Whewell’s Gazette: Year 2, Vol. #09

Whewell’s Gazette

Your weekly digest of all the best of

Internet history of science, technology and medicine

Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell

Cornelis Bloemaert

Year 2, Volume #09

Monday 14 September 2015

EDITORIAL:

It seems that we have just finished posting one edition of Whewell’s Gazette your weekly #histSTM links list when another one comes steaming full tilt around the corner carrying with it the best of the histories of science, technology and medicine that it could pick up in the last seven days in the Internet.

In recent times there has been much news in the science journals about the reproducibility of experimental results or rather the failure to reproduce them. A lot of these reports seem to think that this is a modern phenomenon caused by whatever bogey man that the writer has chosen to hang the blame on. However if these science writers had a better grounding in the history of science they would realise that this problem has been around since people have been doing science.

There have been both cases of genuine discoveries that contemporaries failed to confirm in their attempts to repeat the experiments and cases of discoveries that weren’t discoveries at all.

Just to take a couple of cases from the seventeenth century. Newton was attacked from all sides when he first announced his discovery that white light was actually a mixture of the whole colour spectrum. Much of that criticism was based on theoretical grounds but some of it was that others failed to obtain his results when repeating his prism experiments. In this case the blame lay on the poor quality of the glass prisms available but it did delay the acceptance of his theory considerably.

Earlier in the century many ‘discoveries’ were made and published with the new telescope that other observers were completely unable to confirm. This missing confirmation was because the discoveries weren’t discoveries at all but optical illusions caused by various factors. Francesco Fontana, a noted constructor of telescopes, even published a whole book of such discoveries, his Novae coelestium terrestriumq[ue] rerum observationes, et fortasse hactenus non vulgatae from 1645.

The progress of science is never smooth but proceeds by fits and starts.

Quotes of the week:

“In other words, don’t continually re-invent the wheel, use the tools that are already out there…” – Sophia Collins (@sophiacol)

I do not wish them [women] to have power over men; but over themselves.” – Mary Wollstonecraft

“Striking that in her 1953 Nature article, Franklin thanks Crick, Wilkins and Stokes “for discussion”, but *not* Watson”. – Matthew Cobb (@matthewcobb)

“’I’ve been a very bad girl,’ she said, biting her lip. ‘I need to be punished.’

‘Very well,’ he said and installed Windows 10 on her laptop”. – @50NerdsofGrey

“The duty we owe to history is to rewrite it.” – Oscar Wilde

“Writing is nature’s way of letting you know how sloppy your thinking is.” – Guindon

“Math is nature’s way of letting you know how sloppy your writing is.” – Leslie Lamport

“Formal math is nature’s way of letting you know how sloppy your math is.” – Leslie Lamport h/t @JohnDCook

“Algebra is the offer made by the devil to the mathematician. The devil says: I will give you this powerful machine, it will answer any question you like. All you need to do is give me your soul: give up geometry and you will have this marvellous machine”. —Sir Michael Atiyah, 2002 h/t @divbyzero

“Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted”. – Ralph Waldo Emerson h/@Fayway

Birthdays of the Week:

Jacque Boucher de Crèvecoeur de Parthes born 10 September 1788

Boucher de Perthes Source: Wikimedia Commons

Boucher de Perthes
Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

Yovisto: Jacques de Perthes and European Archaeology

Encyclopaedia Britannica: Jacque Boucher de Perthes

August Kekulé born 7 September 1829

KK Stamp 

Science Notes: Today in Science Histoy –September 7 – August Kekulé

PHYSICS, ASTRONOMY & SPACE SCIENCE:

Yovisto: James van Allen and the Weather in Space

Yovisto: Edward Appleton and the Ionosphere

The Washington Post: Richard G. Hewlett

Verso: Women Computing the Stars

Unidentified women and men standing outside the Mount Wilson Observatory’s Pasadena office, where women computers made the calculations necessary to answer some of the most profound questions in the field of astronomy during the early part of the 20th century. Detail from a photo taken on April 14, 1917, by an unknown photographer. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Unidentified women and men standing outside the Mount Wilson Observatory’s Pasadena office, where women computers made the calculations necessary to answer some of the most profound questions in the field of astronomy during the early part of the 20th century. Detail from a photo taken on April 14, 1917, by an unknown photographer. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Leroy Jackson and Ernest Wende’s Interview

