Whewell’s Gazette: Year2, Vol. #19

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #19

Monday 23 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

The overly warm autumn weather has disappeared overnight and the first signs of winter are poking their nose around the door, so it’s time to curl up warm inside and enjoy the latest edition of Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #histSTM links list bursting at the seams, as always, with the collective wisdom of the Internet on the histories of science, technology and medicine from the last seven days.

In the last two weeks of November exactly one hundred years ago, in 1915, the German physicist, Albert Einstein put the finishing touches to the theory that would elevate him from being one of the leading European scientists to the status of a twentieth-century icon, the General Theory of Relativity. The last weeks have all seen a fair number of reports, essay and blog posts on the theory and its creator but I thought we could bring this week’s crop to the fore and honour the great man here at Whewell’s Gazette.

Albert Einstein during a lecture in Vienna in 1921 by F Schmutzer Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein during a lecture in Vienna in 1921 by F Schmutzer
Source: Wikimedia Commons

We celebrate the centenary of this milestone in the history of physics at a time when the chorus of critics is growing louder and louder with the cries of “was Einstein wrong?” It is the inability of researchers to find a way of combing the general theory of relativity with that other great pillar of twentieth-century physics, that Einstein helped to found, the quantum theory that has led to this question. Many of those who pose it seem to do so with a certain sense of schadenfreude, as if they hope to see Albert pushed from his pedestal.

If the general theory of relativity comes to be replaced by a new ‘better’ theory combining gravity with quantum theory, as it probably will, just as Einstein’s own theory of gravity toppled that of Newton, it won’t do anything to change the enormity of Einstein’s achievement in 1915. Historian of science, should they or indeed the world still exist, will celebrate the bicentenary of this theory just as fulsomely in 2115.

Tech Times: Theory of General Relativity Marks 100th Year: Origins, Political Connections and Other Facts About Einstein’s Theory

Nature: Special: General Relativity at 100

arkansasonline.com: Einstein’s century-old theory stands strong

Einstein Papers: Einstein telling David Hilbert that he had used the nascent general relativity to quantitatively describe the anomalous precession of Mercury 18 November 1915

AHF: Albert Einstein

Brain Pickings: Einstein on the Common Language of Science in a Rare 1941 Recording

Dispatch-Argus: 100 years later, Einstein’s theory stands strong

Science Museum: The past, present and future of general relativity

The New York Times: General Relativities Big Year?

The New Yorker: Albert Einstein’s Sci-Fi Stories

Republican Herald: Century later, relativity still stands strong

Quotes of the week:

Eddington Quote

“Don’t just do something, stand there and think!” – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

“A university professor should “lead you to the fountain of knowledge”, but “whether you drink deeply or only gargle is entirely up to you””. – @GrrlScientist

“In a singing competition between Yoda and Steve Winwood, Steve win would”. – You can call me Q (@QuintinForbes)

“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free. Unless they’re darker than, say, beige.”- Statue of Liberty. – @TheTweetOfGod

“People really hate it when you point out that their rhetorical moves don’t advance their argument”. – Jonathan Dresner (@jondresner)

“Don’t discuss infinity with a mathematician. You’ll never hear the end of it”. – Laura Lang (@MathsforGrownups)

“Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?” — George Carlin h/t @berfois

“Is the cup half-full, or half-empty? Either way, it’s hemlock”. – Damon Young (@damonayoung)

“Let us not, in the eagerness of our haste to educate, forget all the aims of education” – William Godwin h/t @douglassilas

“Just noticed that business books are next to books on potty training in Dewey decimal classification”. – John D. Cook (@JohnDCook)

“It may be said that the entire Renaissance was in Galileo’s library & more importantly in his Dialogue.” – Paula Findlen at HSS 2015 h/t @bhgross

“…when did the history of science society become the history of the scientific book society?” – Paula Findlen at HSS 2015 h/t @elizabeththeyale

“Philosophers often make better coffee than sense”. – Nigel Warburton (@philosophybites)

“Historians of science are not made, they are improvised.” – Robert Fox, Sarton Medalist. h/t @ColdWarScience

Q: “Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door”

A: “Build a better fence, and you can stop them” – Jon Agar (@jon_agar)

