Whewell’s Gazette: Year2, Vol. #20

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #20

Monday 30 November 2015

EDITORIAL:

Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list bringing you all that we could gather together of the histories of science, technology and medicine from the four corners of the Internet over the last seven days cruises into December.

For the second week running we feature Einstein and his General Theory of Relativity, this time celebrating its official one-hundredth birthday. The current (understandable) dominance in the #histsci news of Einstein at the moment leads to thoughts of the Einstein-Currie syndrome, phenomenon or problem as it is variously known. This is the fact that Einstein and Currie are so well known that other important scientists tend to disappear in their shadows. The same phenomenon occurs with Galileo and Newton in the seventeenth century. In fact there is an excellent book by Lesley Murdin titled Under Newton’s Shadow that highlights the other seventeenth English astronomers who were unfortunate enough to be Newton’s contemporaries.

A second unfortunate phenomenon resulting from the dominance in #histSTM of a handful of big names are the articles with titles like “the most important scientist you’ve never heard of!” These are particularly prevalent amongst those trying to promote the role of women in #histSTM. In principle the idea is good but unfortunately the authors almost always choose one of a group of names of women scientist who are in the meantime very well known indeed. A good example this week is an article to be found in our technology rubric, There’s a Navy Destroyer & a Tech Conference Named After This Person But You’ve Probably Never Heard of Her, which is an article about Grace Hopper. Now anybody who is remotely interested in the history of computers and computer science, who doesn’t know about Grace Hopper has being living under a stone. Grace Hopper is one of the most well known computer scientists in the world.

This is just one example and I could go on to list quite a lot more and I think we need a change in the way we approach the subject. Instead of writing the two-hundredth article about Grace Hopper, Lise Meitner, Jocelyn Bell Burnell or whoever we should concentrate on making the many not quite as famous women in #histSTM better known and showing that the spread is much wider than just a few star names.

That this is possible is excellently demonstrated by blogs/websites such as TrowelBlazers or Lady Science. A good example of this by a non-women-specialist blog in this week’s new post at Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog, Women, Minorities and the Manhattan Project. These historians are showing the way. Let’s get away from emphasising the same small handful of star names and start looking at the underbelly and bringing the not quite as famous to the fore.

Quotes of the week:

Bose Quote

We humans have not been around long enough yet to see the trees get really angry. – Liam Heneghan (@DublinSoil)

Henry Moseley

Should have died cosily

At home aged 93, Nobel laureate, former PRS

And not in that mess. – James Sumner (@JamesBSumner)

“History of science became legend, legend became myth, and some prior work that should not have been forgotten was lost.” – Jeremy Yoder (@JBYoder)

“A creationist commenter gets to the heart of the problem: “I would rather believe and be wrong, than not believe and be right.”” – Richard Carter (@friendsofdarwin)

Miller Quote

“John Oliver: “There was only one time in US history when refugees actually did wipe everyone out—and we’ll be celebrating it on Thursday.”” – h/t @Pogue

“I’ve sorted all my Richard Dawkins books in condescending order”. – Paraic O’Donnell (@paraicodonnell)

Scared of clocks:

Hates a young boy:

Very well educated but weirdly obsessive:

Richard Dawkins is Captain Hook – Clee ((@jmclee)

“Ignorance is not so incurable as error.” George Berkeley (1724) h/t @MichelleDiMeo

‘The first act of compassion is to relieve the fool of his folly’ Robert Grosseteste h/t @mcleish_t

“Time Doesn’t Exist Clocks Exist” – Philosophical Graffiti h/t @williamcrawley

“Tang alchemists accidentally invented a primitive form of gunpowder while trying to create an elixir of youth. Ironic”. – Jill Levine (@jilldlevine)

“Chimps are our closest relatives, and yet they never send us Christmas cards. – Chris Addison” h/t @DarwinMonkey

“Dear world, I’d like to unsubscribe from your mailing list. Thanks”. – Finn Arne Jørgensen (@finnarne)

“Actually Wittgenstein is the name of the philosopher not the monster”. – James (@ApathTea)

“I have been trying to think the Unthinkable. But it turns out you can’t”. – @historyscientis