Astronomical Society of the Pacific: Women in Astronomy: An Introductory Resource Guide

Voices of the Manhattan Project: David Hall’s Interview

ABC News: The old Perth observatory: From isolated weather station to centre of history

AIP: Arthur Holly Compton 1892–1962

AIP: Betty Compton – Session I

Corpus Newtonicum: Newton, the Man or: of valuable lists and juicy quotes

about education: J.J. Thomson Biography

Voices of the Manhattan Project: John W. Healy’s Interview

History NASA: Emblems of Exploration (pdf)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 11 – Harvey Fletcher

Yovisto: Irène Joliot-Curie and Artificial Radioactivity

Irène and Marie Curie Source: Wikimedia Commons

Irène and Marie Curie
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Highbrow: Leó Szilárd

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 12 – Moon

EXPLORATION and CARTOGRAPHY:

Royal Museums Greenwich: Looking across the Atlantic in 18th-century maps

in propria persona: On the legal basis for English possession of North America

Halley’s Log: Halley writes from Dartmouth

Halley’s Log: Paramore pink at Spithead

Chart of Spithead by William Heather, 1797; Spithead is the channel north-east of the Isle of Wight (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Chart of Spithead by William Heather, 1797; Spithead is the channel north-east of the Isle of Wight (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Yovisto: Henry Hudson’s Voyages in North America

MEDICINE & HEALTH:

Public Health: Worldly approaches to global health: 1851 to the present

Remedia: Showing the Instruments: Vesalius and the Tools of Surgery and Anatomy

Andreas Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica, Instruments (© National Library of Medicine).

Andreas Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica, Instruments (© National Library of Medicine).

University of Glasgow Library: Pox, pustules and pestilence ­ A history of syphilis treatment

BBC: Silicon Valley’s 91-year-old designer

Thomas Morris: A 19th-century doctor’s guide to etiquette

Thomas Morris: Do no harm – unless it’s a criminal

Center for the History of Medicine: On View: Post-mortem set in wooden case, 1860–1880

Yovisto: Marthe Louise Vogt and the Neurotransmitters

Marthe Louise Vogt

Marthe Louise Vogt

Yovisto: Bernard Siegfried Albinus and his Anatomic Works

Slate: Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

Yovisto: Thomas Sydenham – the English Hippocrates

Thomas Morris: The self-inflicted lithotomy

Academia: When foods became remedies in ancient Greece: The curious case of garlic and other substances

Center for the History of Medicine: Oral History: Carola Eisenberg

Center for the History of Medicine: Anne Pappenheimer Forbes

Photograph of Anne Pappenheimer Forbes, M.D. 1962

Photograph of Anne Pappenheimer Forbes, M.D.
1962

io9: Early Forensics Helped Solve England’s Gruesome “Jigsaw Murders” Case

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Gruesome Tale of Self-Surgery

Yovisto: Phineas Gage’s Accident and the Science of the Mind and the Brain

TECHNOLOGY:

Science & Society: Picture Library: Johnson the First Rider on the Pedestrian Hobbyhorse, 1819

Visualising Late Antiquity: Going Down the Drain in Late Antiquity

Trans Newcomen Soc: Humphrey Gainsborough (1718–1776) Cleric Engineer and Inventor (pdf)

Medium: Close at Hand: A Pocket History of Technology

Georgian Gentleman: When cotton was king… a visit to Quarry Bank Mill

4-yarn-1024x768

Conciatore: A Very Good Run

James S. Huggins’ Refrigerator Door: First Computer Bug

Science Notes: September 9 – Today in Science History – First Computer Bug

Dark Roasted Blend: Antique Digital Calculators & Other Steampunk Gear

Yovisto: Émile Baudot and his Telegraph

Yovisto:Harvey Fletcher – the Father of Stereophonic Sound

Zen Pencils: Robert Goddard

Jalopnik: That Victorian-Living Couple is Just Playing Dress-up Until They Get A Real Victorian Car

1426322138171749005

Nautilus: This Used To Be the Future

Science Notes: Storm Glass Barometer Pendant Instructions

The Guardian: Battle to save historic rail line that heralded the age of science

EARTH & LIFE SCIENCES:

Yovisto: Comte de Buffon and his Histoire Naturelle

Notches: Women’s Experiences in Fornication and Paternity Suits in Massachusetts, 1740–1800

Archaeodeath: The Dead at the Hunterian

Medievalist.net: Ten Strange Medieval Ideas about Animals

University of Cambridge: Research: What is a monster?