“Just don’t think there is a good reason to write ‘quinquennially’ instead of ‘every five years’”. – Dolly Jørgensen (@DollyJørgensen)

Birthday of the Week:

Edwin Hubble born 20 November 1889

Edwin Hubble, doing what he loved best at Mount Wilson Observatory

Edwin Hubble, doing what he loved best at Mount Wilson Observatory

ESA Space Science: 20 November

cosmology.carrnegiescience.edu: 1929: Edwin Hubble Discovers the Universe is Expanding

CUQpoiCVAAA1HRO

Popular Science: The 11 Most Important Cats of Science 2 of 12 Astronomy Cat

Wallifaction: Happy birthday to Edwin Hubble

Edwin Hubble! Seen here in 1923 at a Carnegie solar eclipse expedition to Point Loma, CA.

Edwin Hubble! Seen here in 1923 at a Carnegie solar eclipse expedition to Point Loma, CA.

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE

University of Roehampton: Hearth Tax discovery by Roehampton historians may illuminate Isaac Newton’s life story

AMNH: Shelf Life: Episode Five: How to Time Travel to a Star

Voices of the Manhattan Project: General Leslie Groves’ Interview – Part 10

AIP: Eugene Wigner

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Dorothy McKibbin’s Interview (1979)

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Evelyne Litz’s Interview

Yovisto: Eugene Wigner and the Structure of the Atomic Nucleus

The Guidon: Manila Observatory celebrates 150th anniversary

AHF: George Kistiakowsky

Pat’s Blog: The analemma is Gone, Oh How I Miss it

solar analemma

UCL: STS: Occasional papers: Huang, Hsiang-Fu (ed.) Ouranologia: an Annotated Edition of a Lenten Lecture on Astronomy with Critical Introduction (free pdf)

Ptak Science Books: Astronomy Board Games, 1661 & 1804

Ptak Science Books: Graphs of Astronomical Discoveries

Ptak Science Books: An Unusual Set of Astronomical Images

AHF: “Hanford’s Pioneers” Tour Launches

Kaleidoscope: Science and Invention: How Did the Ancient Chinese Measure Time?

how_did_the_ancient_chinese_measure_timef909427af8f54017b05d

The Guardian: Maxwell’s Equations: 150 years of light

The Independent: The end of an odyssey – Homer’s epic is finally pinned down

AHF: Soviet Hydrogen Bomb Progam

Teyler’s Museum: Tellurium, George Adams, London

Tor.com: Utopian Mars: From Aleriel to The Martian

The Nature of Reality: Schrödinger’s Cat Lives On (Or Not) at the Age of 80

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

British Library: Maps and views blog: A Glance – from a Safe Distance – at the Human Monsters on Pierre Desceliers’ World Map of 1550

Mammoth Tales: The White Elephant of Rucheni

Desceliers Arctic elephant. North is at the bottom of the page.

Desceliers Arctic elephant. North is at the bottom of the page.

Atlas Obscura: Hand-Drawn Maps That Jump Into the Geopolitical Fray

Royal Museums Greenwich: Christopher Columbus

Atlas Obscura: The Delights and Perils of Navigating New York City with a Guidebook from 1899

Dr. Caitlin R. Green: Some interesting early maps of Lincolnshire

It’s About Time: 1587 Sir Walter Raleigh & Roanoke Island, North Carolina

This illustration is a detail from a map in the 1590 edition of Thomas Hariot’s Briefe and True Account of the New Found Land of Virginia.

This illustration is a detail from a map in the 1590 edition of Thomas Hariot’s Briefe and True Account of the New Found Land of Virginia.

It’s About Time: 1590 John White’s Return to Roanoke – Where all had vanished

It’s About Time: 1586 Ralph Lane’s Report on the Colony of Roanoke

BBC News: Stark images of Shackleton’s struggle

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Iridology, a pseudomedical practice, involves reading the patient's iris for diagnosis  h/t @sunfilter

Iridology, a pseudomedical practice, involves reading the patient’s iris for diagnosis
h/t @sunfilter

 Thomas Morris: The eye-brush

Perceptions of Pregnancy: It’s all in the breasts: pregnancy aphorisms in the Hippocratic Corpus

Le Huffington Post: Portrait de médicin: Wilder Graves Penfield

The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates: Reading for Abortions in the Victorian Novel

Forbes: Here’s How Corsets Deformed the Skeletons of Victorian Women

From “Physiology for Young People” p. 84. Fig. 11.A purports to show the natural position of internal organs. B, when deformed by tight lacing of a corset. In this way the liver and the stomach have been forced downward, as seen in the cut. (Public domain image via wikimedia commons.)

