andrew Adonis on Joseph Bazalgette

BBC Radio 4: Natural History Heroes

BBC Radio 4: Natural Histories: Anemone

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Winchester: CfP: Death, Art and Anatomy 3–6 June 2016

Anita Guerrini: Notes and Records – Essay Prize – deadline 31-01-16

University of Flensburg: 1st European IHPST Regional Conference: Science as Culture in the European Context: Historical, Philosophical, and Educational Perspectives 22–25 August 2016

Notches: CfP: Histories of Sexuality and Religion

British Society for the History of Mathematics: Christmas Meeting Birmingham 5 December 2015

St Anne’s College Oxford: CfP: Knowing Demons, Knowing Spirits – Scientiae 2016 5–7 July

University of Exeter: Online Store: One day workshop: Framing the Face: New perspectives on the history of facial hair Friends Meeting House London 28 November 2015

H–Material–Culture: CfP: American Material and Visual Culture in the “Long” Nineteenth Century

Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Oxford: Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology Michaelmas Term 2015

Cleveland.com: Dittrick Medical Museum to host series of ‘Conversations’ on hot-button medical topics

HSTM Network Ireland: Inaugural Conference Maynooth University 13-14 November 2015

University of Groningen: CfP: Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Religion and Science 21–23 March 2016

The Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe – Institute of the Leibniz Association Marburg: Entangled Science? Relocating German-Polish Scientific Relations 28–30 October 2015

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Lancaster: Culture, Society and Medicine Seminars

eä: Journal of Medical Humanities & Social Studies of Science & Technology CfP: Information for Authors

University of Lyon: Séminaire de l’Institut d’histoire de la médecine de Lyon Cycle 2015-2016

Rowan University, NJ: CfP: Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice Sixth Biennial Conference 17–19 June 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Stirling: Chair in Environmental History and Heritage

University of Harvard: History of Pre-Modern or Early Modern Science or Medicine Tenure Track

University of Hull: PhD Studentships in Visual Culture

British Library: AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships

Academic Jobs Wiki: History of Science, Technology, and Medicine 2015–2016

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: Wellcome Trust History of Medicine PhD Studentship: Health Systems in History: the case of Nigeria 1946–c. 2000

Telegraph Museum Porthcurno: Director

n the 19th century Porthcurno was connected to the rest of the world by submarine cables Source: Wikimedia Commons

n the 19th century Porthcurno was connected to the rest of the world by submarine cables
Source: Wikimedia Commons

University of Hertfordshire: PhD Studentship in Early Modern History

California Institute of Technology: Postdoctoral Instructor Position in Philosophy of Science

Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy: Postdoc

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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