PHILOSOPHY  h/t @replicakill

PHILOSOPHY
h/t @replicakill

Birthday of the Week:

Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity born 25 November 1915

 

Spacetime curvature schematic Source: Wikipedia Commons

Spacetime curvature schematic
Source: Wikipedia Commons

The New Yorker: The Space Doctor’s Big Idea

The New York Times: A Century Ago, Einstein’s Theory of Relativity Changed Everything

Huff Post Science: The Blog: Gaga for Gravitation

Forbes: General Relativity and the ‘Lone Genius’ Model of Science

The Washington Post: Einstein’s General Relativity at 100: Put that in your pipe and smoke it

The New York Times: Albert Einstein and Relativity in the Pages of The Times

Articles in The Times from Nov. 10, 1919, left; Nov. 16, 1919, center; and Dec. 3, 1919.

Articles in The Times from Nov. 10, 1919, left; Nov. 16, 1919, center; and Dec. 3, 1919.

Science Museum: The past, present and future of general relativity

In the Dark: 100 Years of General Relativity

SpaceWatchtower: Centennial: Einstein’s General Theory of Gravity

Scientific American: Einstein’s Unfinished Dream: Marrying Relativity to the Quantum World

BBC: Does Einstein’s general theory of relativity still mater?

BBC: What is Albert Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity?

Science Daily: What Did Einstein Mean By ‘Curved’ Spacetime?

National Science Foundation: Albert Einstein, in his own words

Albert Einstein developed the theories of special and general relativity. Picture from 1921. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Albert Einstein developed the theories of special and general relativity. Picture from 1921.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Economist: General Relativity at 100

Youtube: BackstromGroup: Happy Thanksgiving & Happy 100th Anniversary

Youtube: Einstein 100 – Theory of General Relativity

ESA: Lisa Pathfinder: 100 Years of General Relativity

NASA illustration of LISA, taken from http://lisa.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/lisa-waves.html.

NASA illustration of LISA, taken from http://lisa.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/lisa-waves.html.

Perimeter Institute: General Relativity from A to Z

BBC Radio 4: In Our Time: Relativity

AMNH: General Relativity

Popular Science: General Relativity: 100 Years Old and Still Full of Surprises

Scientific America: 100 Years of General Relativity: Scientific American Special Issue

Slate: On the Anniversary of Two Scientific Revolutions

BuzzFeed: 14 Rare Photos of Albert Einstein

Here he is having a picnic in the woods near Oslo, 1920. Albert Einstein Archives / Princeton University Press

Here he is having a picnic in the woods near Oslo, 1920.
Albert Einstein Archives / Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press: Thanks Einstein: Alice Calaprice on the man behind the myth

Princeton University Press: Blog: Was Einstein the First to Discover General Relativity?

Open Culture: Albert Einstein On God: “Nothing More Than the Expression and Product of Human Weakness”

The Guardian: My hero: Albert Einstein by Graham Farmelo

Nature: History: Einstein was no lone genius

 Marcel Grossmann (left) and Michele Besso (right), university friends of Albert Einstein (centre), both made important contributions to general relativity. Grossmann, Einstein: ETH-Bibliothek Zürich/Bildarchiv; Besso: Besso Family/AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives


Marcel Grossmann (left) and Michele Besso (right), university friends of Albert Einstein (centre), both made important contributions to general relativity.
Grossmann, Einstein: ETH-Bibliothek Zürich/Bildarchiv; Besso: Besso Family/AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: Alfonso from Spain and the Alfonsine Tables

Yovisto: Johannes van de Waals – A Pioneer of the Molecular Sciences

BackRe(Action): Dear Dr B: Can you think of a single advancement in theoretical physics, other than speculation, since the early 1980s?