From “Physiology for Young People” p. 84. Fig. 11.A purports to show the natural position of internal organs. B, when deformed by tight lacing of a corset. In this way the liver and the stomach have been forced downward, as seen in the cut. (Public domain image via wikimedia commons.)

Devient Maternity: ‘For shipping his corpse which was becoming very loathsome and nauseous’. The provision of care for the poor, sick and dying in the eighteenth-century

Haverford College News: Studying Historical “Madness”

 

AEON: Better Babies

Gizmodo: The Secret WWII Club That Healed Burned Pilots and Revolutionized Plastic Surgery

Nursing Clio: The History of a Wrist: When Historians Fall Over

The History Company: The Wee Glasgow women and the birth of Caesarian

M Library Blog: A New Acquisition: A Japanese Illustrated Book on Surgery

Woodcut from Irako Mitsuaki. Geka kinmō zui (Kyoto: Ebisuya Ichiemon, 1809)

Woodcut from Irako Mitsuaki. Geka kinmō zui (Kyoto: Ebisuya Ichiemon, 1809)

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow: The Girton and Newnham Unit of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals in World War One

Thomas Morris: Pipe dreams

The Atlantic: Impregnated by a speeding Bullet, and Other Tall Tales

Notches: Bad for the Soul, Good for the Body: Religion, Medicine and Masturbation in the Middle Ages

Thomas Morris: In praise of temperance

Medievalists.net: The Sick and the Dead: Medieval Concepts of Illness and Spinal Disability

TECHNOLOGY:

The Ladybird Story of Radio (1968) knew about David Edward Hughes and e-m waves but didn't quite get his name right. h/t Iwan Rhys Morus

The Ladybird Story of Radio (1968) knew about David Edward Hughes and e-m waves but didn’t quite get his name right. h/t Iwan Rhys Morus

 Conciatore: Manganese Overload

The Ejection Site: 46.2Gs!!! The Story of John Paul Stapp “The Fastest Man On Earth”

Improbable Research: The Fastest Man on Earth (Part 2 of 4)

MAA 100: Mathematical Treasure: Polar Planimeter Invented by Jacob Amsler

The National Archives: ‘All change!’ on Britain’s railways

1812 The first effective locomotive-powered railway

1812 The first effective locomotive-powered railway

Yovisto: The X-43A and the Scramjet Technology

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: The Tizard Mission – 75 Years of Anglo-American Technical Alliance

The Public Domain Revue: Colour Wheels, Charts, and Tables Through History

Two Nerdy History Girls: The Amazing Félix Nadar

Nadar Self-Portrait in Balloon

Nadar Self-Portrait in Balloon

Yovisto: Doug Engelbart and the Computer Mouse

The Guardian: Barry Cooper obituary

The TZranscontinental Railroad: Time Standardization

The National Valve Museum: Website

Dolly Jørgensen: The Metamorphosis of Ajax, jakes, and early modern urban sanitation

Medievalists.net: Guns in Scotland: the manufacture and use of guns and their influence on warfare from the fourteenth century to c. 1625

Phys.org: What toilets and sewers tell us about ancient Roman sanitation

Ruin of a second-century public toilet in Roman Ostia. Credit: Fr Lawrence Lew, OP, CC BY-NC-ND

Ruin of a second-century public toilet in Roman Ostia. Credit: Fr Lawrence Lew, OP, CC BY-NC-ND

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Ascension of a Montgolfier Balloon

The Conversation: Building Hitler’s supergun: the plot to destroy London and why it failed

Graphic Arts Collection: The Principles of Static and Friction

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Making Science Public: Moderation impossible? Climate change, alarmism and rhetorical entrenchment

Making Science Public: Climate realism: What does it mean?