150810-6.-monster-of-cracow

Smithsonian: NMNH: Unassuming Octocoral Collected over 55 Years Ago Found to be New Genus and Species

The Plate: Contrary to Popular Belief, the Modern Pig has Many Parents

ars technica uk: Scientific Method/Science & Exploration: Humans aren’t so special after all: The Fuzzy evolutionary boundaries of Homo Sapiens

Ellen Hutchins: Ireland’s First Female Botanist

AMNH: Green Frogs Mating & Frog Dissection

Penn Biographies: Joseph Leidy (1823–1891)

Letters from Gondwana: The Legacy of Ulisse Aldrovani

Yovisto: Luigi Galvani’s Discoveries in Bioelectricity

Mirror: Charles Darwin confessed his atheism in a private letter which has gone up for auction

NMNH: Human Family Tree

Trowelblazers: Rising Star Trowelblazers

Powered by Osteons: Who needs an osteologist? (Installment 29)

Embryo Project: Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002)

Audubon: Sketch: The Oilbird: Is This Thing Even a Bird

AMNH: Wonderful World of Wasp Nests

Smithsonian.com: Four Species of Homo You’ve Never Heard Of

The Atlantic: 6 Tiny Cavers, 15 Odd Skeletons, and 1 Amazing New Species of Ancient Human

Hyperallergic: A 17th-Century Woman Artist’s Butterfly Journey

Maria Sibylla Merian, Plate 49 from ‘Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium’ (1705) (courtesy Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg, Frankfurt)

Maria Sibylla Merian, Plate 49 from ‘Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium’ (1705) (courtesy Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg, Frankfurt)

Anita Guerrini: History, animals, science, food: The biologist in the ashram (with a walk-on by Harpo Marx)

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 13 – Hans Christian Joachim Gram

CHEMISTRY:

Science Notes: Today in Science History – September 8 – Willard Frank Libby

CHF: Prototype for the Perkin-Elmer Model 12 Infrared Spectrophotometer

Science Notes: September 10 – Today in Science History – Waldo Semon

Waldo Semon – Discovered plasticized PVC or vinyl. Credit: Washington University Chemical Engineering Department

Waldo Semon – Discovered plasticized PVC or vinyl. Credit: Washington University Chemical Engineering Department

META – HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY, RESOURCES and OTHER:

Communication of the ACM: Innovators Assemble: Ada Lovelace, Walter Isaacson, and the Superheroines of Computing

Double Refraction: Histories of science as murder mysteries, or: Steven Weinberg as Henning Mankell

Inside the Science Museum: From Moscow to the Museum

The Recipes Project: First Monday Library Chat: National Library of Scotland

The #EnvHist Weekly

The Recipes Project: Giving Welsh Pupils a Flavour of Antiquity

Technologies of Daily Life: Schools Day. Image courtesy of Evelien Bracke.

Technologies of Daily Life: Schools Day. Image courtesy of Evelien Bracke.

Springer Link: History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences: Special Issue: Experimentation in Twentieth-Century Agricultural Science Contents Page

Niche: Cultivation

William Savage: Pen and Pension: Censoring History

Prospect: Science is fallible, just like us

JHI Blog: Global Microhistory: One or Two Things That I Know About It

CHoM News: Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @HarvardHistMed

Fiction Reboot: Daily Dose: The Act of Becoming: History and Process

The Newsstand: Clemson professor delving into the foundation of scientific philosophy

Stanford News: After 20 years, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy thrives on the web

The Recipes Project: History Bound Up in Every Bite: Food, Environment, and Recipes in the Western Civ Survey

Double Refraction: Lorraine Daston on history as fiction – critical thoughts

Nautilus: Why Futurism Has a Cultural Blindspot

Concocting History: A perfume of Syria

Second century Roman glass. Some of these bottles may have contained perfume. Source: Wikipedia.