AHF: Herbert York

True Anomalies: The Meteorite Crater that Wasn’t: Reflections on SPECTRE

Smithsonian.com: How NASA’s Flight Plan Described the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

The Somnium Project: Johannes Kepler: Somnium (The Dream)

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Alembic Rare Books: Bringing Some Culture to the Physicists: Nina Byers & Richard Feynman

Smithsonia.com: The World’s First Nuclear Reactor was Built in a Squash Court

JHI Blog: The “Conquest of the Sun” and Ideas About Energy

Ri-Science: Charte der Gebirge Des Mondes, 1878

AHF: William “Deak” Parsons

AHF: Moving Forward – 1941

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Women, minorities, and the Manhattan Project

A relatively young Katharine (“Kay”) Way, one of the many female scientists of the Manhattan Project, and one of the rare few scientists whose work took her to all of the major Manhattan Project sites. Source: Emilio Segrè Visual Archives.

A relatively young Katharine (“Kay”) Way, one of the many female scientists of the Manhattan Project, and one of the rare few scientists whose work took her to all of the major Manhattan Project sites. Source: Emilio Segrè Visual Archives.

BBC: Jocelyn Bell Burnell

The Washington Post: A ground zero forgotten

EXPLORATION, CARTOGRAPHY AND NAVIGATION:

Medievalists.net: The Use of Lead and Line by Early Navigators in the North Sea

MBS Birmingham: Amateur gentlemen, Everest, and the Science of Foie Gras

L0035747 Tabloid medicine chest used on 1933 Mount Everest Expedition Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

L0035747 Tabloid medicine chest used on 1933 Mount Everest Expedition
Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

New South Wales: State Library: Discover Collection: In search of rich lands: The Dutch

Icelandic Saga Map: Mapping the Icelandic Sagas

Boston 1775: Mapping Out a Map-Filled Visit to Boston

The Recipes Project: A Recipe for Teaching Atlantic World History: Food and the Columbian Exchange

Polly Platt, Map sampler (1809), Made in Dutchess County, Pleasant Valley, New York, United States, Purchase, Frank P. Stetz Bequest, in loving memory of David Stewart Hull, 2012, 2012.64, Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Polly Platt, Map sampler (1809), Made in Dutchess County, Pleasant Valley, New York, United States, Purchase, Frank P. Stetz Bequest, in loving memory of David Stewart Hull, 2012, 2012.64, Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Instagram: Embroidered Globe by Lydia Satterthwaite, 1817

British Library: Maps and views blog: Magnificent Maps of New York

National Library of Scotland: Blaeu Atlas Maior, 1662-5

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Thomas Morris: Bleeding you well

Neuroscientifically Challenged: History of Neuroscience: The mystery of trepanation

Archaeology: Paleo-dentistry

Collectors Weekly: War and Prosthetics: How Veterans Fought for the Perfect Limb

Left, this Civil War era portrait shows a veteran with a typical wood and leather prosthetic leg. Image courtesy the National Museum of Health and Medicine. Right, this Anglesey-style wooden leg was produced in Britain around 1901, and features a jointed knee and ankle and a spring-fitted heel. Image courtesy of the Science Museum / SSPL.

Left, this Civil War era portrait shows a veteran with a typical wood and leather prosthetic leg. Image courtesy the National Museum of Health and Medicine. Right, this Anglesey-style wooden leg was produced in Britain around 1901, and features a jointed knee and ankle and a spring-fitted heel. Image courtesy of the Science Museum / SSPL.

The Recipes Project: Van Helmont’s Recipes

Early Modern Medicine: Understanding Anger

University of Glasgow: UofG shines light on Erskine archive

Freud Quotes: 1938: Sigmund Freud Arrives in London as Refugee

Nursing Clio: Nursing Thanksgiving

Thomas Morris: Struck dumb

The Guardian: Man stole brains from medical museum and put them on eBay

The Walrus: Doctors Without Science: A brief history of quackery, from leeches to ostrich eggs

1 An arsenic bottle. 2 Eighteenth-century European engraving of Egyptian bloodletting. 3 A 1930s bag advertising purgative medicine. 4 Lobotomy instruments.

1 An arsenic bottle. 2 Eighteenth-century European engraving of Egyptian bloodletting. 3 A 1930s bag advertising purgative medicine. 4 Lobotomy instruments.