Occam’s Corner: Beard science: an examination of the power (and hazards) of Movember

The Dallas Morning News: Nearly pristine mammoth skeleton showcased at Perot Museum

Jae S. Lee/Staff Photographer Ellie May is showcased as if she is floating above the ground, in a similar position to the way she was found. The Columbian mammoth skeleton is about 80 percent or 85 percent intact and an estimated 40,000 years old.

Jae S. Lee/Staff Photographer
Ellie May is showcased as if she is floating above the ground, in a similar position to the way she was found. The Columbian mammoth skeleton is about 80 percent or 85 percent intact and an estimated 40,000 years old.

Gizmodo: Half the World’s Natural History Specimens Might Have the Wrong Name

Notches: Rape and the Sexual Politics of Homosexuality: The U.S. Military Occupation of Okinawa, 1955-56

NYAM: Extra, Extra, Get Your New Banana!

Yale Climate Connection: NYC Climate Museum

Inside Climate News: Climate Scientist Michael Mann: Exxon Story ‘Confirmed Things We Long Suspected’

Academia: Breaking down the body and putting it back: displaying knowledge in the ‘Francisc I. Rainer anthropological collection

Storia della Geologia: Storia della mineralogia – I primi passi

Atlas Obscura: Meet the Midwestern Pilots Who Risk Their Lives to Change the Weather

BHL: Travels in Southern Africa: William John Burchell

"A view in the town of Litakun." Engraved from a drawing by William John Burchell. Travels in the Interior of Southern Africa. v. 2 (1824). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/48905971. Digitized by: University of Pretoria.

“A view in the town of Litakun.” Engraved from a drawing by William John Burchell. Travels in the Interior of Southern Africa. v. 2 (1824). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/48905971. Digitized by: University of Pretoria.

Forbes: Half The World’s Museum Specimens are Wrongly Labeled, but Who is to Blame?

Open Sky: American Meteorological Society Oral History Project

Science League of America: Evolution for John Doe, Part 4

Niche: Workers as Commodities: The Case of Asbestos, Quebec

Jonathan Saha: Paratextual Pachyderms

lifeofelephant00eardrich_0052

NCSE: Excerpt Voyage of the Beagle: The Illustrated Edition

Geschichte der Geologie: Kunst & Geologie: Die Magie des Karfunkelsteins

Making Science Public: The book of life: Reading, writing and editing

BGS Geoheritage – images from the collections: Calx carbonata (calcite) from British mineralogy by James Sowerby 1802–1817

 

CHEMISTRY:

Yovisto: Nicolas Lemery and the Acid-Base Chemistry

Gizmodo: Badass Historical Chemists: The Woman Behind Antoine Lavoisier

Portrait of M. and Mme Lavoisier, by Jacques-Louis David, 1788 (Metropolitan Museum) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of M. and Mme Lavoisier, by Jacques-Louis David, 1788 (Metropolitan Museum)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nature: thesis: Hard-luck Scheele

Situating Chemistry: Situating Chemistry Database 1760–1840

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Yovisto: Albertus Magnus and the Merit of Personal Observation

Wellcome Trust: Researcher Spotlight: Louise Powell

BBC: Culture: Did Dickens invent time travel?

-273.15°C: Eminent Interview

The Bigger Picture: Looking Smithson’s Gift Horse in the Mouth

Edge Effects: Improving the Conversational Geography of Environmental Conferences

Science Museum Group Journal: Issue 4

Wikimedia Commons: Hooke’s Micrographia Diagrams from the National Library of Wales

Irish Philosophy: The “Incomparable Lady Ranelagh”

Katherine Jones, Lady Ranelagh: portrait in Lismore Castle Picture courtesy of Michelle DiMeo

Katherine Jones, Lady Ranelagh: portrait in Lismore Castle
Picture courtesy of Michelle DiMeo

The Harvard Crimson: A Forgotten Field

DSI: Database of Scientific Illustrators 1450–1950

IsisCB Explore: An open access discovery service for the history of science

Science Notes: November 20 in Science History

Science Notes: November 21 in Science History

Science Notes: November 22 in Science History

Society for the Social History of Medicine: The Gazette

Society for Renaissance Studies: Remembering Lisa Jardine

Professor Lisa Jardine in 2015, portrait from the Royal Society Source: Wikimedia Commons