Second century Roman glass. Some of these bottles may have contained perfume. Source: Wikipedia.

Six Degrees of Francis Bacon: Reassembling the early modern social network

Early Modern Experimental Philosophy: Leibniz’s early reflections on natural history and experiment

ESOTERIC:

Conciatore: Don Giovanni

Don Giovanni di Cosimo I de' Medici

Don Giovanni di Cosimo I de’ Medici

Academia: Court Astrologers and Historical Writing in Early Abbasid Baghdad: An Appraisal (pdf)

Enchanted History: New Blog on Witchcraft in Early Modern England and Beyond

UCL: Museums & Collections Blog: Robert Noel and the ‘Science’ of Phrenology

Conciatore: Stonework

BOOK REVIEWS:

The New Rambler: Sleight of Hand

Nature: Genetics: Dawkins, redux

The History of Emotions Blog: History in British Tears

Popular Science: A is for Arsenic – Kathryn Harkup

THE: The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution, by David Wootton

New Books008

Review 31: Against Nature Sex Addiction: A Critical History

The Spectator: Did Hans Asperger save children from the Nazis – or sell them out?

homunculus: Nature: the biography

Forbes: Ancient Guides, Ancient Science, And A Virtual Academy For Idlers

NEW BOOKS:

Historiens de la santé: Mental health nursing: The working lives of paid carers, 1800s–1900s

Colossal: New Japanese Paper Notebooks Featuring Vintage Science Illustrations Merged with Hand-embroidery

notebooks-3

University of Chicago Press: Making “Nature” The History of a Scientific Journal

Historiens de la santé: A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980

Historiens de la santé: Cultural Politics of Hygiene in India, 1890–1940: Contagions of Feeling

ART & EXHIBITIONS

Mystic Seaport – The Museum of America and the Sea: Ships Clocks & Stars 19 September 2015–28 March 2016

Captain James Cook (1728-1779), by William Hodges. Cook relied on chronometers in his later voyages. Image courtesy National Maritime Museum.

Captain James Cook (1728-1779), by William Hodges. Cook relied on chronometers in his later voyages. Image courtesy National Maritime Museum.

Science Museum: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age Opens 18 September 2015

Royal Society: Seeing Closer: 350 years of microscopy 29 June–23 November 2015

Museum of the History of Science: Henry Moseley: A Scientist Lost to War 4 Weeks Till Exhibition Closes!

THEATRE AND OPERA:

The Guardian: Nicole Kidman admits to nerves before stage return in Photograph 51

Buxton Opera House: The Trials of Galileo 21 September – International Tour: March 2014–December 2017

galileo

FILMS AND EVENTS:

ICCESS: The Time Travelling Operating Theatre

L0001839 A surgical operation being performed, circa 1900. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org A surgical operation being performed by W.G. Spencer and others at the Westminster Hospital, London. Photograph circa 1900 Broadway Published: 1900

L0001839 A surgical operation being performed, circa 1900.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
A surgical operation being performed by W.G. Spencer and others at the Westminster Hospital, London.
Photograph
circa 1900 Broadway
Published: 1900

Royal Asiatic Society: Brian Houghton Hodgson Study Day 26 September 2015

Philly Voice: Games & debate abound at Women in Science event 19 September 2015

BBC: Steve Wozniak: Shocked and amazed by Steve Jobs movie

Royal Society: Open House Weekend 2015 19–20 September

Oxford Playhouse: Charles Simonyi Lecture: Putting the Higgs Boson in its Place

Westminster Arts Library: London Plague: Sick City 24 September 2015

The Heritage Alliance: The H word: ‘heritage’ revisited

Royal Society: Hooke’s microscopic world 19 September 2015

Royal Society: Scientific conflict through the ages 20 September 2015

Royal Society: Darwin and the evolution of emotion 19 September 2015

Royal Society: A 13th century theory of everything 19 September 2015

PAINTING OF THE WEEK:

Galileo before the Holy Office, by Joseph-Nicolas Robert-Fleury

Galileo before the Holy Office, by Joseph-Nicolas Robert-Fleury

TELEVISION:

pbs: NOVA: Dawn of Humanity

AHF: Manhattan: Season One Recaps

SLIDE SHOW:

Scientific American: Good and Bad Inventions from 1865

Diving Mask An inventor in Braddock's Field, Penn, added a simple valve to the mouthpiece for exhaling and inhaling air.