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: Hold the Butter! A Brief History of Gorging

University of Toronto: PhD Thesis: From the Hands of Quacks: Aural Surgery, Deafness, and the Making of a Surgical Specialty in 19th Century London by Jaipreet Virdi-Dhesi Free online as pdf

Thomas Morris: Nothing to worry about

The Public Domain Review: The Science of Life and Death in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Dittrick Medical History Center: Todd’s Head Spanner 1930

History Extra: Your 60-second guide to the Black Death

TECHNOLOGY:

Conciatore: Lead Crystal

 

99% Invisible: Episode 157: Devil’s Rope

Barbs Courtesy of The Devil’s Rope Museum

Barbs
Courtesy of The Devil’s Rope Museum

Medium: Clipping the Devil’s Rope

Science at Play: Fingerprinter

ReadThink: There’s a Navy Destroyer & a Tech Conference Named After This Person But You’ve Probably Never Heard of Her

Atlas Obscura: The Telharmonium was the Spotify of 1906

Historically Speaking: Desperately Seeking Ernest

Ptak Science Books: Gear, Teeth, Minie Bullets, Cloth Bindings (1864)

Source: Ptak Science Books

Source: Ptak Science Books

PRI: When Ireland gathered around ‘the Wireless’ in the dark, one boy saw the light

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Atlas Obscura: See a 400-Year-Old Book Made Entirely from Feathers

History of Geology Group: A contemporary William Smith map

NCSE: The Plane Truth at Last Free online web and ebook

Notches: Histories of Sexualities in Central and Eastern Europe

British Library: Discovering Literature: Romantics and Victorians: Darwin and the theory of evolution

The Telegraph: First picture of young Charles Darwin on HMS Beagle reveals shipmate squabbles

Charles Darwin on board the Beagle, painted off the coast of Argentina on 24th September, 1832 Photo: Sotheby's

Charles Darwin on board the Beagle, painted off the coast of Argentina on 24th September, 1832 Photo: Sotheby’s

artlyst: Charles Darwin Watercolour Painted On the Ship Beagle Discovered

The Guardian: Unique watercolour of Darwin on HMS Beagle tipped to fetch upwards of £50,000 at auction

History: This Day in History: Origin of Species is published

abc.net: News: London skeletons reveal British capital’s 2,000-year history as ethnic melting pot

Niche: “Two chemical works behind him, and a soap factory in front”: Living and Working in London’s Industrial Marshlands

The Walrus: The Roughneck Diaries

Colossal: Art Meets Cartography: The 15,000-Year History of a River in Oregon Rendered in Data

Naturalis Historia: Dinosaurs, Dragons and Ken Ham: The Literal Reality of Mythological Creatures

A 40 million year old whale fossil from “whale valley” in Egypt not far from Cairo. Here hundreds of whale fossils lie exposed in this wind eroded valley. These whales where large headed toothed whales that are not alive today.  Many of these would have been exposed for ancient Egyptians to see and wonder what animal they were associated with.  (AFP/File/Cris Bouroncle)

A 40 million year old whale fossil from “whale valley” in Egypt not far from Cairo. Here hundreds of whale fossils lie exposed in this wind eroded valley. These whales where large headed toothed whales that are not alive today. Many of these would have been exposed for ancient Egyptians to see and wonder what animal they were associated with. (AFP/File/Cris Bouroncle)

SNAP.PA: The history of climate change summed up in 10 key dates

Palaeoblog: Born This Day: Dunkinfield Henry Scott

Thinking Like a Mountain: The Decline of Natural History & the Rise of Biology in 19thc Britain

CHEMISTRY:

Chemistry World: Six of the best from Stella

National Geographic: An 80-Year-Old Prank Revealed, Hiding in the Periodic Table!

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

JHI Blog: Hellenism and the Materiality of Greek Books in Renaissance Italy

A copy of the Anthologia Graeca (1494) printed by Lorenzo de Alopa in 1494. Notice the raised bands on the spine, non-projecting endbands, and how the bookblock is smaller than the boards.

A copy of the Anthologia Graeca (1494) printed by Lorenzo de Alopa in 1494. Notice the raised bands on the spine, non-projecting endbands, and how the bookblock is smaller than the boards.