Professor Lisa Jardine in 2015, portrait from the Royal Society
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nicholson’s Journal: Website

The #EnvHist Weekly

NYAM: Discover the Past Support the Future

Metascience: Vol.24, Issue 3 Contents

Academia: Scientific Celebrity: The Paradoxical Case of Emil du Bois-Reymond

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Alchemist Cardinal

The Recipes Project: The Curious Case of the Homunculus, and the Allegorical Recipe

6859587740_ee3f6bb363_o-296x300

Conciatore: The Paracelsans

The Truth Garden: Odd Truths: The alchemical life of glassmaker Antonio Neri

BOOK REVIEWS:

Wonder of Words: The Hunt For Vulcan

Chad Comello: The Hunt for Vulcan

Boston Globe: How Einstein ended hunt for planet that never was

Contagions: The Black Death in the Ottoman Empire and Ragusan Republic

Nature: Books in Brief: Spooky Action at a Distance, Ecology or Catastrophe: The Life of Murray Bookchin etc.

Science Museum Group Journal: The thrilling adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: the (mostly) true story of the first computer, by Sydney Padua

The Early Modern Intelligencer: The Royal Touch in Early Modern England: Politics, Medicine and Sin

9780861933372

idées.fr Le discours de la semence À propos de : L’usage du sexe. Lettres au Dr Tissot, auteur de L’Onanisme (1760). Essai historiographique et texte transcrit par Patrick Singy

Science Book a Day: What Galileo Saw: Imagining the Scientific Revolution

History Today: Books of the Year 2015

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society: Inside the Machine: Art and Invention in the Electronic Age

The Page 99 Test: Melinda Baldwin’s “Making Nature”

Women’s History Association of Ireland: Aphrodisiacs, fertility and medicine in early modern England.

The New York Times: ‘London Fog: The Biography,’ by Christine L. Corton

Central London at night, 1936. Credit Lacey/General Photographic Agency, via Getty Images

Central London at night, 1936. Credit Lacey/General Photographic Agency, via Getty Images

Book Q&As with Deborah Kalb: Q&A with Paul Halpern

NEW BOOKS:

Pool of London Press: The Mapmakers’ World

9781910860007

The Public Domain Review: Selected Essays, Vol. II

Historiens de la santé: Malades, soignants, hôpitaux, représentations en Roussillon, Languedoc & Provence

Johns Hopkins University Press: Alfred Wegener: Science, Exploration, and the Theory of Continental Drift

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Culture 24: A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Royal College of Physicians: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee 18 January 2016–29 July 2016

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution exhibition 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

Painting of Samuel Pepys by John Hayls Source: Wikimedia Commons

Painting of Samuel Pepys by John Hayls
Source: Wikimedia Commons

J D Davies: Pepys Show and Tell

Londonist: Largest Ever Pepys Exhibition Comes to Greenwich

Heinz Nixdorf Museums Forum: Paderborn, Germany: IT began with Ada. Women in Computer History 2 September 2015–10 July 2016

Explore Brooklyn: The Morbid Anatomy Museum: how to get there, what to do, where to go after

Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Luxury of Time: European Clocks and Watches

Hyperallergergic: Celestial Art and Science in Albrecht Dürer’s 1515 Star Charts

ActiveHistory.ca: Science, Technology and Gender in Canada: An AcitveHistory.ca Exhibit in Collaboration with the Canadian Science and Technology Museum

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope 17 December 2015

Hooke's microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hooke’s microscope, from an engraving in Micrographia.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

LAST CHANCE TO SEE: University of Dundee: A History of Nearly Everything Runs until 28 November 2015

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs until 13 March 2016

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Hunterian Museum: Designing Bodies: Models of human anatomy from 1945 to now 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

The Dream Team: Surgeon to the Dead The Old Operating Theatre London 10-12 & 15-17 December 2015

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

EVENTS:

Institute of Historical Research: British Maritime History Seminar: Drawing and Photography in the History of Astronomy 24 November 2015

The Royal Society: Lecture: Lifting the lid – the Royal Society since 1960 10 December 2015