Diving Mask An inventor in Braddock’s Field, Penn, added a simple valve to the mouthpiece for exhaling and inhaling air.

VIDEOS:

History of Alchemy Podcast Presents: Rudolf Two Trippin Cam

Youtube: Podcastnik: History of Alchemy Episode 1: Introduction

CHF: Making and Knowing (fake) Coral

Wikimedia Commons: How to edit Wikipedia – RSC series – Andy Mabbett

Youtube: BSHS Plenary Lecture: Iwan Morus Wales, science and Welsh science

Youtube: Anna Ziegler talks about writing Rosalind Franklin for ‘Photograph 51’

Vimeo: Train Journeys in to Manchester in 1850

Youtube: Berkeley Lab Founder Ernest O. Lawrence Demonstrates the Cyclotron Concept

RADIO:

BBC World Service: Discovery: Death of a Physicist

BBC Radio 4: An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin

Molecular model of penicillin by Dorothy Hodgkin, c. 1945 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Molecular model of penicillin by Dorothy Hodgkin, c. 1945
Source: Wikimedia Commons

BBC Radio 4: Computing Britain

PODCASTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

University of Warwick: CfP: Shaping the Shelf: Print culture and the construction of collective identity (1460–1660) 5 March 2016

Royal Society: Open House: #histsci lectures 19-20 September 2015

University of Durham: Where Science and Society Meet 23–24 September 2015

CHF: Brown Bag Lectures Fall 2015

Image: Wikimedia Commons

Image: Wikimedia Commons

Werkgroep 18e eeuw: CfP: Flavours of the Eighteenth Century Brussels 10-11 March 2016

SSHM: CfP: Religion and Medicine: Healing the Body and Soul from the Middle Ages to the Modern Day Birckbeck College 15-16 July 2016

St John’s College Oxford: Architecture and Experience in the Nineteenth Century 17–18 March 2016

Spinoza Research Newtwork: CfP: Life and Death in Early Modern Philosophy Birckbeck College 14–16 April 2016

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: CfP: Eighth Joint Meeting BSHS, CSHPS, and HSS 22–25 June 2016

Durham University: CN-CS: CfP: One day Conference: Victorian Culture and the Origin of Disciplines 12 March 2016

International Cartographical Association: Announcement of the 1st International Workshop on the Origin and Evolution of Portolan Lisbon, Portugal Charts 5-6 June 2016

Wellcome Library Blog: History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series 2015–2016

National Maritime Museum Greenwich: CfP: From Sea to Sky: the Evolution of Air Navigation from the Ocean and Beyond 10 June 2016

Institute of Welsh Maritime Historical Studies: 7th Annual Conference of MOROL 31 October 2015

National Maritime Museum: Maritime History and Culture Seminars 2015–16

Leipzig & Hannover: Leibniz Summer School 7–16 July 2016

LOOKING FOR WORK:

University of Uppsala: 1-2 Ph.D. positions in History of Science and Ideas linked to the research programme “Medicine at the Borders of Life: Foetal Research and the Emergence of Ethical Controversy in Sweden”

University of Uppsala: 1-2 Postdoctoral positions in History of Science and Ideas linked to the research programme “Medicine at the Borders of Life: Foetal Research and the Emergence of Ethical Controversy in Sweden”

HSS: Dependent Care Grant Application – 2015 Meeting

Norwegian University of Science and Technology: PhD Positions at the NTNU, Faculty of Humanities

University of Vienna: 1 Doctoral Student Position & 6 Associate Positions The Sciences in Historical, Philosophical and Cultural Contexts

South East DTC: ESRC Postgraduate Funding

About thonyc

Aging freak who fell in love with the history of science and now resides mostly in the 16th century.
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