Science Museum: Volunteering for the Cosmonauts exhibition

The Guardian: Scientists finally get under the skin of a 13th century publishing mystery

Phy.org: Getting under the skin of a medieval mystery

University of York: Getting under the skin of a Medieval mystery

University of Cambridge Department of History and Philosophy of Science: John Forrester 25/08/1949–24/11/2015

John Forrester 25/08/1949–24/11/2015

John Forrester 25/08/1949–24/11/2015

University of Cambridge Department of History and Philosophy of Science: Obituary John Forrester (25 August 1949–24 November 2015)

U.S. National Library of Medicine: Images from the History of Medicine

History of the Human Sciences: December 2015; 28 (5) Visibility matters: Diagrammatic Renderings of Human Evolution and Diversity in Physical, Serological and Molecular Anthropology: Table of Contents

The #EnvHist Weekly

The Telegraph: Duncan White, Catherine Nixey and Thomas Morris [historian of medicine] win 2015 Jerwood Awards

History of Psychiatry: December 2015: 26 (4) Table of Contents

The Vintage Scientific Instruments of Brown University: We’re looking for old scientific instruments at Brown!

Smithsonian Science News: Smithsonian Libraries’ Rare Texts Include Early Superstars of Science

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: The Sincerest Form of Flattery

Conciatore: Veins of the Earth

Antonio Neri, "The Mineral Gold" Neri 1598-2000 (Ferguson 67), f. 5r.

Antonio Neri, “The Mineral Gold”
Neri 1598-2000 (Ferguson 67), f. 5r.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Nature: Books in Brief: Thunder and Lightning: Weather Past, Present and Future; The Orange Trees of Marrakesh: Ibn Khaldun and the Science of Man etc.

New Scientist: How a creationist instinct stops us seeing evolution everywhere

Science Book a Day: The Man Who Flattened the Earth: Maupertuis and the Sciences in the Enlightenment

man-who-flattened-the-earth

Science Book a Day: My Sister Rosalind Franklin: A Family Memoir

The Independent: Christmas 2015: The best 6 nature books

The Guardian: The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution by David Wootton review – a big bang moment

The Wall Street Journal: The Shape of Obsession (Google title then click on first link to surmount paywall!)

American Scientist: SCIENTISTS AT WAR: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research.

American Scientist: In Defence of Pure Mathematics

NEW BOOKS:

Cork University Press: The Booles & The Hintons9781782051855-2T

 

Ashgate: Geography, Technology and Instruments of Exploration

Amazon: Deadly Victorian Remedies

Hermann: La critique de la science depuis 1968

The MIT Press: Make It New: The History of Silicon Valley Design

ART & EXHIBITIONS:

The Guardian: My highlights: The Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution exhibition by Michael Prodger

Samuel Pepys by John Hayls, 1666. Illustration: courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London

Samuel Pepys by John Hayls, 1666. Illustration: courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London

Royal Museums Greenwich: Samuel Pepys Season 20 November 2015–28 March 2016

The Architects Newspaper: Not Dead Yet

The Mary Rose: ‘Ringing the Changes’: Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with unrestricted views of the ship

Science Museum: Leonardo da Vinci: The Mechanics of Genius 10 February 2016–4 September 2016

Royal College of Surgeons: Designing Bodies 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

Nature: A view from the bridge: On Reflection: the art and neuroscience of mirrors

Royal Society: Seeing closer: 350 years of microscope Runs till 17 December 2015

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War Runs until 31 January 2016

DPLA: From Colonialism to Tourism: Maps in American Culture

"Folklore Music Map of the United States." Courtesy the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.

“Folklore Music Map of the United States.” Courtesy the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.

The Huntarian: ‌The Kangaroo and the Moose Runs until 21 February 2016

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Runs to 13 March 2016

Natural History Museum, London: Bauer Brothers art exhibition Runs till 26 February 2017

Museum of Science and Industry: Meet Baby Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, & Saturday

Guiding Lights: 500 years of Trinity House and safety at sea Runs till 4 January 2016

Southbank Centre: Faraday’s synaptic gap Runs till 10 January 2016

Science Museum: Ada Lovelace Runs till 31 March 2016

Hunterian Museum: Designing Bodies: Models of human anatomy from 1945 to now 24 November 2015–20 February 2016

THEATRE, OPERA AND FILMS:

Gielgud Theatre: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Booking to 18 June 2016

Upcoming: The Old Operating Theatre: Surgeon to the Dead 10-12 & 15-17 December 2015

EVENTS:

The History of Science, Medicine, & Technology at Oxford University: Open Day 2 December 2015

National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin: Afternoon Lecture – Plant-hunters in Petticoats – a history of Irish women in botany 5 December 2015

Museum of the History of Science: Lightning Strikes! 5 December 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Samuel Crompton Inventing the Spinning Mule by Alfred Walter Bayes, 1895 (c) Bolton Library & Museum Services, Bolton Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Samuel Crompton Inventing the Spinning Mule by Alfred Walter Bayes, 1895
(c) Bolton Library & Museum Services, Bolton Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

TELEVISION:

SLIDE SHOW:

VIDEOS:

AHF: Video from Manhattan Project Symposium Now Available

Youtube: Yale University: Becoming Darwin: History, Memory, and Biography, “Stories of a Scientific Life”

Youtube: AHF: Trinity Test Preparations

Youtube: Wellcome Collection: Tobacco resuscitation kit

Dispersal of Darwin: Janet Browne on becoming Darwin (3 lectures)

RADIO:

BBC Radio 4: Too Old to Be a Genius

BBC Radio 4: Self Drives: Maxwell’s Equations

James and Katherine Maxwell, 1869 Source: Wikimedia Commons

James and Katherine Maxwell, 1869
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

PODCASTS:

Londonist Out Loud: Pepys Show

Soundcloud: AMSEOnline: Century of the Atom…told through the voices of scientists who created the nuclear age

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

HOPOS: CFP: International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 11th International Congress Minneapolis 22-25 June 2016

World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine: 2016 Young Scholars Award Competition: Best original essay on any topic of relevance to the history of the veterinary field

Barts Pathology Museum and the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, London: CfP: Corpses, Cadavers and Catalogues: The Mobilities of Dead Bodies and Body Parts, Past and Present 17–18 May 2016

La Salle des Actes de la faculté de Pharmacie de Paris: Colloque: Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715), un savant en son siècle 9 Décembre 2015

St Anne’s College Oxford: CfP: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century 10–11 September 2016

University of Cambridge: CRASSH: Digital Editing Now 7–9 January 2016

Birkbeck Early Modern Society: CfP: 9th Annual Student Conference Sensing the Early Modern 20 February 2016

Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies: Vol. 47 (2016) Call for Papers

ICOHTEC: Maurice Dumas Prize

University of Durham: CfP: Interdisciplinary International Women’s Day Conference, Durham University, 8 March 2016 Re-Sounding Voices: Women, Silence and the Production of Knowledge

Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University: Symposium: Apps, Maps & Models: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies 22 February 2016

Villa Vigoni (Italy): CfP: Pseudo-Paracelsus: Alchemy and Forgery in Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy 25–28 July 2016

University of Oxford: St Cross College: Conference: Medieval Physics in Oxford 27 February 2016

University of Zurich: CfP: Objects of psychiatry: Between thing-making, reification & personhood 8–11 June 2016

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam: Symposium: Navies in Miniature 4–5 February 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

Society for the History of Technology: The Hindle Fellowship

University of Huddersfield: Research Assistant in Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture (1400–1700)

Yale University: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library seeks Associate Director for Collections, Research & Education

University of Utrecht: PhD Candidate History of Art, Science and Technology

People’s History Museum: Archivist

University of Liverpool: History: Lecturer/Senior Lecturer – Medical Humanities

University of Glasgow: The 2016/17 round of Lord Kelvin/Adam Smith PhD Scholarships is open for applications until Friday 22 January 2016

University of Leeds: The School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science at the University of Leeds is pleased to inform potential applicants for postgraduate study that it has available up to 18 fully-funded PhD scholarships for UK/EU students for 2016-17 entry.

University of Notre Dame: Two Postdoctoral Fellowships in History and/or Philosophy of Science

Universität zu Lübeck: Juniorprofessor W1 “Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Psychologie”

University of Kent: Postgraduate Funding

Chalmers University of Technology: PhD student position in History of Technology

 

 

 

 

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s