Salle des Fêtes, Hôpital civil, Strasbourg: Colloque: Retour sur le genre des biopics de grands scientifiques : Pasteur, Pavlov, Koch, Ehrlich 23 novembre 2015

Wellcome Library: History of Pre-Modern Medicine Seminar: Humanist self-fashioning and ordinary medical practice. The Bohemian physician Georg Handsch (1529–c. 1578) and his notebooks 24 November 2015

medhumlabmanchester: Medicine in Art Society Launch Event Whitworth Art Gallery 26 November 2015

mia-flyer-01Gresham College: Was Einstein Right? 24 November 2015

Diseases of Modern Life: Seminar: Radical Requiems: The return of the past in British Agriculture, 1850–1950 St Anne’s College Oxford 25 November 2015

Morbid Anatomy: Upcoming Events

Natural History Museum: After Hours Lates 27 November 2015

Royal Society: Life through a lens: Celebrating science photography 26 November 2015

Wellcome Collection: Crucial Interventions with Richard Barnett 26 November 2015

Royal Institution: The Tsar’s cup 27 November 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Norbert Wiener by David Levine, New York Review of Books

Norbert Wiener by David Levine, New York Review of Books

TELEVISION:

BBC Four: Timeshift: How Britain Won the Space Race: The Story of Bernard Lovell and Jodrell Bank

Lovell Telescope, Jodrell Bank Observatory Source: Wikimedia Commons

Lovell Telescope, Jodrell Bank Observatory
Source: Wikimedia Commons

io9: On Manhattan, Terrible Things Happen When You “Wake The Dragon”

BFI Southbank: There is a curated selection of clips from TV programmes on the Bomb, computing, DNA and space, culminating in a complete showing of a 1959 programme about supersonic flight. Together, this is the essence of how TV saw science 50 years ago. 26 November 2015

Channel 4: Building Hitler’s Supergun

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

Youtube: THUNK – 79: Science, Pseudoscience, & the Demarcation Problem

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Self Drives: Maxwell’s Equations

PODCASTS:

BBC Global News Podcast: Challenges of curating natural science collections from 23 mins

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Royal Society: Notes and Records: Announcing the 4th Notes and Records Essay Award

H-Physical Sciences: CFP: The Third Biannual Early-Career Conference for Historians of the Physical Sciences

University of Edinburgh: Sixth International Conference on Integrated History and Philosophy of Science (in collaboration with the UK Integrated History and Philosophy of Science) 3-5 July 2016

University of Amsterdam & Utrecht University: CFP: Connecting Collections XVII Universeum Network Meeting 9-11 July 2016

The Bernard S. Finn IEEE History Prize 2016: The prize is awarded annually to the best paper in the history of electrotechnology—power, electronics, telecommunications, and computer science—published during the preceding year Deadline 15 December 2015

All Souls College, Oxford: Workshop: Charles Hutton (1737–1823): being mathematical in the Georgian period 17–18 December 2015

Portrait of Charles Hutton (1737–1823), English mathematician Source: Wikimedia Common

Portrait of Charles Hutton (1737–1823), English mathematician
Source: Wikimedia Common

University of Leiden: CfP: Gender, Power and Materiality in Early Modern Europe 1500–1800 7-9 April 20916

Stony Brook University: Periods and Waves: A Conference on Sound and History 29–30 April 2016

University of Leuven: CfP: Ancient Medicine 30–31 August 2016

Charles Schmitt Prize 2016: Submissions will be accepted in any area of intellectual history, broadly construed, 1500 to the present Deadline 31 December 2015

University of Cambridge: CfP: BSHS Postgraduate Conference 2016 6–8 January

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: CfP: Eighth Joint Meeting of the BSHS, CSHPS, and HSS, 22-25 June 2016

University of Kent: CfP: Medicine in its Place: Situating Medicine in Historical Context 7–10 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Liverpool: The University of Liverpool is planning to support a Medical Humanities University Award application to the Wellcome Trust and is seeking expressions of interest from dynamic and enthusiastic candidates with a strong research track record in this area.

Queen Mary University of London: Postgraduate Research Studentships

Canadian Association for the History of Nursing: Margaret M. Allemang Scholarship for graduate students

British Library: Curator, Map Collection

Royal Signals Museum: Museum Technical Curator

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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